Celestial Atlas
(IC 950 - 999) ←     IC Objects: IC 1000 - 1049 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 1050 - 1099)
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Page last updated Mar 4, 2016
WORKING: Check positions, historical IDs (Corwin+), add basic pix, captions, tags

IC 1000 (= PGC 51201)
Discovered (Jun 23, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (284)
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 19 40, Dec +17 51 17)
Based on a recessional velocity of 5625 km/sec, IC 1000 is about 260 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.9 by 0.5(?) arcmin, it is about 70 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 1000
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1000
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 1000

IC 1001 (= PGC 51249)
Discovered (Jun 29, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (285)
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Virgo (RA 14 20 39.7, Dec +05 25 38)
Apparent size 0.75 by 0.25 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1001
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1001
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1001

IC 1002 (= PGC 51248)
Discovered (Jun 29, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (286)
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Virgo (RA 14 20 42.3, Dec +05 29 09)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1003 (= PGC 51303)
Discovered (Jun 29, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (287)
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Virgo (RA 14 21 29.8, Dec +05 04 23)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1004 (= PGC 1538398)
Discovered (Jun 27, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (288)
A magnitude 14.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0?? pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 20 50.3, Dec +17 39 55)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin? Listed as accompanied by a magnitude 15.0 companion (apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin?) at RA 14 20 49.7, Dec +17 39 46.

IC 1005 (=
NGC 5607 = PGC 51182)
Discovered (Mar 16, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5607)
Discovered (Jun 7, 1888) by Lewis Swift (VII-44) (and later listed as IC 1005)
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type S?? pec) in Ursa Minor (RA 14 19 26.7, Dec +71 35 17)
This entry will probably contain only historical information; for anything else see NGC 5607.

IC 1006 (= PGC 51378)
Discovered (May 14, 1866) by
Truman Safford (15)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 22 59.0, Dec +23 47 41)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 1007 (= PGC 51465)
Discovered (May 18, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (289)
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0/(r)a? pec) in Virgo (RA 14 24 36.6, Dec +04 33 34)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1008 (=
IC 4414 = PGC 51414)
Discovered (May 4, 1866) by Truman Safford (and later listed as IC 1008)
Discovered (Jul 27, 1895) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 4414)
A pair of interacting galaxies in Bo÷tes
A magnitude 15? spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec) at RA 14 23 42.2, Dec +28 20 47
A magnitude 15? spiral galaxy (type Sab? pec) at RA 14 23 42.6, Dec +28 20 50
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1008 (= Safford 5, 1860 RA 14 18 52, NPD 61 01.8) is "pretty faint". The position precesses to RA 14 25 02.9, Dec +28 20 07, but there is nothing there. Corwin notes that Safford often had fairly large errors in right ascension, and suggests an identity with IC 4414, which is about 80 seconds of time west and a little less than an arcmin north of the IC position. That identification is accepted in some quarters, but Thomson suggests PGC 51518, and that is accepted in other quarters, hence its entry immediately below. Thomson's suggestion is based on the presumption that IC 4414 is too bright to be Safford's "pretty faint" object, but several other objects so described by Safford are the same or greater brightness than IC 4414, and PGC 51518 is much fainter than any of those, and in fact much fainter than another galaxy immediately to its southwest; so even if something in that area were to be adopted as IC 1008, PGC 51518 seems a less than suitable candidate. In any event, choosing anything near PGC 51518 as IC 1008 would require an error of 4 arcmin in declination, and Safford's declinations were usually much better than that, so I find Corwin's argument more compelling, and have accepted his identity with IC 4414.
Physical Information: Apparent size of southwestern component is about 0.6 by 0.35 arcmin; of northeastern component, about 0.55 by 0.5 arcmin; of combined structure about 0.8 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near the pair of peculiar spiral galaxies that comprise IC 1008
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1008
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of the interacting pair of galaxies
SDSS image of the pair of peculiar spiral galaxies that comprise IC 1008

PGC 51518 (not =
IC 1008)
Not an IC object but listed here since sometimes misidentified as IC 1008
A magnitude 16 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 25 38.4, Dec +28 16 04)
Historical Identification: As noted in the entry for IC 1008, there is another galaxy (PGC 3825995) near PGC 51518 that is considerably brighter, so even if something near it had to be chosen as IC 1008, PGC 51518 is not the best candidate. However, aside from its extreme faintness, equating PGC 51518 with IC 1008 would require an error of 4 arcmin in declination, and Safford's declinations were usually much better than that, so anything near PGC 51518 is almost certainly not IC 1008.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.23 by 0.16 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 51518, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 1008, also showing PGC 3825995
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 51518, also showing PGC 3825995
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 51518, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 1008

PGC 3825995
Not an IC object but listed here since mentioned in the discussion of
PGC 51518
A magnitude 15? spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 25 31.3, Dec +28 15 24)
Historical Identification: As noted in the discussion of PGC 51518, even if one were to accept the idea that something in its region is IC 1008, PGC 3825995 would be a much better candidate, as its brightness is more appropriate for IC 1008 than the much fainter PGC 51518. However, the 4 arcmin error in declination required makes it unlikely that anything in this region is Safford's object, so PGC 3825995 is listed here only as a reference for that discussion.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.65 by 0.6 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 3825995
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 3825995; see PGC 51518 for a wide-field image

IC 1009 (= PGC 51546)
Discovered (Jun 17, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (290)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 26 17.5, Dec +12 21 12)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1010 (= PGC 51612)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (783)
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SBb??) in Virgo (RA 14 27 20.4, Dec +01 01 33)
Apparent size 1.9 by 1.8 arcmin?

IC 1011 (= PGC 51662)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (784)
A magntude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc?) in Virgo (RA 14 28 04.6, Dec +01 00 22)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7705 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 1011 is about 360 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 350 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 355 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin, the galaxy is about 50 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1011
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1011
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1011

IC 1012 (=
IC 4431 = PGC 51600)
Discovered (May 9, 1866) by Truman Safford (8) (and later listed as IC 1012)
Discovered (Jul 9, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 4431)
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 27 09.5, Dec +30 56 54)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1013 (= PGC 51643)
Discovered (Jun 16, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (291)
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 27 50.8, Dec +25 50 19)
The second IC adds "NPD is 63░, not 62░. Erratum in Nice Obs." Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1014 (= PGC 51685)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1867) by
Truman Safford (78)
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type SBdm??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 28 18.6, Dec +13 46 50)
Apparent size 2.7 by 2.0 arcmin?

IC 1015 (= PGC 51686)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (292)
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 28 19.1, Dec +15 25 13)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1016 (=
IC 4424 = PGC 51624 = "NGC 5619B")
Discovered (Apr 28, 1891) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1016)
Discovered (May 23, 1892) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 4424)
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type S(rs)bc?) in Virgo (RA 14 27 32.4, Dec +04 49 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1016 (Swift list X (#26), 1860 RA 14 21 50, NPD 84 32.7) is "very faint, very small, round, east of h1806", h1806 being NGC 5619. The position precesses to RA 14 28 50.3, Dec +04 49 37, but there is nothing there. Fortunately, Swift's declination was reasonably good and the description fits the galaxy listed above, which lies not far east of NGC 5619 (though nearly 80 seconds of time west of Swift's position). Per Corwin, all of Swift's "novae" of Apr 28, 1891 were poorly measured, three of five so poorly that they have yet to be identified; so the identification of IC 1016 is certain mainly because Swift mentioned its brighter neighbor.
Discovery Notes: Swift's poor position meant that when Bigourdan accurately measured the position of the galaxy, neither he nor Dreyer realized that it might be Swift's object, causing the duplicate listing. But though Bigourdan's position is good and Swift's very poor, standard practice is to use the lower NGC/IC number unless the recognition of the duplication is so recent that the higher number has already been in use for decades, so the galaxy is called IC 1016 about as often as IC 4424.
Non-Standard Designations: IC 1016 is usually called NGC 5619B, due to (per Corwin) Holmberg's listing the two galaxies east of NGC 5619 with non-standard designations. In general, a non-standard NGC designation merely adds an extra layer of confusion, but in this case perhaps the NGC designation can be considered reasonable, since the application of the IC designations is so hit-and-miss.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8075 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 1016 is about 375 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 365 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 370 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.85 by 0.35 arcmin, the galaxy is about 90 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1016, also showing NGC 5619
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1016, also showing NGC 5619
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1016

IC 1017 (= PGC 51668)
Discovered (Jun 16, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (293)
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 28 07.2, Dec +25 52 06)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1018 (= PGC 51675)
Discovered (Jun 16, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (294)
A magnitude 14.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 28 12.7, Dec +25 49 48)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1019 (= PGC 51667)
Discovered (Jul 28, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (295)
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 28 13.3, Dec +25 56 50)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1020 (= PGC 51728)
Discovered (Jul 28, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (296)
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 28 49.4, Dec +26 01 58)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1021 (= PGC 51764)
Discovered (Jun 11, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (297)
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type SBa??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 29 17.0, Dec +20 39 18)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1022 (= PGC 51808)
Discovered (Jul 19, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (298)
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Virgo (RA 14 30 01.9, Dec +03 46 22)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1023
Discovered (1893) by
John Thome (CD -35 9596)
An open cluster in Centaurus (RA 14 32 25.1, Dec -35 48 13)
CD refers to the Cordoba Durchmusterung (the southern complement of the Bonner Durchmusterung), and -35 9596 means object number 9596 in the strip between declination -35 and -36. Apparent size 5.0 arcmin?

IC 1024 (= PGC 51895)
Discovered (Jun 2, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (299)
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Virgo (RA 14 31 27.0, Dec +03 00 28)
Apparent size 1.6 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 1025 (= PGC 51898)
Discovered (Jul 19, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (300)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Virgo (RA 14 31 28.4, Dec +07 03 47)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1026 (=
NGC 5653 = PGC 51814)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5653)
Discovered (May 11, 1866) by Truman Safford (13) (and later listed as IC 1026)
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 30 10.3, Dec +31 12 55)
This entry will be primarily concerned with historical information; for anything else see NGC 5653.

IC 1027 (= PGC 51796)
Discovered (Jul 23, 1887) by
Lewis Swift (VII-45)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 29 48.4, Dec +53 57 56)
The second IC adds "Howe saw only one, with a 13th magnitude star 0.7 arcmin to the southwest". Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1028 (= PGC 52005)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1888) by
Lewis Swift (VIII-81)
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 33 16.4, Dec +41 39 03)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 1029 (= PGC 51955)
Discovered (Jun 14, 1887) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (185)
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 32 27.2, Dec +49 54 16)
Apparent size 2.6 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1030 (=
NGC 5672 = PGC 51964)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5672)
Discovered (May 4, 1866) by Truman Safford (6) (and later listed as IC 1030)
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 32 38.5, Dec +31 40 13)
This entry will be primarily concerned with historical information; for anything else see NGC 5672.

IC 1031 (= PGC 52082)
Discovered (May 6, 1888) by
Lewis Swift (VII-46)
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 34 23.9, Dec +48 02 17)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 1032 (= PGC 52097 + PGC 4126489)
Discovered (May 6, 1888) by
Lewis Swift (VII-47)
A pair of galaxies in Bo÷tes
PGC 52097 = A magnitude 15? lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) at RA 14 34 39.1, Dec +47 58 06
PGC 4126489 = A magnitude 16? spiral galaxy (type SB0/(s)a? pec) at RA 14 34 39.5, Dec +47 58 05
(The PGC numbers shown here are taken from LEDA; NED reverses the designations.) Apparent size of PGC 52097 about 0.65 by 0.65 arcmin? of PGC 4126489 about 0.65 by 0.45 arcmin? Vr of PGC 52097 is 10905 km/sec; of PGC 4126489 is 10860 km/sec.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 52097 and spiral galaxy PGC 4126489 (as defined by LEDA), which comprise IC 1032
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide "closeup" of IC 1032
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair, also showing IC 1031 and 1033
SDSS image of region near the pair of galaxies that comprise IC 1032; also showing are IC 1031 and IC 1033

IC 1033 (= PC 52099)
Discovered (May 6, 1888) by
Lewis Swift (VII-48)
A magnitude 14.2 elliptical galaxy (type E4??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 34 41.8, Dec +47 56 16)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1034 (= PGC 52244)
Discovered (Jul 19, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (301)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 37 13.6, Dec +14 39 57)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 1035 (= PGC 52305)
Discovered (May 24, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (302)
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 38 10.2, Dec +09 20 12)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1036 (= PGC 52320)
Discovered (Jun 13, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (303)
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 38 22.7, Dec +18 06 41)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 1037 (= PGC 52319)
Discovered (Jun 13, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (304)
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 38 25.3, Dec +18 11 04)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1038 (= PGC 52377)
Discovered (Jul 19, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (305)
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 39 27.4, Dec +11 55 44)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1039 (= PGC 52428)
Discovered (May 28, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (306)
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Virgo (RA 14 40 29.3, Dec +03 26 00)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1040 (= PGC 52418)
Discovered (May 24, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (307)
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 40 22.5, Dec +09 28 39)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1041 (= PGC 52434)
Discovered (May 28, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (308)
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Virgo (RA 14 40 37.9, Dec +03 22 38)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1042 (= PGC 52433, and with
NGC 5718 = Arp 171)
Discovered (May 28, 1891) by Stephane Javelle (309)
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Virgo (RA 14 40 38.7, Dec +03 28 11)
Apparent size 1.1 by 1.1 arcmin? Used by the Arp Atlas, with NGC 5718, as an example of galaxies with diffuse counter-tails (all such examples happening to be the result of gravitational interaction between the galaxies).
SDSS closeup of lenticular galaxies NGC 5718 and IC 1042, which comprise Arp 171
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 1042 and NGC 5718 (which see for more images)

IC 1043 (= PGC 2800989)
Discovered (May 28, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (310)
A magnitude 15.1 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Virgo (RA 14 40 43.3, Dec +03 22 29)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 1044 (= PGC 52477)
Discovered (May 24, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (311)
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 41 28.9, Dec +09 25 54)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1045 (=
NGC 5731 = PGC 52409)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5731)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1888) by Lewis Swift (VIII-82) (and later listed as IC 1045)
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 40 09.3, Dec +42 46 45)
This entry will be primarily concerned with historical information; for anything else see NGC 5731.

IC 1046 (= PGC 52284)
Discovered (Jul 11, 1888) by
Lewis Swift (VII-49)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Ursa Minor (RA 14 37 53.2, Dec +69 00 52)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1047 (= PGC 52522)
Discovered (May 18, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (312)
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 42 19.8, Dec +19 11 31)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 1048 (= PGC 52564)
Discovered (Jul 18, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (313)
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Virgo (RA 14 42 57.9, Dec +04 53 27)
Apparent size 2.2 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1049 (= PGC 52379)
Discovered (Jul 2, 1889) by
Lewis Swift (IX-41)
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Draco (RA 14 39 33.0, Dec +62 00 11)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1049
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 1049
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1049
Celestial Atlas
(IC 950 - 999) ←     IC Objects: IC 1000 - 1049     → (IC 1050 - 1099)