Celestial Atlas
(IC 1050 - 1099) ←     IC Objects: IC 1100 - 1149 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 1150 - 1199)
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1100, 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, 1107, 1108, 1109, 1110, 1111, 1112, 1113, 1114, 1115, 1116,
1117, 1118, 1119, 1120, 1121, 1122, 1123, 1124, 1125, 1126, 1127, 1128, 1129, 1130, 1131, 1132, 1133,
1134, 1135, 1136, 1137, 1138, 1139, 1140, 1141, 1142, 1143, 1144, 1145, 1146, 1147, 1148, 1149

Page last updated Feb 18, 2014
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IC 1100 (=
NGC 5881 = PGC 53920)
Discovered (Apr 26, 1789) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5881)
Discovered (Jun 22, 1889) by Lewis Swift (IX-45) (and later listed as IC 1100)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Draco (RA 15 06 20.6, Dec +62 58 50)
(This entry will probably only contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 5881)

IC 1101 (= PGC 54167)
Discovered (Jun 19, 1890) by
Edward Swift (IX-47)
A 15th-magnitude giant galaxy (type cD/S0?) in Virgo (RA 15 10 56.1, Dec +05 44 44)
The second IC adds (per Howe) "Description is extremely faint, very small, 13th magnitude star 1.5 seconds east, 13th magnitude star 2 seconds west and a little north." IC 1101 is a giant elliptical galaxy, and one of the largest of thousands of galaxies in galaxy cluster Abell 2029. Based on its recessional velocity of 23370 km/sec, a straightforward calculation yields a distance of about 1090 million light years. But for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 995 million light years away when the light by which we see it left it, about 1030 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during that time). Given that and its apparent size of 1.2 by 0.6 arcmin, it is about 350 thousand light years across, but its outer halo, which is about 2 arcmin wide, stretches across half a million light years.
SDSS image of giant elliptical galaxy IC 1101
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 1101 and a number of its smaller companions
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near giant elliptical galaxy IC 1101

IC 1102 (= PGC 54188)
Discovered (Jun 24, 1891) by
Lewis Swift (X-30)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Virgo (RA 15 11 04.9, Dec +04 17 38)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6 arcmin

IC 1103 (= PGC 1584180)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (344)
A 16th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4) in Serpens (RA 15 11 35.8, Dec +19 12 30)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin

IC 1104
Recorded (Jun 1, 1889) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (190)
A 15th-magnitude star in Libra (RA 15 12 49.9, Dec -05 03 22)

IC 1105 (= PGC 54338)
Discovered (Jun 24, 1891) by
Lewis Swift (X-31)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Serpens (RA 15 13 13.8, Dec +04 17 17)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4 arcmin

IC 1106 (= PGC 54375)
Discovered (May 18, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (345)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Serpens (RA 15 13 56.2, Dec +04 42 37)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.4 arcmin

IC 1107 (= PGC 54391)
Discovered (May 18, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (346)
A 15th-magnitude compact multiple galaxy (type C M) in Serpens (RA 15 14 09.0, Dec +04 42 53)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin. Whether the two galaxies are connected or merely an optical double is not obvious at this writing.
SDSS image of compact multiple galaxy IC 1107
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 1107 and its possible companion

IC 1108 (=
NGC 5882)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5882)
Discovered (1894) by Williamina Fleming (and later listed as IC 1108)
A 9th-magnitude planetary nebula in Lupus (RA 15 16 50.0, Dec -45 38 56)
(This entry will probably only contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 5882)

IC 1109 (= PGC 54549)
Discovered (Jun 25, 1891) by
Lewis Swift (X-32)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Serpens (RA 15 17 03.9, Dec +05 15 24)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin

IC 1110 (= PGC 54265)
Discovered (Aug 2, 1888) by
Lewis Swift (VII-56)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Ursa Minor (RA 15 12 05.3, Dec +67 21 44)
Apparent size 1.4 by 0.4 arcmin

IC 1111 (=
NGC 5876 = PGC 54110)
Discovered (Jun 11, 1885) by Lewis Swift (1-43) (and later listed as NGC 5876)
Discovered (Aug 27, 1888) by Lewis Swift (VIII-86) (and later listed as IC 1111)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 09 31.4, Dec +54 30 23)
(This entry will probably only contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 5876)

IC 1112 (= PGC 54604)
Discovered (Jun 19, 1890) by
Edward Swift (IX-48)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Serpens (RA 15 17 47.4, Dec +07 13 07)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin.

IC 1113 (= PGC 54629)
Discovered (May 23, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (347)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Serpens (RA 15 18 15.1, Dec +12 29 19)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin.

IC 1114
Recorded (Mar 28, 1889) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (191)
A star in Ursa Minor (RA 15 11 16.0, Dec +75 28 30)

IC 1115
Recorded (May 28, 1889) by
Lewis Swift (VIII-87)
A pair of 15th-magnitude stars in Libra (RA 15 22 19.0, Dec -04 28 28)
Per Dreyer, IC 1115 is "most extremely faint, small, round, pretty bright star to southeast". The second IC adds (per Howe) "Only a double star of 12.5 and 13.5 magnitude, distance 5 arcsec." Per Corwin, Howe identified the object (in a paper published in 1898) with the pair of stars whose position is listed above, based on the 11th-magnitude star about 5 arcmin to the southeast. (The 17th-magnitude galaxy near the pair of stars is too faint for either Swift or Howe to have seen.)
DSS image of region near the pair of stars listed as IC 1115
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair of stars identified as IC 1115 (to the left of the label)

IC 1116 (= PGC 54848)
Discovered (Jun 19, 1890) by
Edward Swift (IX-49)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Serpens (RA 15 21 55.2, Dec +08 25 26)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin.

IC 1117 (= PGC 55003)
Discovered (Jul 8, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (348)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Serpens (RA 15 24 22.8, Dec +15 29 21)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2 arcmin.

IC 1118 (=
IC 4543 = PGC 55035)
Discovered (Jul 29, 1891) by Stephane Javelle (349) (and later listed as IC 1118)
Discovered (Jun 3, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 4543)
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Serpens (RA 15 24 59.5, Dec +13 26 42)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 1119 (= PGC 55062 + PGC 1068507)
Discovered (Aug 16, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (788)
A 15th-magnitude galaxy pair in Serpens
PGC 55062: A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) at RA 15 25 44.7, Dec -03 39 31
PGC 1068507: A 16th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C) at RA 15 25 44.1, Dec -03 39 12
Available images suggest that this object represents a middle stage in the collision and merging of two previously separate objects. Based on a recessional velocity of 9745 km/sec, IC 1119 is about 450 million light years away. (For galaxies at such a distance the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us makes a small difference in the distance estimate, but it is only a small one in comparison to the uncertainty associated with such an estimate, so I do not bother to apply it unless the recessional velocity exceeds 10,000 km/sec.) Given that and the 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin apparent size of the spiral (PGC 55062), it is about 80 thousand light years across, while the 0.3 by 0.3 apparent size of the compact galaxy (PGC 106850) would make it about half that size.
DSS image of the colliding galaxies listed as IC 1119
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 1119
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the colliding galaxies
DSS image of the region near the colliding galaxies listed as IC 1119

IC 1120 (= PGC 1573089)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (350)
A pair of galaxies in Serpens
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) at RA 15 26 10.9, Dec +18 52 19
A 15th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C) at RA 15 26 11.4, Dec +18 52 30
Apparent size of spiral galaxy 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin; of compact galaxy 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of the galaxy pair listed as IC 1120
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 1120
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy pair
SDSS image of the region near the galaxy pair listed as IC 1120

IC 1121 (= PGC 55152)
Discovered (Jun 19, 1890) by
Edward Swift (IX-50)
A 14th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C) in Serpens (RA 15 27 44.0, Dec +06 48 16)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin.

IC 1122 (= PGC 1326415)
Discovered (Jun 4, 1889) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (192)
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4) in Serpens (RA 15 29 23.0, Dec +07 37 03)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin.

IC 1123
Recorded (Jun 28, 1889) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (193)
A 14th-magnitude star in Bo÷tes (RA 15 28 54.1, Dec +42 53 55)

IC 1124 (= PGC 55254)
Discovered (May 28, 1889) by
Lewis Swift (VIII-88)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Serpens (RA 15 30 00.9, Dec +23 38 18)
The second IC adds "Evidently = Javelle #1367, 1860 RA 15 23 55, NPD 65 53.0, pretty bright, considerably small, extended 250░, nuclear." Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin.

IC 1125 (= PGC 55388)
Discovered (Jun 10, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (789)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBdm) in Serpens (RA 15 33 05.7, Dec -01 37 42)
Apparent size 1.7 by 1.0 arcmin.

IC 1126
Recorded (Apr 12, 1886) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (194)
A 14th-magnitude star in Serpens (RA 15 35 00.8, Dec +04 59 26)

IC 1127 (=
IC 4553 = PGC 55497 = Arp 220)
Discovered (May 4, 1866) by Truman Safford (and later listed as IC 1127)
Discovered (Jul 25, 1903) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 4553)
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type Scd? pec) in Serpens (RA 15 34 57.2, Dec +23 30 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1127 (= Safford #7, 1860 RA 15 29 50, NPD 66 03.2) is "pretty faint". The position precesses to RA 15 35 54.5, Dec +23 28 48, about a minute of time to the east of the galaxy listed above, but this is a fairly typical error for Safford, as he merely centered the telescope on his discoveries, then used the setting circles to determine an approximate position (the IC1 positions look more precise than Safford's original measurements because they involve a correction for precession, in the same way that the precessed positions in these entries look more precise than the 1860 NGC/IC positions for the same reason). In any event, PGC 55497 is the only object in the region that could possibly be what Safford observed, so the identification is considered essentially certain. (The double entry was caused by the fact that Javelle's position was much more accurate, and therefore apparently in a completely different position.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.2 arcmin. Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a galaxy with adjacent loops.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1127, also known as Arp 220; also shown is IC 4554
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1127, also showing IC 4554
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy (Wikisky; SDSS server down at time of posting)
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1127, also known as Arp 220
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide 'raw' HST image of the central part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
'Raw' HST image of core of spiral galaxy IC 1127, also known as Arp 220
Below, a 0.4 arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy (Image Credits NASA, ESA, and C. Wilson (McMaster University))
(rotated about 30 degrees clockwise to allow for more detail)
HST image of central core of spiral galaxy IC 1127, also known as Arp 220

IC 1128 (= PGC 55648)
Discovered (May 28, 1889) by
Lewis Swift (VIII-89)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Serpens (RA 15 37 52.8, Dec -01 44 05)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin.

IC 1129 (= PGC 55330)
Discovered (Jul 13, 1887) by
Edward Swift (VII-57)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Ursa Minor (RA 15 32 00.8, Dec +68 14 48)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin.

IC 1130 (= PGC 55644)
Discovered (May 29, 1889) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (195)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Serpens (RA 15 37 44.0, Dec +17 14 40)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin.

IC 1131 (= PGC 55683)
Discovered (Jun 29, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (351)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Serpens (RA 15 38 51.6, Dec +12 04 52)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin.

IC 1132 (= PGC 55750)
Discovered (May 9, 1866) by
Truman Safford (9)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Serpens (RA 15 40 06.7, Dec +20 40 49)
Apparent size 1.2 by 1.0 arcmin.

IC 1133 (= PGC 55793)
Discovered (Jul 1, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (352)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Serpens (RA 15 41 12.0, Dec +15 34 24)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.4 arcmin.

IC 1134 (= PGC 55937)
Discovered (Jul 1, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (353)
A pair of galaxies in Serpens
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) at RA 15 44 58.4, Dec +16 57 46
A 15th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C) at RA 15 44 59.9, Dec +16 57 33
Apparent size of lenticular galaxy is 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin; of compact galaxy is 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin. (Unless the IC states that the object is double or noticeably elongated, only the brighter galaxy is likely to have been observed by Javelle; but that question will be discussed in the next iteration of this page.)
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 1134 and its compact companion
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 1134
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the object
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 1134 and its compact companion

IC 1135 (= PGC 55964)
Discovered (Jun 17, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (354)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Serpens (RA 15 45 34.7, Dec +17 42 00)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.2 arcmin.

IC 1136 (= PGC 56049)
Discovered (Jun 10, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (790)
A 14th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C) in Serpens (RA 15 47 34.3, Dec -01 32 41)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin.

IC 1137 (= PGC 2816978)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1890) by
Lewis Swift (IX-51)
A 15th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C) in Serpens (RA 15 48 32.6, Dec +08 35 17)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin.

IC 1138 (= PGC 56070)
Discovered (Jul 28, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (355)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Corona Borealis (RA 15 48 15.8, Dec +26 12 22)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.2 arcmin.

IC 1139 (= PC 55236)
Discovered (Jun 18, 1888) by
Lewis Swift (VII-58)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Ursa Minor (RA 15 29 26.0, Dec +82 35 04)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.2 arcmin.

IC 1140
Recorded (Jun 23, 1889) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (196)
Three stars in Serpens (RA 15 49 25.3, Dec +19 06 52)

IC 1141 (= PGC 56141)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1888) by
Lewis Swift (VII-60)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Serpens (RA 15 49 47.0, Dec +12 23 57)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin.

IC 1142 (= PGC 56169)
Discovered (Jun 27, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (356)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Scd) in Serpens (RA 15 50 25.9, Dec +18 08 24)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin.

IC 1143 (= PGC 55279)
Discovered (Jun 18, 1888) by
Lewis Swift (VII-59)
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Ursa Minor (RA 15 30 55.8, Dec +82 27 23)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9 arcmin.

IC 1144 (= PGC 56216)
Discovered (Jun 7, 1890) by
Lewis Swift (IX-52)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Hercules (RA 15 51 21.6, Dec +43 25 06)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.6 arcmin.

IC 1145 (= PGC 55904)
Discovered (Jul 13, 1887) by
Edward Swift (VII-61)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Ursa Minor (RA 15 44 08.3, Dec +72 25 51)
Apparent size 1.5 by 0.5 arcmin.

IC 1146 (= PGC 56085)
Discovered (Aug 2, 1888) by
Lewis Swift (VII-62)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Draco (RA 15 48 22.0, Dec +69 23 10)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin.

IC 1147 (= PGC 56159)
Discovered (Aug 2, 1888) by
Lewis Swift (VII-63)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Draco (RA 15 50 11.5, Dec +69 33 36)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.6 arcmin.

IC 1148 (=
NGC 6020 = PGC 56467)
Discovered (May 9, 1866) by Truman Safford (and later listed as NGC 6020)
Discovered (May 9, 1866) by Truman Safford (10) (and later listed as IC 1148)
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Serpens (RA 15 57 08.1, Dec +22 24 18)
An odd duplication caused by Dreyer not noticing Safford's observations until after finishing the NGC. As a result, the original entry for NGC 6020 lists another observer and different data; but there is no doubt that Safford's observation was of the same object at an earlier date, hence his being credited with a double discovery on the basis of a single observation. Also for that reason, this entry will only contain historical information; for physical data and images see NGC 6020.

IC 1149 (= PGC 56511)
Discovered (Jun 16, 1892) by
Lewis Swift (X-8)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Serpens (RA 15 58 07.9, Dec +12 04 11)
Apparent size 1.2 by 1.0 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1149
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 1149
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1149
Celestial Atlas
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