Celestial Atlas
(IC 1300 - 1349) ←     IC Objects: IC 1350 - 1399 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 1400 - 1449)
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Page last updated Mar 23, 2013
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IC 1350 (=
IC 1354 = PGC 65939)
Discovered (Aug 7, 1891) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1354)
Discovered (July 26, 1892) by Stephane Javelle (411) (and later listed as IC 1350)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Aquarius (RA 21 01 52.2, Dec -13 51 08)
Based on a recessional velocity of 8380 km/sec, IC 1354 is about 390 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin it is about 70 thousand light years across.
DSS image of  spiral galaxy IC 1350
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 1350
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near  spiral galaxy IC 1350

IC 1351 (= PGC 941325)
Discovered (Aug 6, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (412)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Aquarius (RA 21 01 52.3, Dec -13 12 05)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2 arcmin.

IC 1352 (= PGC 938673)
Discovered (Aug 5, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (413)
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Aquarius (RA 21 01 54.8, Dec -13 23 04)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.1 arcmin.

IC 1353 (= PGC 940278)
Discovered (Aug 6, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (414)
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Aquarius (RA 21 01 56.3, Dec -13 16 21)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin.

IC 1354 (=
IC 1350 = PGC 65939)
Discovered (Aug 7, 1891) by Stephane Javelle (415) (and later listed as IC 1354)
Discovered (July 26, 1892) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1350)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Aquarius (RA 21 01 52.2, Dec -13 51 08)
(this entry will mostly consist of historical information; for anything else see IC 1350)

IC 1355 (= PGC 2800921)
Discovered (Aug 6, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (416)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Aquarius (RA 21 01 58.3, Dec -13 10 21)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin.

IC 1356 (= PGC 65965)
Discovered (Aug 16, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (417)
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Capricornus (RA 21 02 53.0, Dec -15 48 43)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin.

IC 1357 (= PGC 66092)
Discovered (Sep 13, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (418)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Aquarius (RA 21 05 57.2, Dec -10 42 57)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.7 arcmin.

IC 1358 (= PGC 2817440)
Discovered (Aug 16, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (419)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Capricornus (RA 21 06 29.7, Dec -16 12 13)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin.

IC 1359 (= PGC 66189)
Discovered (Sep 11, 1889) by
Lewis Swift (IX-96)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Delphinus (RA 21 08 43.0, Dec +12 29 02)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.4 arcmin.

IC 1360 (= PGC 66266)
Discovered (Aug 19, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (792)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Equuleus (RA 21 10 50.3, Dec +05 04 18)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3 arcmin.

IC 1361 (= PGC 66297)
Discovered (Aug 19, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (793)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Equuleus (RA 21 11 29.1, Dec +05 03 17)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin.

IC 1362 (= PGC 66316)
Discovered (Sep 29, 1891) by
Rudolf Spitaler (24)
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Aquarius (RA 21 11 52.6, Dec +02 19 46)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin.

IC 1363
Discovered (Sep 9, 1893) by
Thomas Espin (9)
A group of stars in Cygnus (RA 21 10 40.0, Dec +46 52 12)

IC 1364 (= PGC 66367)
Discovered (Sep 30, 1891) by
Rudolf Spitaler (25)
A 14th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C) in Equuleus (RA 21 13 24.6, Dec +02 46 13)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.6 arcmin.

IC 1365 (= PGC 66381)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1891) by
Edward Swift (X-48)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4) in Equuleus (RA 21 13 56.0, Dec +02 33 55)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin.

IC 1366 (= PGC 66386)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1891) by
Rudolf Spitaler (27)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Aquarius (RA 21 14 07.9, Dec +01 46 36)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin.

IC 1367 (= PGC 66390)
Discovered (Sep 30, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (421)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Equuleus (RA 21 14 09.6, Dec +02 59 40)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin.

IC 1368 (= PGC 66389)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1891) by
Edward Swift (X-49)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Aquarius (RA 21 14 12.6, Dec +02 10 42)
The second IC adds (per Howe "Not round but much extended 225°". Apparent size 1.2 by 0.4 arcmin.

IC 1369 (= OCL 204)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1891) by
Frederick Pechüle
A 9th-magnitude open cluster (type I1m) in Cygnus (RA 21 12 09.0, Dec +47 46 00)
Apparent size 5.0 arcmin.

IC 1370 (= PGC 66418)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (422)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0 pec?) in Aquarius (RA 21 15 14.3, Dec +02 11 32)
Per Dreyer, IC 1370 (= Javelle 422, 1860 RA 21 08 08, NPD 88 23.7) is "very faint, 2 faint stars involved". The field contains a group of at least six galaxies and a star (presumably one of the '2 faint stars involved'). The brightest galaxy (the one whose data are listed here) is undoubtedly the primary object observed by Javelle, but as noted by Corwin some of the other galaxies could have contributed to the impression he had of the object (for one thing, it appears that one of them is what he thought was a second star), and in any event the whole group appears closely connected, so the IC listing is sometimes attributed to only the bright galaxy, and sometimes to the group. Based on a recessional velocity of 15160 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 1370 is about 700 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that IC 1370 was about 655 million light years away when the light by which we see it left it, about 680 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 1.6 by 0.5 arcmin, the brightest galaxy is about 300 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 1370 and its numerous companions
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 1370 and its numerous companions
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the group
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 1370 and its numerous companions

IC 1371 (= PGC 66578)
Discovered (Sep 15, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (423)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Aquarius (RA 21 20 15.6, Dec -04 52 34)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin.

IC 1372 (= PGC 3083153)
Discovered (Aug 19, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (424)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Aquarius (RA 21 20 17.1, Dec -05 36 17)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin.

IC 1373 (= PGC 66589)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1891) by
Rudolf Spitaler (28)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Aquarius (RA 21 20 37.1, Dec +01 05 35)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin.

IC 1374 (= PGC 66605)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (425)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Aquarius (RA 21 21 02.6, Dec +01 42 49)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin.

IC 1375 (= PGC 66603)
Discovered (Aug 1, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (426)
A 14th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C) in Equuleus (RA 21 20 59.7, Dec +03 59 09)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin.

IC 1376
Recorded (Sep 21, 1867) by
Truman Safford (85)
A lost or nonexistent object in Aquarius (RA 21 24 42.0, Dec -05 44 34)

IC 1377 (= PGC 66722)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (427)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Equuleus (RA 21 25 26.8, Dec +04 18 51)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin.

IC 1378
Discovered (Sep 16, 1893) by
Thomas Espin (11)
A group of stars in Cepheus (RA 21 22 52.0, Dec +55 27 50)

IC 1379 (= PGC 66741)
Discovered (Jul 29, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (428)
A 15th-magnitude elliptical (type E0) in Equuleus (RA 21 26 01.1, Dec +03 05 50)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin.

IC 1380 (= PGC 66779)
Discovered (Oct 3, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (429)
A 14th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C) in Pegasus (RA 21 27 10.9, Dec +02 43 05)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin.

IC 1381 (= PGC 66789)
Discovered (Nov 6, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (430)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB) in Aquarius (RA 21 27 33.6, Dec -01 11 17)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin.

IC 1382 (=
NGC 7056 = PGC 66641)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1863) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 7056)
Discovered (Sep 29, 1866) by Truman Safford (55) (and later listed as IC 1382)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Pegasus (RA 21 22 07.5, Dec +18 39 56)
(this entry will contain mostly historical information; for anything else see NGC 7056)

IC 1383 (= PGC 66792)
Discovered (Nov 6, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (431)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin.


IC 1384 (= PGC 66796)
Discovered (Nov 6, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (432)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sdm?) in Aquarius (RA 21 27 53.0, Dec -01 22 07)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1384
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 1384
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1384

IC 1385 (= PGC 66832)
Discovered (Nov 6, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (433)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB?) in Aquarius (RA 21 28 51.1, Dec -01 04 11)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin.

IC 1386 (= PGC 66852)
Discovered (Aug 22, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (434)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Capricornus (RA 21 29 37.4, Dec -21 11 44)
Apparent size 1.5 by 1.1 arcmin.

IC 1387 (= PGC 66851)
Discovered (Nov 6, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (435)
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Aquarius (RA 21 29 34.4, Dec -01 21 02)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin.

IC 1388 (= PGC 66857)
Discovered (Sep 8, 1891) by
Lewis Swift (X-50)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Aquarius (RA 21 29 52.1, Dec -00 37 51)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin.

IC 1389 (= PGC 66916)
Discovered (Aug 25, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (436)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Capricornus (RA 21 32 08.0, Dec -18 01 09)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin.

IC 1390 (= PGC 66922)
Discovered (Dec 4, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (437)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Aquarius (RA 21 32 24.9, Dec -01 51 43)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin.

IC 1391 (= PGC 67002)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (438)
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Aquarius (RA 21 35 00.4, Dec -00 30 41)
Apparent size 0.2 by 0.2 arcmin.

IC 1392 (= PGC 67017)
Discovered (Sep 12, 1866) by
Truman Safford (50)
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Cygnus (RA 21 35 32.6, Dec +35 23 55)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin.

IC 1393 (= PGC 67148)
Discovered (Oct 16, 1887) by
Ormond Stone (823)
A 15th-magniutde lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Capricornus (RA 21 40 14.1, Dec -22 24 40)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin.

IC 1394 (= PGC 67145)
Discovered (Sep 14, 1887) by
Lewis Swift (VIII-100)
A 14th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C) in Pegasus (RA 21 40 12.9, Dec +14 38 01)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9 arcmin.

IC 1395 (= PGC 67183)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (439)
A 14th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C) in Pegasus (RA 21 41 41.3, Dec +04 06 18)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin.

IC 1396
Discovered (August, 1893) by
Edward Barnard
An emission nebula in Cepheus (RA 21 38 54.0, Dec +57 29 20)
A nearly three degree wide (170 by 140 arcmin) emission nebula about 2500 light years from the Earth (and hence the best part of 150 light years across), IC 1396 fluoresces in the intense radiation of the 4th-magnitude variable star near its center, μ Cephei. Bordering the nebula and within it are numerous knots of cooler, denser gas and dust which are outlined by or silhouetted against the hot, glowing gas surrounding them. One of the more dramatic knots is the elongated structure to the west (right) of the nebula's center, called the Elephant Trunk Nebula (closeups of which are shown below in visible and infrared radiation). μ Cephei, also known as Herschel's Garnet Star, is the prototype of the μ-Cephei type variables. It is a red supergiant of irregular brightness, varying from about magnitude 3.5 to 5 over a period of two to two and a half years. Its mass is estimated at 15 times that of the Sun, and it is one of the largest stars known -- the best part of two billion miles across at maximum size -- meaning it would nearly fill the orbit of Saturn. It is a very cool star (only about 3700 Kelvins, or 6200 Fahrenheit), so most of its radiation is in the infrared. Its visible radiation is about 40 thousand times that of the Sun, and taking into account absorption of its light by interstellar dust and the large proportion of infrared radiation it must give off, its total luminosity must be nearly ten times greater, or about 350 thousand solar luminosities. The star is near the end of its life, having already begun to fuse helium into carbon in its core, and within a few million years (hardly any time on an astronomical time scale) will blow itself to bits in a supernova explosion, leaving behind nothing but (most likely) a black hole or (less likely) a neutron star.
ESO/DSS image of emission nebula IC 1396
Above, an aproximately 3 by 4 degree wide view of IC 1396 (the Elephant Trunk is to the right of center)
(Image Credit: DSS/ESA/ESO/NASA FITS Liberator; Color Composite by Davide De Martin (Skyfactory.org))
Below, a closeup of the Elephant Trunk (Image Credit/©: Jean-Charles Cuillandre (CFHT), Hawaiian Starlight)
CFHT image of the Elephant Trunk, in emission nebula IC 1396
Below, a Spitzer telescope infrared image of the Elephant Trunk (Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Caltech)
Spitzer infrared image of the Elephant Trunk, in emission nebula IC 1396

"IC 1396A"
Not an IC object but sometimes called IC 1396A since it is a part of
IC 1396
An emission nebula in Cepheus (RA 21 35 30.0, Dec +57 23 00)
Apparent size 14 by 2.0 arcmin. A region near the Elephant Trunk.
ESO/DSS image of the western portion of emission nebula IC 1396, showing the regions sometimes referred to as IC 1396A and IC 1396B
Above, a 2 degree wide view of of the western portion of IC 1396, showing "IC 1396A" and "IC 1396B"
(Image Credit: DSS/ESA/ESO/NASA FITS Liberator; Color Composite by Davide De Martin (Skyfactory.org))

"IC 1396B"
Not an IC object but sometimes called IC 1396B since it is a part of
IC 1396
An emission nebula in Cepheus (RA 21 34 30.0, Dec +57 28 00)
Apparent size 12 by 4.0 arcmin. A region to the west of the Elephant Trunk. See "IC 1396A" for a labeled view of the region.

IC 1397 (= PGC 170372)
Discovered (Sep 15, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (440)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Aquarius (RA 21 44 02.2, Dec -04 53 04)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3 arcmin.

IC 1398 (= PGC 67306)
Discovered (Nov 6, 1891) by
Rudolf Spitaler (29)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Pegasus (RA 21 45 51.4, Dec +09 28 32)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4 arcmin.

IC 1399 (= PGC 67316)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (441)
A 15th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C) in Pegasus (RA 21 46 08.8, Dec +04 24 10)
Based on a recessional velocity of 11765 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 1399 is about 550 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 525 million light years away when the light by which we see it left it, about 535 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.75 by 0.6 arcmin, IC 1399 is about 115 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of compact galaxy IC 1399
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 1399
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near compact galaxy IC 1399
Celestial Atlas
(IC 1300 - 1349) ←     IC Objects: IC 1350 - 1399     → (IC 1400 - 1449)