Celestial Atlas
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Page last updated Oct 22, 2016
(Checked for mis-spelling of Stewart, deleted title tags), added Dreyer IC2 entries
Checked Corwin positions, Steinicke historical/physical databases, PGC IDs
WORKING 1567: Check identification, add discussion/pix/etc as needed

IC 1550 (= PGC 1533)
Discovered (Jun 22, 1900) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type S0?) in Andromeda (RA 00 24 27.6, Dec +38 11 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1550 (Javelle #816, 1860 RA 00 17 05, NPD 52 35.1) is "round, stellar, very faint nucleus".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5910 km/sec (and H = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 1550 is about 275 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.8 by 0.6 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 65 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near  spiral galaxy IC 1550
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1550
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of  spiral galaxy IC 1550

IC 1551 (= PGC 1700)
Discovered (Nov 12, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type Sbc? pec) in Pisces (RA 00 27 35.4, Dec +08 52 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1551 (Javelle #817, 1860 RA 00 20 21, NPD 81 54.2) is "faint, very small, round, mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 00 27 34.2, Dec +08 52 19, only about half an arcmin southwest of the core of the galaxy and well within its extended arms, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 13040 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 1551 is about 600 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 575 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it left it, about 590 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion on the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its 2.5 by 1.2 arcmin(?) apparent size, IC 1551 is about 400 thousand light years across (this size includes its extended arms; the central part of the galaxy is considerably smaller). The galaxy appears to have a double nucleus, so there is a good chance that it is the result of the merger of two galaxies, which would explain its very extended arms. However, hints of structure in images such as those shown here often prove unreliable when better images become available; so there is no guarantee that this is the correct explanation.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1551
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1551
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1551

IC 1552 (= PGC 1817)
Discovered (Nov 23, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pisces (RA 00 29 44.0, Dec +21 28 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1552 (Javelle #818, 1860 RA 00 22 26, NPD 69 18.4) is "faint, pretty large, diffuse".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.1 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1552
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1552
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1552

IC 1553 (= PGC 1977)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Sculptor (RA 00 32 40.0, Dec -25 36 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1553 (DeLisle Stewart #109, 1860 RA 00 25 36, NPD 116 22) is "very faint, very much extended 10".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.0 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1553
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1553
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1553

IC 1554
Recorded (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart)
The object generally identified as IC 1554 is almost certainly not what Stewart observed
A lost or nonexistent object in Sculptor (RA 00 32 50.1, Dec -32 01 36
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1554 (DeLisle Stewart #110, 1860 00 25 55, NPD 122 48) is "very faint, very small, extremely extended 170, suddenly brighter middle". The position precesses to the one listed above, but there is nothing there or anywhere near there. Steinicke lists the object as not found. Thomson states that the object almost universally designated as IC 1554 lies nearly a quarter degree away, which would be an "extremely unusual" error for Stewart to make, and notes that the purported IC 1554 does not resemble Stewart's description (which has the nebula extended slightly east of south, while the "accepted" IC 1554 is extended well to the west of south). Corwin makes no mention of problems with the object, but according to Thomson agrees that the galaxy identified as IC 1554 is not the correct one. Since the three most knowledgeable authorities on the historical NGC/IC agree that the supposed IC 1554 is the wrong object, I cannot help but agree with their assessment. For that reason, the object generally referred to as IC 1554 is referred to on this site as PGC 2000.
DSS image of the region around Stewart's position for the apparently lost or nonexistent IC 1554
Above, a 12 arcmin region centered on Stewart's position for IC 1554 (the box in the center)

PGC 2000 (not =
IC 1554)
Not an IC object but listed here since usually misidentified as IC 1554
A magnitude 13(?) lenticular galaxy (type SB0(rs)a pec) in Sculptor (RA 00 33 07.3, Dec -32 15 30)
Historical Misidentification: See IC 1554 for a discussion of why the galaxy listed above, though usually called IC 1554, cannot be that IC object.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1735 km/sec (and H = 70 km/sec/Mpc), PGC 2000 is about 80 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of of about 1.3 by 0.7 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 30 thousand light years across. The galaxy is listed (as the apparently nonexistent IC 1554) in NED as being part of a pair with half-degree distant NGC 148, and also as a member of the NGC 134 group of galaxies, which includes NGC 115, 131, 148 and 150, IC 1555 and PGC 2044. Several of these are also listed as members of a group of galaxies in or near Sculptor with recessional velocities of about 1500 to 1800 km/sec (this is not "the" Sculptor Group, a close neighbor to our Local Group with an average recessional velocity of less than 300 km/sec).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 2000
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 2000, which is not IC 1554
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 2000 (usually misidentified as IC 1554)
Below, a 36 arcmin wide DSS image showing PGC 2000 and half-degree distant NGC 148
DSS image of the region between lenticular galaxies PGC 2000 and NGC 148

IC 1555 (= PGC 2071 = PGC 722447 = PGC 3196421)
Discovered (May 22, 1898) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)d?) in Sculptor (RA 00 34 32.8, Dec -30 01 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1555 (Swift list XII (#3), 1860 RA 00 27 41, NPD 120 46.2) is "most extremely faint, small, round, 2 stars in line to west". The position precesses to RA 00 34 36.4, Dec -29 59 51, about 3.6 seconds of time east and 1' 12" north of the center of the galaxy listed above, but there is nothing else nearby and there are two stars in a line to the west, so the identification seems certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1570 km/sec, IC 1555 is about 75 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 65 to 85 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.35 by 0.8 arcmin (based on the images below), it is about 25 thousand light years across. IC 1555 is listed as a member of the NGC 134 group of galaxies, which includes NGC 115, 131, 148 and 150, PGC 2000 (often erroneously identified as IC 1554) and 2044. Several of these are also listed as members of a group of galaxies in or near Sculptor with recessional velocities of about 1500 to 1800 km/sec (this is not "the" Sculptor Group, a close neighbor to our Local Group, with an average recessional velocity of less than 300 km/sec).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1555
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1555
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1555

IC 1556
Recorded (Sep 10, 1895) by
Lewis Swift
A lost or nonexistent object in Cetus (RA 00 35 04.1, Dec -09 33 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1556 (Swift list XI (#4), 1860 RA 00 27 58, NPD 100 20.3) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, very difficult". There is nothing at the position listed in the IC2, and Swift's original position precesses to RA 00 35 04.1, Dec -09 33 56 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there nor anywhere near there, so I consider IC 1556 lost or (more likely) nonexistent. However, Corwin lists a possible candidate a few seconds of time to the east and not quite 15 arcmin to the north, and such errors are not entirely unreasonable for Swift's observations, so although there cannot be any certainty about Corwin's identification (even he uses a colon to indicate that it is merely an educated guess), the following entry discusses that object (PGC 2100). Note: LEDA has no entry for IC 1556, which is reasonable, since it probably doesn't exist.
SDSS image of region near Swift's position for the apparently nonexistent IC 1556
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on Swift's position for "IC 1556"

PGC 2100 (possibly but not likely =
IC 1556)
Probably not an IC object but listed here as a possible candidate for IC 1556
A magnitude 14(?) galaxy (type SB0/a? pec) in Cetus (RA 00 34 58.0, Dec -09 20 32)
Historical (Mis?)identification: As noted in the entry for IC 1556, Corwin lists PGC 2100 as a possible candidate for that object, although it is nearly a quarter degree to the north and there is nothing in Swift's description to help decide whether there is any reason to consider the identity in any way certain. However, it is at least a better candidate than an earlier one (PGC 2086), which is fainter and does not match Swift's description as "round"; so although PGC 2100 cannot be considered a certain candidate for IC 1556, it is at least better than any previous candidate.
Physical Information: The galaxy has faint extensions to the northwest and southeast, possibly due to a gravitational interaction with PGC 2086, which is at about the same distance and probably a physical companion; hence my classifying it as "peculiar". With its fainter extensions it spans about 2.1 by 1.05 arcmin, while the brighter portion of the galaxy is only about 0.9 by 0.65 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 2100, which may or may not be IC 1556, also showing PGC 2086, which is certainly not IC 1556
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 2100, also showing PGC 2086
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image faintly showing the galaxy's outer regions
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 2100, which may or may not be IC 1556, faintly showing the galaxy's outer regions
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the main galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 2100, which may or may not be IC 1556

PGC 2086 (not =
IC 1556)
Not an IC object but listed here since once thought to be a candidate for IC 1556
A magnitude 14.5(?) galaxy (type Sb?) in Cetus (RA 00 35 02.9, Dec -09 22 06)
Historical Misidentification: As noted in the entry for PGC 2100, Corwin once listed PGC 2086 as IC 1556, but has now decided that since it is fainter than PGC 2100 and does not fit Swift's description of the object as round, it is not a good candidate for IC 1556, and he has abandoned it in favor of PGC 2100 (which is also not a terribly convincing candidate, but is at least better than PGC 2086).
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.8 by 0.35 arcmin (from the image below). Probably a physical companion of PGC 2100, which may or may not be IC 1556.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 2086, which is certainly not IC 1556
Above, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 2086 (see PGC 2100 for a wider-field image)

IC 1557 (= PGC 2130)
Discovered (Nov 6, 1899) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type SB0(rs)a?) in Cetus (RA 00 35 34.5, Dec -02 52 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1557 (Howe list III (#1), 1860 RA 00 28 26, NPD 93 39.0) is "extremely faint, very small, 2 very faint stars close; near (NGC) 161", NGC 161 being not far to the north northwest of the galaxy. Often misidentified as NGC 161, despite the IC entry's specifically stating that it is "near" that object; e.g., LEDA misidentifies it as NGC 161, and therefore lists it as PGC 2131.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.75 by 0.45 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 1557, also showing NGC 161
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1557, also showing NGC 161
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 1557

IC 1558 (= PGC 2142 = PGC 779687)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type SBm?) in Sculptor (RA 00 35 47.3, Dec -25 22 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1558 (DeLisle Stewart #111, 1860 RA 00 28 54, NPD 116 09) is "extended 160, star to north, perhaps spiral".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.3 by 2.4 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1558
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1558
Below, a 4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1558

IC 1559 (= PGC 2201, and with
NGC 169 = Arp 282)
Discovered (Sep 18, 1857) by R. J. Mitchell
Also observed (Oct 7, 1885) by Guillaume Bigourdan
Also observed (Nov 22, 1897) by Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a? pec) in Andromeda (RA 00 36 52.3, Dec +23 59 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1559 (3rd Lord Rosse, Bigourdan #245, Javelle #819, 1860 RA 00 29 30, NPD 66 47.6) is "very faint, 0.5 arcmin south southeast of (NGC) 169".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.5 by 0.3 for the main body of the galaxy; including its southeastern extension, about 0.75 by 0.4 arcmin. A physical companion of NGC 169 (which see for images), with which it is used by the Arp Atlas as an example of galaxies with infall and attraction.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 169 and IC 1559, which comprise Arp 282
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 169, also showing IC 1559
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair; the glare at top is from magnitude 6.5 HD 3411
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 169 and lenticular galaxy IC 1559, which comprise Arp 282
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of IC 1559, also showing part of NGC 169
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 1559, also showing part of NGC 169, with which it comprises Arp 282

IC 1560 (not =
NGC 164)
Recorded (Nov 28, 1896) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A lost or nonexistent object Pisces (RA 00 37 38.9, Dec +02 39 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1560 (Bigourdan #361, 1860 RA 00 30 28, NPD 88 06) is "extremely faint, perhaps = 164", . The position precesses to RA 00 37 39.4, Dec +02 40 15, but there is nothing there. In his notes for his #361 Bigourdan suggested that "his" nebula might be NGC 164, with a minute of error in the NGC right ascension, whence Dreyer's "perhaps = 164". However, there is no doubt that Bigourdan's suggestion was wrong, and that there is nothing that could fit his observation, so (per Corwin) this is undoubtedly one of Bigourdan's "fausse images", and therefore lost or nonexistent. (Unlike some nonexistent objects for which LEDA provides a useless PGC designation, there is no PGC entry for IC 1560.)
Discovery Notes: Bigourdan's comparison star was listed by him as "A.G. Albany 133 (8)" meaning #133 in the catalog he referred to and an 8th magnitude star, for which he lists a position of (1900) RA 00 32 52.24, Dec +02 12 48.3. This precesses to (2000) RA 00 38 00.5, Dec +02 45 49, essentially identical to the position of magnitude 7.7 HD 3503, at RA 00 38 00.6, Dec +02 45 49, and there no other stars of similar brightness anywhere nearby, so that must have been his comparison star. (If his comparison star had been considerably fainter it might have been conceivable that he misidentified it, but under the circumstances there can be no doubt that it is the one under discussion.) The star has a proper motion of +13.8 milliarcsec per year in right ascension and -5.9 milliarcsec per year in declination, meaning that in 1900 it would been 1.4 arcsec = 0.1 seconds of time west and 0.6 arcsec north of its current position, or at (2000) RA 00 38 00.5, Dec +02 45 50, which is essentially identical to the position used by Bigourdan, so no error can be ascribed to the position of his comparison star.
     Using Bigourdan's position for the star and the offsets he lists for his nebula (-21.69 seconds of time in right ascension and -6' 9.4" in declination, his #361 must have been at or near (1900) RA 00 32 30.6, Dec +02 06 39, which precesses to RA 00 37 38.9, Dec +02 39 40 (whence the position above), within the round-off errors of Dreyer's position. But there is absolutely nothing there, and nothing of his #361's supposed magnitude of about 13.5 anywhere near there, so Corwin's statement that this was a false image is certainly correct, and IC 1560 is indeed lost or (more likely) nonexistent.
DSS image of region near Bigourdan's position for the lost or (more likely) nonexistent IC 1560
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Bigourdan's position for IC 1560
The "bright" star near the upper left corner is his comparison star, HD 3503

IC 1561 (= PGC 2305)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Cetus (RA 00 38 32.6, Dec -24 20 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1561 (DeLisle Stewart #112, 1860 RA 00 31 31, NPD 115 06) is "extended 105, star to north".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.3 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1561, also showing IC 1562
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1561, also showing IC 1562
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1561

IC 1562 (= PGC 2308)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SABbc?) in Cetus (RA 00 38 34.0, Dec -24 16 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1562 (DeLisle Stewart #113, 1860 RA 00 31 37, NPD 115 02) is "small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.75 by 1.4 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1562, also showing IC 1561
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1562, also showing IC 1561
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1562

IC 1563 (= PGC 2332, = "NGC 191A", and with
NGC 191 = Arp 127)
Discovered (Dec 16, 1897) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Cetus (RA 00 39 00.3, Dec -09 00 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1563 (Bigourdan #362, 1860 RA 00 31 55, NPD 99 46) is "extremely faint, stellar, 0.6 arcmin southeast of (NGC) 191". Unfortunately, sometimes called NGC 191A, making it one of the most deplorable examples of non-standard NGC designations.
Warning About Non-Standard Designations: Since the galaxy has a perfectly good IC designation, calling it NGC 191A is an abomination, and should never be used (except as in this case, to correct the error).
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.55 by 0.2 arcmin (from the image below).
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 1563, also showing part of NGC 191, with which it comprises Arp 127
Above, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of IC 1563; see NGC 191 for wider-field images

IC 1564 (= PGC 2342)
Discovered (Aug 23, 1895) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type SBcd? pec) in Pisces (RA 00 39 05.1, Dec +06 01 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1564 (Howe list I (b), 1860 RA 00 31 56, NPD 84 48) is "extremely faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.05 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1564
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1564
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1564

IC 1565 (= PGC 2372 =
IC 1567?)
Discovered (Aug 23, 1895) by Herbert Howe (and later listed as IC 1567)
Discovered (Nov 24, 1897) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1565)
A magnitude 13.4 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Pisces (RA 00 39 26.3, Dec +06 44 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1565 (Javelle #820, 1860 RA 00 32 11, NPD 84 02.5) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.6 by 1.4 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 1565, also showing IC 1566
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1565, also showing IC 1566
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 1565

IC 1566 (= PGC 73393)
Discovered (Nov 24, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.8 lenticular galaxy (type SAB0/a?) in Pisces (RA 00 39 33.4, Dec +06 48 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1566 (Javelle #821, 1860 RA 00 32 19, NPD 83 57.3) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.8 by 0.6 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 1566, also showing IC 1565 and IC 1568
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1566, also showing IC 1565 and 1568
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 1566

WORKING HERE: Duplicate entry generally accepted but far from certain

IC 1567 (=
IC 1565? = PGC 2372)
Discovered (Aug 23, 1895) by Herbert Howe (and later listed as IC 1567)
Discovered (Nov 23, 1897) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1565)
A magnitude 13.4 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Pisces (RA 00 39 26.3, Dec +06 44 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1567 (Howe list I (c), 1860 RA 00 32 21, NPD 84 09) is "a nebulous star". There is some uncertainty about whether IC 1567 is actually IC 1565 (e.g., LEDA does not list IC 1567), and Corwin lists (as a far less likely but barely possible candidate) the galaxy at RA 00 39 36.0, Dec +06 39 51 (= PGC 73395).
Physical Information: Given the tentative duplicate entry, see IC 1565 for anything else (for now; whereas if further investigation casts still more doubt on the identity, that will be discussed in the next iteration of this page.)

IC 1568 (= PGC 2404)
Discovered (Nov 24, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Pisces (RA 00 39 56.0, Dec +06 50 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1568 (Javelle #822, 1860 RA 00 32 43, NPD 83 55.2) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.65 by 0.65 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 1568, also showing IC 1566
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1568, also showing IC 1566
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 1568

IC 1569 (= PGC 2430)
Discovered (Nov 24, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Pisces (RA 00 40 28.0, Dec +06 43 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1569 (Javelle #823, 1860 RA 00 33 15, NPD 84 03.0) is "very faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.7 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below). Recessional velocity 11345 km/sec, so probably 80 million light years further than its "neighbor", IC 1570. The fainter galaxy to its southwest (PGC 73420) is sometimes noted as a companion, but since there is nothing known about that object it could just as easily be a background galaxy; however, because of the supposed connection it is discussed immediately below.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 1569, also showing IC 1570
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1569, also showing IC 1570
Below, a 1.1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy and its apparent companion, PGC 73420
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 1569 and its apparent companion, PGC 73420

PGC 73420
Not an IC object but listed here since an apparent companion of
IC 1569
A magnitude 16.5(?) spiral galaxy (type S(rs)b?) in Pisces (RA 00 40 26.3, Dec +06 42 56)
Physical Information: Nothing is known about this galaxy save for its brightness, appearance and apparent size (of about 0.3 by 0.1 arcmin, from the images below). It is listed as an apparent companion of IC 1569, but since nothing else is known about it, it could just as easily be a much more distant background object. Given the object's bright nucleus, it may be a Seyfert or starburst galaxy.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 73420, which may or may not be a companion of IC 1569
Above, a 0.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 73420; for wider-field views see IC 1569

IC 1570 (= PGC 73426)
Discovered (Nov 24, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 16.2 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)a? pec) in Pisces (RA 00 40 34.1, Dec +06 45 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1570 (Javelle #824, 1860 RA 00 33 20, NPD 84 00.9) is "very faint, very small, round, very faint nucleus". (Note to self: LEDA has no entry for IC 1570, so the identification may be more uncertain than stated by Steinicke and Corwin.)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.6 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below). Recessional velocity 9645 km/sec, so probably 80 million light years closer than its "neighbor", IC 1569.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1570, also showing IC 1569
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1570, also showing IC 1569
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1570

IC 1571 (= PGC 2440)
Discovered (Dec 22, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Cetus (RA 00 40 38.1, Dec -00 19 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1571 (Javelle #825, 1860 RA 00 33 28, NPD 91 06.4) is "faint, pretty small, round, diffuse".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.0 by 0.85 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1571
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1571
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1571

IC 1572
Recorded (Dec 3, 1888) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A lost or nonexistent object in Pisces (RA 00 41 11.7, Dec +16 14 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1572 (Bigourdan #363, 1860 RA 00 33 55, NPD 74 30) is "extremely faint, stellar, III 200 near", (WH) III 200 being NGC 213. The position precesses to RA 00 41 14.0, Dec +16 16 09, but there is nothing there, and rather disturbingly is nearly a quarter degree to the south of NGC 213, suggesting a serious problem with the description. As discussed below (in painstaking and perhaps painful detail), the object is almost certainly lost or nonexistent, and it is even possible (if not probable) that Bigourdan's observations of 1888 (which provided the position) and 1897 (which provided the description) don't even refer to the same object. Per Corwin, the former is almost certainly a "fausse images", one of numerous objects supposedly observed by Bigourdan that never existed in the first place, and the latter may exist, but if so is almost certainly lost.
Discovery Notes: When there is nothing at the NGC/IC position I like to consult original records, which in this case show that Bigourdan used an "anonymous" 12th magnitude comparison star whose position was determined by comparison with BD+15 101, an 8th magnitude star to the northwest of NGC 213. BD+15 #101 has a "current" position of (2000) RA 00 40 27.4, Dec +16 34 47, with a proper motion of 0.058 arcsec of right ascension and -0.171 arcsec of declination per year, so that a century earlier it was 5.8 arcsec or 0.4 seconds of time further west and 17 arcsec further north, or at (2000) RA 00 40 27.0, Dec +16 35 04 = (1900) RA 00 35 13.2, Dec +16 02 07. Bigourdan's "anonymous" star was measured by him as being 42 seconds of time east and 14 arcmin south of the BD star, or at (1900) RA 00 35 55.2, Dec +15 48 07, which is a little southwest of the position he listed for it. The 'new' position precesses to (2000) RA 00 41 09.0, Dec +16 21 03, just south of a magnitude 12.8 star, which must be the one Bigourdan used as his comparison star. Its actual position is (2000) RA 00 41 09.2, Dec +16 21 11 = (1900) RA 00 35 55.4, Dec +15 48 15, about 2 arcmin southwest of his stated position for the star (which explains why there is nothing at that stated position). Bigourdan's offsets from the comparison star to his #363 are +02.5 seconds of right ascension and -06' 58" of declination, placing it at (1900) 00 35 57.9, Dec +15 41 17 = (2000) RA 00 41 11.7, Dec +16 14 13 (whence the position above), which is almost exactly 14 arcmin south of NGC 213, and hardly fits either Bigourdan's description of the star being just west of NGC 213, or Dreyer's statement that it is near NGC 213, so it is not at all surprising that there is nothing there (though it is gratifying that it isn't far from Dreyer's position, showing that although it doesn't hurt to check the math, it usually comes out more or less as originally stated). As a result it seems most likely that the 1888 position that became IC 1572 was mis-measured or mis-recorded, and the "object" is lost or (per Corwin, more likely) nonexistent (and given its description even if it was real it was probably only a faint star, in which case it wouldn't make much difference if it was lost).
An Apparently Possible But Incorrect Solution: There is one possibility that could be considered that would yield an actual object for what Bigourdan thought he saw in 1888. Namely, if he became confused about his positions and his #363 was at +06' 58" of declination instead of -06' 58" from his comparison star, then it could be the star near the southeastern rim of NGC 213, which is a magnitude 13.5 star at RA 00 41 11.6, Dec +16 28 00 (2.4 seconds of time east and 6' 49" north of Bigourdan's comparison star). In other words, if the declination offset were reversed and Bigourdan's statement that the object was just west of NGC 213 were reversed, that star would perfectly fit his position and description. But if that star was his #363, why would he have gone to the trouble of measuring the offset of his comparison star from the BD star and the offset of #363 from his comparison star? Why wouldn't he have just said, "just east of NGC 213" (as he said "just west" in 1897)? So although this suggestion might appear reasonable, it would be unlikely to be correct, and most likely merely a coincidence, even under the best of circumstances. And in fact, since Bigourdan mentioned the star when he observed NGC 213, it is certainly only a coincidence. Given that, why have I retained this suggestion? Because it is a good example of how an effort to find a "lost" object might appear to yield a reasonable explanation, and yet that explanation is completely wrong; and I feel that there must be other cases in which NGC/IC objects have been identified by "reasonable" arguments, but are not what the original observers actually saw. So even now (and to a greater extent when I have finished this catalog) there are many (and will be even more) entries where I have questioned the identification of objects that are not listed as "certainly" or "almost certainly" correct.
And A Final Note: Since the position measured by Bigourdan in 1888 is a quarter of a degree from NGC 213, and his comment for the observation of 1897 (in which he did not measure the position) says his #363 is "just west" of NGC 213, there is (as noted by Corwin) a high probability that the two observations do not refer to the same object. But there is nothing at the 1888 position, and nothing to the west of NGC 213, so both observations were probably "fausse images", and IC 1572 is almost certainly not lost, but nonexistent.
SDSS image of region between Bigourdan's position for IC 1572 and NGC 213
Above, a 15 arcmin wide SDSS image showing the region between NGC 213 and the position of IC 1572
Bigourdan's position is near the bottom, his comparison star is at center, and NGC 213 is near the top

IC 1573 (= PGC 2521)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 16.0 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Cetus (RA 00 42 10.4, Dec -23 35 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1573 (DeLisle Stewart #114, 1860 RA 00 35 13, NPD 114 18) is "extremely faint, extremely small, much extended 60".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.05 by 0.15 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1573, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 230
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1573, also showing NGC 230
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1573

IC 1574 (= PGC 2578 = PGC 817130)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.7 irregular galaxy (type IB(s)m?) in Cetus (RA 00 43 03.8, Dec -22 14 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1574 (DeLisle Stewart #115, 1860 RA 00 36 07, NPD 113 00) is "very faint, very much extended 0, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: IC 1574's recessional velocity of 360 km/sec is too small for a reliable distance estimate based on the Hubble expansion velocity, but happens to yield a result (about 17 million light years) in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 14 to 16 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 2.15 by 0.6 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 10 thousand light years across, so it is a "dwarf" galaxy, with at most a few hundred million stars.
SDSS image of region near dwarf irregular galaxy IC 1574
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1574
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of dwarf irregular galaxy IC 1574
Below, a 2.2 by 2.4 arcmin wide 'raw' HST image overlaid on the one above (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
'Raw' HST image of dwarf irregular galaxy IC 1574

IC 1575 (= PGC 2601 ("+ PGC 2602"), and =
Arp 231)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1896) by Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.7(?) lenticular galaxy (type (R)S0(r)a? pec) in Cetus (RA 00 43 33.3, Dec -04 07 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1575 (Swift list XI (#5), 1860 RA 00 36 28, NPD 94 55.1) is "extremely faint, small, round, 10th magnitude star to south".
Physical Information: Some references list this as a pair of galaxies, but it is actually a single galaxy with a dark dust lane that gives low-resolution images the appearance of a pair; hence its listing as either PGC 2601 (the actual galaxy) or as PGC 2601 + 2602 (the nonexistent pair). The latter view is reflected by its Arp designation, which corresponds to a multiple galaxy. However, reflecting the former view, LEDA now lists PGC 2601 = PGC 2602 = IC 1575, indicating that the earlier designation as two separate objects has been abandoned. IC 1575 is a peculiar galaxy, with concentric apparently "polar" rings surrounding its core, thereby giving the impression of a pair of galaxies in lower-resolution images. The galaxy has an apparent size of 1.6 by 1.0 arcmin?, not counting the partial ring about half its diameter to the south of it (visible in the wide field view below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 1575, also known as Arp 231
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1575
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 1575, also known as Arp 231

IC 1576 (= PGC 2630)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Sbc? pec) in Sculptor (RA 00 44 14.1, Dec -25 06 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1576 (DeLisle Stewart #116, 1860 RA 00 37 20, NPD 115 52) is "very faint, very small, considerably extended 135, between 2 stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1576, also showing IC 1578
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1576, also showing IC 1578
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1576

IC 1577 (=
IC 48 = PGC 2603 = PGC 2608)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1888) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 48)
Reobserved on several occasions (between 1891 and 1895) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 48)
Reobserved (between 1895 and 1907) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1577)
A magnitude 13.1 lenticular galaxy (type SA(rs)0? pec?) in Cetus (RA 00 43 34.5, Dec -08 11 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1577 (Barnard, 1860 RA 00 37 31, NPD 98 54.3) is "pretty bright, small, round, gradually brighter middle and stellar nucleus". The position precesses to RA 00 44 36.3, Dec -08 08 17, but there is nothing there. However, per Corwin, if Barnard made a one minute of time error in the RA (a common type of copying error) the position would precess to RA 00 43 36.4, Dec -08 08 14, about 3 arcmin nearly due north of IC 48, which perfectly fits the description and is the only suitable candidate anywhere in the region; so the identification as a duplication of IC 48 seems essentially certain.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see IC 48 for anything else, including a more detailed discussion of the duplicate entry.

IC 1578 (= PGC 2637)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Sculptor (RA 00 44 26.0, Dec -25 04 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1578 (DeLisle Stewart #117, 1860 RA 00 37 32, NPD 115 50) is "very faint, very small, very much extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.75 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1578, also showing IC 1576
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1578, also showing IC 1576
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1578

IC 1579 (= PGC 2667 = PGC 766496)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type (R)SBbc? pec?) in Sculptor (RA 00 45 32.4, Dec -26 33 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1579 (DeLisle Stewart #118, 1860 RA 00 38 44, NPD 117 20) is "extremely faint, extremely small, considerably extended 15, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.2 by 0.65 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1579
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1579
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1579

IC 1580
Recorded (Dec 21, 1897) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A pair of stars in Andromeda (RA 00 46 21.4, Dec +29 56 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1580 (Bigourdan #364, 1860 RA 00 38 49, NPD 60 51) is "very faint, very stellar". (LEDA has no entry for IC 1580)
Physical Information: The northwestern star is about magnitude 15.2, while the southeastern is about magnitude 15.8.
SDSS image of region near the pair of stars listed as IC 1580, also showing NGC 243
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1580, also showing NGC 243

IC 1581 (= PGC 2676)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.4 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Sculptor (RA 00 45 46.4, Dec -25 55 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1581 (DeLisle Stewart #119, 1860 RA 00 39 14, NPD 116 40) is "extremely faint, extremely small, extended 45, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.9 by 0.15 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1581
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1581
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1581

IC 1582 (= PGC 2701)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.1 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Cetus (RA 00 46 16.8, Dec -24 16 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1582 (DeLisle Stewart #120, 1860 RA 00 39 20, NPD 115 03) is "extremely faint, extremely small, extended 45, suddenly brighter middle like a star".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.15 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1582
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1582
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1582

IC 1583 (= PGC 2760 = PGC 1681011)
Discovered (Nov 23, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Andromeda (RA 00 47 10.3, Dec +23 04 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1583 (Javelle #826, 1860 RA 00 39 47, NPD 67 41.3) is "faint, very small, round, stellar nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.7 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 1583, also showing IC 1585 and PGC 2773
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1583, also showing IC 1585 and PGC 2773
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 1583

IC 1584 (= PGC 2766)
Discovered (Nov 8, 1899) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc?) in Andromeda (RA 00 47 18.6, Dec +27 49 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1584 (Bigourdan #365, 1860 RA 00 39 48, NPD 62 57) is "extremely faint, large, diffuse, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.9 by 1.2 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1584
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1584
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1584

IC 1585 (= PGC 2764)
Discovered (Nov 23, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec) in Andromeda (RA 00 47 14.3, Dec +23 03 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1585 (Javelle #827, 1860 RA 00 39 51, NPD 67 42.5) is "faint, very small, round, stellar nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.8 by 0.65 arcmin (from the images below). Possibly with a binary nucleus, but the fainter part might just be a foreground star.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 1585, also showing IC 1583 and PGC 2773
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1585, also showing IC 1583 and PGC 2773
Below, a 1.3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 1585

PGC 2773
Not an IC object but listed here since an apparent companion of
IC 1585
A magnitude 15.5(?) galaxy (type Sab? pec) in Andromeda (RA 00 47 19.4, Dec +23 02 55)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.85 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below). A starburst galaxy.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 2773
Above, a 1 arcmin with SDSS image of PGC 2773; for wider-field images, see IC 1585

IC 1586 (= PGC 2813)
Discovered (Nov 23, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sbc? pec?) in Andromeda (RA 00 47 56.3, Dec +22 22 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1586 (Javelle #828, 1860 RA 00 40 32, NPD 68 24.8) is "faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.3 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1586
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1586
Below, a 0.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1586

IC 1587 (= PGC 2852)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Cetus (RA 00 48 43.3, Dec -23 33 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1587 (DeLisle Stewart #121, 1860 RA 00 41 50, NPD 114 19) is "extremely faint, extremely small, almost round".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.2 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1587
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1587
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1587

IC 1588 (= PGC 2965 = PGC 133686)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)ab?) in Cetus (RA 00 50 57.7, Dec -23 33 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1588 (DeLisle Stewart #122, 1860 RA 00 44 08, NPD 114 19) is "very faint, very small, considerably extended 155".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1588
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1588
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1588

IC 1589
Recorded (Aug 1, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A pair of stars in Sculptor (RA 00 51 59.5, Dec -34 25 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1589 (Swift list XI (#6), 1860 RA 00 44 49, NPD 125 13.6) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round, like double nebula". Per Corwin, Swift places the "double nebula" at RA 00 51 31, Dec -34 28 06 and RA 00 51 31, Dec -34 27 48. Corwin places the apparently uncertain pair at the position shown above. (LEDA has no entry for IC 1589)
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near the pair of stars that may be IC 1589
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the pair of stars that may be IC 1589

IC 1590 (= "PGC 3518681")
Discovered (Oct 31, 1899) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
An open cluster in Casseiopeia (RA 00 52 49.4, Dec +56 38 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1590 (Bigourdan #366, 1860 RA 00 44 57, NPD 34 10) is "a cluster, very large, stars scattered; 281 to east", NGC 281 being the "281" in question. LEDA lists IC 1590 with the designation PGC 3518681 (and as a cluster), but a search of the database for that designation returns no result. Note: The position above is based on the X-ray image of the cluster, and is very slightly to the south of its optical center.
Physical Information: Associated with emission nebula NGC 281, but distinguished from it by being the cluster near the nebula's center, rather than the nebula itself. The stars in IC 1590 provide most of the radiation that energizes the emission nebula, particularly HD 5005, a magnitude 7.8 double star (the brightest star in the cluster, located near the center of the cluster) consisting of an O4 Main Sequence star and an O9.7 subgiant.
DSS image of region near IC 1590, the open cluster near the center of emission nebula NGC 281
Above, an 18 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1590
Below, an 18 arcmin wide composite image centered on IC 1590; for wider-field images see NGC 281
(Image Credit X-ray: NASA/CXC/CfA/S.Wolk et al; Optical: NSF/AURA/WIYN/Univ. of Alaska/T.A.Rector
Composite X-ray and optical image of region near IC 1590, the open cluster near the center of emission nebula NGC 281

IC 1591 (=
NGC 276 = PGC 3054)
Discovered (1886) by Frank Muller (and later listed as NGC 276)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1898) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 1591)
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Cetus (RA 00 52 06.6, Dec -22 40 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1591 (DeLisle Stewart #123, 1860 RA 00 45 14, NPD 113 26) is "very faint, very small, considerably extended 95, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Given the duplicate listing, see NGC 276 for anything else.

IC 1592 (= PGC 3139)
Discovered (Jan 15, 1895) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pisces (RA 00 53 27.0, Dec +05 46 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1592 (Howe list I (#1), 1860 RA 00 46 13, NPD 84 59.4) is "extremely faint, small, between a 12th magnitude star and a 13th magnitude star".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.8 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below). There has been speculation that PGC 212615, the galaxy just west of IC 1592, may be a companion of the IC object, so it is discussed immediately below; but since nothing is known about the PGC object, whether it is actually a physical companion is completely unknown.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1592, also showing PGC 212615
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1592, also showing PGC 212615
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1592

PGC 212615
Not an IC object but listed here as a possible companion of
IC 1592
A magnitude 16.5(?) spiral galaxy (type SBdm?) in Pisces (RA 00 53 21.2, Dec +05 46 05)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin (from the image below). Nothing else seems to be available, so whether it is actually a companion of IC 1592 is completely unknown. (NED lists the object as GALEXASC J005321.23+054605.0)
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 212615, a possible companion of IC 1562
Above, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 212615; for a wider-field image see IC 1592

IC 1593
Recorded (Dec 6, 1898) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A pair of stars in Pisces (RA 00 54 39.7, Dec +32 31 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1593 (Bigourdan #367, 1860 RA 00 47 04, NPD 58 16) is "extremely faint, semi-stellar". (LEDA lists no entry for IC 1593)
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near the pair of stars listed as IC 1593
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1593

IC 1594 (= PGC 3161)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Phoenix (RA 00 53 45.3, Dec -47 38 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1594 (DeLisle Stewart #124, 1860 RA 00 47 16, NPD 138 24) is "extremely faint, extremely small, considerably extended 130, stellar nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.25 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1594
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1594
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1594

IC 1595 (= PGC 3162 = PGC 529501)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Phoenix (RA 00 53 47.0, Dec -45 11 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1595 (DeLisle Stewart #125, 1860 RA 00 47 21, NPD 135 57) is "extremely faint, small, much extended 10, stellar nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.5 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1595
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1595
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1595

IC 1596 (= PGC 3219)
Discovered (Dec 17, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pisces (RA 00 54 42.9, Dec +21 31 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1596 (Javelle #829, 1860 RA 00 47 17, NPD 69 14.7) is "faint, small, extended east-west, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.3 by 0.75 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1596
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1596
Below, a 2.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1596

IC 1597 (= PGC 3144 = PGC 382081)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Tucana (RA 00 53 32.1, Dec -58 06 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1597 (DeLisle Stewart #126, 1860 RA 00 47 27, NPD 148 52) is "extremely faint, extremely small, considerably extended 165, considerably brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.4 by 0.3 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1597
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1597
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1597

IC 1598 (= PGC 3217)
Discovered (Jan 15, 1895) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Pisces (RA 00 54 41.8, Dec +05 46 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1598 (Howe list I (#2), 1860 RA 00 47 28, NPD 84 59.2) is "a nebulous 11th magnitude star; 9th magnitude star 10 seconds of time to west, 4.5 arcmin to north".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.1 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1598
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1598
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1598

IC 1599 (= PGC 3210)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Cetus (RA 00 54 32.8, Dec -23 29 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1599 (DeLisle Stewart #127, 1860 RA 00 47 44, NPD 114 15) is "very faint, very small, considerably extended 100".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.05 by 0.2 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1599
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1599
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1599
Celestial Atlas
(IC 1500 - 1549) ←     IC Objects: IC 1550 - 1599     → (IC 1600 - 1649)