Celestial Atlas
(IC 1700 - 1749) ←IC Objects: IC 1750 - 1799 Link for sharing this page on Facebook→ (IC 1800 - 1849)
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1750, 1751, 1752, 1753, 1754, 1755, 1756, 1757, 1758, 1759, 1760, 1761, 1762, 1763, 1764, 1765, 1766,
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Page last updated June 28, 2021
Checked Corwin positions, added Dreyer entries, updated formatting to current standards

IC 1750
(= PGC 7266 = UGC 1412 = CGCG 413-007)

Discovered (Dec 21, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pisces (RA 01 56 18.6, Dec +04 04 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1750 (Javelle #899, 1860 RA 86 36.5) is "very faint, very small, pretty round, nuclear."
Physical Information: Based on arecessional velocity of 5655 km/sec, IC 1750 is about 265 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.25 by 0.3 arcmin, it is about 95 thousand light years across. (Note to self: All current protocols followed.)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1750
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1750
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1750

IC 1751 (=
NGC 741)
(= PGC 7252 = UGC 1415 = CGCG 413-008 = MCG +01-06-003)

Discovered (Dec 13, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 741)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 741)
Discovered (Nov 26, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1751)
Also observed (Nov 24, 1899) by Herbert Howe (and later listed as IC 1751)
An 11th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Pisces (RA 01 56 21.0, Dec +05 37 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1751 (Swift list XI (#28), Howe, 1860 RA 01 49 03, NPD 85 03.6) is "pretty bright, pretty small, round, 9th magnitude star north-preceding (to northwest)." Swift states that the nebula is located at 1900 RA 01 50 45, Dec +05 11.2, and is pretty faint, pretty small and round, with a 9th magnitude star "near" to the northwest. Howe states that the nebula is at 1900 RA 01 51 08, Dec +05 08.3, and the 9th magnitude star is 7 seconds of time west and 1.6 arcmin north of the nebula. Swift's position is (as was often the case) relatively poor, being well to the west of Howe's, but the reference to the 9th magnitude star makes it certain that they observed the same nebula. As usual, Dreyer used Howe's micrometric measurements for the IC2 position, which precesses to RA 01 56 21.4, Dec +05 37 38, nearly dead center on NGC 741, and Howe's accurate position for the 9th magnitude star makes the identification of IC 1751 as a duplicate of NGC 741 absolutely certain. Despite that PGC 7250, the faint galaxy to the north of NGC 741, is often misidentified as IC 1751, so it is discussed immediately below.
Discovery Notes: Since the position of IC 1751 and the 9th magnitude star so perfectly agree with those for NGC 741, its separate listing in the IC2 must have simply been due to an oversight.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 741 for anything else.

PGC 7250 (not = IC 1751, nor NGC 741)
(= CGCG 413-006 = MCG +01-06-006)

Neither an NGC object or an IC object, but listed here because sometimes misidentified as IC 1751
(Much to be done here before going on)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

IC 1752
(= PGC 7337 = MCG +05-05-032)

Discovered (Nov 17, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.3 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Triangulum (RA 01 57 15.4, Dec +28 36 49), and
the magnitude 15.2 and 16.1 stars flanking the galaxy (at RA 01 57 14.7. Dec +28 36 57 and RA 01 57 15.9, Dec +28 36 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1752 (Javelle #900, 1860 RA 01 49 19, NPD 62 03.9) is "faint, very small, 14.5 magnitude star attached."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 1753
(= PGC 7353 = CGCG 503-061 = MCG +05-05-033)

Discovered (Nov 17, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.9 elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Triangulum (RA 01 57 19.3, Dec +28 35 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1753 (Javelle #901, 1860 RA 01 49 23, NPD 62 05.3) is "faint, very small, diffuse, 14.5 magnitude star close."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1754
(= PGC 7307 = UGC 1424 = CGCG 413-011)

Discovered (Dec 21, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.5 lenticular galaxy (type (R)S0?) in Pisces (RA 01 56 49.9, Dec +04 01 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1754 (Javelle #902, 1860 RA 01 49 34, 86 39.6) is "faint, small, gradually brighter middle."
Note About PGC Designation: A search of the LEDA database for IC fails to find that designation, but instead returns an entry for PGC 7307, which is IC 1754; so although the connection between the two is not recognized, the correct entry is reached.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1755
(= PGC 7341 = UGC 1428 = CGCG 438-007 = MCG +02-06-005)

Discovered (Jan 17, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type Sa??) in Aries (RA 01 57 09.8, Dec +14 33 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1755 (Javelle #903, 1860 RA 01 49 37, NPD 76 09.0) is "faint, small, diffuse."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1756
(= PGC 7328 = UGC 1429 = CGCG 387-008 = MCG +00-06-005)

Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Cetus (RA 01 57 05.4, Dec -00 28 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1756 (Barnard, 1860 RA 01 49 53, NPD 91 09.6) is "very faint, extended north-preceding south-following (northwest-southeast), 13th magnitude star close south-following (to southeast)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 1757
(= PGC 174458)

Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 15.7 elliptical? galaxy (type E?) in Cetus (RA 01 57 11.4, Dec -00 28 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1757 (Barnard, 1860 RA 01 49 57, NPD 91 10.0) is "extremely faint, very small, round."
Note About PGC Designation: A search of the LEDA database for IC 1757 returns a message saying that there is no entry for IC 1757, but reaches the entry for PGC 174458, which is IC 1757.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.2 arcmin?

SDSS J015712.25-002821.5
Not an IC object but listed here because probably a companion of
IC 1757
A magnitude 18.5 galaxy (type ?) in Cetus (RA 01 57 12.3, Dec -00 28 22)
Physical Information: Both this galaxy and IC 1757 have similar recessional velocities 24206 km/sec for this one, and 23847 km/sec (relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background) for IC 1757, which is close enough that whether they are close enough to be physically interacting or not, they are most likely actual companions, in the same way that our galaxy and the Andromeda Galaxy, though not close enough to physically interact at the current time, are certainly part of a gravitationally bound system (the Local Group).

IC 1758
(= PGC 170024)

Discovered (Nov 24, 1899) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Cetus (RA 01 56 52.5, Dec -16 32 32),
and the magnitude 13.9 star superimposed on the galaxy (RA 01 56 52.3, Dec -16 32 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1758 (Howe list III (#6), 1860 RA 01 50 09, NPD 107 13.5) is "faint. extremely small, suddenly brighter middle, 11th magnitude star."
Discovery Note: Howe's paper actually says "... is a star of mag. 11 with very slight outlying nebulosity." For that reason, Corwin states that the star is part of the IC "object", as shown in the title for this entry.
Note About PGC Designation: A search of the LEDA database for IC 1758 returns a message saying that there is no entry for IC 1758, but reaches the entry for PGC 170024, which is IC 1758.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 1759 (=
IC 1760)
(= PGC 7400 = ESO 354-018 = MCG -06-05-016)

Discovered (Sep 29, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1759)
Discovered (Nov 17, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1760)
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)bc?) in Fornax (RA 01 57 55.4, Dec -32 59 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1759 (Swift list XI (#29), 1860 RA 01 51 18, NPD 123 43.3) is "pretty bright. very small, round, brighter middle, 10th magnitude star close south-preceding (to the southwest)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.4 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1759
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1759 (the star at far lower left is HD 12135 = CD -33 681)
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1759

IC 1760 (=
IC 1759)
(= PGC 7400 = ESO 354-018 = MCG -06-05-016)

Discovered (Sep 29, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1759)
Discovered (Nov 17, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1760)
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)bc?) in Fornax (RA 01 57 55.4, Dec -32 59 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1760 (= Swift list XI (#30), 1860 RA 01 51 18, NPD 122 41.5) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round (PD 123°?)". Per Corwin, Dreyer's query about the NPD is due to the fact that Swift's original notes included "Cordoba 681 southwest", which would be impossible if the NPD was 122 degrees, because Cordoba entries in that range of right ascension are numbered in the 700's. As it turns out Cordoba Durchmusterung (CD) -33 681 is to the southeast of the galaxy, not the southwest, but the reference to the star confirms its identification; and as it happens, its equality with IC 1759, which see for anything else. (There is more to discuss historically, but that will be covered in the next iteration of this page.) Unfortunately, the ESO catalog misidentifies IC 1760 as PGC 7357, and as a result so do almost all modern catalogs, so that object is listed immediately below.
Note About The PGC Designation: As noted immediately above, an error in the ESO catalog resulted in PGC 7357 being misidentified as IC 1760 ins almost all modern catalogs. As a result, the correct information for IC 1760, which is a duplicate observation of IC 1759, is taken from the entry for IC 1759.
Physical Information:

PGC 7357 (not =
IC 1760)
(= ESO 414-015)

Not an IC object, but listed here because almost always misidentified as IC 1760
A magnitude 16 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Fornax (RA 01 57 24.6, Dec -31 59 16)
Historical Misidentification: As noted in the entry for IC 1760, an error in the ESO catalog resulted in PGC 7357 being misidentified as IC 1760 in almost all modern catalogs. This entry serves as a warning about that error, and provides the correct designations for PGC 7357.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 7357, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 1760
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 7357, which is not IC 1760
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 7357, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 1760

IC 1761
(= PGC 7484 = CGCG 387-019)

Discovered (Oct 2, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
Discovered (date?) by Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a??) in Cetus (RA 01 58 52.3, Dec +00 34 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer. IC 1761 (Javelle #904, (Swift list V #18), 1860 RA 01 51 41, NPD 90 05.8) is "very faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle and nucleus."
Discovery Note: Evidently Dreyer failed to recognize Swift's observation as the same object, so he did not receive credit in the IC2 entry; but his observation has been inserted in the entry in parentheses.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1762
(= PGC 7393 = ESO 354-017 = MCG -06-05-015)

Discovered (Sep 6, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
Discovered (1899) by DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Fornax (RA 01 57 48.6, Dec -33 14 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer. IC 1762 (Swift list XI (#31), DeLisle Stewart, 1860 RA 01 51 49, NPD 123 57.5) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, 7th magnitude star north-following (to the northeast)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1763
(= PGC 7514 = ESO 414-020 = MCG -05-05-025)

Discovered (Oct 10, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Fornax (RA 01 59 11.8, Dec -27 48 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer. IC 1763 (Swift list XII (#8), 1860 RA 01 52 26, NPD 118 28.3) is "most extremely faint, small, round, 8th magnitude star south-south-following (to the south-southeast)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1764
(= PGC 7603 = UGC 1486 = CGCG 482-044 = MCG +04-05-033)

Discovered (Jan 18, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type SBb??) in Aries (RA 02 00 23.4, Dec +24 34 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer. IC 1764 (Javelle #905, 1860 RA 01 52 32, NPD 66 06.1) is "faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1765 (=
NGC 783)
(= PGC 7657 = UGC 1497 = CGCG 503-073 = MCG +05-05-042)

Discovered (Sep 22, 1871) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 783)
Discovered (late 1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1765)
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Triangulum (RA 02 01 06.6, Dec +31 52 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1765 (Barnard, 1860 RA 01 52 32, NPD 58 50.2) is "small (faint) star attached preceding (on the west)."
Physical Information: This entry will primarily contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 783.

IC 1766 (=
NGC 785)
(= PGC 7694 = UGC 1509 = CGCG 503-076 = MCG +05-05-046)

Discovered (Oct 25, 1876) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 785)
Discovered (late 1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1766)
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Triangulum (RA 02 01 40.0, Dec +31 49 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer. IC 1766 (Barnard, 1860 RA 01 53 05, NPD 58 54.2) has "no description."
Physical Information: This entry will primarily contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 785.

IC 1767
(= PGC 7568 = MCG -02-06-012)

Discovered (Dec 18, 1896) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a??) in Cetus (RA 01 59 59.4, Dec -11 04 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1767 (Swift list XI (#32), 1860 RA 01 53 07, NPD 101 48.1) is "extremely faint, pretty small, between 2 stars of magnitude 10.5, 2 stars to north."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1768
(= PGC 7636 = ESO 477-021 = MCG -04-05-026)

Discovered (Oct 18, 1896) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Fornax (RA 02 00 49.9, Dec -25 01 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1768 (Swift list XI (#33), 1860 RA 01 54 18, NPD 115 46.4) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, 3 stars of magnitude 9 south-following (to the southeast), very difficult."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1769
(= PGC 7645 = ESO 414-021)

Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Fornax (RA 02 00 54.9, Dec -31 55 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1769 (DeLisle Stewart #158, 1860 RA 01 54 44, NPD 122 36) is "extremely faint, extremely small, much exntended 80°."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 1770
(= PGC 7751 = UGC 1522 = CGCG 438-016 = MCG +02-06-013)

Discovered (Nov 24, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Pisces (RA 02 02 14.4, Dec +09 58 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1770 (Javelle #906, 1860 RA 01 54 48, NPD 80 41.6) is "faint, very small, round, stellar."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1771
(= PGC 7737 = CGCG 438-015 = MCG +02-06-014)

Discovered (Nov 24, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Pisces (RA 02 02 15.9, Dec +09 58 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1771 (Javelle #907, 1860 RA 01 54 50, NPD 80 42.4) is "faint, very small, round, stellar."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1772
(= PGC 7781 = MCG +01-06-033)

Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 13.6 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Pisces (RA 02 02 42.8, Dec +07 44 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1772 (Barnard, 1860 RA 01 55 21, NPD 82 55.8) is "faint, small, suddenly a little brighter middle, 8.5 magnitude star 166 arcsec to north."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1773 (=
NGC 804)
(= PGC 7873 = UGC 1557 = CGCG 503-079 = CGCG 504-001 = MCG +05-05-049)

Discovered (Sep 7, 1885) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 804)
Discovered (Dec 24, 1897) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 1773)
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Triangulum (RA 02 04 02.1, Dec +30 49 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1773 (Bigourdan #372, 1860 RA 01 55 58, NPD 59 52) is "very faint, very small, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: This entry will primarily contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 804.

IC 1774
(= PGC 7863 = UGC 1559 = CGCG 438-021 = MCG +02-06-020)

Discovered (Dec 21, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type SBcd??) in Aries (RA 02 03 58.9, Dec +15 19 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1774 (Javelle #908, 1860 RA 01 56 23, NPD 75 21.7) is "very faint, diffuse."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.2 arcmin?

IC 1775
(= PGC 7958 = MCG +02-06-023)

Discovered (Dec 22, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Aries (RA 02 05 17.5, Dec +13 30 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1775 (Javelle #909, 1860 RA 01 57 45, NPD 77 09.4) is "faint, small, diffuse, 13.5 magnitude star near."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1776
(= PGC 7952 = UGC 1579 = CGCG 413-037 = MCG +01-06-038)

Discovered (Dec 21, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SBcd??) in Pisces (RA 02 05 15.1, Dec +06 06 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1776 (Javelle #910, 1860 RA 01 57 56, NPD 84 33.3) is "faint, pretty large, irregularly round, diffuse."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.1 arcmin?

IC 1777
(= PGC 8021 = CGCG 438-027 = MCG +02-06-029)

Discovered (Dec 21, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Aries (RA 02 06 08.7, Dec +15 12 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1777 (Javelle #911, 1860 RA 01 58 34, NPD 75 28.0) is "faint, extremely small, round, stellar."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1778 (=
IC 199)
(= PGC 8026 = UGC 1594 = CGCG 413-041 = MCG +01-06-041)

Discovered (Dec 15, 1892) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 199)
Discovered (Jan 29, 1897) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1778)
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sab??) in Pisces (RA 02 06 19.4, Dec +09 13 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1778 (Javelle #912, 1860 RA 01 58 53, NPD 81 26.9) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle and nucleus."
Physical Information: Javelle's two observations are essentially identical, so the double listing is a failure by Javelle and Dreyer to notice that. This entry will primarily contain historical information; for anything else see IC 199.

IC 1779
(= PGC 8039 = CGCG 387-035)

Discovered (Nov 20, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.8 elliptical galaxy (type E3??) in Pisces (RA 02 06 26.0, Dec +03 42 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1779 (Javelle #913, 1860 RA 01 59 08, NPD 86 58.6) is "faint, small, round, 14th magnitude star near."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1780
(= PGC 8070 = CGCG 438-029 = MCG +02-06-032)

Discovered (Jan 17, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Aries (RA 02 06 51.2, Dec +14 43 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1780 (Javelle #914, 1860 RA 01 59 17, NPD 75 56.5) is "faint, small, diffuse, several stars of 9th and 10th magnitude near."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1781
(= PGC 8067 = PGC 1141440 = CGCG 387-037)

Discovered (Nov 20, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Cetus (RA 02 06 52.8, Dec -00 31 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1781 (Javelle #915, 1860 RA 01 59 47, NPD 91 11.9) is "faint, very small, round, nuclear."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1782 (=
NGC 823)
(= PGC 8093 = ESO 478-002 = MCG -04-06-005)

Discovered (Oct 14, 1830) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 823)
Discovered (Oct 8, 1896) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1782)
A magnitude 12.8 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Fornax (RA 02 07 20.1, Dec -25 26 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1782 (Swift list XI (#34), 1860 RA 02 01 05, NPD 116 09.0) is "very faint, double star in nebula."
Physical Information: This entry will primarily contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 823.

IC 1783
(= PGC 8279 = ESO 354-046 = MCG -06-05-037)

Discovered (Dec 29, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
Discovered (1899) by DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Fornax (RA 02 10 06.0, Dec -32 56 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1783 (Swift list XI (#35), DeLisle Stewart, 1860 RA 02 03 55, NPD 123 39.4) is "pretty faint, very small, much extended north-south, faint star preceding (to the west)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1784
(= PGC 8676 = UGC 1744 = CGCG 504-041 = MCG +05-06-019)

Discovered (Jan 20, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type Sb pec??) in Triangulum (RA 02 16 12.8, Dec +32 38 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1784 (Javelle #916, 1860 RA 02 07 59, NPD 58 01.3) is "faint, large, extended preceding-following (west-east), gradually brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1785
(= PGC 8682 = CGCG 504-044 = MCG +05-06-021)

Discovered (Jan 20, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.7 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Triangulum (RA 02 16 21.0, Dec +32 39 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1785 (Javelle #917, 1860 RA 02 08 07, NPD 58 00.3) is "faint, small, round, stellar."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1786
(= PGC 8662 = CGCG 413-067)

Discovered (Nov 24, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Cetus (RA 02 16 05.6, Dec +05 08 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1786 (Javelle #918, 1860 RA 02 08 44, NPD 85 30.2) is "very faint, very small, round, nuclear."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 1787 (=
IC 217)
(= PGC 8673 = MCG -02-06-046)

Discovered (Dec 7, 1893) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 217)
Discovered (Oct 12, 1896) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1787)
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Cetus (RA 02 16 10.6, Dec -11 55 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1787 (Swift list XI (#37), 1860 RA 02 09 24, NPD 102 36.2) is "extremely faint, very much extended, between 2 stars preceding following (west and east), 8th magnitude star north-following (to northeast)." The position precesses to RA 02 16 12.0, Dec -11 57 03, only an arcmin and a half south of the galaxy, and the perfect description of the nearby starfield makes the identification certain (for an image, see IC 217). As noted by Corwin, Javelle and Swift's positions and descriptions are sufficiently similar that Swift or Dreyer should have realized that Swift's XI-37 was IC 217 (the right ascensions are identical, the declinations differ by less than an arcmin, and both noted its considerable elongation), but neither did, so the galaxy ended up with duplicate IC entries.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see IC 217 for anything else.

IC 1788
(= PGC 8649 = ESO 415-015 = MCG -05-06-011)

Discovered (Dec 25, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 11.6 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Fornax (RA 02 15 50.0, Dec -31 12 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer. IC 1788 (Swift list XI (#36), 1860 RA 02 09 25, NPD 121 50.6) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round, 2 stars north-following (to the northeast)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.6 by 1.1 arcmin?

IC 1789
(= PGC 8766 = UGC 1763 = CGCG 504-049 = MCG +05-06-024)

Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type Sa??) in Triangulum (RA 02 17 51.2, Dec +32 23 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1789 (Barnard, 1860 RA 02 09 59, NPD 58 14.8) is "faint, small, irregular figure, ?" the question mark presumably meaning that Barnard was uncertain about the existence of the nebula.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1790
(= PGC 8752 = UGC 1762 = CGCG 438-050 = MCG +02-06-055)

Discovered (Jan 4, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Aries (RA 02 17 38.0, Dec +12 30 34)
Historical Identification: Per IC 1790 (Javelle #919, 1860 RA 02 10 05, NPD 78 08.6) is "faint, small, diffuse."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1791
(= PGC 8758 = UGC 1764 = CGCG 438-051 = MCG +02-06-056)

Discovered (Jan 4, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Aries (RA 02 17 41.3, Dec +12 28 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1791 (Javelle #920, 1860 RA 02 10 09, NPD 78 120.9) is "small, round, like a nebulous 11th magnitude star."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 1.0 arcmin?

IC 1792
(= PGC 8839 = UGC 1781 = CGCG 523-018 = MCG +06-06-015)

Discovered (Nov 17, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Sab??) in Triangulum (RA 02 19 01.1, Dec +34 27 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1792 (Javelle #921, 1860 RA 02 10 43, NPD 56 11.3) is "faint, small, pretty round, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1793
(= PGC 8969 = UGC 1816 = CGCG 504-062 = MCG +05-06-027)

Discovered (Jan 20, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type Sab??) in Triangulum (RA 02 21 32.4, Dec +32 32 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer. IC 1793 (Javelle #922, 1860 RA 02 13 15, NPD 58 06.8) is "faint, small, extended 200°, gradually a little brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1794
(= PGC 8963 = CGCG 462-004 = MCG +03-07-003)

Discovered (Nov 21, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a??) in Aries (RA 02 21 30.2, Dec +15 45 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1794 (Javelle #923, 1860 RA 02 13 49, NPD 74 54.2) is "faint, very small, diffuse, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1795
(= "PGC 3518576")

Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
An emission nebula in Cassiopeia (RA 02 26 33.0, Dec +62 02 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1795 (Barnard, 1860 RA 02 16 20±, NPD 28 34) is "a patch of nebulosity."
Note About The PGC Designation: For purposes of completeness, LEDA assigns a PGC designation to most NGC/IC objects, even if they are not galaxies; but in this case, a search of the database for the PGC designation returns no result, so it is shown in quotes.
Physical Information: Apparent size 40 by 20 arcmin?

IC 1796
(= PGC 9041 = ESO 298-038 = MCG -07-06-001)

Discovered (1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.0 lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0??) in Phoenix (RA 02 22 47.3, Dec -41 22 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1796 (DeLisle Stewart #159, 1860 RA 02 17 12, NPD 132 01) is "very faint, very small, round."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin?

IC 1797
(= PGC 9205 = UGC 1880 = CGCG 462-010 = MCG +03-07-010)

Discovered (Jan 18, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type SBc??) in Aries (RA 02 25 27.9, Dec +20 23 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1797 (Javelle #924, 1860 RA 02 17 39, NPD 70 13.5) is "faint, very small, irregular figure, diffuse."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 1798
(= "PGC 3637647" = 2MASXJ02261552+1325504)

Discovered (Jan 4, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.5 elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Aries (RA 02 26 15.5, Dec +13 25 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1798 (Javelle #925, 1860 RA 02 18 40, NPD 77 11.3) is "verry faint, very small, suddenly brighter middle equal to 15th magnitude star."
Note About The PGC Designation: Although this object is a galaxy, a search of the HyperLEDA database for its PGC designation returns no result, so it is shown in quotes. A search for the IC or 2MASX designations will return a very incomplete entry for the object.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1799 (=
NGC 920)
(= PC 9432 = PGC 2273239 = UGC 1943 = CGCG 553-014 = MCG +08-05-012)

Discovered (Sep 11, 1885) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 920)
Discovered (Jan 28, 1891) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 1799)
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Andromeda (RA 02 28 45.9, Dec +45 58 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1799 (Bigourdan #251, 1860 RA 02 19 41, NPD 44 40) is "very faint, small, a little brighter middle, 13th magnitude star preceding (to the west) 0.5 arcmin." The position precesses to RA 02 28 43.9, Dec +45 57 49, just off the southwestern rim of the galaxy listed above and only 0.5 arcmin from its center, the description is perfect and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Note About Duplicate Entry: Until 2014, it had been (incorrectly) long presumed that NGC 920 was PGC 9377, so the duplication involving IC 1799 was unknown (and in fact, as of September 2020 both NED and LEDA still show the incorrect identification of NGC 920, and do not show the duplicate entry). The reason for the original error and its correction are discussed in the entry for NGC 920.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 920 for anything else.
Celestial Atlas
(IC 1700 - 1749) ←IC Objects: IC 1750 - 1799→ (IC 1800 - 1849)