Celestial Atlas
(IC 1750 - 1799) ←     IC Objects: IC 1800 - 1849 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 1850 - 1899)
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1800, 1801, 1802, 1803, 1804, 1805, 1806, 1807, 1808, 1809, 1810, 1811, 1812, 1813, 1814, 1815, 1816,
1817, 1818, 1819, 1820, 1821, 1822, 1823, 1824, 1825, 1826, 1827, 1828, 1829, 1830, 1831, 1832, 1833,
1834, 1835, 1836, 1837, 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842, 1843, 1844, 1845, 1846, 1847, 1848, 1849

Page last updated Jul 6, 2016
WORKING: Check positions, historical IDs (Corwin+), add basic pix/captions/tags

IC 1800
Recorded (Dec 22, 1897) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (373)
A pair of stars in Triangulum (RA 02 28 31.4, Dec +31 24 48)

IC 1801 (= PGC 9392, and with
NGC 935 = Arp 276)
Discovered (Dec 27, 1897) by Stephane Javelle (926)
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Aries (RA 02 28 12.9, Dec +19 34 59)
Apparent size 1.6 by 0.6 arcmin? Used, with NGC 935 (which see for images), by the Arp Atlas as an example of interacting galaxies.

IC 1802 (= PGC 9462)
Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Aries (RA 02 29 13.9, Dec +23 05 00)
Per Dreyer, IC 1802 (Barnard, 1860 RA 02 20 44, NPD 67 30.6) has a "magnitude 11 star 1 arcmin to the northwest". The position precesses to RA 02 28 40.7, Dec +23 07 09, but there is nothing there. However, as noted by Corwin, there is a reasonably bright galaxy just over 2 arcmin to the south and 30 seconds of time to the east of the IC position that does have a suitable star in the correct relative position, and it is the only such nebula in the area. As a result, it is reasonably certain that it is the object Barnard recorded, and it is listed as such here. (It should be noted that the identification of IC 1803 and 1804 rest on this assumption, so their entries refer to this discussion.) Apparent size 1.3 by 1.1 arcmin? (Note: A Wikisky search for IC 1802 shows the galaxy listed here, but mislabeled IC 1803. A search for PGC 9462 is truncated to PGC 462, which is of course a completely different object) Apparent size 1.3 by 1.1 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 1802
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 1802 and "nearby" galaxies PGC 1681200 and 1681391
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing 2MASX J02291731+2308260
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 1802, also showing 2MASX J02291731+2308260, the galaxy identified by Steinicke as IC 1803

PGC 462 (obviously not = PGC 9462 =
IC 1802)
Not an IC object but listed here due to the truncation error mentioned above
A magnitude 15 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Cetus (RA 00 06 12.5, Dec -22 51 09)
Apparent size 1.05 by 0.3 arcmin?
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 462
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 462
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 462

IC 1803 (probably = PGC 9507)
Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
PGC 9507 = A magnitude 14.7 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Aries (RA 02 29 49.9, Dec +23 06 31)
Per Dreyer, IC 1803 (Barnard, 1860 RA 02 21 21, NPD 67 28.6) has a "stellar nucleus". The position precesses to RA 02 29 18.0, Dec +23 09 05, but there is nothing there. Corwin notes that given the discussion of IC 1802 (which see), the assumption of a similar positional error for IC 1803 and 1804 (presumably observed by Barnard on the same night) falls on a pair of galaxies that are the brightest and second-brightest in a small group, and therefore were almost certainly seen by Barnard. On that basis he suggests that they are IC 1803 and 1804. Unfortunately, their diagonal positions are reversed in the sky compared to Barnard's positions (being northwest-southeast, instead of southwest-northeast). This means that which galaxy is IC 1803 and which IC 1804 is uncertain. Using Barnard's positions the eastern one would be IC 1803, but using their actual positions, the western one would be IC 1803. The entries here use their actual positions, so that they are listed in order of their right ascensions, but that may be backwards from the original observations. Still, although which galaxy represents which IC entry is uncertain at best, it seems likely that the pair of galaxies does correspond to the pair of IC objects. (Note: Wikisky misidentifies IC 1802 as IC 1803, and a Wikisky search for PGC 9507 is truncated to PGC 507, which is of course a completely different object. Finally, Steinicke assigns IC 1803 to 2MASX J02291731+2308260, which is therefore discussed immediately below.) Apparent size 0.45 by 0.45 arcmin?
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy PGC 9507, which is probably IC 1803, and elliptical galaxy PGC 9512, which is probably IC 1804
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 1803 and 1804
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy PGC 9507, which is probably IC 1803, and elliptical galaxy PGC 9512, which is probably IC 1804

2MASX J02291731+2308260 (not =
IC 1803)
Not an IC object but listed here since sometimes misidentified as IC 1803
A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Aries (RA 02 29 17.2, Dec +23 08 27)
(Listed as IC 1803 by Steinicke, and therefore listed as such in preliminary versions of this page, which relied only on Steinicke's NGC/IC database.) Apparent size 0.4 by 0.25 arcmin.
SDSS image of 2MASX J02291731+2308260, the galaxy identified by Steinicke as IC 1803
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of 2MASX J02291731+2308260
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 1802
SDSS image of region near 2MASX J02291731+2308260, the galaxy identified by Steinicke as IC 1803, also showing IC 1802

PGC 507 (obviously not = PGC 9507, which is probably
IC 1803)
Not an IC object but listed here due to the truncation error mentioned above
A magnitude 15? spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Pegasus (RA 00 06 40.1, Dec +26 09 15)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.35 arcmin?

IC 1804 (probably = PGC 9512)
Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
PGC 9512 = A magnitude 13.9 elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Aries (RA 02 29 54.4, Dec +23 05 50)
(See IC 1803 for a partial historical discussion and images; a more detailed historical discussion will be posted in the next iteration of this page.) Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1805 (= OCL 352; associated with the Heart Nebula)
Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 6.5 open cluster and surrounding nebulosity in Cassiopeia (RA 02 32 48.0, Dec +61 27 42)
Strictly speaking, IC 1805 is the open cluster that illuminates the surrounding nebula, as the nebulosity was not easily observable in the 1800's. Today, however, the availability of CCD cameras and computer-aided imaging has made the nebulosity better known than the cluster which lights it up, especially since it and a nearby nebulosity were dubbed the "Heart and Soul Nebulae", causing them to be featured on astronomy websites near Valentine's Day. Apparent size 20 arcmin?
DSS view of region near open cluster IC 1805
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 1805
Below, a 30 arcmin wide view of the cluster and surrounding nebulosity
DSS view of region near open cluster IC 1805, also showing the surrounding nebulosity
Below, a 2.5 degree wide view of the cluster (just above center) and surrounding nebulosity
DSS view of the Heart Nebula and its associated clusters
Below, a 5 degree wide view of the Heart and Soul Nebulae associated with IC 1805 and 1848
DSS view of the Heart and Soul Nebulae and their associated clusters
Below, a WISE infrared view of the Heart Nebula and its associated clusters
WISE infrared closeup of the Heart Nebula
Below, a WISE infrared view of the Heart Nebula and (to its left) the Soul Nebula
(Credit for the WISE images above and below: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA, Photojournal)
WISE infrared view of region near IC 1805 and 1848, including the Heart and Soul Nebulae

IC 1806 (= PGC 95515)
Discovered (Jan 16, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (927)
A magnitude 15.1 elliptical galaxy (type E3??) in Aries (RA 02 29 34.9, Dec +22 56 38)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1807 (= PGC 9547)
Discovered (Jan 16, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (928)
A magnitude 14.7 elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Aries (RA 02 30 30.9, Dec +22 57 01)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1808 (=
NGC 963 = PGC 9545)
Discovered (1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 963)
Discovered (Dec 14, 1903) by Stephane Javelle (929) (and later listed as IC 1808)
A magnitude 13.7 irregular galaxy (type Irr??) in Cetus (RA 02 30 31.1, Dec -04 12 56)
This entry will be primarily concerned with historical information; for anything else see NGC 963.

IC 1809 (= PGC 9616)
Discovered (Jan 16, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (930)
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type SBb??) in Aries (RA 02 31 40.5, Dec +22 55 03)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1810 (= PGC 9477)
Discovered (1901) by
DeLisle Stewart (160)
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SBab??) in Eridanus (RA 02 29 26.6, Dec -43 04 36)
Apparent size 1.3 by 1.0 arcmin?

IC 1811 (= PGC 9555)
Discovered (Dec 22, 1897) by
Lewis Swift (XI-38)
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SBab??) in Fornax (RA 02 30 38.0, Dec -34 15 53)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.9 arcmin?

IC 1812 (= PGC 9486)
Discovered (1901) by
DeLisle Stewart (161)
A magnitude 12.2 elliptical galaxy (type E2??) in Eridanus (RA 02 29 31.8, Dec -42 48 41)
Apparent size 2.0 by 1.6 arcmin?

IC 1813 (= PGC 9567)
Discovered (Dec 22, 1897) by
Lewis Swift (XI-39)
A magnitude 13.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a??) in Fornax (RA 02 30 49.6, Dec -34 13 18)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1814 (=
NGC 964 = PGC 9582)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 964)
Discovered (Dec 22, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1814)
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Fornax (RA 02 31 05.7, Dec -36 02 05)
Per Dreyer, IC 1814 (Swift list XI (#40), 1860 RA 02 24 35, NPD 126 39.6) is "pretty bright, pretty small, much extended". The position precesses to RA 02 30 22.6, Dec -36 02 10, just under 3/4 of a minute of time west of the only object in the region that could be considered "pretty bright", namely NGC 964, which not only has the same declination as Swift's observation, but an essentially identical description ("pretty bright, pretty small, much extended 215°"). As a result, despite the error in the right ascension, the equivalence of NGC 964 (which see for anything other than a historical discussion) and IC 1814 is reasonably certain. There is another galaxy (PGC 9571) a little to the west of NGC 964 that has been identified as IC 1814 in some places, but aside from having the wrong declination (which is a much less likely error than having the wrong right ascension), PGC 9571 is four magnitudes fainter than NGC 964, and there is no possibility that Swift would have described it as "pretty bright". If he had noticed it, he would have called it "extremely faint" or even "most extremely faint". Still, even though PGC 9571 cannot be IC 1814, the fact that it has been misidentified as such requires mention, as in the entry immediately below.

PGC 9571 (not =
IC 1814)
Not an IC object, but listed here because sometimes misidentified as IC 1814
A magnitude 16 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Fornax (RA 02 30 51.4, Dec -36 00 09)
(See IC 1814 for a discussion of why PGC 9571 cannot be IC 1814, despite its being misidentified as such in some places.) Based on a recessional velocity of 4670 km/sec, PGC 9571 is about 215 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.0 by 0.2 arcmin, it is about 65 thousand light years across. (Note: Listed in NED as 6dFJ0230514-360009.)
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 9571, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 1814
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 9571
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 964 = IC 1814
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 9571, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 1814, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 964, which is also IC 1814

IC 1815 (= PGC 9794)
Discovered (Jan 20, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle (931)
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type SB0??) in Triangulum (RA 02 34 19.9, Dec +32 25 48)
Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1 arcmin?

IC 1816 (= PGC 9634)
Discovered (Oct 12, 1896) by
Lewis Swift (XI-41)
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Fornax (RA 02 31 51.0, Dec -36 40 20)
Apparent size 1.4 by 1.2 arcmin?

IC 1817 (= PGC 9757 + PGC 9764)
Discovered (Jan 4, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (932)
A pair of galaxies in Aries
PGC 9757 = A magnitude 15.8 spiral galaxy (type SBa? pec) at RA 02 33 49.5, Dec +11 12 12
PGC 9764 = A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Sb? pec) at RA 02 33 50.8, Dec +11 12 10
Apparent size of PGC 9757 about 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin? of PGC 9764 about 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin?
DSS image of spiral galaxies PGC 9757 and PGC 9764, which comprise IC 1817
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 1817
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
DSS image of region near spiral galaxies PGC 9757 and PGC 9764, which comprise IC 1817

IC 1818 (= PGC 970700)
Discovered (Jan 6, 1899) by
Herbert Howe (2)
A magnitude 14.4 elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Cetus (RA 02 34 07.1, Dec -11 02 25)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1819 (= PGC 9858)
Discovered (Dec 18, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle (933)
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Cetus (RA 02 35 41.8, Dec +04 03 08)
Apparent size 1.6 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 1820 (= PGC 9866)
Discovered (Dec 21, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle (934)
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Cetus (RA 02 35 52.7, Dec +06 02 27)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 1821 (= PGC 9898)
Discovered (Aug 1, 1895) by
Stephane Javelle (935)
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sb? pec?) in Aries (RA 02 36 25.3, Dec +13 46 50)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin? Apparently interacting with J0236267+134647.
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1821 and its apparent companion, spiral galaxy J0236267+134647
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 1821 and J0236267+134647
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1821 and its apparent companion, spiral galaxy J0236267+134647

J0236267+134647
Not an IC object but listed here since apparently interacting with
IC 1821
A magnitude 16.5 spiral galaxy (type Sbc? pec?) in Aries (RA 02 36 26.7, Dec +13 46 47)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin? Apparently interacting with IC 1821 (which see for images), but nothing is known about it, so whether they are really a physical pair or merely an optical double is also unknown. (Listed in NED as IC 1821 NED02.)

IC 1822
Recorded (Dec 22, 1894) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (252)
A star in Cetus (RA 02 35 42.3, Dec -08 33 44)

IC 1823 (= PGC 10013)
Discovered (Jan 20, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle (936)
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SBc??) in Triangulum (RA 02 38 36.9, Dec +32 04 13)
Apparent size 2.1 by 1.0 arcmin?

IC 1824 (=
NGC 1027 = OCL 357)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1027)
Discovered (late 1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1824)
A magnitude 6.7 open cluster (type III2p) in Cassiopeia (RA 02 42 36.0, Dec +61 35 42)
Per Dreyer, IC 1824 (Barnard, 1860 RA 02 30 30, NPD 29 00) is "a cluster, faint stars, perhaps faint nebulosity to west extends to it". The position precesses to RA 02 41 15.2, Dec +61 36 22, a little over a minute of time to the west of open cluster NGC 1027, and about midway between that cluster and an extended region of nebulosity that does not extend as far as the cluster, but does fill a region much larger than the distance between the nebulosity and the cluster. Despite the error in its IC position, the only reasonable conclusion (with which Corwin concurs) is that IC 1824 must be a poorly recorded reobservation of NGC 1027 (which see for anything other than historical information).

IC 1825 (= PGC 10031)
Discovered (Jan 29, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle (937)
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Cetus (RA 02 38 55.5, Dec +09 05 49)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1826 (=
IC 1830 = PGC 10041)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1897) by Lewis Swift (XI-42) (and later listed as IC 1826)
Discovered (1901) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 1830)
A magnitude 12.8 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a??) in Fornax (RA 02 39 03.7, Dec -27 26 35)
Apparent size 1.7 by 1.4 arcmin?

IC 1827 (= PGC 10087)
Discovered (Dec 21, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle (938)
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type Sa??) in Cetus (RA 02 39 46.4, Dec +01 33 30)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 1828 (=
NGC 1036 = PGC 10127)
Discovered (Nov 29, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1036)
Discovered (Jan 18, 1898) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1828)
A magnitude 13.2 peculiar galaxy (type pec??) in Aries (RA 02 40 29.0, Dec +19 17 49)
Per Dreyer, IC 1828 (Javelle 939, 1860 RA 02 32 35, NPD 71 16.6) is "faint, small, irregular figure, gradually brighter middle and nucleus". The position precesses to RA 02 40 26.0, Dec +19 19 41, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. The double listing is a more puzzling matter. Corwin ascribes it to an error of 10s of time and 2 arcmin of declination in the NGC position, but as noted in the entry for NGC 1036 (which see for anything other than historical information), its position was less than an arcmin off, so that can't be the reason. The only reasonable explanation seems to be Corwin's final supposition, namely that Javelle and Dreyer simply failed to notice Herschel's essentially identical observation.

IC 1829 (= PGC 10131)
Discovered (Jan 7, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (940)
A magnitude 14.6 "compact" galaxy (type C??) in Aries (RA 02 40 32.8, Dec +14 17 53)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1830 (=
IC 1826 = PGC 10041)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1826)
Discovered (1901) by DeLisle Stewart (162) (and later listed as IC 1830)
A magnitude 12.8 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a??) in Fornax (RA 02 39 03.7, Dec -27 26 35)
This entry will primarily contain historical information; for anything else see IC 1826.

IC 1831
Discovered (1906) by
Max Wolf
An emission nebula in Cassiopeia (RA 02 44 00.0, Dec +63 00 36)
Apparent size 120 arcmin?

IC 1832 (= PGC 10216)
Discovered (Jan 17, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle (941)
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Aries (RA 02 41 57.6, Dec +19 01 50)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 1833 (= PGC 10205)
Discovered (Dec 22, 1897) by
Lewis Swift (XI-43)
A magnitude 13.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Fornax (RA 02 41 38.6, Dec -28 10 18)
Apparent size 1.5 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1834 (= PGC 10267)
Discovered (Nov 21, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle (942)
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Cetus (RA 02 42 48.0, Dec +03 05 02)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1835 (= PGC 10342)
Discovered (Jan 7, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle (943)
A magnitude 14.6 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Aries (RA 02 43 49.0, Dec +14 53 22)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin?
DSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 1835
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 1835
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 1835

IC 1836 (= PGC 10306)
Discovered (Jan 29, 1894) by
Stephane Javelle (944)
A magnitude 15.5 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Cetus (RA 02 43 23.3, Dec +03 06 18)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1837 (=
NGC 1072 = PGC 10315)
Discovered (Dec 20, 1881) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 1072)
Discovered (Jan 24, 1898) by Stephane Javelle (945) (and later listed as IC 1837)
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Cetus (RA 02 43 31.3, Dec +00 18 25)
(The double listing was due to an error by Javelle, and this entry will only contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 1072.)

IC 1838 (= PGC 10389)
Discovered (Jan 18, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle (946)
A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Aries (RA 02 44 43.0, Dec +19 27 18)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin? Possibly associated with a smaller companion (J0244430+192732).
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 1838 and its possible companion, lenticular galaxy J0244430+192732
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 1838, also showing J0244430+192732
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 1838

J0244430+192732
Not an IC object but listed here since a possible companion of
IC 1838
A magnitude 16.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Aries (RA 02 44 43.0, Dec +19 27 32)
Apparent size 0.2 by 0.1 arcmin? (See IC 1838 for images.)

IC 1839 (= PGC 10394)
Discovered (Jan 7, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (947)
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Aries (RA 02 44 43.0, Dec +15 14 22)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1840 (=
NGC 1105 = PGC 10333)
Discovered (Dec 2, 1885) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 1105)
Discovered (Jan 30, 1900) by Herbert Howe (7) (and later listed as IC 1840)
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type SAB0(rs)a? pec) in Cetus (RA 02 43 42.0, Dec -15 42 20)
Historical Identification: The identification of the galaxy listed above as IC 1840 is certain, but will be covered here in more detail in the next iteration of this page. As discussed at the entry for NGC 1105, there is no doubt that this is a duplicate entry; but the identity of NGC 1105 was in doubt for more than a century, so although the galaxy is now usually called NGC 1105, a search for IC 1840 or PGC 10333 is more certain to lead to the correct object.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 1105 for anything else.

IC 1841 (= PGC 10442)
Discovered (Jan 11, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle (948)
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type SBb??) in Aries (RA 02 45 36.3, Dec +18 55 45)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1842 (= PGC 10428)
Discovered (Dec 22, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle (949)
A magnitude 14.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Aries (RA 02 45 23.4, Dec +11 27 32)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1843 (= PGC 10429)
Discovered (Dec 18, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle (950)
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SBab??) in Cetus (RA 02 45 24.9, Dec +02 52 50)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1844 (= PGC 10448)
Discovered (Dec 18, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle (951)
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type Sa??) in Cetus (RA 02 45 49.2, Dec +03 13 50)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1845
Recorded (Dec 22, 1897) by
Lewis Swift (XI-44)
A pair of stars in Fornax (RA 02 43 56.7, Dec -27 56 05)

IC 1846 ( = PGC 10573, and perhaps =
NGC 1109?)
Possibly recorded (Dec 2, 1863) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 1109)
Discovered (Jan 7, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1846)
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Aries (RA 02 47 43.5, Dec +13 15 20)
Per Dreyer, IC 1846 (Javelle 952, 1860 RA 02 40 06, NPD 77 21.1) is "faint, small, a gradually little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 02 47 44.5, Dec +13 14 13, just over an arcmin south of the galaxy, so the identification is reasonably certain. However, as discussed at the entry for NGC 1109, its equivalence with NGC 1109 is far less certain, and whether Marth's observation had anything to do with Javelle's object is merely an educated guess, and not even the only such guess; so although noted as possibly identical to NGC 1109 for historical reasons, PGC 10573 should probably never be referred to by the NGC designation, but as IC 1846 or some other non-NGC listing. Based on a recessional velocity of 8900 km/sec, IC 1846 is about 415 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.65 by 0.65 arcmin, it is about 80 thousand light years across.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 1846, also sometimes but probably erroneously referred to as NGC 1109
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 1846
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 1846, also sometimes but probably erroneously referred to as NGC 1109

IC 1847 (= PGC 10580)
Discovered (Jan 7, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (953)
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Aries (RA 02 47 53.6, Dec +14 30 20)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1848 (= OCL 364; associated with the Soul Nebula)
Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 6.5 open cluster (type IV3pn) in Cassiopeia (RA 02 51 18.0, Dec +60 24 30)
Strictly speaking, as in the case of IC 1805 (which see), the IC object is the open cluster which illuminates the nebula, as the nebulosity was not easily observable in the 1800's. Today, however, the availability of CCD cameras and computer-aided imaging has made the nebulosity better known than the cluster which lights it up, especially since it and a nearby nebulosity were dubbed the "Heart and Soul Nebulae" (causing them to be featured on astronomy websites near Valentine's Day).
DSS view of open cluster IC 1848
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the open cluster IC 1848
Below, a 30 arcmin wide view of the cluster and surrounding nebulosity
DSS view of region near open cluster IC 1848, also showing associated emission nebulosity
Below, a 2.5 degree wide view of the cluster (right of center) and surrounding nebulosity
DSS view of the Soul Nebula and its associated open cluster, IC 1848
Below, a 5 degree wide view of the Heart and Soul Nebulae associated with IC 1848 and 1805
DSS view of the Heart and Soul Nebulae and their associated open clusters
Below, a WISE infrared view of the Soul Nebula associated with IC 1848
WISE infrared closeup of the Soul Nebula and open cluster IC 1848
Below, a WISE infrared view of the Soul Nebula and to its right the Heart Nebula
(Credit for the WISE images above and below: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA, Photojournal)
WISE infrared view of region near the Heart and Soul Nebulae and their associated clusters, including open clusters IC 1805 and IC 1848

IC 1849 (= PGC 10582)
Discovered (Jan 29, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle (954)
A magnitude 14.4 elliptical galaxy (type E??) in Cetus (RA 02 47 44.7, Dec +09 21 24)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin?
Celestial Atlas
(IC 1750 - 1799) ←     IC Objects: IC 1800 - 1849     → (IC 1850 - 1899)