Celestial Atlas
(IC 1750 - 1799) ←IC Objects: IC 1800 - 1849 Link for sharing this page on Facebook→ (IC 1850 - 1899)
Click here for Introductory Material
QuickLinks:
1800, 1801, 1802, 1803, 1804, 1805, 1806, 1807, 1808, 1809, 1810, 1811, 1812, 1813, 1814, 1815, 1816,
1817, 1818, 1819, 1820, 1821, 1822, 1823, 1824, 1825, 1826, 1827, 1828, 1829, 1830, 1831, 1832, 1833,
1834, 1835, 1836, 1837, 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842, 1843, 1844, 1845, 1846, 1847, 1848, 1849

Page last updated July 8, 2021
Checked Corwin positions, added Dreyer entries, updated various designations as needed
Updated formatting to current standards
Check historical IDs (Corwin+), add basic pix/captions/tags
WORKING: The entries for clusters connected to the Heart & Soul nebulae need far more work

IC 1800
Recorded (Dec 22, 1897) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A pair of magnitude 15.6 and 16.2 stars in Triangulum (RA 02 28 31.1, Dec +31 24 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1800 (Bigourdan #373, 1860 RA 02 20 17, NPD 59 13) is "extremely faint, small, an extremely small cluster?" The position precesses to RA 02 28 33.8, Dec +31 24 47, about 0.6 arcmin east-northeast of the midpoint of the pair of stars listed above, the description fits (Bigourdan estimated the size of the "cluster" as about 25 arcsec, and the two stars are about 24 arcsec apart) and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Note About PGC Designation: HyperLEDA often assigns PGC designations to NGC/IC objects that are not galaxies, but in this case it did not, and a search for IC 1800 returns a message stating that there is no entry for that object.
Physical Information: As can be seen in the image below, the southern star is the brighter one. There is SDSS coverage for the region near NGC 931, but not for the region near IC 1800, so only a DSS image is shown below.
DSS image of region near the pair of stars listed as IC 1800, also showing NGC 931
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the pair of stars listed as IC 1800, also showing NGC 931

IC 1801 (with
NGC 935 = Arp 276)
(= PGC 9392 = UGC 1936 = CGCG 462-015 = MCG +03-07-016)

Discovered (Dec 27, 1897) by Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)c? pec) in Aries (RA 02 28 12.7, Dec +19 35 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer. IC 1801 (Javelle #926, 1860 RA 02 20 24, NPD 71 03.3) is "faint, small, gradually a little brighter middle, diffuse." The position precesses to RA 02 28 12.8, Dec +19 34 30, less than half an arcmin due south of the center of the galaxy listed above and near its southern outline; and although it seems strange that no mention is made of its companion, NGC 935, a footnote in Javelle's paper indicates that his #926 was measured in conjunction with NGC 935, so the identification is certain.
Usage By The Arp Atlas: IC 1801 and NGC 935 are used by the Arp Atlas as an example of interacting galaxies, with the note "Both intersecting edges seem dimmed."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.35 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below)
PanSTARRS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 935 and IC 1801, which comprise Arp 276
Above, a 12 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image centered on IC 1801 and NGC 935
Below, a 2.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of Arp 276
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxies NGC 935 and IC 1801, which comprise Arp 276
Below, a 2.75 arcmin wide false-color composite of ultraviolet, infrared and visible-light images of the pair
(Image Credit NASA/JPL-Caltech/L. Lanz (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA))
Composite of GALEX ultraviolet, Spitzer infrared, and visible-light images of spiral galaxy NGC 935 and its spiral companion, IC 1801, which comprise Arp 276
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of IC 1801
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 1801 and part of its companion

IC 1802
(= PGC 9462 = CGCG 483-067 = MCG +04-06-057)

Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Aries (RA 02 29 14.0, Dec +23 04 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1802 (Barnard, 1860 RA 02 20 44, NPD 67 30.6) has a "magnitude 11 star 1 arcmin north-preceding (to the northwest)." The position precesses to RA 02 28 40.7, Dec +23 07 09, but there is nothing there. However, as noted by Corwin, there is a reasonably bright galaxy just over 2 arcmin to the south and 30 seconds of time to the east of the IC position that does have a suitable star in the correct relative position, and it is the only such nebula in the area. As a result, it is reasonably certain that this is the object Barnard recorded, and it is listed as such here. (It should be noted that the identification of IC 1803 and 1804 also rest on this assumption, so their entries refer to this discussion.)
Note About Wikisky Truncation Error: Most searches of Wikisky for an object whose designation begins with a 9 remove all leading 9s and show a completely different object. As it happens. a Wikisky search for IC 1802 returns an image of IC 1802, but labeled as IC 1803, so someone knowing that IC 1802 is PGC 9462 might try to search for that, instead; but if they do, what they will see is not PGC 9462, but PGC 462 (discussed where linked, because of that error). So unless the position of IC 1802 is used for a Wikisky search, there is no way to be sure that it returned the correct object.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.1 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 1802, also showing 2MASX J02291731+2308260, the galaxy identified by Steinicke as IC 1803
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1802, also showing 2MASX J02291731+2308260
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of IC 1802 and "nearby" galaxies PGC 1681200 and 1681391
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 1802

PGC 1681200
Not an IC object but listed here as a possible companion of
IC 1802
A magnitude 15.5(?) spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec) in Aries (RA 02 29 17.0, Dec +23 05 11)
Note About PGC Designation: NED does not usually recognize "PGC" designations beyond those in the original catalog (a little over 73000 objects); however, a search of NED for LEDA 1681200 does return a page for this galaxy.
Physical Information: NED 3K Vr 13304 km/sec, z 0.044378; LEDA .44 x .21 arcmin

PGC 462 (obviously not PGC 9462 =
IC 1802)
(= ESO 472-014 = MCG -04-01-014)

Not an IC object but listed here due to the truncation error mentioned above
A magnitude 15(?) spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Cetus (RA 00 06 12.5, Dec -22 51 09)
Note About Wikisky Truncation Error: For an explanation of why this entry is here, instead of somewhere else, see the note about Wikisky's tendency to truncate all leading 9s in the entry for IC 1802.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.05 by 0.3 arcmin?; main galaxy .77 x .22 arcmin, plus faint north extension .97 x .22 arcmin (both from images below)
PanSTARRS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 462
Above, a 12 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image centered on PGC 462 (incorrectly shown in a Wikisky search for PGC 9462)
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy PGC 462

IC 1803
(probably PGC 9507 = MCG +04-06-058)

Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
PGC 9507 = A magnitude 14.7 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Aries (RA 02 29 50.0, Dec +23 06 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1803 (Barnard, 1860 RA 02 21 21, NPD 67 28.6) has a "stellar nucleus." The position precesses to RA 02 29 18.0, Dec +23 09 05, but there is nothing there. Corwin notes that given the discussion of IC 1802 (which see), the assumption of a similar positional error for IC 1803 and 1804 (presumably observed by Barnard on the same night) falls on a pair of galaxies that are the brightest and second-brightest in a small group, and therefore were almost certainly seen by Barnard. On that basis he suggests that they are IC 1803 and 1804. Unfortunately, their diagonal positions are reversed in the sky compared to Barnard's positions (being northwest-southeast, instead of southwest-northeast). This means that which galaxy is IC 1803 and which IC 1804 is uncertain. Using Barnard's positions the eastern one would be IC 1803, but using their actual positions, the western one would be IC 1803. The entries here use their actual positions, so that they are listed in order of their right ascensions, but that may be backwards from the original observations. Still, although which galaxy represents which IC entry is uncertain at best, it seems likely that the pair of galaxies does correspond to the pair of IC objects.
Note About Wikisky Truncation Error: As noted in the entry for IC 1802, a search of Wikisky for IC 1802 shows the correct galaxy, but labels it as IC 1803, and a Wikisky search for IC 1803 shows the same object, which is obviously wrong. Worse yet, due to the truncation error discussed in the entry for IC 1802, a Wikisky search for PGC 9507 is truncated to PGC 507, which is also a completely different object (and therefore discussed at the linked entry).
Yet Another Mistake?: As a hopefully final error, Steinicke's database assigns IC 1803 to 2MASX J02291731+2308260, which is therefore discussed in the second entry below.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.45 by 0.45 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy PGC 9507, which is probably IC 1803, and elliptical galaxy PGC 9512, which is probably IC 1804
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 9507 (= IC 1803?) and PGC 9512 (= IC 1804?)
Also shown are PGC 1681312, a suggested companion of PGC 9507 but actually a foreground galaxy,
and 2MASXJ02300030+2305100, a suggested companion of PGC 9512 but actually a background galaxy
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair, which are probably IC 1803 and 1804, also showing PGC 1681312
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy PGC 9507, which is probably IC 1803, and elliptical galaxy PGC 9512, which is probably IC 1804

PGC 1681312
Not an IC object but listed here as a possible companion of
PGC 9507
A magnitude 18(?) irregular galaxy (type IB? pec) in Aries (RA 02 29 49.7, Dec +23 05 33)
Note About PGC Designation: NED does not usually recognize "PGC" designations beyond those in the original catalog (a little over 73000 objects); however, a search of NED for LEDA 1681312 does return a page for this galaxy.
Physical Information: Query: Is the faint object just to its east part of a single, peculiar galaxy? or a separate (and probably interacting) object? In any event, PGC 1681312 is not a companion of either PGC 9507 or 9512, but a foreground object only about 2/3 of the way between us and them.
LEDA .37 x .30 arcmin (for entire structure?); NED 3K Vr 6088 km/sec

2MASX J02291731+2308260 (almost certainly not =
IC 1803)
(= "PGC 3638674")

Not an IC object but listed here because sometimes misidentified as IC 1803
A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Aries (RA 02 29 17.2, Dec +23 08 27)
Historical (Mis?)Identification: (Listed as IC 1803 by Steinicke, and therefore listed as such in preliminary versions of this page, which relied only on Steinicke's NGC/IC database.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin (from the images below)
3K Vr 11714 km/sec, z 0.0390741
SDSS image of region near 2MASX J02291731+2308260, the galaxy identified by Steinicke as IC 1803, also showing IC 1802
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on 2MASX J02291731+2308260, also showing IC 1802
Below, a 0.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of 2MASX J02291731+2308260, the galaxy identified by Steinicke as IC 1803

PGC 507 (obviously not PGC 9507, which is probably
IC 1803)
(= UGC 50 = CGCG 477-053 = CGCG 478-025 = MCG +04-01-024)

Not an IC object but listed here because of the truncation error mentioned in the entries for IC 1802 and 1803
A magnitude 15? spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Pegasus (RA 00 06 40.1, Dec +26 09 15)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.35 arcmin?

IC 1804 (probably = PGC 9512)
(= CGCG 483-068 = MCG +04-06-060)

Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
PGC 9512 = A magnitude 13.9 elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Aries (RA 02 29 54.4, Dec +23 05 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1804 (Barnard, 1860 RA 02 21 26, NPD 67 28.1) has "no description." (See IC 1803 for a partial historical discussion and images; a more detailed historical discussion will be posted in the next iteration of this page.)
Note About Wikisky Truncation Error: As noted in the entries for IC 1802 and 1803, a search for their PGC designations fails because the leading 9 is truncated; but in the case of IC 1804, both a Wikisky search for IC 1804 and PGC 9512 show the correct object!
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin? NED Solar Vr 9430 km/sec, 3K Vr 9192 km/sec, more than 1700 km/sec less than for the supposed "companion" immediately below.

2MASXJ02300030+2305100
(= "PGC 3638941")

Not an IC object but listed here as a possible companion of
IC 1804
A magnitude 19 galaxy (type S0?) in Aries (RA 02 30 00.3, Dec +23 05 10)
Physical Information: NED Solar Vr 11255 km/sec, z .037544 (use nearby galaxies for correction to 3K Vr), 16.2 x 11.7 arcsec (?? diameter for 'total magnitude' 29.4 arcsec) IF THE 2MASX Vr is correct, then this is a background galaxy, and not a companion of PGC 9512.
WORKING HERE: Check Steinicke's nebular additions
IC 1805, part of the Heart Nebula
(= OCL 352 and a considerable part of the nebulosity to its east)
(OCL 352 = "PGC 3518516")

Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 6.5 open cluster and surrounding nebulosity in Cassiopeia (RA 02 32 46.0, Dec +61 28 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1805 (Barnard, 1860 RA 02 21 30, NPD 29 09) is "a cluster, considerably open, extremely large nebulosity extends following (to the east)."
Identification Note: Based on the IC description, IC 1805 is the cluster (whose position is the one specified by Barnard, and a considerable part of the nebulosity toward its east, though how much of the so-called Heart Nebula should be considered part of IC 1805 is uncertain, as modern photographs show far more of the nebulosity than would have been visible in the 1800's. Still, at least the brighter parts of the nebula to the east of the cluster should be considered to be part of IC 1805.
Physical Information: Apparent size 20 arcmin?
DSS view of region near open cluster OCL 352, which is part of IC 1805
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on OCL 352
Below, a 30 arcmin wide DSS image of the cluster and surrounding nebulosity
DSS view of region near open cluster OCL 352, which is part of IC 1805, also showing the surrounding nebulosity
Below, a 35 arcmin DSS image showing the region most likely corresponding to Barnard's description
DSS view of region near open cluster OCL 352, also showing the surrounding nebulosity which was probably included in Barnard's description of what became IC 1805
Below, a 2.5 degree wide view of the cluster (just above center) and surrounding nebulosity
DSS view of the Heart Nebula and its associated clusters
Below, a 5 degree wide view of the Heart and Soul Nebulae associated with IC 1805 and 1848
DSS view of the Heart and Soul Nebulae and their associated clusters
Below, a WISE infrared view of the Heart Nebula and its associated clusters
WISE infrared closeup of the Heart Nebula
Below, a WISE infrared view of the Heart Nebula and (to its left) the Soul Nebula
(Credit for the WISE images above and below: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA, Photojournal)
WISE infrared view of region near IC 1805 and 1848, including the Heart and Soul Nebulae

IC 1806
(= PGC 95515)

Discovered (Jan 16, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.1 elliptical galaxy (type E3??) in Aries (RA 02 29 35.0, Dec +22 56 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer. IC 1806 (Javelle #927, 1860 RA 02 21 37, NPD 67 40.6) is "faint, very small, round, brighter middle and nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1807
(= PGC 9547 = PGC 95516 = CGCG 483-071 = MCG +04-06-062)

Discovered (Jan 16, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.7 elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Aries (RA 02 30 31.0, Dec +22 56 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, 1807 (Javelle #928, 1860 RA 02 22 33, NPD 67 40.2) is "faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1808 (=
NGC 963)
(= PGC 9545 = PGC 9615 = MCG -01-07-017)

Discovered (1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 963)
Discovered (Dec 14, 1903) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1808)
A magnitude 13.7 irregular galaxy (type Irr??) in Cetus (RA 02 30 31.3, Dec -04 12 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1808 (Javelle #929, 1860 RA 02 23 29, NPD 94 50.2) is "faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: This entry will be primarily concerned with historical information; for anything else see NGC 963.

IC 1809
(= PGC 9616 = UGC 1996 = CGCG 484-002 = MCG +04-07-004)

Discovered (Jan 16, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type SBb??) in Aries (RA 02 31 40.4, Dec +22 55 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1809 (Javelle #930, 1860 RA 02 23 43, NPD 67 42.7) is "pretty bright, pretty large, extended 135°, gradually brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1810
(= PGC 9477 = ESO 246-018 = MCG -07-06-009)

Discovered (1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SBab??) in Eridanus (RA 02 29 26.8, Dec -43 04 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1810 (DeLisle Stewart #160, 1860 RA 02 24 03, NPD 133 43) is "very faint, round, stellar nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.0 arcmin?

IC 1811
(= PGC 9555 = ESO 355-020 = MCG -06-06-008)

Discovered (Dec 22, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SBab??) in Fornax (RA 02 30 38.2, Dec -34 15 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1811 (Swift list XI (#38), 1860 RA 02 24 04, NPD 124 52.8) is "most extremely faint, small, round, 2 stars preceding (to the west), north-preceding (northwestern) of 2 (sic)," the other being IC 1813 (Dreyer's "sic" refers to the fact that Swift's positions should make this the southwestern of 2, not the northwestern, as mis-stated in Swift's paper.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.9 arcmin?

IC 1812
(= PGC 9486 = ESO 246-019 = MCG -07-06-008)

Discovered (1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.2 elliptical galaxy (type E2??) in Eridanus (RA 02 29 31.8, Dec -42 48 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1812 (DeLisle Stewart #161, 1860 RA 02 24 09, NPD 133 27) is "very faint, brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.6 arcmin?

IC 1813
(= PGC 9567 = ESO 355-022 = MCG -06-06-009)

Discovered (Dec 22, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a??) in Fornax (RA 02 30 49.5, Dec -34 13 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1813 (Swift list XI (#39), 1860 RA 02 24 19, NPD 124 52.5) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round, faint star to north, 2 stars north-preceding (to the northwest), south-following (southeastern) of 2 (sic)," the other being IC 1811 (Dreyer's "sic" refers to the fact that Swift's positions should make this the northeastern of 2, not the southeastern, as mis-stated in Swift's paper.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1814 (=
NGC 964)
(= PGC 9582 = ESO 355-024 = MCG -06-06-010)

Discovered (Sep 1, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 964)
Discovered (Dec 22, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1814)
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Fornax (RA 02 31 05.8, Dec -36 02 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1814 (Swift list XI (#40), 1860 RA 02 24 35, NPD 126 39.6) is "pretty bright, pretty small, much extended." The position precesses to RA 02 30 22.6, Dec -36 02 10, just under 3/4 of a minute of time west of the only object in the region that could be considered "pretty bright", namely NGC 964, which not only has the same declination as Swift's observation, but an essentially identical description ("pretty bright, pretty small, much extended 215°"). As a result, despite the error in the right ascension, the equivalence of NGC 964 (which see for anything other than a historical discussion) and IC 1814 is reasonably certain. There is another galaxy (PGC 9571) a little to the west of NGC 964 that has been identified as IC 1814 in some places, but aside from having the wrong declination (which is a much less likely error than having the wrong right ascension), PGC 9571 is four magnitudes fainter than NGC 964, and there is no possibility that Swift would have described it as "pretty bright". If he had noticed it, he would have called it "extremely faint" or even "most extremely faint". Still, even though PGC 9571 cannot be IC 1814, the fact that it has been misidentified as such requires mention, as in the entry immediately below.
Physical Information:

PGC 9571 (not =
IC 1814)
(= ESO 355-023)

Not an IC object, but listed here because sometimes misidentified as IC 1814
A magnitude 16.2(?) spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Fornax (RA 02 30 51.4, Dec -36 00 09)
Historical (Mis)Identifications: (See IC 1814 for a discussion of why PGC 9571 cannot be IC 1814, despite its being misidentified as such in some places.) Because of those misidentifications, a search of Wikisky for IC 1814 shows PGC 9571; however, due to the Wikisky truncation error for leading 9's, a search for PGC 9571 shows PGC 571(!) So the only proper way to search for either IC 1814 or PGC 9571 is using their coordinates.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 4530 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), PGC 9571 is about 210 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.9 by 0.15 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 55 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 9571, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 1814, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 964, which is also IC 1814
Below, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 9571, also showing NGC 964 = IC 1814
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of PGC 9571
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 9571, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 1814

IC 1815
(= PGC 9794 = UGC 2047 = CGCG 505-013 = MCG +05-07-014)

Discovered (Jan 20, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type SB0??) in Triangulum (RA 02 34 20.0, Dec +32 25 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1815 (Javelle #931, 1860 RA 02 25 59, NPD 58 11.3) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle and nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1 arcmin?

IC 1816
(= PGC 9634 = ESO 355-025 = MCG -06-06-011)

Discovered (Oct 12, 1896) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Fornax (RA 02 31 51.0, Dec -36 40 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1816 (Swift list XI (#41), 1860 RA 02 26 11, NPD 127 22.5) is "very faint, small, round, 2 stars near preceding (to the west)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.2 arcmin?

IC 1817
(= CGCG 439-016 = PGC 9757 + PGC 9764)
(PGC 9757 = MCG +02-07-014; PGC 9764 = MCG +02-07-015)

Discovered (Jan 4, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A pair of galaxies in Aries (RA 02 33 50.2, Dec +11 12 13)
PGC 9757 = A magnitude 15.8 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)a? pec) at RA 02 33 49.6, Dec +11 12 13
PGC 9764 = A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type SABb? pec) at RA 02 33 50.8, Dec +11 12 12
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1817 (Javelle #932, 1860 RA 02 26 18, NPD 79 24.7) is "faint, pretty large, extended preceding-following (west-east), diffuse." The position precesses to RA 02 33 50.2, Dec +11 12 24, less than 0.2 arcmin due north of the midpoint of the pair of galaxies listed above and right where their northern extensions meet, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Since the pair is obviously interacting, the average of their recessional velocities relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background is the best value for estimating their Hubble Flow distance. For PGC 9757 the CMB recessional velocity is about 6890 km/sec, while for PGC 9764 it is about 6925 km/sec. Based on an average of about 6905 to 6910 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 1817 is about 320 to 325 million light-years away. Given that and an apparent size of about 0.4 by 0.25 arcmin for PGC 9757 and about 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin for PGC 9764 (from the images below), the western galaxy is about 35 to 40 thousand light-years across, and its eastern companion is about 55 to 60 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxies PGC 9757 and PGC 9764, which comprise IC 1817
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1817
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the pair of galaxies that comprise IC 1817
(Image processing by Courtney Seligman using AladinLite and Adobe Photoshop CS4 Extended)DSS image of spiral galaxies PGC 9757 and PGC 9764, which comprise IC 1817

IC 1818
(= PGC 970700)

Discovered (Jan 6, 1899) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 14.4 elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Cetus (RA 02 34 07.1, Dec -11 02 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1818 (Howe list II (#2), 1860 RA 02 27 20, NPD 101 39.4) is "very faint, extremely small, round, probably a nebulous star."
Note About the PGC Designation: A search of HyperLEDA for IC 1818 returns a message stating that that object is not in the database; however, a search for PGC 970700 will show the object listed above, and a search of NED for IC 1818 or PGC 970700 shows the page for this galaxy.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1819
(= PGC 9858 = CGCG 414-023)

Discovered (Dec 18, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Cetus (RA 02 35 41.8, Dec +04 03 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer. IC 1819 (Javelle #933, 1860 RA 02 28 24, NPD 86 34.4) is "faint, very small, round."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 1820
(= PGC 9866 = CGCG 414-024)

Discovered (Dec 21, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Cetus (RA 02 35 52.6, Dec +06 02 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1820 (Javelle #934, 1860 RA 02 28 31, NPD 84 34.1) is "faint, very small, round, brighter middle and nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 1821
(= PGC 9898 = CGCG 439-020)

Discovered (Aug 1, 1895) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)bc? pec) in Aries (RA 02 36 25.4, Dec +13 46 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1821 (Javelle #935, 1860 RA 02 28 47, NPD 76 49.1) is "pretty faint, small, gradually brighter middle, diffuse." The position precesses to RA 02 36 25.0, Dec +13 47 41, about 0.8 arcmin nearly due north of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain, save for the problem discussed in the next paragraph.
Note About Its Companion: PGC 9898 is obviously interacting with the galaxy to its east, 2MASS J02362658+1346456; because of that, that galaxy is discussed in the entry immediately below. However, LEDA and SIMBAD do not list the companion at all, and although NED lists it as if part of IC 1821 (namely, as IC 1821 NED02), that is almost certainly wrong, because if Javelle had been able to see the fainter galaxy, his description would have almost certainly included "extended preceding-following", and since it does not, the 2MASS galaxy should only be thought of as a companion of IC 1821, not as part of it.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 11820 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 1821 is about 550 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 525 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 535 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.55 by 0.3 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 85 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1821 and its interacting companion, spiral galaxy 2MASS J02362658+1346456
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1821, also showing 2MASS J02362658+1346456
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the pair and its faint northern extension
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 1821 and its interacting companion, spiral galaxy 2MASS J02362658+1346456, also showing their faint northern extension

2MASS J02362658+1346456
Not an IC object but listed here because interacting with
IC 1821
A magnitude 16.5 spiral galaxy (type SBbc? pec) in Aries (RA 02 36 26.6, Dec +13 46 46)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.25 by 0.15 arcmin for the main galaxy, and about 0.65 by 0.2 arcmin including its northern extension from the image. Obviously interacting with IC 1821 (which see for images), but other than its position and magnitude (the latter derived by comparing its GAIA entry with the one for IC 1821), nothing is specified in any of the references I consulted. The classification and apparent size were estimated and measured, respectively, directly from the PanSTARRS image.

IC 1822
Recorded (Dec 22, 1894) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 15.4 star in Cetus (RA 02 35 42.4, Dec -08 33 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1822 (Bigourdan #252, 1860 RA 02 28 49, NPD 99 11) is "a magnitude 13.5 star, slightly nebulous."
Note About PGC Designation: In most cases, HyperLEDA assigns a designation to NGC/IC objects regardless of their nature, but in this case it did not, and a search of the database for IC 1822 fails to find a result, and says so.
Physical Information:

IC 1823
(= PGC 10013 = UGC 2125 = CGCG 505-027 = MCG +05-07-024)

Discovered (Jan 20, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SBc??) in Triangulum (RA 02 38 37.0, Dec +32 04 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1823 (Javelle #936, 1860 RA 02 30 15, NPD 58 32.8) is "faint, small, irregular figure, diffuse."
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.0 arcmin?

IC 1824 (=
NGC 1027)
(= "PGC 3518638" = OCL 357)

Discovered (Nov 3, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1027)
Discovered (late 1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1824)
A magnitude 6.7 open cluster (type III2p) in Cassiopeia (RA 02 42 45.0, Dec +61 35 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1824 (Barnard, 1860 RA 02 30 30, NPD 29 00) is "a cluster, stars faint, perhaps faint nebulosity preceding (to the west) extends to it". The position precesses to RA 02 41 15.2, Dec +61 36 22, a little over a minute of time to the west of open cluster NGC 1027, and about midway between that cluster and an extended region of nebulosity that does not extend as far as the cluster, but does fill a region much larger than the distance between the nebulosity and the cluster. Despite the error in its IC position, the only reasonable conclusion (with which Corwin concurs) is that IC 1824 must be a poorly recorded reobservation of NGC 1027 (which see for anything other than historical information).
Note About Identification: Although Barnard apparently saw the nebulosity to the west of the cluster, his position and description suggest that IC 1824 should probably be considered to be only the cluster. Some references might choose to include part of the nebulosity as part of IC 1824, but since its description was so vague there is no way to know how much (if any) of the nebula should be included, which makes such a definition questionable.
Note About The PGC Designation: HyperLEDA usually assigns PGC designations to NGC/IC objects, regardless of their nature, and in this case there is such a designation, as shown above; however, a search of the LEDA database for that designation returns no result, so it is shown in quotes.
Physical Information:

IC 1825
(= PGC 10031 = UGC 2138 = CGCG 414-031)

Discovered (Jan 29, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Cetus (RA 02 38 55.6, Dec +09 05 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1825 (Javelle #937, 1860 RA 02 31 27, NPD 81 30.6) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle and nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1826 (=
IC 1830)
(= PGC 10041 = UGCA 37 = ESO 416-006 = MCG -05-07-012)

Discovered (Sep 6, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1826)
Discovered (1899) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 1826)
Discovered (1901) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 1830)
A magnitude 12.8 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a??) in Fornax (RA 02 39 03.6, Dec -27 26 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1826 (Swift list XI (#42), DeLisle Stewart, 1860 RA 02 32 18, NPD 118 02.9) is "pretty bright, considerably small, round, 8th magnitude star near preceding (to the west)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.4 arcmin?

IC 1827
(= PGC 10087 = PGC 175363 = UGC 2152 = CGCG 388-089 = MCG +00-07-075)

Discovered (Dec 21, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type Sa??) in Cetus (RA 02 39 46.5, Dec +01 33 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1827 (Javelle #938, 1860 RA 02 32 31, NPD 89 02.7) is "faint, small, fan-shape, magnitude 13.5 star close to south."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 1828 (=
NGC 1036)
(= PGC 10127 = UGC 2160 = CGCG 462-041 = MCG +03-07-041)

Discovered (Nov 29, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1036)
Discovered (Jan 18, 1898) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1828)
A magnitude 13.2 peculiar galaxy (type pec??) in Aries (RA 02 40 29.0, Dec +19 17 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1828 (Javelle #939, 1860 RA 02 32 35, NPD 71 16.6) is "faint, small, irregular figure, gradually brighter middle and nucleus." The position precesses to RA 02 40 26.0, Dec +19 19 41, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. The double listing is a more puzzling matter. Corwin ascribes it to an error of 10s of time and 2 arcmin of declination in the NGC position, but as noted in the entry for NGC 1036 (which see for anything other than historical information), its position was less than an arcmin off, so that can't be the reason. The only reasonable explanation seems to be Corwin's final supposition, namely that Javelle and Dreyer simply failed to notice Herschel's essentially identical observation.
Physical Information:

IC 1829
(= PGC 10131 = CGCG 439-026)

Discovered (Jan 7, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.6 elliptical galaxy (type E pec?) in Aries (RA 02 40 32.8, Dec +14 17 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1829 (Javelle #940, 1860 RA 02 32 50, NPD 71 17.5) is "very faint, very small, diffuse, mottled but not resolved."
Note About The PGC Designation: A search of HyperLEDA for IC 1829 states that there is no such entry, but returns the page for PGC 10131, which is IC 1829, so though faulty, the search does "work".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1830 (=
IC 1826)
(= PGC 10041 = UGCA 37 = ESO 416-006 = MCG -05-07-012)

Discovered (Sep 6, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1826)
Discovered (1899) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 1826)
Discovered (1901) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 1830)
A magnitude 12.8 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a??) in Fornax (RA 02 39 03.6, Dec -27 26 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1830 (DeLisle Stewart #162, 1860 RA 02 32 57, NPD 118 03) is "very faint, small, suspected, extremely faint star 1.5 arcmin south-preceding (to the southwest)."
Physical Information: This entry will primarily contain historical information; for anything else see IC 1826.

IC 1831
(= "PGC 3518577")

Discovered (1906) by
Max Wolf
An emission nebula in Cassiopeia (RA 02 44 00.0, Dec +63 00 36)
Corwin lists a position of RA 02 44 12, Dec +62 09
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1831 (Wolf ([AN] 4082), 1860 RA 02 33, NPD 27) is "very faint, most extremely large."
Note About The PGC Designation: HyperLEDA assigns a PGC designation for most NGC/IC objects, regardless of their nature, and in this case returns the designation shown above; however, a search of the database for that designation returns no result, hence its being shown in quotes.
Physical Information: Apparent size 120 arcmin?

IC 1832
(= PGC 10216 = CGCG 462-044 = MCG +03-07-045)

Discovered (Jan 17, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Aries (RA 02 41 57.7, Dec +19 01 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1832 (Javelle #941, 1860 RA 02 34 03, NPD 71 34.7) is "faint, irregular figure or a little extended north-south, brighter middle and nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 1833
(= PGC 10205 = ESO 416-007 = MCG -05-07-013)

Discovered (Dec 22, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
Discovered (date?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Fornax (RA 02 41 38.7, Dec -28 10 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1833 (Swift list XI (#43), Howe, 1860 RA 02 35 34, NPD 118 46.2) is "most extremely faint, small, round, 3 double stars north-following (to the northeast)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1834
(= PGC 10267 = UGC 2189 = CGCG 388-099 = MCG +00-07-085)

Discovered (Nov 21, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Cetus (RA 02 42 48.1, Dec +03 05 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1834 (Javelle #942, 1860 RA 02 35 34, NPD 87 29.9) is "faint, pretty small, pretty round, gradually a little brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1835
(= PGC 10342 = CGCG 439-027 = CGCG 440-001)

Discovered (Jan 7, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.6 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Aries (RA 02 43 49.1, Dec +14 53 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1835 (Javelle #943, 1860 RA 02 36 07, NPD 75 42.6) is "faint, small, round, diffuse."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 (from the images below). NED 3K Vr 13681 km/sec, "V m-p" 15.7; LEDA 15(?)
Apparent Companions: Corwin lists three objects that in DSS images appear to be possible companions (all are labeled in the PanSTARRS image below). One is just a faint star, while the others are faint galaxies. However, almost nothing appears to be known about any of them that can't be directly determined from their images (namely their positions, apparent sizes and to a rough extent, apparent magnitudes, so they are only briefly discussed in the following entry.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 1835
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1835
Below, a 0.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy and its apparent companions
PanSTARRS image of elliptical galaxy IC 1835 and three 'apparent companions'

Apparent Companions of
IC 1835 (all in Aries)
Not IC objects but listed here because at first glance, they could be companions of IC 1835
A magnitude 17.5(?) star at RA 02 43 48.8, Dec +14 53 15
2MASX J02435056+1453092: A magnitude 20(?) galaxy (type S0?) at RA 02 43 50.6, Dec +14 53 09
2MASS J02434862+1453111: A magnitude 19.5(?) galaxy (type E1?) at RA 02 43 48.6, Dec +14 53 1
Caveats: All the magnitudes shown above are taken from GAIA (since no other reference seems to have much, if anything, about them), which treats everything as if more or less a point source of light. As a result, the magnitude of the star may be more or less accurate, but those for the galaxies are suspect (for instance, GAIA's magnitude for IC 1835, which is by far the brightest of the objects in the region, is fainter than that for any of the other objects, proving that for extended objects, GAIA magnitudes are definitely suspect.)
Physical Information: For the star, only the magnitude and position are of interest. For 2MASS J02434862+1453111 (the southwestern galaxy), the apparent size is about 0.17 by 0.15 arcmin (from the PanSTARRS image of IC1835), but nothing else appears to be available, so anything else would be mere guesswork.
  For 2MASX J02435056+1453092, NED lists a recessional velocity of about 19255 km/sec relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background. If this is correct, then that galaxy is a background object, at least half again as far away as IC 1835. Based on that recessional value (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that 2MASX J02435056+1453092 is about 895 to 900 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 830 to 835 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 855 to 860 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.18 x 0.12 arcmin from the PanSTARRS image of IC 1835, the galaxy is about 40 to 45 thousand light-years across.

IC 1836
(= PGC 10306 = CGCG 388-102 = MCG +00-07-087)

Discovered (Jan 29, 1894) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.5 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Cetus (RA 02 43 23.5, Dec +03 06 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1836 (Javelle #944, 1860 RA 02 36 09, NPD 87 28.8) is "faint, small, round, very little brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin?

2MASXJ02432103+0306564
(= "PGC 32642915")

Not an IC object but listed here as a possible companion of
IC 1836
A magnitude (??) spiral? galaxy (type S?) in Cetus (RA 02 43 21.0, Dec +03 06 57
Note About The PGC Designation: Although HyperLEDA assigns a PGC designation to this galaxy, a search of the database for that designation returns no result, so it is shown in quotes; and an NED search requires use of the 2MASX designation (but, unfortunately, contains absolutely no information about the object except for its position).
Physical Information: An apparent size and very tentative classification can be determined from images of the object, but anything else would be pure guesswork, so whether this is in any way connected to IC 1836 is also mere speculation, and the galaxy probably has nothing to do with the IC object.

IC 1837 (=
NGC 1072)
(= PGC 10315 = UGC 2208 = CGCG 388-103 = CGCG 389-001 = MCG +00-07-088)

Discovered (Dec 20, 1881) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 1072)
Discovered (Jan 24, 1898) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1837)
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Cetus (RA 02 43 31.3, Dec +00 18 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1837 (Javelle #945, 1860 RA 02 36 22, NPD 90 29.1) is "faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved." (Duplicate entry caused by an error by Javelle.)
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 1072 for anything else.

IC 1838
(= PGC 10389 = CGCG 463-005 = MCG +03-08-002)

Discovered (Jan 18, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SAB0/a? pec) in Aries (RA 02 44 43.0, Dec +19 27 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1838 (Javelle #946, 1860 RA 02 36 51, NPD 71 09.1) is "faint, very small, round, suddenly brighter middle like a 14th magnitude star." The position precesses to RA 02 44 43.2, Dec +19 26 38, less than 0.7 arcmin nearly due south of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 7370 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 1838 is about 340 to 345 million light-years away, considerably closer than a single redshift-independent distance estimate of about 470 to 475 million light-years. In addition, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 330 to 335 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 335 to 340 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.55 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 50 to 55 thousand light-years across.
Note About Classification: In most respects the galaxy looks like a typical lenticular galaxy, but there is a definitely bluish tinge surrounding it in the closeup image below, suggesting a ring of relatively hot, young stars, which is why I added (R) and pec to its "type".
Note About J024430+192734: It has been suggested that this might be a companion of IC 1838, but there is no indication of any interaction between the two galaxies, and I cannot find any information about the (smaller? more distant?) object (whose name, as shown here, is simply based on its position: (J2000) RA 02 44 43.0, Dec +19 27 34). Based on its appearance and apparent brightness compared to objects of known magnitude, it is probably a galaxy of about magnitude 17, most likely an elliptical (type E0?) or lenticular (type E/S0?), and has an apparent size of about 0.93 by 0.92 arcmin (all from the images below). But if anything else is known, that would be news to me (so if you know where there is something about it, please let me know).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 1838
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1838, also showing "possible" companion J0244430+192734
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxies
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 1838 and its possible companion, (elliptical?) galaxy J0244430+192734

IC 1839
(= PGC 10394 = UGC 2220 = CGCG 440-002 = MCG +02-08-001)

Discovered (Jan 7, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Aries (RA 02 44 42.9, Dec +15 14 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1839 (Javelle #947, 1860 RA 02 37 00, NPD 75 20.2) is "very faint, small, round, diffuse."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1840 (=
NGC 1105)
(= PGC 10333 = MCG -03-08-004)

Discovered (Dec 2, 1885) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 1105)
Discovered (Jan 30, 1900) by Herbert Howe (and later listed as IC 1840)
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type SAB0(rs)a? pec) in Cetus (RA 02 43 42.0, Dec -15 42 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1840 (Howe list III (#7), 1860 RA 02 37 05, NPD 106 18.0) is "very faint, very small, much brighter middle, 1081 north-following (to the northeast)," 1081 meaning NGC 1081.
Discovery Note: The identification of the galaxy listed above as IC 1840 is certain, but will be covered here in more detail in the next iteration of this page. As discussed at the entry for NGC 1105, there is no doubt that this is a duplicate entry; but the identity of NGC 1105 was in doubt for more than a century, so although the galaxy is now usually called NGC 1105, a search for IC 1840 or PGC 10333 is more certain to lead to the correct object.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 1105 for anything else.

IC 1841
(= PGC 10442 = CGCG 463-007)

Discovered (Jan 11, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type SBb??) in Aries (RA 02 45 36.2, Dec +18 55 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1841 (Javelle #948, 1860 RA 02 37 44, NPD 71 40.7) is "faint, very small, round, gradually a very little brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1842
(= PGC 10428 = CGCG 440-003)

Discovered (Dec 22, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Aries (RA 02 45 23.4, Dec +11 27 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1842 (Javelle #949, 1860 RA 02 37 50, NPD 79 08.0) is "faint, very small, round, gradually a little brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1843
(= PGC 10429 = UGC 2228 = CGCG 389-004 = MCG +00-08-004)

Discovered (Dec 18, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SBab??) in Cetus (RA 02 45 24.6, Dec +02 52 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1843 (Javelle #950, 1860 RA 02 38 10, NPD 87 42.4) is "faint, pretty large, extended preeding-following (west-east), diffuse."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1844
(= PGC 10448 = CGCG 389-006 = MCG +00-08-007)

Discovered (Dec 18, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type Sa??) in Cetus (RA 02 45 49.3, Dec +03 13 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1844 (Javelle #951, 1860 RA 02 38 36, NPD 87 20.9) is "faint, pretty small, extended preceding-following (west-east), diffuse."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1845
Recorded (Dec 22, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A pair of stars in Fornax (RA 02 43 56.7, Dec -27 56 05)
Corwin lists the position as RA 02 43 57.0, Dec -27 58 10, with stars at 02 43 56.9, -27 58 06 and 02 43 57.1, -27 58 15
He also lists a possible candidate at RA 02 45 37.2, Dec -27 57 40, with a companion at 02 45 40.2, -17 55 42
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1845 (Swift list XI (#44), 1860 RA 02 38 51, NPD 118 32.9) is "most extremely faint, small, round, double star north-preceding (to the northwest)."
Note About The PGC Designation: HyperLEDA usually assigns a PGC designation for NGC/IC objects regardless of their nature, but in this case it did not, so a search for IC 1845 states that there is no entry for that IC object. However, that search does return a result, which might lead to some people incorrectly assuming that the object listed on that page (PGC 10441 is IC 1845. That is not correct, so I have added an entry immediately below this one as a warning about that sort of misapprehension.
Physical Information:

PGC 10441 (not
IC 1845)
(= ESO 416-015 = MCG -05-07-018)

Not an IC object but listed here because a LEDA search for IC 1845 might lead some people to assume that it is IC 1845
A magnitude ? galaxy (type ?) in Fornax (RA 02 45 37.3, Dec -27 57 40)
Possible Misidentification As IC 1845: A LEDA search for IC 1845 states that there is no entry for that object, but shows a page for PGC 10441, which could lead to the unwary mistakenly thinking that PGC 10441 is the unlisted IC object. For that reason, this entry is posted here as a warning about such a misconception.
Physical Information:

IC 1846 (perhaps but probably not =
NGC 1109)
(= PGC 10573 = UGC 2265 = CGCG 440-008 = MCG +02-08-006)

Possibly recorded (Dec 2, 1863) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 1109)
Discovered (Jan 7, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1846)
A magnitude 14.4 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Aries (RA 02 47 43.5, Dec +13 15 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1846 (Javelle #952, 1860 RA 02 40 06, NPD 77 21.1) is "faint, small, gradually a little brighter middle." The position precesses to RA 02 47 44.5, Dec +13 14 13, just over an arcmin south of the galaxy, so the identification is reasonably certain. However, as discussed at the entry for NGC 1109, its equivalence with NGC 1109 is far less certain, and whether Marth's observation had anything to do with Javelle's object is merely an educated guess, and not even the only such guess; so although noted as possibly identical to NGC 1109 for historical reasons, PGC 10573 should probably never be referred to by the NGC designation, but as IC 1846 or some other non-NGC listing.
Note About Designations Shown Above: All the designations shown above are correct for IC 1846. The only question is whether they also apply to NGC 1109, since that is probably not a duplicate entry for the IC object.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 8680 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 1846 is about 405 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 390 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 395 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.85 by 0.7 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 95 to 100 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 1846, also sometimes but probably erroneously referred to as NGC 1109
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1846, sometimes misidentified as NGC 1109
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 1846, also sometimes but probably erroneously referred to as NGC 1109

IC 1847
(= PGC 10580 = CGCG 440-010)

Discovered (Jan 7, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Aries (RA 02 47 53.7, Dec +14 30 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1847 (Javelle #953, 1860 RA 02 40 09, NPD 76 04.8) is "faint, small, irregular figure, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1848 (= OCL 364, plus part of the Soul Nebula)
(= "PGC 3518517" plus various designations for whatever part of the Nebula is part of IC 1848)

Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 6.5 open cluster (type IV3pn) in Cassiopeia (RA 02 51 18.0, Dec +60 24 30)
Corwin lists the position as RA 02 55, NPD +60.0, and the cluster at RA 02 51 10, Dec +60 24.1
and and eastern component at RA 02 58 39, Dec +60 33.0,
and a middle component at RA 02 54 48, Dec +60 38.1,
and a western component at RA 02 51 32, Dec +60 24.2
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1848 (Barnard, 1860 RA 02 40 30, NPD 30 09) is "a cluster, stars faint, extends 8 minutes of time following (to the east), in faint nebulosity."
Identification Note: As in the case of IC 1805 (which see), the IC object is the open cluster which illuminates the nebula surrounding it, plus the eastern part of the nebula. The general public (and the media devoted to them) tends to think of the entire nebula as IC 1848, while professional astronomers have tended to think of only the cluster as IC 1805. However, Barnard's description makes it clear that although his position is for the cluster, what he observed included at least the eastern part of the nebula; so the actual IC 1848 is somewhere in-between the two very different definitions.
Note About The PGC Designation: HyperLEDA assigns a PGC designation to most NGC/IC objects, regardless of their nature, and assigned the one shown above to IC 1848; however, a search of the LEDA database for that PGC designation returns no result, so it is shown in quotes.
Physical Information:
DSS view of open cluster usually thought of as IC 1848
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the open cluster usually thought of as IC 1848
Below, a 1 degree wide DSS image of the cluster and the nebulosity extending 8 minutes of time to the east,
which should almost certainly also be considered part of IC 1848
DSS image of the region near the open cluster usually thought of as IC 1848, plus the nebulosity extending about 8 minutes of time to the east of the cluster, which is almost certainly part of Barnard's object
Below, a 2.5 degree wide view of the cluster (right of center) and surrounding nebulosity
DSS view of the Soul Nebula and its associated open cluster, IC 1848
Below, a 5 degree wide view of the Heart and Soul Nebulae associated with IC 1848 and 1805
DSS view of the Heart and Soul Nebulae and their associated open clusters
Below, a WISE infrared view of the Soul Nebula associated with IC 1848
WISE infrared closeup of the Soul Nebula and open cluster IC 1848
Below, a WISE infrared view of the Soul Nebula and to its right the Heart Nebula
(Credit for the WISE images above and below: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA, Photojournal)
WISE infrared view of region near the Heart and Soul Nebulae and their associated clusters, including open clusters IC 1805 and IC 1848

IC 1849
(= PGC 10582 = CGCG 415-009 = MCG +01-08-002)

Discovered (Jan 29, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.4 elliptical galaxy (type E??) in Cetus (RA 02 47 44.6, Dec +09 21 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1849 (Javelle #954, 1860 RA 02 40 41, NPD 81 13.5) is "faint, very small, round, stellar."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin?
Celestial Atlas
(IC 1750 - 1799) ←IC Objects: IC 1800 - 1849→ (IC 1850 - 1899)