Celestial Atlas
(IC 2100 - 2149) ←IC Objects: IC 2150 - 2199 Link for sharing this page on Facebook→ (IC 2200 - 2249)
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2150, 2151, 2152, 2153, 2154, 2155, 2156, 2157, 2158, 2159, 2160, 2161, 2162, 2163, 2164, 2165, 2166,
2167, 2168, 2169, 2170, 2171, 2172, 2173, 2174, 2175, 2176, 2177, 2178, 2179, 2180, 2181, 2182, 2183,
2184, 2185, 2186, 2187, 2188, 2189, 2190, 2191, 2192, 2193, 2194, 2195, 2196, 2197, 2198, 2199

Page last updated June 18, 2021
Updated formatting, Added Dreyer entries
NEXT: Check positions, historical IDs (Corwin+), add basic pix, captions, tags

IC 2150 (= PGC 18000)
Discovered (Jan 31, 1898) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)bc) in Columba (RA 05 51 18.5, Dec -38 19 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2150 (Swift list XI (#87), 1860 RA 05 46 20, NPD 128 23.5) is "most extremely faint, small, very much extended, very difficult, 3 stars to south."
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3120 km/sec, IC 2150 is about 145 million light-years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 120 to 165 million light-years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.75 by 0.8 arcmin, it is about 115 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2150
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2150
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2150

IC 2151 (= PGC 18040)
Discovered (Jan 22, 1900) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Lepus (RA 05 52 36.8, Dec -17 47 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2151 (Howe list III (#17), 1860 RA 05 46 26, NPD 107 49.2) is "extremely faint, pretty small, near IC 438."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.9 arcmin?

IC 2152 (= PGC 18148)
Discovered (Dec 1, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type SBa??) in Lepus (RA 05 57 53.3, Dec -23 10 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2152 (Swift list XI (#89), Howe, 1860 RA 05 52 03, NPD 113 11.9) is "pretty bright, pretty small, round, several bright stars following (to east)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.2 arcmin?

IC 2153 (= PGC 18212 + PGC 18213)
Discovered (April, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A pair of galaxies in Columba
PGC 18212 = A magnitude 13.5? spiral galaxy (type Sab? pec) at RA 06 00 04.3, Dec -33 55 14
PGC 18213 = A magnitude 13.5? spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec) at RA 06 00 05.4, Dec -33 55 06
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2153 (DeLisle Stewart #306, 1860 RA 05 55 03, NPD 123 55) is "extremely faint, very small, suspected."
Physical Information: Apparent size of PGC 18212 is about 0.75 by 0.45 arcmin; of PGC 18213 is about 0.8 by 0.6 arcmin; of the pair and their outer extensions, about 2.0 by 0.8 arcmin.
DSS image of region near interacting spiral galaxies PGC 18212 and PGC 18213, which comprise IC 2153
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2153
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide image of interating spiral galaxies PGC 18212 and 18213, which comprise IC 2153
DSS image of interacting spiral galaxies PGC 18212 and PGC 18213, which comprise IC 2153

IC 2154 (=
NGC 2139 = PGC 18258)
Discovered (Nov 17, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2139)
Discovered (Dec 1, 1897) by Lewis Swift (XI-90) (and later listed as IC 2154)
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe (and later listed as IC 2154)
A magnitude 11.6 spiral galaxy (type SBc??) in Lepus (RA 06 01 08.0, Dec -23 40 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2154 (Swift list XI (#90), Howe, 1860 RA 05 55 19, NPD 113 40.8) is "pretty faint, pretty small, star north-following (to northeast), 2 stars north-preceding (to northwest), probably = II 264," WH II 264 being NGC 2139.
Physical Information: This entry will primarily deal with historical information; for anything else see NGC 2139.

IC 2155
Recorded (April, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A lost or nonexistent object in Columba (RA 06 00 49.0, Dec -34 00 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2155 (DeLisle Stewart #307, 1860 RA 05 55 45, NPD 124 01) is "extremely faint, very small, round, suspected."
Physical Information:

IC 2156
Discovered (Jan 11, 1899) by
Thomas Espin
A group of stars in Gemini (RA 06 04 50.6, Dec +24 09 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2156 (Espin (#1), 1860 RA 05 56 14, NPD 65 51) is "a cluster, nebulous?"
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.5 arcmin? (Steinicke wonders whether simply a northern extension of IC 2157.)

IC 2157 (= OCL 465)
Discovered (Jan 11, 1899) by
Thomas Espin
A magnitude 8.4 open cluster (type III2p) in Gemini (RA 06 04 49.8, Dec +24 03 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2157 (Espin (#2), 1860 RA 05 56 17, NPD 65 58) is "a cluster, small."
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.0 arcmin?

IC 2158 (= PGC 18388)
Discovered (Dec 1, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 12.1 spiral galaxy (type SBab??) in Columba (RA 06 05 17.9, Dec -27 51 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2158 (Swift list XI (#91), Howe, 1860 RA 05 59 48, NPD 117 50.8) is "very faint, pretty small, a little extended, brush, star attatched north-following (to the northeast)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.3 arcmin?

IC 2159
Discovered (Feb 11, 1890) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
An emission nebula in Orion (RA 06 09 57.0, Dec +20 25 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2159 (Bigourdan #386, 1860 RA 06 01 33, NPD 69 34) is "very faint, very large, diffuse."
Physical Information: Part of NGC 2175.

IC 2160 (= PGC 18092)
Discovered (Dec 18, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SBc??) in Mensa (RA 05 55 28.7, Dec -76 55 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2160 (DeLisle Stewart #308, 1860 RA 06 01 47, NPD 166 55) is "very faint, very small, stellar nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 2161 (= a GCL in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Dec 18, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A globular cluster in Mensa (RA 05 57 26.9, Dec -75 08 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2161 (DeLisle Stewart #309, 1860 RA 06 01 49, NPD 165 08) is "extremely faint, very small, brighter middle, suspected."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 arcmin?

IC 2162
Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
An emission nebula in Orion (RA 06 13 06.0, Dec +17 58 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2162 (Barnard, 1860 RA 06 05 01, NPD 71 59.7) is "very faint, pretty large, round, 10th magnitude star involved preceding (to the west)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 3.0 arcmin?

IC 2163 (= PGC 18751)
Discovered (Feb 11, 1898) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 11.7 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)c pec) in Canis Major (RA 06 16 28.0, Dec -21 22 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2163 (Howe list I (#7), 1860 RA 06 10 32, NPD 111 19.7) is "extremely faint, pretty small, h 3032 preceding (to the west) by 7 seconds," JH 3032 being NGC 2207.
Physical Information: Paired and strongly gravitationally interacting with NGC 2207, which also see for a more detailed discussion of that galaxy and images of the pair. Based on a recessional velocity of 2765 km/sec, IC 2163 is about 130 million light-years away, and certainly at the same distance as NGC 2207. Given that and its apparent size of 3.0(?) by 1.2 arcmin, it is about 110 thousand light-years across.

IC 2164 (= PGC 18424)
Discovered (Dec 18, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type Sab??) in Mensa (RA 06 06 52.4, Dec -75 21 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2164 (DeLisle Stewart #310, 1860 RA 06 11 28, NPD 165 19) is "extremely faint, most extremely small, round, stellar nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin?

IC 2165
Discovered (1898) by
Williamina Fleming
A magnitude 10.5 planetary nebula in Canis Major (RA 06 21 42.7, Dec -12 59 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2165 (Fleming #79, 1860 RA 06 15 16, NPD 102 55) is "planetary, stellar."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.47 arcmin?

IC 2166 (= PGC 19064)
Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Lynx (RA 06 26 55.8, Dec +59 04 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2166 (Barnard, 1860 RA 06 19 40, NPD 30 50) is "a nebula; faint star preceding (to the west) 1 arcmin, double star following (to the east) 3 arcmin."
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 2.1 arcmin?

IC 2167 (=
IC 446)
Discovered (Jan 24, 1894) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 446)
Discovered (late 1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 2167)
A star and reflection nebula in Monoceros (RA 06 31 06.0, Dec +10 27 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2167 (Barnard, 1860 RA 06 23 32, NPD 79 27.9) is "a 9.5 magnitude star in faint, large nebula."
Physical Information: This entry will be primarily concerned with historical information; for anything else see IC 446.

IC 2168
Recorded (Jan 1, 1892) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A pair of stars in Auriga (RA 06 33 47.7, Dec +44 41 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2168 (Bigourdan #387, 1860 RA 06 23 33, NPD 45 13) is "a cluster, small, faint nebulosity."
Physical Information:

IC 2169 (=
IC 447)
Discovered (Jan 24, 1894) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 447)
Discovered (late 1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 2169)
A reflection nebula in Monoceros (RA 06 31 06.0, Dec +09 52 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2169 (Barnard, 1860 RA 06 23 41, NPD 80 05.2) is "faint, large, diffuse, several stars of magnitude 9 to 10 involved."
Physical Information: This entry will be primarily concerned with historical information; for anything else see IC 447.

IC 2170
Recorded (Jan 1, 1892) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A lost or nonexistent object in Auriga (RA 06 34 05.0, Dec +44 41 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2170 (Bigourdan #388, 1860 RA 06 23 52, NPD 45 12) is "extremely faint, small, mottled but not resolved, 13th magnitude star south-preceding-preceding (south-southwest) 0.8 arcmin."
Physical Information:

IC 2171
Recorded (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
A lost or nonexistent object in Canis Major (RA 06 45 13.0, Dec -17 40 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2171 (Barnard, 1860 RA 06 39, NPD 107 32) is "faint, 3 stars of 10th magnitude around."
Physical Information:

IC 2172 (=
NGC 2282)
Discovered (Mar 3, 1886) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as NGC 2282)
Discovered (late 1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 2172)
A reflection nebula in Monoceros (RA 06 46 51.2, Dec +01 18 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2172 (Barnard, 1860 RA 06 39 37, NPD 88 31.7) is "a nebulous star."
Physical Information: This entry will be primarily concerned with historical information; for anything else see NGC 2282.

IC 2173
Recorded (Dec 21, 1884) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A star in Gemini (RA 06 50 47.2, Dec +33 27 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2173 (Bigourdan #339 [389], 1860 RA 06 41 35, NPD 56 24) is "an extremely faint nebulous star, 2288 close, 12th magnitude star north-north-preceding (north-northwest) 1 arcmin," NGC 2288 being the "close" object.
IC2 Note: From the run of numbers for Bigourdan's nebulae in this region and its position and description, "339" is an obvious typo for "389", hence the latter's inclusion in the IC listing in brackets.
Physical Information:

IC 2174 (= PGC 20252)
Discovered (Dec 24, 1891) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SBa??) in Camelopardalis (RA 07 09 05.0, Dec +75 21 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2174 (Bigourdan #264, 1860 RA 06 50 20, NPD 14 27) is "extremely faint, small, brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 2175
Recorded (Feb 11, 1896) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A pair of stars in Gemini (RA 07 08 39.6, Dec +35 17 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2175 (Bigourdan #265, 1860 RA 06 50 21, NPD 54 32) is "extremely faint, pretty large, mottled but not resolved, nebulous?"
Physical Information:

IC 2176 (= PGC 20193)
Discovered (Feb 11, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Gemini (RA 07 07 31.8, Dec +32 28 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2176 (Javelle #990, 1860 RA 06 58 25, NPD 57 19.6) is "very faint, very small, round, stellar."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 2177
Discovered (1898) by
Isaac Roberts
An emission nebula in Monoceros (RA 07 04 25.3, Dec -10 27 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2177 (Roberts ([AN] 3509), 1860 RA 06 58 30, NPD 100 30) is "pretty bright, extremely large, irregularly round, very diffuse." Roberts' paper states that there is a wide nebulous band running across it in a south-following (southeastern) to north-preceding (northwestern) direction, and the nebula spans about 13 minutes of arc.
Physical Information: Apparent size 20 arcmin? (Associated with a B emission star.)

IC 2178 (= PGC 20196)
Discovered (Feb 11, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Gemini (RA 07 07 37.6, Dec +32 30 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2178 (Javelle #991, 1860 RA 06 58 31, NPD 57 17.0) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle and nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 2179 (= PGC 20516)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1894) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 12.4 elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Camelopardalis (RA 07 15 32.3, Dec +64 55 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2179 (Bigourdan #267, 1860 RA 07 01 58, NPD 24 49) is "a 13th magnitude star in a very faint, very small nebula (= III 746?)," WH III 746 being , which is not IC 2179. The position precesses to RA 07 15 32.7, Dec +64 57 11, only about 1.6 arcmin nearly due north of the galaxy listed above, the description is reasonable and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
What About The Reference To NGC 2347?: Why does the IC2 entry mention NGC 2347, which is over 13 arcmin south-southeast of IC 2179 and nearly 15 arcmin south-southeast of Bigourdan's position? That has to do with Bigourdan's "Big Book" for "VII Heures" right ascension, published seven years later (but several years before the IC2 was published). In that volume Bigourdan gives the data for his original observations, which have several errors in the identification of comparison stars, and as a result, though still labeled as a 'nova', it is right next to the entry for NGC 2347, and the positions only differ by 5 or 6 arcmin; and though Bigourdan himself does not suggest that his nova and 2347 were the same, Dreyer must have thought that given the large difference between the original and later published positions for B 267, there was a possibility that it might be the same as the NGC object (there is a thorough discussion of this in Corwin's database, which I will try to clearly summarize when I finish this page).
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 1.1 arcmin?

IC 2180 (= PGC 20344)
Discovered (Apr 6, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Sab??) in Gemini (RA 07 11 19.5, Dec +26 22 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2180 (Javelle #992, 1860 RA 07 02 40, NPD 63 24.1) is "faint, small, irregular figure, diffuse."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 2181 (= PGC 20417)
Discovered (Feb 7, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Sab??) in Gemini (RA 07 13 10.3, Dec +18 59 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2181 (Javelle #993, 1860 RA 07 04 59, NPD 70 46.5) is "faint, small, round, stellar."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 2182 (= PGC 1575387)
Discovered (Feb 7, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Gemini (RA 07 14 11.0, Dec +18 56 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2182 (Javelle #994, 1860 RA 07 05 59, NPD 70 49.3) is "very faint, very small, diffuse, 12th magnitude star attached."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 2183
Recorded (April, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
Probably a nonexistent object in Canis Major (RA 07 16 56.0, Dec -20 24 36) ,div align=justify>Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2183 (DeLisle Stewart #311, 1860 RA 07 10 52, NPD 110 10) is "a wisp 2 arcmin north-south, 3 stars to north, suspected."
Physical Information: Probably a plate defect.
IC 2184 (= PGC 21123)
Discovered (Jan 24, 1900) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (390)
A magnitude 13.1 pair of interacting galaxies in Camelopardalis (RA 07 29 24.9, Dec +72 07 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2184 (Bigourdan #390, 1860 RA 07 14 10, NPD 17 46) is "very faint, small, stellar, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3605 km/sec, IC 2184 is about 165 million light-years away. The system was previously classified as an irregular or peculiar spiral galaxy, but is now recognized as a pair of colliding edge-on spiral galaxies, each of probable type SBb pec. The western component is 0.8 by 0.15 arcmin, the eastern is 0.95 by 0.15 arcmin, and the overall size of the region involved in their collision is 1.4 by 1.35 arcmin. Given their probable distance, the individual components are about 45 and 40 thousand light-years across, and the system is about 65 thousand light-years across. The pair of galaxies should eventually merge into a single larger galaxy, and since we see them as they were in the very distant past, by now they have not only merged, but all the exceptionally bright stars created by their collision have lived out their brilliant but brief lives and blown themselves to bits.
DSS image of region near the pair of interacting spiral galaxies listed as IC 2184
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image cenered on IC 2184
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the pair of interacting galaxies listed as IC 2184
DSS image of the pair of interacting spiral galaxies listed as IC 2184
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the pair (Image Credit Hubble/ESA/NASA)
HST image of the pair of interacting spiral galaxies listed as IC 2184

IC 2185 (= PGC 20889)
Discovered (Feb 11, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Gemini (RA 07 23 16.1, Dec +32 29 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2185 (Javelle #995, 1860 RA 07 14 14, NPD 57 14.4) is "faint, small, round."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 2186 (almost certainly =
IC 2188)
(= PGC 20858)

Discovered (Feb 11, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 2186)
Discovered (Feb 28, 1900) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 2188)
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Gemini (RA 07 22 43.1, Dec +21 30 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2186 (Javelle #996, 1860 RA 07 14 24, NPD 68 12.7) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved."
Historical Misidentification LEDA lists IC 2186 as a duplicate observation of IC 2188, but NED identifies it as a much fainter galaxy (PGC 3089868) to the northeast of IC 2188. For that reason, PGC 3089868, although almost certainly having nothing to do with IC 2186, is discussed in the next entry.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin?

PGC 3089868
(almost certainly not
IC 2186)
Not an IC object but listed here because misidentified as IC 2186 in NED
A magnitude ? galaxy (type ?) in Gemini (RA 07 22 47.7, Dec +21 31 45)
Historical Misidenification:
Physical Information:

IC 2187 (= PGC 20857)
Discovered (Feb 11, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Gemini (RA 07 22 43.3, Dec +21 28 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2187 (Javelle #997, 1860 RA 07 14 24, NPD 68 15.7) is "faint, small, round, diffuse, 11.5 magnitude star very near."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 2188 (almost certainly =
IC 2186)
(= PGC 20858)

Discovered (Feb 11, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 2186)
Discovered (Feb 28, 1900) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 2188)
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Gemini (RA 07 22 43.1, Dec +21 30 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2188 (Javelle #998, 1860 RA 07 14 24, NPD 68 13.9) is "faint, small, diffuse, faint nucleus."
Physical Information: Although the identification of IC 2186 as IC 2188 is uncertain, it is standard practice for duplicate entries to use the "earlier" designation, so for anything else see IC 2186. Just keep in mind that a search of NED for IC 2186 will certainly bring up the wrong object.

IC 2189
Recorded (1894) by
Williamina Fleming (75)
A star in Canis Minor (RA 07 24 57.0, Dec +08 55 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2189 (Fleming #75), 1860 RA 07 17 19, NPD 80 49) is "planetary, stellar."
Physical Information:

IC 2190 (= PGC 21144)
Discovered (Jan 16, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Auriga (RA 07 29 54.3, Dec +37 27 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2190 (Javelle #999, 1860 RA 07 20 28, NPD 52 12.0) is "faint, pretty small, diffuse."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 2191 (= PGC 21163)
Discovered (Feb 7, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Gemini (RA 07 30 17.4, Dec +24 19 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2191 (Javelle #1000, 1860 RA 07 21 48, NPD 65 23.3) is "faint, very small, round, stellar."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 2192 (= PGC 1952738)
Discovered (Jan 24, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Gemini (RA 07 33 19.8, Dec +31 33 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2193 (Javelle #1001, 1860 RA 07 24 22, NPD 58 20.8) is "faint, very small, round, 14th magnitude star nearly in contact."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.45 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 2192, also showing IC 2193
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 2192, also showing IC 2193
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 2192

IC 2193 (= PGC 21276)
Discovered (May 12, 1888) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Gemini (RA 07 33 23.6, Dec +31 29 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2193 (Barnard, 1860 RA 07 24 23, NPD 58 15.6) is "close preceding (western) star of 10th magnitude (= J 1001?)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.9 arcmin?

IC 2194 (= PGC 21285)
Discovered (May 9, 1888) by
Edward Barnard
Also observed (date?) by Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Gemini (RA 07 33 40.2, Dec +31 20 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2194 (Barnard, Javelle #1002, 1860 RA 07 24 43, NPD 58 22.5) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 2195
Recorded (1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A lost or nonexistent object in Carina (RA 07 28 27.0, Dec -51 15 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2195 (DeLisle Stewart #312, 1860 RA 07 24 52, NPD 140 58) is "considerably bright, small, round, brighter middle, suspected."
Physical Information:

IC 2196 (= PGC 21300)
Discovered (May 9, 1888) by
Edward Barnard
Also observed (date?) by Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 12.7 elliptical galaxy (type E2??) in Gemini (RA 07 34 09.7, Dec +31 24 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2196 (Barnard, Javelle #1003, 1860 RA 07 25 13, NPD 58 18.1) is "faint, small, pretty round, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved, 3 stars 2 arcmin preceding (to the west)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1 arcmin?

IC 2197 (probably = PGC 213402)
Discovered (May 9, 1888) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 16(?) spiral galaxy (type Sm?) in Gemini (RA 07 34 25.3, Dec +31 25 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2197 (Barnard, 1860 RA 07 25 27, NPD 58 19.5) is "very very faint". (Note: This is one of five nebulae listed by Barnard in A.J. 1897, #422, p. 112.) The position precesses to RA 07 34 23.3, Dec +31 22 37, but there is nothing there. For various reasons Corwin suspects the galaxy above is probably Barnard's object; though he is not certain of the identification, NED and LEDA have adopted his choice (more about this to be posted in the next iteration of this page). Corwin also mentions that Steinicke chose a different galaxy (PGC 1942468) as IC 2197, but doubts it is the correct object. Still, this means that there is bound to be confusion about the identification of IC 2197, and Steinicke's choice should also be discussed (as it is, immediately below).
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.75 by 0.25 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 213402, which is probably IC 2197; also shown are IC 2196 and PGC 1942468, which is sometimes listed as but is probably not IC 2197
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the probable IC 2197, also showing PGC 1942468 and IC 2196
(The IC position of IC 2197 is shown by a box)
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 213402, which is probably IC 2197
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 213402, which is probably IC 2197

PGC 1942468 (probably not =
IC 2197)
Probably not an IC object but listed here since listed by Steinicke as IC 2197
A magnitude 16(?) spiral galaxy (type Sm?) in Gemini (RA 07 34 18.9, Dec +31 20 14)
Historical Misidentification: See IC 2197 for a note about the reason for this entry. Further details should be posted in the next iteration of this page.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 1942468, which is sometimes listed as but is probably not IC 2197; also shown are IC 2196 and PGC 213402, which probably is IC 2197
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 1942468, also showing IC 2196 and the probable 2197
(The IC position of IC 2197 is shown by a box)
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 1942468
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 1942468, which is sometimes listed as but is probably not IC 2197

IC 2198 (= PGC 21298)
Discovered (Feb 7, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.1 elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Gemini (RA 07 34 11.1, Dec +23 57 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2198 (Javelle #1004, 1860 RA 07 25 44, NPD 65 43.9) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 2199 (= PGC 21328)
Discovered (May 9, 1888) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SABbc?) in Gemini (RA 07 34 55.6, Dec +31 16 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2199 (Barnard, 1860 RA 07 25 59, NPD 58 29.0) is "faint, small."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2199
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 2199
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2199
Celestial Atlas
(IC 2100 - 2149) ←IC Objects: IC 2150 - 2199→ (IC 2200 - 2249)