Celestial Atlas
(IC 2150 - 2199) ←     IC Objects: IC 2200 - 2249 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 2250 - 2299)
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Page last updated Oct 15, 2013
WORKING: Check positions, historical IDs (Corwin+), add basic pix, captions, tags

IC 2200 (= PGC 21075)
Discovered (1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type (R)SABb pec) in Carina (RA 07 28 17.4, Dec -62 21 10)
Per Dreyer, IC 2200 (= DeLisle Stewart #313, 1860 RA 07 26 37, NPD 152 03) is "extremely faint, extremely small, extremely extended 65, between 2 stars, suspected", 'suspected' meaning that Stewart felt some uncertainty about the observation, but was more certain the nebula existed than not. The position precesses to RA 07 28 18.0, Dec -62 20 25, less than a half arcmin north of the main body of the eastern member of a pair of galaxies, which object is therefore listed here as IC 2200. The description "between 2 stars" suggests that Stewart mistook the nucleus of the western member of the pair for a star, and that PGC 21062 is therefore not part of IC 2200. Instead, it is considered a separate object and given a separate entry, immediately below.
     Based on a recessional velocity of 3250 km/sec, IC 2200 is about 150 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.4 by 0.85 arcmin, it is about 60 thousand light years across. It and its companion are thought to be separated by only 80 thousand light years, because they are gravitationally interacting, and have a common envelope of hot gases presumably expelled by their interaction. They will probably merge into a single galaxy within a few hundreds of millions of years. It should be noted that their estimated separation is based on the envelope of gas that they share. If they were much further apart they would probably have separate gaseous envelopes.
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2200 and lenticular galaxy PGC 21062, which is also known as IC 2200A
Above, 3 arcmin wide DSS image of IC 2200 and PGC 21062
Below, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the pair
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2200 and lenticular galaxy PGC 21062, which is also known as IC 2200A

PGC 21062 (= "IC 2200A")
Not an IC object but sometimes called IC 2200A due to its proximity to
IC 2200
A magnitude 12.7 lenticular galaxy (type SB(s)0? pec) in Carina (RA 07 28 06.6, Dec -62 21 47)
Paired with IC 2200, which see for a more detailed discussion and images of the galaxies. Based on its recessional velocity of 3240 km/sec, PGC 21062 is about 150 million light years away, and in any event must be at the same distance as its companion. Given that and its apparent size of 1.4 by 1.3 arcmin, it is about 60 thousand light years across.

IC 2201 (= PGC 21372)
Discovered (Feb 11, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle (1006)
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sa??) in Gemini (RA 07 36 16.8, Dec +33 07 23)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 2202 (= PGC 21057)
Discovered (1901) by
DeLisle Stewart (314)
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Volans (RA 07 27 54.9, Dec -67 34 28)
Apparent size 2.0 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 2203 (= PGC 21555)
Discovered (Feb 12, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle (1007)
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SBc??) in Gemini (RA 07 40 33.6, Dec +34 13 48)
Apparent size 1.2 by 1.0 arcmin?

IC 2204 (= PGC 21581)
Discovered (Feb 12, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle (1008)
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type SBab??) in Gemini (RA 07 41 18.1, Dec +34 13 53)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin?

IC 2205 (= PGC 21773)
Discovered (Jan 16, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (1009)
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Gemini (RA 07 46 54.5, Dec +26 52 22)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 2206
Recorded (1895) by
Williamina Fleming (76)
A pair of stars in Puppis (RA 07 45 46.1, Dec -34 22 11)
Primary of magnitude 9.5, secondary of magnitude 14(?) that may have led to mistaken interpretation as nebulous just a few arcsec south.

IC 2207 (= PGC 21918)
Discovered (Feb 12, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle (1010)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Gemini (RA 07 49 50.8, Dec +33 57 45)
Apparent size 2.0 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 2208 (= PGC 22040)
Discovered (Apr 7, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle (1011)
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Gemini (RA 07 52 07.9, Dec +27 29 03)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 2209 (= PGC 22232)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1894) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (268)
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SBb??) in Camelopardalis (RA 07 56 14.2, Dec +60 18 14)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin?

IC 2210
Recorded (Jan 14, 1900) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (391)
A pair of stars in Lyxn (RA 07 56 56.3, Dec +56 40 50)

IC 2211 (= PGC 22314)
Discovered (Feb 11, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle (1012)
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type Sa??) in Gemini (RA 07 57 45.6, Dec +32 33 31)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 2212 (= PGC 22371)
Discovered (Feb 11, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle (1013)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Gemini (RA 07 58 57.1, Dec +32 36 46)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 2213 (= PGC 22372)
Discovered (Feb 8, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (1014)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Gemini (RA 07 59 06.5, Dec +27 27 52)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 2214 (= PGC 22417)
Discovered (Feb 7, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (1015)
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SBab??) in Lynx (RA 07 59 53.8, Dec +33 17 25)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 2215
Recorded (Mar 13, 1899) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (392)
A pair of stars in Gemini (RA 07 59 33.0, Dec +24 55 44)

IC 2216
Recorded (Mar 11, 1899) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (393)
A pair of stars in Canis Minor (RA 07 59 27.7, Dec +05 36 52)

IC 2217 (= PGC 22476)
Discovered (Feb 8, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (1016)
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Cancer (RA 08 00 49.8, Dec +27 30 01)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 2218 (= PGC 22509)
Discovered (Feb 7, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (1017)
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Cancer (RA 08 01 38.4, Dec +24 25 55)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.2 arcmin? Steinicke lists PGC 1707313 as a component, but it is not only much fainter than, but also well separated from its larger companion, and there is nothing in Javelle's description to indicate that it should be considered part of the IC entry; however, it does have a similar recessional velocity and may be a physical companion, so it is listed immediately below.

PGC 1707313 (not = part of
IC 2218)
Not an IC object or part of one, but listed here since a possible physical companion of IC 2218
A magnitude 16.7 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Cancer (RA 08 01 36.8, Dec +24 26 22)
Apparent size 0.2 by 0.1 arcmin? As noted in the discussion of IC 2218, not a part of that IC entry; but a possible physical companion, as it has a similar recessional velocity. However, there are no obvious signs of interaction between the two, so although they may be relatively close to each other, they are almost certainly not as close as they appear.

IC 2219 (= PGC 22565)
Discovered (Feb 10, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (1018)
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Cancer (RA 08 02 36.5, Dec +27 26 14)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 2220, the Toby Jug Nebula
Discovered (Mar 30, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart (315)
An emission nebula and star in Carina (RA 07 56 51.3, Dec -59 07 31)
Apparent size 7.5 by 5.0 arcmin. Lit up by 6th magnitude HD 65750. (Also called the Butterfly Nebula, but that name is usually assumed to refer to NGC 6302.)
DSS image of region near emission nebula IC 2220, also known as the Toby Jug Nebula
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2220
Below, a roughly 10 arcmin wide Capella Observatory image of the nebula
(Image Credit & © Capella Observatory; used by permission)
Capella Observatory image of emission nebula IC 2220, also known as the Toby Jug Nebula
Below, a (somewhat overexposed) ESO image of the nebula (Image Credit: ESO)
ESO image of emission nebula IC 2220, also known as the Toby Jug Nebula

IC 2221 (= PGC 2101054)
Discovered (Feb 28, 1900) by
Stephane Javelle (1019)
A magnitude 15.2 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Lynx (RA 08 05 08.0, Dec +37 27 02)
Per Dreyer, IC 2221 (= Javelle #1019, 1860 RA 07 55 53, NPD 52 09.4) is "very faint, very small, round, difficult". The position precesses to RA 08 05 08.1, Dec +37 27 08, right on the galaxy listed above, so the identity is certain. However, some references unaccountably list a completely different object (PGC 22713) as IC 2221, so that object is covered immediately below as a warning about the mistake. Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 2221
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of IC 2221
Below, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 2222 and PGC 22713
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 2221, also showing IC 2222 and PGC 22713 (which is sometimes misidentified as IC 2221)

PGC 22713 (not =
IC 2221)
Not an IC object but listed here since sometimes misidentified as IC 2221
A magnitude 15? lenticular galaxy (type SB0/(rs)a?) in Lynx (RA 08 05 29.7, Dec +37 32 09)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.55 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 22713, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 2221
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 22713
Below, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 2221 and 2222
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 22713, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 2221; also shown are IC 2222 and the correct IC 2221

IC 2222 (= PGC 22700)
Discovered (Feb 10, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (1020)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Lynx (RA 08 05 14.8, Dec +37 28 21)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 2223 (possibly =
IC 2224 = PGC 2101266)
Recorded (Feb 10, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (1021)
A lost or nonexistent object in Lynx (RA 08 05 46.0, Dec +37 27 45)
or A magnitude 14.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Lynx (RA 08 05 50.3, Dec +37 27 35)
Per Corwin, there is a good chance that this is the same object as IC 2224, and despite some uncertainty, that identification has been accepted by the NED, with the caveat that the identification is very uncertain. Whatever the truth, this entry will only discuss historical information.

IC 2224 (= PGC 2101266, and possibly =
IC 2223)
Discovered (Feb 28, 1900) by Stephane Javelle (1022)
A magnitude 14.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Lynx (RA 08 05 50.3, Dec +37 27 35)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 2225 (= PGC 22708)
Discovered (Feb 11, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (1023)
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a??) in Lynx (RA 08 05 28.1, Dec +35 56 49)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 2226 (= PGC 22747)
Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type Sab??) in Cancer (RA 08 06 11.1, Dec +12 32 39)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 2227 (= PGC 22787)
Discovered (Feb 10, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (1024)
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Lynx (RA 08 07 07.1, Dec +36 14 00)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 2228
Recorded (Mar 11, 1899) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (394)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 07 05.4, Dec +08 01 33)

IC 2229 (=
IC 496 (= PGC 22903 + PGC 93095))
Discovered (Mar 2, 1892) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 496)
Discovered (Feb 11, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (1025) (and later listed as IC 2229)
A triplet of galaxies in Cancer
PGC 93095 = A magnitude 15.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) at RA 08 09 44.2, Dec +25 52 54
PGC 22903 = A magnitude 16(?) pair of galaxies (type S pec + Irr pec) at RA 08 09 45.5, Dec +25 52 50
(This entry will only discuss the duplicate listing; for anything else see IC 496.)

IC 2230 (= PGC 22944)
Discovered (Feb 11, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (1026)
A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Cancer (RA 08 10 56.5, Dec +25 41 07)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 2231 (= PGC 22950)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1895) by
Lewis Swift (XI-92)
A magnitude 14.0 elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Canis Minor (RA 08 11 01.4, Dec +05 05 15)
Apparent size 1.0 by 1.0 arcmin?

IC 2232 (=
NGC 2543 = PGC 23028)
Discovered (Feb 3, 1788) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2543)
Discovered (Feb 12, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (1028) (and later listed as IC 2232)
A magnitude 11.9 spiral galaxy (type SBb??) in Lynx (RA 08 12 57.8, Dec +36 15 13)
This entry will be primarily concerend with historical information; for anything else see NGC 2543.

IC 2233 (= PGC 23071)
Discovered (Mar 25, 1894) by
Isaac Roberts
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)d?) in Lynx (RA 08 13 59.0, Dec +45 44 23)
Apparent size 4.5 by 0.45 arcmin. Apparently a "superthin" galaxy.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2233
Above, a 6 arcmin wide SDSS image of IC 2233
Below, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2233

IC 2234 (= PGC 2065350)
Discovered (Feb 12, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (1029)
A magnitude 15.5 elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Lynx (RA 08 13 51.6, Dec +35 29 36)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 2235
Recorded (Jan 9, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-1)
A pair of stars in Cancer (RA 08 13 34.1, Dec +24 04 41)

IC 2236
Recorded (Jan 9, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-2)
Three stars in Cancer (RA 08 13 37.6, Dec +24 02 55)

IC 2237
Recorded (Jan 9, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-3)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 14 08.0, Dec +24 41 43)

IC 2238
Recorded (Jan 9, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-4)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 14 08.6, Dec +24 39 42)

IC 2239 (= PGC 23078)
Discovered (Jan 9, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-5)
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Cancer (RA 08 14 06.7, Dec +23 51 59)

IC 2240
Recorded (Jan 9, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-6)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 14 47.5, Dec +24 28 03)

IC 2241
Recorded (Jan 9, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-7)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 15 08.9, Dec +24 07 48)

IC 2242
Recorded (Jan 9, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-8)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 15 11.7, Dec +24 07 59)

IC 2243
Recorded (Jan 9, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-9)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 15 18.5, Dec +23 57 45)

IC 2244
Recorded (Jan 9, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-10)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 15 22.3, Dec +24 32 45)

IC 2245
Recorded (Jan 9, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-11)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 15 28.4, Dec +24 32 08)

IC 2246
Recorded (Jan 9, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-12)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 16 01.0, Dec +23 50 58)

IC 2247 (= PGC 23169)
Discovered (Jan 9, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-13)
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Cancer (RA 08 15 59.0, Dec +23 11 59)
Apparent size 1.8 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 2248 (= PGC 23176)
Discovered (Jan 9, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-14)
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Cancer (RA 08 16 04.7, Dec +23 08 04)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 2249 (= PGC 23202)
Discovered (Jan 9, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-15)
A magnitude 15.7 spiral galaxy (type Scd? pec?) in Cancer (RA 08 16 34.5, Dec +24 29 35)
Apparent size 0.35 by 0.25 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2249
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of IC 2249
Below, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2249
Celestial Atlas
(IC 2150 - 2199) ←     IC Objects: IC 2200 - 2249     → (IC 2250 - 2299)