Celestial Atlas
(IC 2250 - 2299) ←     IC Objects: IC 2300 - 2349 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 2350 - 2399)
Click here for Introductory Material
QuickLinks:
2300, 2301, 2302, 2303, 2304, 2305, 2306, 2307, 2308, 2309, 2310, 2311, 2312, 2313, 2314, 2315, 2316,
2317, 2318, 2319, 2320, 2321, 2322, 2323, 2324, 2325, 2326, 2327, 2328, 2329, 2330, 2331, 2332, 2333,
2334, 2335, 2336, 2337, 2338, 2339, 2340, 2341, 2342, 2343, 2344, 2345, 2346, 2347, 2348, 2349

Page last updated Oct 12, 2013
WORKING: Check positions, historical IDs (Corwin+), add basic pix, captions, tags

IC 2300
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-65)
A magnitude 15(?) star in Cancer (RA 08 20 12.7, Dec +18 25 12)
Like many of Wolf's fainter "nebulae", a stellar object misidentified as a nebula.
DSS image of region near the stars listed as IC 2300 and IC 2301
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2300, also showing IC 2301
(The stars to the left of each label are the IC objects)

IC 2301
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-66)
A magnitude 15(?) star in Cancer (RA 08 20 13.9, Dec +18 26 04)
Like many of Wolf's fainter "nebulae", a stellar object misidentified as a nebula. Close to IC 2300, which see for an image.

IC 2302
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-67)
A magnitude 16(?) star in Cancer (RA 08 20 17.3, Dec +19 21 24)
Like many of Wolf's fainter "nebulae", a stellar object misidentified as a nebula
DSS image of region near the star listed as IC 2302, also showing the star listed as IC 2303
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2302, also showing IC 2303
(The star above each label is the IC object)

IC 2303
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-68)
A magnitude 16(?) star in Cancer (RA 08 20 19.4, Dec +19 25 09)
Like many of Wolf's fainter "nebulae", a stellar object misidentified as a nebula. Not far from IC 2302, which see for an image.

IC 2304
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-69)
A pair of stars (15th and 17th magnitudes) in Cancer (RA 08 20 35.8, Dec +19 26 22)
Like many of Wolf's fainter "nebulae", a stellar object misidentified as a nebula. Near IC 2307, which see for an image.

IC 2305
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-70)
A magnitude 13(?) star in Cancer (RA 08 20 40.2, Dec +19 27 10)
Like many of Wolf's fainter "nebulae", a stellar object misidentified as a nebula. Near IC 2307, which see for an image.

IC 2306
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-71)
A magnitude 16(?) star in Cancer (RA 08 20 39.5, Dec +19 06 36)
Like many of Wolf's fainter "nebulae", a stellar object misidentified as a nebula.
DSS image of region near the star listed as IC 2306
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2306

IC 2307 (= PGC 23417)
Discovered (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-72)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Cancer (RA 08 20 42.9, Dec +19 26 27)
Based on a recessional velocity of 12,940 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 2307 is about 600 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 570 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 585 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.7 by 0.25 arcmin, it is about 115 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2307
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of IC 2307
Below, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 2304, 2305 and 2308
(IC 2305 is the star below its label, and IC 2304 is the double star to the left of the label)
SDSS image of the double star listed as IC 2304, the star listed as IC 2305, spiral galaxy IC 2307, and IC 2308

IC 2308 (= PGC 23415)
Discovered (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-73)
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Cancer (RA 08 20 45.3, Dec +19 21 42)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 2309 (= PGC 23416)
Discovered (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-74)
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Cancer (RA 08 20 43.6, Dec +18 23 50)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 2310
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-75)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 20 46.3, Dec +18 27 48)

IC 2311 (= PGC 23304)
Discovered (Feb 16, 1898) by
Herbert Howe (8)
A magnitude 11.5 elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Puppis (RA 08 18 45.9, Dec -25 22 12)
Apparent size 1.3 by 1.3 arcmin?

IC 2312 (= PGC 1561585 + PGC 1561719)
Discovered (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-76)
A pair of galaxies in Cancer
PGC 1561585 = A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) at RA 08 20 53.2, Dec +18 30 30
PGC 1561719 = A magnitude 16(?) compact galaxy (type S?) at RA 08 20 53.4, Dec +18 30 44
Since the two galaxies appear as a single image on Wolf's plate, they are both considered part of IC 2312; but since PGC 1561585 appears much brighter (and bigger) and almost nothing is known about PGC 1561719, the latter is discussed as if a completely separate object (which it may well be) in the last paragraph of this entry. Given a recessional velocity of 25,315 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 1561585 is about 1180 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 1070 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 1115 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.35 by 0.3 arcmin, the galaxy is about 110 thousand light years across.
    Nothing is known about the recessional velocity or distance of PGC 1561719, and given any lack of apparent interaction between the two galaxies, they may well have absolutely nothing to do with each other, save for being in the same direction. All that can be said is that the apparent size of PGC 1561719 is about 0.15 by 0.15 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 1561585 and compact galaxy PGC 1561719, which comprise IC 2312
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of IC 2312
Below, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 1561585 and compact galaxy PGC 1561719, which comprise IC 2312

IC 2313
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-77)
A magnitude 14(?) star in Cancer (RA 08 20 54.6, Dec +18 30 52)

IC 2314
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-78)
A pair of stars in Cancer (RA 08 21 03.7, Dec +18 45 47)

IC 2315
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-79)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 21 10.9, Dec +18 54 53)

IC 2316
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-80)
A pair of stars in Cancer (RA 08 21 15.3, Dec +19 45 36)

IC 2317
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-81)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 21 21.6, Dec +18 50 40)

IC 2318
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-83)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 21 32.8, Dec +18 37 23)
(Noted as 2 stars following)

IC 2319
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-84)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 21 33.1, Dec +18 28 34)

IC 2320
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-85)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 21 35.4, Dec +18 40 13)

IC 2321
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-86)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 21 39.1, Dec +18 28 07)

IC 2322
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-87)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 21 39.0, Dec +18 29 02)

IC 2323
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-88)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 21 41.3, Dec +18 36 48)

IC 2324
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-89)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 21 58.8, Dec +19 11 38)

IC 2325
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-90)
A lost or nonexistent object in Cancer (RA 08 22 08.7, Dec +18 54 42)
(Possibly a plate defect)

IC 2326
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-91)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 22 12.0, Dec +19 00 42)

IC 2327 (= PGC 23447)
Discovered (Feb 15, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle (1035)
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type Sa??) in Hydra (RA 08 21 28.0, Dec +03 10 08)
Apparent size 1.4 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 2328
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-92)
A lost or nonexistent object in Cancer (RA 08 22 17.3, Dec +19 36 59)

IC 2329 (= PGC 23483)
Discovered (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-93)
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sd??) in Cancer (RA 08 22 19.4, Dec +19 24 56)
Apparent size 2.1 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 2330
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-94)
A lost or nonexistent object in Cancer (RA 08 22 23.2, Dec +18 51 12)

IC 2331
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-95)
A pair of stars in Cancer (RA 08 22 35.2, Dec +19 40 45)

IC 2332
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-96)
A magnitude 14(?) star in Cancer (RA 08 22 39.7, Dec +19 55 13)

IC 2333
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-97)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 23 01.0, Dec +19 04 54)

IC 2334
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-98)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 23 00.0, Dec +18 36 52)

IC 2335 (= PGC 1591222)
Discovered (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-99)
A magnitude 15.2 elliptical galaxy (type E3??) in Cancer (RA 08 23 07.1, Dec +19 24 27)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 2336
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-100)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 23 19.1, Dec +18 32 14)

IC 2337 (= PGC 23529)
Discovered (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-101)
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Cancer (RA 08 23 20.3, Dec +18 32 08)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.1 arcmin?

IC 2338 (= PGC 23542, and with
IC 2339 = Arp 247)
Discovered (Mar 2, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (1036)
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)cd pec) in Cancer (RA 08 23 32.7, Dec +21 20 16)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin. Used by the Arp Atlas (with IC 2339 as an example of a galaxy with fission.
SDSS image of spiral galaxies IC 2338 and IC 2339, which comprise Arp 247
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of IC 2338 and 2339
Below, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the pair, also showing IC 2341
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies IC 2338 and IC 2339, which comprise Arp 247, also showing IC 2341

IC 2339 (= PGC 23545, and with
IC 2338 = Arp 247)
Discovered (Mar 2, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (1037)
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)c pec) in Cancer (RA 08 23 34.2, Dec +21 20 51)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.55 arcmin. Used by the Arp Atlas (with IC 2338 (which see for images) as an example of a galaxy with fission.

IC 2340 (= PGC 23544)
Discovered (Mar 1, 1900) by
Stephane Javelle (1038)
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Cancer (RA 08 23 30.2, Dec +18 44 58)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 2341 (= PGC 23552)
Discovered (Mar 2, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (1039)
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Cancer (RA 08 23 41.4, Dec +21 26 06)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 2342
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-103)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 23 32.2, Dec +18 34 46)

IC 2343
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-104)
A magnitude 14(?) star in Cancer (RA 08 23 32.2, Dec +18 34 47)
(An apparent pair with IC 2342)

IC 2344
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-105)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 23 54.9, Dec +18 39 34)

IC 2345
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-106)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 24 08.5, Dec +19 57 09)

IC 2346
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-107)
A pair of stars in Cancer (RA 08 24 10.5, Dec +19 42 20)

IC 2347
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-108)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 24 14.0, Dec +18 46 26)

IC 2348 (= PGC 23589)
Discovered (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-109)
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type SABa(rs)?) in Cancer (RA 08 24 20.2, Dec +20 32 02)
Apparent size 0.65 by 0.35 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2348
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of IC 2348
Below, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2348

IC 2349
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-110)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 24 17.1, Dec +19 00 22)
Celestial Atlas
(IC 2250 - 2299) ←     IC Objects: IC 2300 - 2349     → (IC 2350 - 2399)