Celestial Atlas
(IC 200 - 249) ←IC Objects: IC 250 - 299 Link for sharing this page on Facebook→ (IC 300 - 349)
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Page last updated Jun 15, 2017
Checked Corwin positions, Steinicke's updated historical database
Added Dreyer's IC entries, more accurate magnitudes, updated formatting to current standards
Added images as possible (some online image databases were offline)
NEXT ITERATION: update DSS+ pix/historical/physical information

IC 250 (= PGC 10162)
Discovered (Oct 13, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Cetus (RA 02 40 54.3, Dec -13 18 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 250 (Javelle #93, 1860 RA 02 34 12, NPD 103 55.1) is "very faint, pretty small, irregular figure".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 10420 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 250 is about 485 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 465 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 475 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.85 by 0.7 arcmin, the galaxy is about 115 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 250
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 250
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 250
Below, a 1 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 250

IC 251 (= PGC 10184)
Discovered (Dec 5, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type SAB(rs)a?) in Cetus (RA 02 41 13.8, Dec -14 57 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 251 (Javelle #94, 1860 RA 02 34 36, NPD 105 33.6) is "faint, small, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7400 km/sec, IC 251 is about 345 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.85 by 0.55 arcmins, it is about 85 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 251
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 251
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 251
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy IC 251

IC 252 (= PGC 144971)
Discovered (Dec 5, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Cetus (RA 02 41 45.1, Dec -14 50 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 252 (Javelle #95, 1860 RA 02 35 07, NPD 105 26.9) is "faint, small, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 02 41 45.0, Dec -14 50 52, right on the galaxy listed above, so the identification is certain. The galaxy is apparently accompanied by a magnitude 15.7 spiral galaxy (type S?) at RA 02 41 44.9, Dec -14 50 47, but nothing is known about the companion (save for its apparent size of 0.2 by 0.1 arcmin), so whether they are actually physical companions or merely an optical double is unknown. Either way, the "companion" is probably too faint to have had any effect on Javelle's observation, and shouldn't be considered part of IC 252.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7255 km/sec, PGC 144971 is about 335 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.45 by 0.25 arcmin, it is about 45 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 252
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 252
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 252
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy IC 252

IC 253 (= PGC 10226)
Discovered (Dec 5, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Cetus (RA 02 42 05.7, Dec -15 02 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 253 (Javelle #96, 1860 RA 02 35 27, NPD 105 38.9) is "pretty bright, irregular figure, brighter middle" (the NGC entry lists the brightness as "bB", but that is a typographical error; it should be "pB"). The position precesses to RA 02 42 04.4, Dec -15 02 54, on the southwestern edge of the galaxy, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7330 km/sec, IC 253 is about 340 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.9 by 0.7 arcmins, it is about 90 thousand light years across. Given their similar direction and distance, it may be a physical companion of NGC 1065.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 253, also showing NGC 1065 and IC 254
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 252, also showing NGC 1065 and IC 254
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 253
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy (blue spots are flaws in the image)
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy IC 253

IC 254 (= 2MASX J02420497-1506239)
Discovered (Dec 5, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.2 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Cetus (RA 02 42 05.0, Dec -15 06 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 254 (Javelle #97, 1860 RA 02 35 27, NPD 105 42.5) is "very faint, extremely small, round, 1065 close", 1065 being NGC 1065. The position precesses to RA 02 42 04.3, Dec -15 06 30, on the southwestern edge of the galaxy (just as in the case of IC 253, which was discovered on the same night), so the identification is certain. (Warning: Despite the certain identification and Javelle and Dreyer's statements that NGC 1065 is "close" (and therefore not the same object), IC 254 is often misidentified as the NGC object.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.2 by 0.13 arcmin; nothing else appears to be available.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 254, also showing NGC 1065 and IC 253
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 254, also showing NGC 1065 and IC 253
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy and NGC 1065
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 254, also showing NGC 1065
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy IC 254

IC 255 (= PGC 10540)
Discovered (Dec 29, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Aries (RA 02 47 03.2, Dec +16 17 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 255 (Javelle #572, 1860 RA 02 39 15, NPD 74 19.5) is "very faint, very small, round, 12th magnitude star 5 seconds of time to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.55 by 0.35 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 255, also showing NGC 1088
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 255, also showing NGC 1088
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 255
Below, a 0.7 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 255

WORKING HERE: Identifications and misidentifications
PGC 10729 (probably = IC 256, but usually listed as IC 257 (this is Herschel's observation)
PGC 10737 (usually listed as IC 256, but probably not an IC object
PGC 10728 (not an IC object but sometimes listed as a companion of PGC 10737

IC 256 (probably =
PGC 10729, but usually equated with PGC 10737)
Discovered (Nov 12, 1786) by William Herschel
Discovered (Sep 6, 1888) by Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude galaxy (type E/S0?) in Perseus (RA 02 49 45.4, Dec +46 58 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 256 (Swift list VIII (#2), 1860 RA 02 40 25, NPD 43 36.4) is "extremely faint, a little extended, small, 1st of 3", the others being IC 257 and 260 (some references give the brightness as "considerably faint" due to a defective "sort" (the individual metal piece for a single character), but Swift's description makes it clear that the entry should read "extremely faint"). On Sep 6, 1888 Lewis Swift discovered three objects (his Catalogue No. 8 nebulae 2, 3 and 4), all in the same region in Perseus. These are listed as IC 256, 257 and 260. There is no doubt of the identity of IC 260, as Swift's position and his description of the surrounding starfield exactly match the galaxy in question. However, there is considerable confusion about the identity of IC 256 and 257.
 Dreyer's records for the two IC entries are as follows: IC 256 (Swift list VIII (#2), 1860 RA 02 40 25, NPD 43 36.4) is "extremely faint, a little extended, small, 1st of 3", the others being IC 257 and 260. IC 257 (Swift list VIII (#3), 1860 RA 02 40 30, NPD 43 36.1) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, very difficult, 2nd of 3", the others being IC 256 and 260. The positions precess to (for IC 256) RA 02 49 46.2, Dec +46 58 45, and (for IC 257) RA 02 49 51.2, Dec +46 59 03, which are (for IC 256) on the northeastern edge of PGC 10729, and (for IC 257) about an arcmin east northeast of the same galaxy.
 The simplest conclusion is that IC 256 is PGC 10729, and IC 257 (which was apparently much fainter and harder to observe) existed only in Swift's imagination. However, since there is a very faint galaxy (PGC 10737) to the southwest of PGC 10729, it has been suggested (and generally accepted) that it is probably IC 256, and PGC 10729 is IC 257. But if Swift had observed that pair of galaxies they should have been in the same field of view, and I find it hard to believe that in such a case he would have recorded their relative brightnesses completely backward from their actual brightnesses, and made an error of a factor of two in their relative positions. So I think that he did not observe PGC 10737, IC 256 is PGC 10729, and IC 257 is a nonexistent object. But since this is completely different from what the reader may find elsewhere, this entry serves only to explain the history involved, and the reader should refer to the individual PGC objects' entries (immediately following the entry for IC 257) for anything else.
Physical Information:

IC 257 (probably nonexistent, but usually equated with
PGC 10729)
Recorded (Sep 6, 1888) by Lewis Swift
A nonexistent object in Perseus (RA 02 49 51.2, Dec +46 59 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 257 (Swift list VIII (#3), 1860 RA 02 40 30, NPD 43 36.1) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, very difficult, 2nd of 3", the others being IC 256 and 260. As noted in the entry for IC 256 (which see for the gory details), IC 257 is probably a nonexistent object (with the precessed position listed above), but is usually (almost certainly erroneously) listed as PGC 10729 (which is probably actually IC 256). Given that, readers who prefer to accept the identification as PGC 10729 should refer to the PGC entry, immediately following.

PGC 10729 (usually listed as
IC 257, but probably actually IC 256)
A magnitude 12.6 galaxy (type E/S0?) in Perseus (RA 02 49 45.4, Dec +46 58 34)
Historical Identification: (Refer to IC 256 for a historical discussion of the probable identification and misidentification.)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7765 km/sec, PGC 10729 is about 360 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.6 by 1.05 arcmin, it is about 170 thousand light years across. There is a conflicting recessional velocity measurement of 9240 km/sec, probably due to the fact that when (as in this case) the proper identification of an object is in question, different observers may observe different galaxies, but think they are observing the same object (which is why it is important for observers to know the correct identification for what they are observing). Since there is no way to know which (if either) of the recessional velocities is the correct one for PGC 10729, it doesn't hurt to use both values, and hope that one of them is correct. So... Based on a recessional velocity of 9240 km/sec, PGC 10729 is about 430 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.7 by 1.05 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 200 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 10729, which is probably IC 256 but is usually listed as IC 257, and PGC 10737, which is probably not an IC object but is usually listed as IC 256
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 10729 and PGC 10737
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 10729, which is probably IC 256 but is usually listed as IC 257, and PGC 10737, which is probably not an IC object but is usually listed as IC 256
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 10729
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 10729, which is probably IC 256 but is usually listed as IC 257

PGC 10737 (usually but probably incorrectly listed as
IC 256)
A magnitude 16.9 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Perseus (RA 02 49 40.3, Dec +46 57 16)
Historical Identification: (Refer to IC 256 for a historical discussion of the probable misidentification, and to PGC 10729 for images.)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8755 km/sec, PGC 10737 is about 410 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin (from the image below), it is about 60 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 10737, which is usually but probably incorrectly listed as IC 256
Above, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 10737 (see PGC 10729 for more images

IC 258 (= PGC 10730)
Discovered (Sep 3, 1891) by
Sherburne Burnham
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type (R)SBb?) in Perseus (RA 02 49 46.0, Dec +41 03 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 258 (Burnham, 1860 RA 02 40 49, NPD 49 31.5) is "very faint, a very little brighter middle, 9.5 magnitude star 2 arcmin to east". The position precesses to RA 02 49 45.8, Dec +41 03 38, on the northern edge of the galaxy listed above (which is the eastern member of a pair of galaxies separated by one arcmin), and the 10th magnitude star just under 2' to the east (BD+40 608) makes the identification certain. (Warning: Since the NGC/IC catalogs are in order of right ascension, IC 258 would normally be to the west of IC 259, but their positions were reversed by a blunder made by Burnham in converting the 1891 position of IC 259 to the 1860 equinox. Some references have not picked up on that error, and therefore have the identifications backwards.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.15 by 1.05 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 258 and lenticular galaxy IC 259
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 258 and 259
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the pair
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 258 and lenticular galaxy IC 259
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of IC 258
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 258

IC 259 (= PGC 10721 + a foreground star)
Discovered (Sep 3, 1891) by
Sherburne Burnham
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Perseus (RA 02 49 40.9, Dec +41 03 18)
plus a 15th-magnitude double star at RA 02 49 39.8, Dec +41 03 32
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 259 (Burnham, 1860 RA 02 41 12, NPD 49 31.4) is "very faint, double, distance 17 arcsec", "distance" referring to the separation of the two nuclei (one of which is actually a star). The position precesses to RA 02 50 09.0, Dec +41 03 41, several arcmin to the east of a pair of galaxies, the eastern member of which is IC 258 (which see for images). Burnham measured the 1891 positions of the two nebulae as offsets from 10th-magnitude BD+40 608 (which lies just under 2 arcmin east of IC 258), then converted the 1891 positions to the 1860 equinox. Dreyer correctly copied Burnham's 1860 positions, which put IC 259 to the east of IC 258 (as would be normal if correct, since the catalog is in order of right ascension). However, Burnham's offsets for the two nebulae show that he made a blunder in converting IC 259's position from the equinox of 1891 to that of 1860. Those offsets place his "Nebula 2" almost exactly one arcmin west of "Nebula 1", not well to its east. The corrected position falls right on the galaxy listed above, which appears to be a double as stated in its description (though the northwestern "nebula" is actually a double star), so the identification is certain. (Warning: Since the NGC/IC catalogs are in order of right ascension, IC 259 would normally be to the east of IC 258, as noted above. But Burnham's error in doing the equinox conversions reversed their positions. Unfortunately, some references have not picked up on that error, and therefore have the identifications backwards.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin.
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy IC 259
Above, a 0.6 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of IC 259; see IC 258 for more images

IC 260 (= PGC 10812)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1888) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.2 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Perseus (RA 02 51 00.9, Dec +46 57 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 260 (Swift list VIII (#4), 1860 RA 02 41 40, NPD 43 37.3) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, 2 faint stars near, 3rd of 3", the others being IC 256 and 257. The position precesses to RA 02 51 01.9, Dec +46 57 41, on the northeastern edge of the galaxy, and two 13th-magnitude stars to the southwest exactly match Swift's Catalogue No. 8 note (which states that the galaxy is "in line with" the stars), so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.5 by 1.0 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 260
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 260
Below, a 1.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 260

PGC 213106
Not an IC object but listed here as a possible companion of
IC 206
A magnitude 15.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0/a? pec) in Perseus (RA 02 50 50.8, Dec +46 57 46)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.25 by 0.25 arcmin (from the image below); nothing else available. Noted as an apparent "companion" of IC 206 by Corwin, but it is probably a background galaxy, rather than an actual companion.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC213106, also showing IC 260
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 213106, also showing IC 260
Below, a 0.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC213106

IC 261 (=
NGC 1120 = PGC 10664)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 1120)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1891) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 261)
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0-) in Eridanus (RA 02 49 04.1, Dec -14 28 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 261 (Javelle #98, 1860 RA 02 42 26, NPD 105 03.3) is "faint, pretty large". The position precesses to RA 02 49 03.6, Dec -14 28 14, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Per Corwin, the double listing is due to Leavenworth's position being off by a minute, so it appeared that there were multiple objects in the region; but the descriptions are identical, so the identity with NGC 1120 (which see for anything else) is also certain.

IC 262 (= PGC 10850)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1888) by
Edward Swift
A magnitude 13.2 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0/a?) in Perseus (RA 02 51 43.3, Dec +42 49 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 262 (Swift list VIII (#5), 1860 RA 02 42 34, NPD 47 45.3) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, between 2 stars, very difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.6 by 1.3 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 262=
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 262
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 262

IC 263 (= PGC 10716)
Discovered (Nov 9, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Cetus (RA 02 49 40.0, Dec -00 04 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 263 (Javelle #99, 1860 RA 02 43 25, NPD 90 42.0) is "very faint, very small, round, nucleus = 14th magnitude". The position precesses to RA 02 57 45.0, Dec +00 26 49, but there is nothing there. Per Corwin, Javelle mistakenly thought he used BD-00 438 as his comparison star for IC 263 and IC 264, but actually used BD-00 436. This made his RA 57s too large, and his NPD 2.6 arcmin too large. A corrected position (1860 RA 02 42 28, NPD 90 39.4) precesses to RA 02 49 37.5, Dec -00 04 23, only half an arcmin west of the galaxy listed above, which fits Javelle's description, so the identification is as certain as the supposition about the use of the wrong reference star. But as already noted, Javelle apparently made the same mistake with IC 264 (discovered in the same region on the same night), so the identification appears as certain as most.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 10716, which is almost certainly IC 263
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 263
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 10716, which is almost certainly IC 263

IC 264 (= PGC 10644)
Discovered (Nov 9, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.7 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Cetus (RA 02 48 47.6, Dec -00 06 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 264 (Javelle #100, 1860 RA 02 43 44, NPD 90 44.4) is "very faint, extremely small, round, stellar". The position precesses to RA 02 50 53.3, Dec -00 09 33, but as in the case of IC 263, there is nothing there. However, as noted in the entry for IC 263, it appears that Javelle mistakenly thought he had used BD-00 438 as his comparison star for IC 263 and 264, but actually used BD-00 436. This made his RA 57s too large, and his NPD 2.6 arcmin too large. A corrected position (1860 RA 02 42 47, NPD 90 41.8) precesses to RA 02 49 56.4, Dec -00 06 49, but unlike IC 263, for which the corrected position falls very close to an appropriate galaxy, there is still nothing at the position. However, Corwin notes that if Javelle also made the relatively common mistake of reversing the direction of the offset in RA from the companion star, then instead of being 35 seconds east of BD-00 436 it would have been 35 seconds west, and its re-corrected 1860 position (RA 02 41 37, NPD 90 41.8) would precess to RA 02 48 46.4, Dec -00 06 40, only half an arcmin west of the galaxy listed above, which perfectly fits Javelle's description, so although it took some work to get there the identification appears certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below). Listed as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 1).
SDSS image of region near  lenticular galaxy PGC 10644, which is almost certainly IC 264
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 264
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of  lenticular galaxy PGC 10644, which is almost certainly IC 264

IC 265 (= PGC 10978)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1888) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.6 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Perseus (RA 02 54 44.0, Dec +41 39 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 265 (Swift list VIII (#6), 1860 RA 02 45 46, NPD 48 54.8) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.85 by 0.7 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 265, also showing NGC 1129, NGC 1130 and NGC 1131
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 265, also showing NGC 1129, 1130 and 1131
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 265

IC 266 (= PGC 11002)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1888) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Perseus (RA 02 55 04.6, Dec +42 15 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 266 (Swift list VIII (#7), 1860 RA 02 45 59, NPD 48 18.8) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.95 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 266
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 266
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 266

IC 267 (= PGC 10932)
Discovered (Nov 8. 1887) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (Nov 28, 1888) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(s)b) in Aries (RA 02 53 50.2, Dec +12 50 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 267 (Bigourdan 138, Swift list VII (#7), 1860 RA 02 46 29, NPD 77 44.0) is "very faint, pretty small, diffuse, II 254 to northwest", (WH) II 254 being NGC 1134.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 2.0 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 267
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 267
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 267
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 267

IC 268 (= PGC 11032)
Discovered (Dec 1, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type SABab?) in Eridanus (RA 02 55 27.0, Dec -14 06 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 268 (Javelle #101, 1860 RA 02 48 48, NPD 104 40.4) is "very faint, very small, irregularly round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 268, also showing IC 269 and IC 270
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 268, also showing IC 269 and 270
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 268
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 268

IC 269 (= PGC 11033)
Discovered (Dec 1, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0(rs)a?) in Eridanus (RA 02 55 26.5, Dec -14 04 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 269 (Javelle #102, 1860 RA 02 48 49, NPD 104 38.1) is "extremely faint, very small, diffuse".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.1 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below). Probably a Seyfert galaxy.
DSS image of  lenticular galaxy IC 269
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of IC 269; for a wider view see IC 268
Below, a 1 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of  lenticular galaxy IC 269

IC 270 (= PGC 11061)
Discovered (Dec 1, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type E/SA0?) in Eridanus (RA 02 55 44.2, Dec -14 12 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 270 (Javelle #103, 1860 RA 02 49 07, NPD 104 46.4) is "pretty bright, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.2 by 1.8 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 270, also showing IC 272
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 270, also showing IC 272
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 270
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of nucleus of lenticular galaxy IC 270

IC 271 (= PGC 11078)
Discovered (Dec 14, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.8 irregular galaxy (type Irr? pec?) in Eridanus (RA 02 55 59.5, Dec -12 00 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 271 (Javelle #573, 1860 RA 02 49 18, NPD 102 34.9) is "very faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.15 by 0.7 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 271
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 271
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of irregular galaxy IC 271
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the central galaxy
PanSTARRS image of central portion of irregular galaxy IC 271

IC 272 (= PGC 11086)
Discovered (Dec 1, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc?) in Eridanus (RA 02 56 06.4, Dec -14 11 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 272 (Javelle #104, 1860 RA 02 49 29, NPD 104 45.0) is "very faint, small, irregular figure".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.0 by 0.65 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 272, also showing IC 270
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 272, also showing IC 270
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 272
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 272

IC 273 (= PGC 11156)
Discovered (Jan 6, 1894) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Cetus (RA 02 57 10.8, Dec +02 46 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 273 (Javelle #574, 1860 RA 02 49 55, NPD 87 46.5) is "faint, pretty small, a little extended 235°, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.45 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 273
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 273
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 273

WORKING HERE: historical identification
lost or nonexistent RA 03 00 05.2, Dec +44 12 55
triple star RA 03 00 17.7, Dec +44 13 34
galaxy RA 03 00 42.1, Dec +44 15 29

IC 274
Recorded (Oct 31, 1888) by
Lewis Swift
A lost or nonexistent object in Perseus (RA 03 00 05.2, Dec +44 12 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 274 (Swift list VIII (#8), 1860 RA 02 50 50, NPD 46 20.8) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, very difficult". Swift's Catalogue No. 8 note adds "Preceding of 2" (the other being IC 275) and "The most difficult object yet seen here. Another still fainter suspected near". The position precesses to RA 03 00 05.2, Dec +44 12 55 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there, and numerous efforts to identify what Swift might have seen have produced no satisfactory result. Given the statement about how hard it was to observe the object, it might never have existed. Or it might have been a 'ghost' or internal reflection image caused by BD+43 614, the 9.5 magnitude star to the south of Swift's position. Or it might have been PGC 138572, an object proposed but rejected by Corwin for lack of any evidence to support the proposal. It could even have been SDSS J030020.53+441259.0, the faint galaxy 15s of time due east of Swift's position, which with its superimposed foreground star would be as good a fit for his description as anything else. In other words, it could be almost anything or nothing; hence its description here as "lost or nonexistent".
SDSS image of region centered on Swift's position for the lost or nonexistent IC 274, also showing spiral galaxy SDSS J030020.53+441259.0, which may or may not be what Swift observed
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 274's position
(also showing SDSS J030020.53+441259.0)

SDSS J030020.53+441259.0 (a possible candidate for
IC 274)
Not an IC object but a possible candidate for the otherwise lost or nonexistent IC 274
A magnitude 17(?) spiral galaxy (type SBd?) in Perseus (RA 03 00 20.53, Dec +44 12 59)
plus (if actually = IC 274) a 16th-magnitude foreground star at RA 03 00 19.9, Dec +44 12 59
Historical Identification: As discussed in the entry for IC 274, this is one of several candidates for that IC object, but there is no adequate evidence to accept any of them as actually being that otherwise lost or nonexistent object.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin (from the images below); nothing else known (even its designation is simply taken from its position in the SDSS image database).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy SDSS J030020.53+441259.0, a possible candidate for the otherwise lost or nonexistent IC 274, also showing PGC 138572, another candidate for that title
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on SDSS J030020.53+441259.0, also showing PGC 138572
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy SDSS J030020.53+441259.0, a possible candidate for the otherwise lost or nonexistent IC 274

PGC 138572 (a possible candidate for
IC 274)
Not an IC object but a possible candidate for the otherwise lost or nonexistent IC 274
A magnitude 15.5(?) spiral galaxy (type Sc pec?) in Perseus (RA 03 00 42.1, Dec +44 15 29)
Historical Identification: As discussed in the entry for IC 274, this is one of several candidates for that IC object, but there is no adequate evidence to accept any of them as actually being that otherwise lost or nonexistent object.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.7 by 0.2 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 138572, a possible candidate for the otherwise lost or nonexistent IC 274, also showing SDSS J030020.53+441259.0, another candidate for that title, and the galaxies listed as IC 275
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 138572;
also shown are IC 275 and SDSS J030020.53+441259.0
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 138572, a possible candidate for the otherwise lost or nonexistent IC 274

IC 275 (= PGC 11389 + PGC 11388 + PGC 11390)
Discovered (Oct 31, 1888) by
Lewis Swift
A triplet of galaxies in Perseus
PGC 11388 = A magnitude 16.5 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) at RA 03 00 55.9, Dec +44 20 47
PGC 11389 = A magnitude 16.3 elliptical galaxy (type E1 pec?) at RA 03 00 55.9, Dec +44 21 01
PGC 11390 = A magnitude 15.6 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) at RA 03 00 58.6, Dec +44 20 59
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 275 (Swift list VIII (#9), 1860 RA 02 51 40, NPD 46 12.8) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, between 2 stars". Swift's Catalogue No. 8 note adds "Faint star near to west, double star near to southwest, following of 2", the other being IC 274. The position precesses to RA 03 00 56.2, Dec +44 20 48, on the southern side of the brightest of the three galaxies listed above, and the stars to the south and southwest make the identification certain. The main question about the identification has to do with the statement "between 2 stars", which does not seem to apply to the group unless Swift thought the eastern member of the triplet was a faint star. For that reason some think that only the western pair (PGC 11388 and 11389) should be IC 275, but it is general practice to apply the term to all three galaxies, as I have done here.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 9735 km/sec, PGC 11389 is about 450 million light years across. Given that and its apparent size of 1.1 by 1.0 arcmin, it is about 140 thousand light years across. Presuming the other galaxies are at the same distance (LEDA lists the same recessional velocity for PGC 11388 and 11389, but NED only assigns the recessional velocity to PGC 11389), PGC 11388's apparent size of 0.45 by 0.4 arcmin corresponds to about 60 thousand light years, and PGC 11390's apparent size of 0.45 by 0.45 arcmin corresponds to about 60 thousand light years.
SDSS image of region near the elliptical galaxies that comprise IC 275, also showing PGC 138752, a possible candidate for the otherwise lost or nonexistent IC 274
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 275, also showing PGC 138572
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxies that comprise IC 275
SDSS image of elliptical galaxies PGC 11388, 11389 and 11390, which comprise IC 275
Below, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image also showing the stars probably noted by Swift
SDSS image of the elliptical galaxies that comprise IC 275, also showing the stars that help make the identity certain

IC 276 (= PGC 11264)
Discovered (Dec 14, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.1 lenticular galaxy (type SAB0?) in Eridanus (RA 02 58 41.0, Dec -15 42 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 276 (Javelle #575, 1860 RA 02 52 08, NPD 106 16.2) is "pretty bright, small, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.95 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 276
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 276
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 276
Below, a 1 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy IC 276

IC 277 (= PGC 11336)
Discovered (Jan 6, 1894) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc? pec) in Cetus (RA 02 59 50.6, Dec +02 46 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 277 (Javelle #576, 1860 RA 02 52 35, NPD 87 47.4) is "pretty bright. pretty small, round, nucleus = 12.5 magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size of central galaxy of about 1.0 by 0.75 arcmin; extent of outer regions 2.25 by 1.2 arcmin (all from the images below). A starburst galaxy.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 277
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 277
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 277

IC 278 (= PGC 11414)
Discovered (Sep 12, 1890) by
Sherburne Burnham
A magnitude 13.2 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Perseus (RA 03 01 30.4, Dec +37 45 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 278 (Burnham, 1860 RA 02 52 39, NPD 52 47.6) is "very faint, 10th magnitude star 95 arcsec to west, faint star 12 arcsec to southwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.65 by 1.25 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 278
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 278
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 278

IC 279 (= PGC 11401)
Discovered (Dec 29, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc?) in Aries (RA 03 01 12.2, Dec +16 12 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 279 (Javelle #577, 1860 RA 02 53 24, NPD 74 20.3) is "very faint, very small, round, diffuse".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.75 by 0.45 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 279
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 279
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 279
Below, a 1 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 279

IC 280
Recorded (Oct 27, 1888) by
Lewis Swift
A lost or nonexistent object in Perseus (RA 03 03 20.1, Dec +42 21 21)
or possibly a 13th-magnitude stellar grouping at RA 03 03 04.1, Dec +42 21 27
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 280 (Swift list VIII (#10), 1860 RA 02 54 11, NPD 48 11.9) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round". The position precesses to RA 03 03 20.1, Dec +42 21 21 (whence the position above), but there are no nebulae anywhere near there that Swift could possibly have seen. However, there is a fairly compact group of faint stars about 3 arcmin due west of the position that Swift might have mistaken for a nebular object, with a total brightness comparable to other objects he described as "extremely faint". So although there can be no certainty attached to the identification, the group of stars is considered a reasonable candidate for IC 280, and is generally assumed to be so.
SDSS image of region near Swift's position for the lost or nonexistent IC 280, also showing the group of stars generally assumed to be what he recorded
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on Swift's position for IC 280,
also showing the group of stars assumed to be what he recorded

IC 281 (=
NGC 1177 = PGC 11581)
Discovered (Nov 29, 1874) by Lawrence Parsons, 4th Earl of Rosse (and later listed as NGC 1177)
Discovered (Nov 1, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 281)
A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Perseus (RA 03 04 37.2, Dec +42 21 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 281 (Swift list VIII (#11), 1860 RA 02 55 23, NPD 48 11.9) is "most extremely faint, very small, star close to north, II 607 near", (WH) II 607 being NGC 1175. The position precesses to RA 03 04 32.7, Dec +42 21 11, about an arcmin southwest of NGC 1177, and between it and NGC 1175. There is nothing else nearby, and the star directly north of NGC 1177 makes it clear that Swift had simply "rediscovered" NGC 1177 (which see for anything else). Corwin feels that either Swift or Dreyer should have realized the duplication, especially since Dreyer observed NGC 1177 with Lord Rosse's 72-inch Leviathan; but as in many other cases where such things seem obvious in hindsight, no one caught the oversight, resulting in the duplicate entry.

IC 282 (=
NGC 1198 = PGC 11648)
Discovered (Dec 6, 1880) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 1198)
Discovered (Oct 27, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 282)
A magnitude 12.5 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Perseus (RA 03 06 13.2, Dec +41 50 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 282 (Swift list VIII (#12), 1860 RA 02 56 03, NPD 48 41.7) is "extremely faint, small, round, between 2 nearby stars". The position precesses to RA 03 05 11.0, Dec +41 51 17, but there is nothing there. However, per Corwin, the description fits NGC 1198 (which see for anything else), which is almost exactly a minute of time due east, so a duplication of that entry seems reasonably certain.

IC 283 (= PGC 11539)
Discovered (Dec 4, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Cetus (RA 03 03 50.6, Dec -00 12 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 283 (Javelle #105, 1860 RA 02 56 42, NPD 90 45.7) is "pretty bright, extremely small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.75 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below). A Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 283
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 283
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 283

IC 284 (= PGC 11643)
Discovered (Oct 27, 1888) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 11.5 spiral galaxy (type SAd?) in Perseus (RA 03 06 09.9, Dec +42 22 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 284 (Swift list VIII (#13), 1860 RA 02 56 47, NPD 48 10.9) is "most extremely faint, pretty large, a little extended, double star to northwest, between 2 stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 4.1 by 1.5 arcmin (from the images below). The western side of the galaxy overlaps PGC 11646, which lies behind the larger galaxy; but there is no evidence of any interaction between them, so they are probably an optical double.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 284 and lenticular galaxy PGC 11646
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 284, also showing PGC 11646
Below, a 4.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the optical double
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 284 and lenticular galaxy PGC 11646

PGC 11646
Not an IC object but listed here since an optical double with
IC 284
A magnitude 16.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type (R)E/S0?) in Perseus (RA 03 06 06.6, Dec +42 21 56)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.55 arcmin; nothing else available, but since it lies behind IC 284 (which see for images), it must be as far or (probably only slightly) further away.

IC 285 (= PGC 11557)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type SAB0/a?) in Eridanus (RA 03 04 06.2, Dec -12 00 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 285 (Javelle #578, 1860 RA 02 57 25, NPD 102 34.3) is "faint, very small, diffuse, II 475 to west", (WH) II 475 being NGC 1200.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.25 by 0.3 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 285, also showing NGC 1200
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 285, also showing NGC 1200
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 285
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy IC 285

IC 286
Recorded (Dec 14, 1890) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A lost or nonexistent object in Eridanus (RA 03 04 47.5, Dec -06 29 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 286 (Bigourdan #139, 1860 RA 02 57 53, NPD 97 02) is "very faint". The position precesses to RA 03 04 47.5, Dec -06 29 07 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there. Corwin says that at one time he thought IC 286 might be an erroneous measurement of the relatively nearby NGC 1202, but later decided that since Bigourdan also observed NGC 1202 on the same night, IC 286 must be something else. What it might be is unknown, because the reference star Bigourdan claimed to have used does not exist at or anywhere near the position he ascribed to it. His description of the field is fairly exact, so it it possible that at some point the reference star and IC 286 may be identified, but for now it remains a lost or nonexistent object.
DSS image of region near Bigourdan's position for the currently lost or nonexistent IC 286
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Bigourdan's position for IC 286

IC 287 (= PGC 170040)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Eridanus (RA 03 04 57.8, Dec -12 04 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 287 (Javelle #579, 1860 RA 02 58 17, NPD 102 37.6) is "faint, very small, round, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.55 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 287
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 287
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 287
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of nucleus of lenticular galaxy IC 287

IC 288 (= PGC 11702)
Discovered (Oct 31, 1888) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Perseus (RA 03 07 32.9, Dec +42 23 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 288 (Swift list VIII (#14), 1860 RA 02 58 17, NPD 48 10.7) is "very faint, very small, round, 2 stars to northeast, perhaps a small cluster?".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.3 by 0.45 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 288
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 288
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 288

IC 289
Discovered (Sep 2, 1888) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.2 planetary nebula in Cassiopeia (RA 03 10 19.3, Dec +61 19 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 289 (Swift list VIII (#15), 1860 RA 02 59 07, NPD 29 12.9) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, between 2 very faint stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.85 by 0.8 arcmin (from the images below).
Superposition of NOAO image of region near planetary nebula IC 289 on a DSS background to provide more detail and fill in missing areas
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on IC 289
(NOAO image below superimposed on a DSS background)
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide image of the nebula
(Image Credit Brad Ehrhorn/John Smith/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO image of planetary nebula IC 289
Below, a 1 arcmin wide false-color image of the nebula (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST detail of planetary nebula IC 289

IC 290 (=
IC 1884 = PGC 11817)
Discovered (Sep 11, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 290)
Discovered (1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1884)
A magnitude 14.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Perseus (RA 03 09 42.8, Dec +40 58 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 290 (Swift list VIII (#16), 1860 RA 03 00 35, NPD 49 33.3) is "most extremely faint, small, round". The position precesses to RA 03 09 41.7, Dec +40 59 02, just north of the eastern side of the galaxy listed above, so the identification is certain. (See IC 1884 for a discussion of the double listing.)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.35 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 290
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 290
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image oflenticular galaxy IC 290

IC 291 (= PGC 11699)
Discovered (Oct 13, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(rs)a?) in Eridanus (RA 03 07 26.4, Dec -12 35 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 291 (Javelle #106, 1860 RA 03 00 46, NPD 103 08.1) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.45 by 0.55 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 291
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 291
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 291
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the central galaxy
PanSTARRS image of central regions of spiral galaxy IC 291

IC 292 (=
IC 1887 = PGC 11846)
Discovered (Sep 11, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 292)
"Discovered" (1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1887)
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Perseus (RA 03 10 12.9, Dec +40 45 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 292 (Swift list VIII (#17), 1860 RA 03 01 10, NPD 49 46.5) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, star to south, between 2 stars". The position precesses to RA 03 10 16.0, Dec +40 45 44, less than an arcmin west-southwest of the galaxy (more nearly between the two stars to its southwest than the galaxy itself), so the identification is certain. (See IC 1887 for a discussion of the double listing.)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.15 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 292
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 292
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 292

IC 293 (=
IC 1888 = PGC 11873)
Discovered (Sep 11, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 293)
Also observed (1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1888)
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0(r)a?) in Perseus (RA 03 10 56.2, Dec +41 08 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 293 (Swift list VIII (#18), 1860 RA 03 01 44, NPD 49 23.7) is "extremely faint, small, round". The position precesses to RA 03 10 51.9, Dec +41 08 27, only an arcmin west of the galaxy, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain. (See IC 1888 for a discussion of the double listing.)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.9 by 0.75 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 293
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 293
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 293

IC 294 = IC 295 = IC 296 = PGC 11878
On Sep 11 and 14, 1888 Lewis Swift recorded three "nebulae" in nearly the same position, a position that contains only a single galaxy. Such multiple records of a single object are not unprecendented, so it is possible that all three observations were of the same object, with slightly different measurements of its position. It is also possible that only one of the three observations was of the galaxy, and the other two were of individual stars or groups of stars that Swift mistook for nebulous objects, perhaps due to the "seeing" being different on the nights in question. There is no way of knowing which scenario is correct, so some students of the field assign all three numbers to the galaxy, while others assign one to the galaxy and list the others as lost or nonexistent. I suspect that whatever Swift thought he observed in the region, all three of his observations were of that galaxy or of something associated with it, so I have treated them as duplicate entries.

IC 294 (= PGC 11878 =
IC 295 = IC 296 = IC 1889)
Discovered (Sep 11, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 294)
Probably re-recorded (Sep 11, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 295)
Probably re-recorded (Sep 14, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 296)
Discovered (1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1889)
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(rs)a?) in Perseus (RA 03 11 03.1, Dec +40 37 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 294 (Swift list VIII (#19), 1860 RA 03 01 50, NPD 49 54.2) is "very faint, pretty small, irregularly round". The position precesses to RA 03 10 55.8, Dec +40 37 57, less than an arcmin from the western edge of the galaxy, so the identification is certain. (See IC 295, 296 and 1889 for a discussion of the duplicate listings.)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.9 by 1.25 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 294
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 294
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 294

WORKING HERE: Check most recent identifications of IC 295/296

IC 295 (= PGC 11878 =
IC 294 = IC 296 = IC 1889)
Discovered (Sep 11, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 294)
Probably re-recorded (Sep 11, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 295)
Probably re-recorded (Sep 14, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 296)
Discovered (1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1889)
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB0/a?(rs)) in Perseus (RA 03 11 03.1, Dec +40 37 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 295 (Swift list VIII (#20), 1860 RA 03 01 55, NPD 49 55.2) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round". The position precesses to RA 03 11 00.8, Dec +40 36 56, within the western outline of IC 294, so it appears that this is a duplicate record for that galaxy (which see for anything else). (Corwin lists as lost?)

IC 296 (= PGC 11878 =
IC 294 = IC 295 = IC 1889)
Discovered (Sep 11, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 294)
Probably re-recorded (Sep 11, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 295)
Probably re-recorded (Sep 14, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 296)
Discovered (1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1889)
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB0/a?(rs)) in Perseus (RA 03 11 03.1, Dec +40 37 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 296 (Swift list VIII (#21), 1860 RA 03 01 59, NPD 49 54.5) is "extremely faint, pretty small, irregularly round, faint double star to west". The position precesses to RA 03 11 04.9, Dec +40 37 37, practically on the nucleus of IC 264, and the pair of 14th-magnitude stars to the west of the galaxy certainly fits the description, so it appears that this is a duplicate record for that galaxy (which see for anything else). (Corwin lists as lost?)

WORKING HERE: Corwin lists questionable identifications of IC 297
double star at RA 03 13 18.4, Dec +42 08 53 (preferred by Steinicke)
double star at RA 03 13 01.4, Dec +42 09 18

IC 297
Recorded (Sep 15, 1888) by
Lewis Swift
A lost or nonexistent object in Perseus (RA 03 13 15.1, Dec +42 06 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 297 (Swift list VIII (#22), 1860 RA 03 04 02, NPD 48 25.5) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, very difficult, faint star to southwest" (Swift's Catalogue No. 8 note adds "4 stars in line to south"). The position precesses to RA 03 13 15.1, Dec +42 06 18 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there. The position must be fairly accurate, as there is an obvious line of 4 stars running nearly east-west to the southwest of it, but there are no nebulae anywhere near the position, and although there are a number of scattered stars, which if any of them are what Swift recorded is not obvious (it would depend upon how bright Swift's "faint star to southwest" is, which is unknown). Several suggestions have been made as to which star or pair of stars might be IC 297, but given how uncertain all such identifications are, it seems best to just list the object as lost or nonexistent.
SDSS image of region near Swift's position for the lost or nonexistent IC 297
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on Swift's position for IC 297

Corwin lists galaxy at RA 03 11 18.9, Dec +01 18 51 (the pair below?)
but also lists pair at RA 03 11 19.4, Dec +01 18 48

IC 298 (= PGC 1190197 (= PGC 11890 + SDSS J031118.4+011856)) =
Arp 147)
Discovered (Dec 29, 1893) by Stephane Javelle
A pair of galaxies in Cetus
SDSS J031118.4+011856 = A magnitude 14(?) ring galaxy (type (R)Irr pec) at RA 03 11 18.4, Dec +01 18 56
PGC 11890 = A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type (R)S0(r)a? pec) at RA 03 11 19.6, Dec +01 18 50
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 298 (Javelle #580, 1860 RA 03 04 05, NPD 89 12.4) is "faint, pretty large, 2 bright points involved".
Physical Information: (The PGC designations are not entirely clear, but it appears that PGC 11890 refers specifically to the eastern member of the pair, while PGC 1190197 refers to both members, and hence to Arp 147.) IC 298 is a pair of peculiar galaxies almost certainly created by a galactic collision, in which one galaxy (the eastern "1") passed through the center of the other (the western "0"), removing its core and triggering a starburst in the remaining portion of the galaxy, which formed a circular ring of hot, bright stars and heated gases, and thanks to being nearly face-on to our line of sight, looks like a ring. The other galaxy also suffered considerable distortion and stripping of its core, but was left looking far more normal, partly because it is nearly edge-on to our line of sight, so its essentially circular outer ring is not so obviously a circle. The odd result is a pair of galaxies that look like the numbers "1" and "0" placed side by side in the sky. Note: The eastern member of the pair is sometimes misidentified as PGC 11893; that is actually a galaxy a few arcmin to the southeast, as shown in the wide-field image below.
 Based on a recessional velocity of 9655 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 298 is about 450 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy pair was about 430 to 435 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 440 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.45 by 0.35 arcmin, the western "0" is about 55 to 60 thousand light years across, while the eastern "1", with an apparent size of about 0.3 by 0.1 arcmin (apparent sizes of both galaxies from the HST image below) is about 35 to 40 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near the pair of ring galaxies known as IC 298 and as Arp 147, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas; also shown is spiral galaxy PGC 11893, which is sometimes called IC 298A
Above, an SDSS image centered on IC 298, also showing PGC 11893
(the SDSS image above is overlaid on a 12 arcmin wide DSS image to fill in missing areas)
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair
SDSS image of the pair of ring galaxies listed as IC 298, and also known as Arp 147
Below, a 0.6 by 0.7 arcmin wide image of the pair (Image Credit NASA, ESA, & M. Livio (STScI), HubbleSite)
HST image of the pair of ring galaxies listed as IC 298 and also known as Arp 147

PGC 11893 (not = "IC 298A", and not part of
IC 298)
Not an IC object but listed here since sometimes misidentified as part of double galaxy IC 298
A magnitude 14.9 galaxy (type SBd? pec?) in Cetus (RA 03 11 27.8, Dec +01 17 12)
Historical Identification: Unlike many galaxies that are labeled as "NGC xxxA" or IC xxxA" because they are near the NGC/IC object in question, PGC 11893 is sometimes called IC 298A because of a misuse of its PGC listing in describing one of the components of IC 298. It is not in any way associated with IC 298, nor does its PGC designation have anything to do with either member of the pair.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.45 by 0.35 arcmin (from the image below); nothing else appears to be available.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 11893, which is sometimes called IC 298A
Above, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 11893; for a wide-field view, see IC 298

IC 299 (= PGC 942795)
Discovered (Oct 13, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Eridanus (RA 03 11 02.5, Dec -13 06 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 299 (Javelle #107, 1860 RA 03 04 25, NPD 103 38.6) is "very faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.85 by 0.75 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 299
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 299
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 299
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of lenticular galaxy IC 299
Celestial Atlas
(IC 200 - 249) ←IC Objects: IC 250 - 299→ (IC 300 - 349)