Celestial Atlas
(IC 2950 - 2999) ←     IC Objects: IC 3000 - 3049 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 3050 - 3099)
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3000, 3001, 3002, 3003, 3004, 3005, 3006, 3007, 3008, 3009, 3010, 3011, 3012,
3013, 3014, 3015, 3016, 3017, 3018, 3019, 3020, 3021, 3022, 3023, 3024, 3025,
3026, 3027, 3028, 3029, 3030, 3031, 3032, 3033, 3034, 3035, 3036, 3037, 3038,
3039, 3040, 3041, 3042, 3043, 3044, 3045, 3046, 3047, 3048, 3049

Page last updated Dec 27, 2015 (checked Steinicke discovery revisions)
WORKING: Add basic pix, tags

IC 3000
Recorded (July, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A nonexistent object in Hydra (RA 12 06 08.4, Dec -29 40 46)
Per Dreyer, IC 3000 (DeLisle Stewart #358, 1860 RA 11 58 57, NPD 118 54) is "faint, indistinct (possible defect)". The position precesses to RA 12 06 08.4, Dec -29 40 46, but there is nothing there, save for a 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy that would have been listed as "extremely faint" or more likely, "most extremely faint", and Stewart and Dreyer's suspicion that #358 was a plate defect is almost certainly correct.

IC 3001 (= PGC 38379)
Discovered (Jun 12, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (1210)
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Ursa Major (RA 12 06 16.7, Dec +33 31 34)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3001
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3001
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS region near image of spiral galaxy IC 3001

IC 3002 (= PGC 38443)
Discovered (Jun 12, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (1211)
A magnitude 15.6 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 07 04.2, Dec +33 22 57)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3002
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3002
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS region near image of spiral galaxy IC 3002

IC 3003 (= PGC 38490)
Discovered (May 26, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 07 32.5, Dec +32 48 48)
Per Dreyer, IC 3003 (Javelle #1212, 1860 RA 11 59 59, NPD 56 22.1) is "faint, small, diffuse, nuclear, mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 12 07 07.4, Dec +32 51 08, several arcmin from any suitable candidate. Per Corwin, the problem is that for this and his #1208 (= IC 2993) Javelle misidentified the comparison star. Using the correct star positively identifies PGC 38490 as the object Javelle observed. Apparent size 0.8 by 0.6 arcmin.

IC 3004 (= PGC 38457)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (795)
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Virgo (RA 12 07 10.2, Dec +13 14 51)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3004
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3004
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS region near image of spiral galaxy IC 3004

IC 3005 (= PGC 38464)
Discovered (July, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart (359)
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SBcd?) in Hydra (RA 12 07 14.3, Dec -30 01 34)
Apparent size 2.3 by 0.4 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3005
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3005
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS region near image of spiral galaxy IC 3005

IC 3006
Recorded (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A nonexistent object in Virgo (RA 12 07 22.9, Dec +13 00 14)
Per Dreyer, IC 3006 (Frost #796, 1860 RA 12 00 15, NPD 76 14) is "round, brighter middle, 15th magnitude". The position precesses to RA 12 07 24.6, Dec +12 59 14, about 2 arcmin southeast of a 14th-magnitude star that is sometimes identified as IC 3006. However (per Corwin), Frost's description doesn't really match the appearance of a starlike object, and a nearly 30 years later description by Adelaide Ames based on the same plate is definitely not that of a stellar object; so Frost's #796 was almost certainly a plate defect, and IC 3006 does not correspond to any real object.

IC 3007 (= PGC 38486)
Discovered (May 26, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle (1213)
A magnitude 14.7 elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 07 30.7, Dec +31 20 55)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin.

IC 3008 (= PGC 38512)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (797)
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 07 51.8, Dec +13 34 41)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3008
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3008
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS region near image of spiral galaxy IC 3008

IC 3009
Recorded (Sep 14, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (221)
A nonexistent object in Hydra (RA 12 08 00.1, Dec +12 38 47)
Per Corwin probably a plate defect, as nothing in the area resembles Schwassmann's description.

IC 3010 (= PGC 38511)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1898) by
Lewis Swift (XI-134)
Also observed (1899?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 12.2 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a) in Hydra (RA 12 07 57.3, Dec -30 20 22)
Apparent size 1.9 by 1.8 arcmin.

IC 3011 (=
NGC 4119 = NGC 4124 = PGC 38527)
Discovered (Jan 18, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4119)
Rediscovered (Mar 15, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4124)
Rediscovered (Feb 23, 1900) by Arnold Schwassmann (124) (and later listed as IC 3011)
A magnitude 11.4 spiral? galaxy (type SA0(r)a?) in Virgo (RA 12 08 09.5, Dec +10 22 44)
(This entry will only contain historical information; for anything else, see NGC 4119.) Herschel's early observations were not as accurate as his later ones, and a poor position for his initial observation of this galaxy led to its being assigned two NGC numbers and (much later on) an IC number as well. Per Corwin, Schwassmann's position is essentially identical to that of the NGC listing, so it must have just been an oversight on his and Dreyer's part that led to the IC listing.

IC 3012 (= PGC 38546)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (798)
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Virgo (RA 12 08 23.9, Dec +11 10 37)
Based on a recessional velocity of 9715 km/sec, IC 3012 is about 450 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin, it is about 100 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3012
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3012
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3012

IC 3013 (= PGC 38547)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (799)
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sd Ring?) in Virgo (RA 12 08 25.6, Dec +10 01 00)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3013
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3013
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3013

IC 3014 (= PGC 38562)
Discovered (Jun 12, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (1214)
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SBbc pec?) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 08 36.9, Dec +38 49 55)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3014
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3014
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3014

IC 3015 (= PGC 38588)
Discovered (Jan 31, 1898) by
Lewis Swift (XI-135)
Also observed (1899?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Hydra (RA 12 09 00.1, Dec -31 31 10)
Apparent size 2.9 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3015
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3015
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3015

IC 3016 (= PGC 38620)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (800)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type SBc(s)) in Virgo (RA 12 09 18.5, Dec +11 25 47)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.6 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 7) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3016
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3016
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3016

IC 3017 (= PGC 1435797)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 15.9 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 09 22.7, Dec +13 37 07)
Per Dreyer, IC 3017 (Frost #801, 1860 RA 12 02 15, NPD 75 37) is "round, brighter middle, diffuse, magnitude 14.5". The position precesses to RA 12 09 24.1, Dec +13 36 14, between two galaxies, but closer to the fainter northern one. The brighter southern one was also observed by Frost on the same night (as Frost #802 = IC 3018, which see for more about this), and if not for an error in the NPD of that object, the identification of the two galaxies would have been simple. Unfortunately, Frost made a 30 arcmin error in the NPD for the southern nebula, so that instead of being recorded as 2 arcmin to the south of Frost #801, it was listed as 28 arcmin to the north. As a result the fainter northern galaxy is usually incorrectly referred to as IC 3018, and the brighter southern one as IC 3017. A future iteration of this page will discuss the situation in more detail, but for now it suffices to say that the identifications given here, though backwards from the usual ones, are absolutely certain. Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3017
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3017
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3018
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3017, also showing spiral galaxy IC 3018

IC 3018 (= PGC 39627)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 09 24.9, Dec +13 34 32)
Per Dreyer, IC 3018 (Frost #802, 1860 RA 12 02 21, NPD 75 09) is "round, a little brighter middle, magnitude 13.5". There is little doubt that Frost's polar distance should have read "NPD 75 39", as with that 30 arcmin correction his observations of IC 3017 and 3018 agree reasonably well in position and brightness with the two galaxies involved. Unfortunately, due to the positional error most references incorrectly assign the brighter southern galaxy to the entry for IC 3017 and the fainter northern galaxy to the entry for IC 3018 (and some assign both entries to the brighter galaxy). However, per Corwin (referring to Adelaide Ames' later examination of Frost's plate), there is no doubt that the northern object is IC 3017 and the southern IC 3018. (A future iteration of this page will discuss the situation in more detail.) Apparent size 0.6 by 0.2 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 10) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3018
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3018
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3017
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3018, also showing spiral galaxy IC 3017

IC 3019 (= PGC 38624)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (803)
A magnitude 13.2 elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 09 22.3, Dec +13 59 32)
Apparent size 1.4 by 1.3 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 9) of the Virgo Cluster.

IC 3020 (= PGC 1452566)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (804)
A magnitude 15.7 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 09 27.1, Dec +14 13 30)
Based on a recessional velocity of 20845 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 3020 is about 970 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 895 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 925 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin, IC 3020 is about 100 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3020
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3020
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3020

IC 3021 (= PGC 38684)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (805)
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sm) in Virgo (RA 12 09 54.5, Dec +13 02 59)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 15) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3021
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3021
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3021

IC 3022 (= PGC 38694)
Discovered (Jun 12, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (1215)
A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 10 02.3, Dec +38 44 26)
Apparent size 2.9 by 0.9 arcmin.

IC 3023 (= PGC 38692)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (806)
A magnitude 14.6 irregular galaxy (type Im?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 10 01.9, Dec +14 22 01)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.6 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 17) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of irregular galaxy IC 3023
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3023
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 3023

IC 3024 (= PGC 38709)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (807)
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Virgo (RA 12 10 12.0, Dec +12 19 32)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.4 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 18) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3024
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3024
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3024

IC 3025 (= PGC 38726)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (808)
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Virgo (RA 12 10 23.0, Dec +10 11 19)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 21) of the Virgo Cluster.

IC 3026
Recorded (July, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart (360)
A nonexistent object in Hydra (RA 12 10 34.0, Dec -29 55 24)
Per Corwin, this must have been a defect on the plate used to photograph the area. Stewart gives offsets of the supposed object relative to IC 764 in his entries for both objects, and they agree with the position Dreyer recorded in the IC2; so the fact that there is nothing at that position means the observation had nothing to do with any celestial body.

IC 3027
Recorded (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (809)
A nonexistent object in Coma Berenices (RA 12 10 30.0, Dec +14 11 36)
Per Corwin, Adelaide Ames (while compiling her Virgo Cluster catalog) noted that this was a defect on the plate Frost used.

IC 3028 (= PGC 38747)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (810)
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type S) in Virgo (RA 12 10 35.6, Dec +11 45 41)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.2 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 24) of the Virgo Cluster. (Note: A Wikisky search for IC 3028 shows an empty area southwest of the galaxy, but the galaxy is properly labeled with its PGC number.)
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3028
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3028
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3028

IC 3029 (= PGC 38755)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (811)
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 10 41.8, Dec +13 19 53)
Apparent size 1.4 by 0.4 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 27) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3029
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3029
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3031
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3029, also showing spiral galaxy IC 3031

IC 3030
Recorded (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (812)
A nonexistent object in Coma Berenices (RA 12 11 06.0, Dec +14 08 36)
Per Corwin, Frost's position was confirmed by Adelaide Ames, using the same plate; so the IC position must be correct, and the fact that there is nothing there means the "object" must have been a plate defect.

IC 3031 (= PGC 92941)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (813)
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 11 04.2, Dec +13 18 29)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.1 arcmin. Edge-on, so impossible to determine an accurate type without far better images.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3031
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3031
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3029
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3031, also showing spiral galaxy IC 3029

IC 3032 (= PGC 38800)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (814)
A magnitude 13.8 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 11 07.8, Dec +14 16 31)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 33) of the Virgo Cluster.

IC 3033 (= PGC 38803)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (815)
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sdm?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 11 10.0, Dec +13 35 17)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 34) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3033
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3033
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3033

IC 3034 (= PGC 1451880)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (816)
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 11 47.7, Dec +14 12 05)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.2 arcmin. Vr 18880 km/sec, so several hundred million light years away.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3034
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3034
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3034

IC 3035 (=
NGC 4165 = PGC 38885)
Rediscovered (Apr 8, 1864) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 4165)
Rediscovered (Nov 16, 1900) by Arnold Schwassmann (and later listed as IC 3035)
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SAB(r)a?) in Virgo (RA 12 12 11.8, Dec +13 14 46)
Per Dreyer, IC 3035 (Schwassmann #222, 1860 RA 12 05 04, NPD 75 58.4) is "faint, considerably small". The position precesses to RA 12 12 12.6, Dec +13 14 51, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. The failure to recognize the equality with NGC 4165 (which see for anything else) is presumably due to the two arcmin error in d'Arrest's position (as discussed at the NGC entry); but there is no doubt that both entries apply to the same galaxy. (Per Corwin, an earlier reference incorrectly equated IC 3035 with the much fainter galaxy to the north of NGC 4165, but Schwassmann's 6-inch telescope couldn't have photographed that with the plates at his disposal.)

IC 3036 (= PGC 38888)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (817)
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type Sm?) in Virgo (RA 12 12 15.1, Dec +12 29 19)
Apparent size 1.6 by 1.2 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 48) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3036
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3036
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3036

IC 3037 (= PGC 38894)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (818)
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Virgo (RA 12 12 20.5, Dec +09 59 09)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 51) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3037
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3037
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3037

IC 3038 (= PGC 3038)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (819)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sab pec?) in Virgo (RA 12 12 32.6, Dec +11 21 12)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 57) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3038
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3038
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3038

IC 3039 (= PGC 38919)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (820)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Virgo (RA 12 12 32.6, Dec +12 18 36)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.3 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 59) of the Virgo Cluster. An unusually bright nucleus, but not listed as a Seyfert galaxy, so perhaps a chance alignment with a foreground star?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3039
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3039
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3039

IC 3040 (= PGC 38922)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (821)
A magnitude 14.6 irregular galaxy (type Irr?) in Virgo (RA 12 12 34.5, Dec +11 04 27)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 60) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of irregular galaxy IC 3040
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3040
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 3040

IC 3041 (= PGC 1415716)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (822)
A magnitude 16.2 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Virgo (RA 12 12 42.7, Dec +12 45 47)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3041
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3041
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3041

IC 3042 (=
NGC 4178 = PGC 38943)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1825) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4178)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1900) by Arnold Schwassmann (151) (and later listed as IC 3042)
A magnitude 11.4 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)dm) in Virgo (RA 12 12 46.2, Dec +10 51 51)
Per Corwin, the duplicate listing was due to a simple oversight on Schwassmann's part. He did not include the NGC number in his table of Virgo Cluster objects, and Dreyer didn't notice the equality with NGC 4178 (which see for anything else).

IC 3043
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (823)
A magnitude 15.4 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Virgo (RA 12 12 47.2, Dec +10 00 36)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3043
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3043
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3043

IC 3044 (= PGC 38945)
Discovered (Nov 22, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (273)
Also recorded (May 7, 1904) by Royal Frost (#??)
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)cd pec?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 12 48.4, Dec +13 58 34)
Apparent size 2.0 by 0.8 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 67) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3044
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3044
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3044

IC 3045
Recorded (Sep 14, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (224)
A nonexistent object in Virgo (RA 12 12 59.7, Dec +12 46 46)
Per Corwin, this is almost certainly a defect on Schwassmann's plate. There is nothing at his position, let alone anything that matches his description ("pretty bright or pretty faint, considerably small, nucleus south of middle, nucleus equivalent to 10.5 magnitude star, small pointed nucleus"). The eccentrically positioned, bright nucleus especially reminds Corwin of the appearance of blemishes found near the edges of glass plates.

IC 3046 (= PGC 38977)
Discovered (Sep 14, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (225)
Also recorded (May 7, 1904) by Royal Frost (#??)
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Virgo (RA 12 13 07.8, Dec +12 55 07)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.3 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 76) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3046
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3046
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3047
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3046, also showing spiral galaxy IC 3047

IC 3047 (= PGC 1420536)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (824)
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Virgo (RA 12 13 14.6, Dec +12 59 50)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3047
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3047
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3046
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3047, also showing spiral galaxy IC 3046

IC 3048
Recorded (Sep 14, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A magnitude 14(?) star in Virgo (RA 12 13 21.5, Dec +13 04 08)
Per Dreyer, IC 3048 (Schwassmann #226, 1860 RA 12 06 14, NPG 76 09.1) is "faint, small, possibly a 13th-magnitude star". The position precesses to RA 12 13 22.4, Dec +13 04 10, almost midway between a pair of faint stars. Per Corwin, the 14th-magnitude western star is probably Schwassmann's #226, as his recorded positions are usually a little east of the objects he observed (so I have used the position of that star as the position for IC 3048). But not having seen the original plate (which appears to have gone missing), Corwin supposes that it might have shown a blended image of the brighter star and the 15th magnitude star to its east; so it is barely possible that IC 3048 is the pair (barely possible in that given their separation, a blended image of the two stars should have looked like an extended, less starlike object than what Schwassmann described).
DSS image of region near the star listed as IC 3048
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the star listed as IC 3048

IC 3049 (= PGC 200284 (+ PGC 39009?))
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost
One or both members of a pair of galaxies in Coma Berenices
Probably PGC 200284 = A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) at RA 12 13 34.1, Dec +14 28 45
(+ PGC 39009?) = A 15th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type IBm pec?) at RA 12 13 33.2, Dec +14 28 58
Per Dreyer, IC 3049 (Frost #825, 1860 RA 12 06 28, NPD 74 45) is "round, perhaps a planetary nebula, magnitude 16". The position precesses to RA 12 13 36.1, Dec +14 28 16, less than an arcmin southeast of a pair of faint galaxies. Per Corwin, IC 3049 is probably the closer, more compact, higher-surface brightness member of the pair (PGC 200284), but not having had a chance to look at Frost's plate, supposes that although the larger, lower-surface brightness member of the pair (PGC 30039, which is a member (VCC 83) of the Virgo Cluster) was probably too faint for Frost to photograph, the pair may have appeared as a single extended image (although the description as "round" argues against that possibility). Of course, modern observational tools allow the lower-surface brightness galaxy to be easily observed, and because of its larger size, to appear more impressive; so although PGC 200284 is probably Frost's IC 3049, the designation is usually applied to the pair. However, they are not a real pair, as PGC 200284, with a recessional velocity of 19040 km/sec (z = 0.063503), is hundreds of millions of light years beyond the Virgo Cluster. Apparent size of PGC 200284 = 0.45 by 0.15 arcmin, of PGC 39009 = 0.65 by 0.35 arcmin. Vr of PGC 39009 is 2440 km/sec.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 200284, which is probably IC 3049, and its apparent companion, irregular galaxy PGC 39009, which is usually treated as part of the IC object
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3049
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the optical double
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 200284, which is probably IC 3049, and its apparent companion, irregular galaxy PGC 39009, which is usually treated as part of the IC object
Celestial Atlas
(IC 2950 - 2999) ←     IC Objects: IC 3000 - 3049     → (IC 3050 - 3099)