Celestial Atlas
(IC 3000 - 3049) ←     IC Objects: IC 3050 - 3099 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 3100 - 3149)
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3050, 3051, 3052, 3053, 3054, 3055, 3056, 3057, 3058, 3059, 3060, 3061, 3062,
3063, 3064, 3065, 3066, 3067, 3068, 3069, 3070, 3071, 3072, 3073, 3074, 3075,
3076, 3077, 3078, 3079, 3080, 3081, 3082, 3083, 3084, 3085, 3086, 3087, 3088,
3089, 3090, 3091, 3092, 3093, 3094, 3095, 3096, 3097, 3098, 3099

Page last updated Dec 27, 2015: Checked revisions in Steinicke's discovery information
WORKING: Complete basic pix, tags

IC 3050 (=
NGC 4189 = PGC 39025)
Discovered (Apr 8, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4189)
Also observed (Nov 16, 1900) by Arnold Schwassmann (227) (and later listed as IC 3050)
A magnitude 11.7 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)cd?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 13 47.2, Dec +13 25 29)
Per Corwin, the position is so close to that for NGC 4189 that there is no doubt of the equality of the two entries, and the only explanation is that Schwassmann and Dreyer simply failed to notice the identity. It was pointed out by Adelaide Ames in her 1930 monograph and catalog of the Virgo Cluster. (This entry will only contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 4189.)

IC 3051 (=
NGC 4193 = PGC 39040)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4193)
Also observed (Nov 16, 1900) by Arnold Schwassmann (228) (and later listed as IC 3051)
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)c?) in Virgo (RA 12 13 53.4, Dec +13 10 22)
Per Corwin, the position is so close to that for NGC 4193 that there is no doubt of the equality of the two entries, and the only explanation is that Schwassmann and Dreyer simply failed to notice the identity. It was pointed out by Adelaide Ames in her 1930 monograph and catalog of the Virgo Cluster. (This entry will only contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 4193.)

IC 3052 (= PGC 39031)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (826)
A magnitude 15.4 dwarf elliptical galaxy (type dE3) in Virgo (RA 12 13 48.3, Dec +12 41 25)
Based on a recessional velocity of 910 km/sec, IC 3052 is about 40 million light years away, but for such small velocities peculiar (non-Hubble expansion) velocities can substantially effect the results, and the galaxy could be somewhat further away (it is listed as a member (VCC 93) of the Virgo Cluster, which is about 50 million light years away). Depending on the actual distance, its apparent size of 0.45 by 0.3 arcmin corresponds to 5 or 6 thousand light years, hence its designation as a dwarf galaxy.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3052
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3052
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3052

IC 3053 (= PGC 39038)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (827)
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type Sab(r)) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 13 52.0, Dec +14 13 21)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 95) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3053
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3053
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3053

IC 3054 (= PGC 39080)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (828)
A magnitude 15.2 elliptical galaxy (type dE3?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 14 14.5, Dec +13 32 32)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.45 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 109) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3054
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3054
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3054

IC 3055 (= PGC 1403639 + two companions)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (829)
A trio of interacting galaxies in Virgo
NED01 = A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S? pec) at RA 12 14 21.9, Dec +12 05 26
NED02 = An 18th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C?) at RA 12 14 22.1, Dec +12 05 31
NED03 = A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S pec) at RA 12 14 22.5, Dec +12 05 28
Per Dreyer, IC 3055 (Frost #829, 1860 RA 12 07 16, NPD 77 09) has a "brighter middle, magnitude 15". The position precesses to RA 12 14 24.3, Dec +12 04 16, about 1.2 arcmin southeast of a triplet of galaxies known as PGC 1403639 and its companions, IC 3055 NED01 and IC 3055 NED02. There appears to be no question about the identification of this triplet with IC 3055; searches for IC 3055 in NED, LEDA and Wikisky all show the same group, and Corwin lists the positions of the individual members in his catalog. However, I have noticed some places where IC 3055 is misidentified as PGC 39104, a dwarf galaxy a few arcmin to the northeast, so that object is discussed immediately below, and labeled in the wide-field image of IC 3055. The two larger galaxies (NED01 and PGC 1403639) have recessional velocities of 19105 and 19070 km/sec. Based on that, a straightforward calculation indicates that the system is about 890 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that IC 3055 was about 825 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 850 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that, IC 3055 NED01 = SDSSJ121421.86+120526.0, with an apparent size of 0.2 by 0.15 arcmin, is about 50 thousand light years across, IC 3055 NED02 = SDSSJ121422.10+120530.8, with an apparent size of 0.07 by 0.07 arcmin, is about 15 thousand light years across, IC 3055 NED03 = PGC 1403639, with an apparent size of 0.35 by 0.3 arcmin, is about 85 thousand light years across, and the entire system, which with its extended arms has an apparent size of 1.1 by 0.4 arcmin, is about 260 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of the interacting triplet of galaxies listed as IC 3055
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3055
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the triplet, also showing NGC 4200 and PGC 39104
SDSS image of the interacting triplet of galaxies listed as IC 3055, also showing dwarf irregular galaxy PGC 30914, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 3055, and lenticular galaxy NGC 4200

PGC 39104 (not
IC 3055)
Not an IC object, but listed here since sometimes misidentified as IC 3055
A 16th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type Irr) in Virgo (RA 12 14 32.9, Dec +12 06 12)
PGC 39104 is listed as a member (VCC 113) of the Virgo Cluster, but based on a recessional velocity of 2090 km/sec, it is about 95 million light years away, which puts it on the far side of or even well beyond the Cluster. Given its presumed distance and an apparent size of 0.4 by 0.25 arcmin, it is about 10 thousand light years across. The only classification I could find was for a lenticular galaxy, but its appearance suggests that it is a dwarf irregular or a peculiar dwarf elliptical galaxy.
SDSS image of dwarf irregular galaxy PGC 39104, sometimes misidentified as IC 3055
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 39104; see IC 3055 for a wide-field view

IC 3056 (= PGC 39113)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (830)
A magnitude 15(?) irregular galaxy (type Im) in Virgo (RA 12 14 37.3, Dec +12 48 45)
Per Corwin, there is nothing near Frost's position that he could have picked up on his plate, but there is a galaxy with the correct appearance (per Frost, "Streak, extended 1 arcmin at 50 degrees") exactly one degree south of the IC position. Its probable identification with IC 3056 was suggested by Adelaide Ames in her 1930 monograph and catalog of the Virgo Cluster, and since one-digit typographical errors are not uncommon, the identification seems certain. However, not all catalogs have accepted the identification, so IC 3056 is sometimes listed as nonexistent. Apparent size 1.05 by 0.45 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 119) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of irregular galaxy IC 3056
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3056
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 3056

IC 3057
Recorded (April, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart (361)
A nonexistent object in Centaurus (RA 12 15 02.0, Dec -44 28 24)
The IC description is "considerably faint, small, round, possible defect". Per Corwin, the only object that might correspond to Stewart's record is well off the recorded position, and too faint to have registered on the relatively short-exposure image used by Stewart, so Stewart's supposition that the "object" was merely a plate defect is almost certainly correct.

IC 3058 (= PGC 1449108)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (831)
A magnitude 15.7 spiral galaxy (type S pec?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 14 47.4, Dec +14 05 43)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3058
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3058
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3061
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3058, also showing spiral galaxy IC 3061

IC 3059 (= PGC 39142)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (832)
A magnitude 14.2 irregular galaxy (type Im?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 14 55.1, Dec +13 27 39)
Apparent size 1.6 by 1.3 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 126) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of irregular galaxy IC 3059
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3059
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3066
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 3059, also showing spiral galaxy IC 3066

IC 3060 (= PGC 39147)
Discovered (Sep 14, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (229)
Also observed (May 7, 1904) by Royal Frost (#?)
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Virgo (RA 12 15 02.0, Dec +12 32 52)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 129) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3060
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3060
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3060

IC 3061 (= PGC 39152)
Discovered (Nov 22, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (274)
Also observed (May 7, 1904) by Royal Frost (#?)
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 15 04.3, Dec +14 01 44)
Apparent size 2.2 by 0.4 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 131) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3061
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3061
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3061

IC 3062 (= PGC 39156)
Discovered (Nov 16, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (275)
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 15 05.1, Dec +13 35 40)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 134) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3062
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3062
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3062

IC 3063 (= PGC 39160)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (833)
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Virgo (RA 12 15 06.8, Dec +12 00 58)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.6 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 135) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3063
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3063
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3063

IC 3064 (=
NGC 4206 = PGC 39183)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4206)
Discovered (Sep 14, 1900) by Arnold Schwassmann (230) (and later listed as IC 3064)
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)bc) in Virgo (RA 12 15 16.7, Dec +13 01 22)
Per Corwin, the position is so close to that for NGC 4206 that there is no doubt of the equality of the two entries, and the only explanation is that Schwassmann and Dreyer simply failed to notice the identity. It was pointed out by Adelaide Ames in her 1930 monograph and catalog of the Virgo Cluster.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 4206 for anything else.

IC 3065 (= PGC 39173)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (834)
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 15 12.5, Dec +14 26 01)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 140) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3065
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3065
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3065

IC 3066 (= PGC 39181)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (835)
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 15 16.2, Dec +13 28 25)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.2 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 143) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3066
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3066
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3059
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3066, also showing irregular galaxy IC 3059

IC 3067 (=
IC 772 = PGC 39178)
Discovered (Apr 6, 1888) by Guillaume Bigourdan (170) (and later listed as IC 772)
Discovered (May 15, 1903) by Stephane Javelle (1216) (and later listed as IC 3067)
A magnitude 14.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 15 15.8, Dec +23 57 32)
Per Corwin, the double listing is due to errors by Javelle and Bigourdan in reducing the offsets from their comparison stars to the positions listed in the IC. If their offsets are reduced using modern data they fall right on the galaxy listed above; so the identification with that galaxy and the equality of the two listings are certain.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see IC 772 for anything else.

IC 3068 (= PGC 1394706)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (836)
A magnitude 16.3 spiral galaxy (type SABc?) in Virgo (RA 12 15 23.2, Dec +11 30 40)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3068
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3068
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3068

IC 3069 (= PGC 1375482)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (837)
A magnitude 15.4 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Virgo (RA 12 15 19.8, Dec +10 09 39)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3069
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3069
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3069

IC 3070
Recorded (Sep 14, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A magnitude 15.4 star in Virgo (RA 12 15 24.6, Dec +13 02 20)
Per Dreyer, IC 3070 (Schwassmann #231, 1860 RA 12 08 17, NPD 76 10.9) is "very faint, very small". The position precesses to RA 12 15 25.0, Dec +13 02 23, almost exactly on the star listed above, lying a few arcmin northeast of the center of NGC 4206, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is considered certain.

IC 3071
Recorded (Feb 10, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A magnitude 14.5 star in Virgo (RA 12 15 31.8, Dec +09 32 41)
Per Dreyer, IC 3071 (Schwassmann #126, 1860 RA 12 08 23, NPD 79 40.5) is "extremely faint, extremely small". The position precesses to RA 12 15 31.6, Dec +09 32 47, almost exactly on a star a few arcmin south of NGC 4207, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is considered certain.

IC 3072
Recorded (Feb 10, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A magnitude 15.9 star in Virgo (RA 12 15 38.1, Dec +09 33 20)
Per Dreyer, IC 3072 (Schwassmann #127, 1860 RA 12 08 28, NPD 79 39.9) is "extremely faint, extremely small, questionable". The position precesses to RA 12 15 36.5, Dec +09 33 23, less than half an arcmin west of a star a few arcmin southeast of NGC 4207, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is considered certain.

IC 3073 (= PGC 39215)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (838)
A magnitude 14.4 irregular galaxy (type Im?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 15 35.7, Dec +13 37 11)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.6 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 155) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of irregular galaxy IC 3073
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3073
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 3073

IC 3074 (= PGC 39233)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (152)
Also observed (May 7, 1904) by Royal Frost (#?)
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)dm?) in Virgo (RA 12 15 46.1, Dec +10 41 55)
Apparent size 2.3 by 0.3 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 162) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3074
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3074
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3074

IC 3075 (= PGC 39240)
Discovered (May 20, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle (1217)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 15 55.0, Dec +23 35 46)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3075
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3075
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3075

IC 3076
Recorded (Feb 10, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A magnitude 14.6 star in Virgo (RA 12 16 04.0, Dec +09 04 46)
Per Dreyer, IC 3076 (Schwassmann #77, 1860 RA 12 08 56, NPD 80 08.6) is "very faint, very small". The position precesses to RA 12 16 04.6, Dec +09 04 42, almost exactly on a faint star, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is considered certain.

IC 3077 (= PGC 39256)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (839)
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type Sd?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 15 56.1, Dec +14 25 58)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 170) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3077
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3077
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3077

IC 3078 (= PGC 39263)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (840)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sab(r)) in Virgo (RA 12 16 00.0, Dec +12 41 16)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin. A starburst galaxy, and a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 1.9). Listed as a member (VCC 174) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3078
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3078
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3081
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3078, also showing lenticular galaxy IC 3081

IC 3079 (= PGC 39273)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (841)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type SBa) in Virgo (RA 12 16 04.2, Dec +11 32 06)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 177) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3079
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3079
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3079

IC 3080 (= PGC 39269)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (842)
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type SBa) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 16 02.6, Dec +14 11 24)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 176) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3080
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3080
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3080

IC 3081 (= PGC 39282)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (843)
A magnitude 14.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Virgo (RA 12 16 09.0, Dec +12 41 28)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 178) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3081
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3081
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3078
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3081, also showing spiral galaxy IC 3078

IC 3082 (= PGC 1694700)
Discovered (May 20, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle (1218)
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type S) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 16 12.1, Dec +23 50 31)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3082
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3082
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3084 and 3089
(The bright star at top is 5th-magnitude 7 Comae Berenices)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3082, also showing elliptical galaxy IC 3084 and lenticular galaxy IC 3089

IC 3083 (perhaps = PGC 1411150)
Recorded (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A nonexistent object or a 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Virgo (RA 12 16 21.3, Dec +12 31 41)
Per Dreyer, IC 3083 (Frost #844, 1860 RA 12 09 16, NPD 76 38) has a "brighter middle, magnitude 15". The position precesses to RA 12 16 23.9, Dec +12 35 18, but there is nothing there. Per Corwin, the most likely candidate is PGC 1411150, which lies about 3 arcmin almost due south of Frost's position, and that identification has been hesistantly adopted by NED and (via cross-referencing) LEDA, and as a result, Wikisky. However, Steinicke has adopted a more cautious approach, and lists IC 3083 as "not found"; and I think everyone would agree that Frost's object may be lost or nonexistent. Still, having proposed a candidate, it seems appropriate to discuss the galaxy, as long as its identification as IC 3083 is stated as tentative. Apparent size 0.5 by 0.45 arcmin, Vr 19310 km/sec (so well over 800 million light years away).
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 1411150, which may be IC 3083
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 1411150
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
(The box near the top shows Dreyer's position for IC 3083)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PCC 1411150, which may be IC 3083

IC 3084 (= PGC 39301)
Discovered (May 15, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle (1219)
A magnitude 14.8 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 16 23.4, Dec +23 55 06)
Apparent size 0.35 by 0.25 arcmin. (Due to the proximity of 5th-magnitude 7 Comae Berenices, multi-wavelength images of the area near IC 3084 are badly overexposed and discolored; so monochrome images have been used in their place.)
DSS monochrome image of elliptical galaxy IC 3084
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3084
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3082 and 3089
(The bright star at top is 5th-magnitude 7 Comae Berenices)
DSS monochrome image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3084, also showing  spiral galaxy IC 3082 and lenticular galaxy IC 3089

IC 3085
Recorded (Feb 10, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A magnitude 13.3 star in Virgo (RA 12 16 26.0, Dec +09 28 09)
Per Dreyer, IC 3085 (Schwassmann #128, 1860 RA 12 09 18, NPD 79 45.1) is "extremely faint, very small, = 13th-magnitude star". The position precesses to RA 12 16 26.4, Dec +09 28 12, almost exactly on the westernmost of three 13th-magnitude stars; so the last part of the description appears to have been perfect, and the identification of IC 3085 as that star listed above is considered certain.

IC 3086
Recorded (Feb 10, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A magnitude 14(?) double star in Virgo (RA 12 16 27.8, Dec +09 00 33)
Per Dreyer, IC 3086 (Schwassmann #78, 1860 RA 12 09 19, NPD 80 12.8) is "extremely faint, very small". The position precesses to RA 12 16 27.5, Dec +09 00 30, right on the brighter member of a close double, which (per Corwin) is thereby positively identified as IC 3086.

IC 3087 (not =
NGC 4222)
Recorded (Nov 16, 1900) by Arnold Schwassmann
A magnitude 15.1 star and magnitude 15.6 double star in Virgo (RA 12 16 26.6, Dec +13 17 21)
Per Dreyer, IC 3087 (Schwassmann #234, 1860 RA 12 09 20, NPD 75 56.0) is "faint, small, extremely extended 30, nebulosity uncertain". The position precesses to RA 12 16 27.7, Dec +13 17 18, a second of time east of the midpoint of a pair of stars oriented at the same 30 specified by the IC; so per Corwin, the identification of that pair with IC 3087 is certain. (Despite that, IC 3087 is often mistakenly equated with spiral galaxy NGC 4222.)

IC 3088
Recorded (Feb 10, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (129)
Probably a magnitude 14.3 star in Virgo (RA 12 16 28.4, Dec +09 27 32)
Per Dreyer, IC 3088 (Schwassmann #129, 1860 RA 12 09 21, NPD 79 45.6) is "very faint, very small, = 14th-magnitude star". The position precesses to RA 12 16 29.4, Dec +09 27 42, just east of the star listed above (the southeastern member of the trio involving IC 3085), so it appears that the last part of the IC description was perfect. However, the offset between Schwassmann's position and that star is larger than for any of the other stellar objects listed above, so although Corwin considers the aforementioned star the best candidate for IC 3088, he thinks it possible that the northeastern star, or even the pair of eastern stars in the triad might have been Schwassmann's #129.

IC 3089 (= PGC 39302)
Discovered (May 20, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle (1220)
A magnitude 14.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 16 29.6, Dec +23 49 42)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3089
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3089
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3082 and 3084
(The glare at the top is from 5th-magnitude 7 Comae Berenices)
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3089, also showing elliptical galaxy IC 3084 and spiral galaxy IC 3082

IC 3090
Recorded (Feb 10, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A pair of magnitude 15 and 15.5 stars in Virgo (RA 12 16 31.6, Dec +09 26 23)
Per Dreyer, IC 3090 (Schwassmann #79, 1860 RA 12 09 24, NPD 79 46.9) is "very faint, very small". The position precesses to RA 12 16 32.4, Dec +09 26 24, just northeast of the midpoint of the pair of stars noted above, which per Corwin must be Schwassmann's #79, and therefore IC 3090.

IC 3091 (= PGC 39318)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (845)
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a pec) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 16 29.2, Dec +14 00 45)
Apparent size 2.4 by 0.6 arcmin (including extended arms). Listed as a member (VCC 193) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of peculiar lenticular galaxy IC 3091
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3091
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near peculiar lenticular galaxy IC 3091

IC 3092 (= PGC 1373788)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (846)
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type S) in Virgo (RA 12 16 32.2, Dec +10 02 47)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3092
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3092
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3092

IC 3093 (= PGC 39342)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (847)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 16 42.2, Dec +14 16 42)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 206) of the Virgo Cluster. (A double system?)
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3093
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3093
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3093

IC 3094 (= PGC 39362)
Discovered (Nov 16, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (277)
Also observed (May 7, 1904) by Royal Frost (#?)
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 16 55.9, Dec +13 37 32)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 213) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3094
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3094
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3094

IC 3095 (= PGC 39357)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-1)
Also observed (May 15, 1903) by Stephane Javelle (#?)
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 16 55.3, Dec +23 57 29)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3095
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3095
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
The glare at right is from 5th-magnitude 7 Comae Berenices
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3095

IC 3096 (= PGC 39358)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (848)
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 16 52.3, Dec +14 30 55)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.4 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 209) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3096
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3096
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3096

IC 3097 (= PGC 39375)
Discovered (Feb 10, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (80)
Also observed (May 7, 1904) by Royal Frost (#?)
A magnitude 14.2 elliptical galaxy (type E5 pec?) in Virgo (RA 12 17 01.0, Dec +09 24 27)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 216) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3097
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3097
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3097

IC 3098 (=
NGC 4235 = PGC 39389)
Discovered (Jan 23, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4235)
Discovered (Oct 30, 1899) by Arnold Schwassmann (5) (and later listed as IC 3098)
A magnitude 11.6 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)a) in Virgo (RA 12 17 09.7, Dec +07 11 27)
Per Corwin, the position and description for IC 3098 match NGC 4235 (which see for anything else) very well, so Schwassmann and Dreyer must have simply overlooked the identity, leading to the double listing.

IC 3099 (= PGC 39390)
Discovered (Sep 14, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (235)
Also observed (May 7, 1904) by Royal Frost (#?)
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Virgo (RA 12 17 09.3, Dec +12 27 12)
Apparent size 2.3 by 0.3 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 224) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3099
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3099
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing part of IC 3105
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3099, also showing part of irregular galaxy IC 3105
Celestial Atlas
(IC 3000 - 3049) ←     IC Objects: IC 3050 - 3099     → (IC 3100 - 3149)