Celestial Atlas
(IC 3100 - 3149) ←     IC Objects: IC 3150 - 3199 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 3200 - 3249)
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3150, 3151, 3152, 3153, 3154, 3155, 3156, 3157, 3158, 3159, 3160, 3161, 3162, 3163, 3164, 3165, 3166,
3167, 3168, 3169, 3170, 3171, 3172, 3173, 3174, 3175, 3176, 3177, 3178, 3179, 3180, 3181, 3182, 3183,
3184, 3185, 3186, 3187, 3188, 3189, 3190, 3191, 3192, 3193, 3194, 3195, 3196, 3197, 3198, 3199

Page last updated Dec 27, 2015: Checked revisions in Steinicke's discovery information
WORKING: Historical information, additional pix, tags

IC 3150 (= PGC 39673 = PGC 1331163)
Discovered (Nov 20, 1899) by
Arnold Schwassmann (43)
A magnitude 14.5 galaxy (type S pec?) in Virgo (RA 12 19 28.5, Dec +07 47 56)
Perhaps the result of a merger between two colliding galaxies. Based on a recessional velocity of 7270 km/sec, IC 3150 is about 340 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.6 by 0.3 arcmins, about 60 thousand light years across. The galaxy is listed as a member (VCC 352) of the Virgo Cluster, but given its distance, is far beyond the Cluster.
SDSS image of peculiar spiral galaxy IC 3150
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3150
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3148
SDSS image of region near peculiar spiral galaxy IC 3150, also showing spiral galaxy IC 3148

IC 3151 (= PGC 39682)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (861)
A magnitude 14.2 galaxy (type SBa(r)) in Virgo (RA 12 19 32.8, Dec +09 24 53)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 356) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3151
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3151
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3151

IC 3152 (= PGC 39688)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1898) by
Lewis Swift (XI-136)
A magnitude 12.5 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Hydra (RA 12 19 35.9, Dec -26 08 41)
Apparent size 1.8 by 1.2 arcmin.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3152
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3152
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3152

IC 3153 (= PGC 39693)
Discovered (Apr 8, 1894) by
Hermann Kobold (6, K5)
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sc(r)) in Virgo (RA 12 19 36.8, Dec +05 23 54)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 359) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3153
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3153
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 4259, 4270 and 4273
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3153, also showing lenticular galaxies NGC 4259 and 4270, and spiral galaxy NGC 4273

IC 3154 (= PGC 3089509)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-15)
A magnitude 15.1 elliptical galaxy (type E5) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 19 33.9, Dec +25 35 11)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3154
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3154
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3154

IC 3155 (= PGC 39708)
Discovered (June, 1865) by
Auguste Voigt (3)
Also observed (Apr 5, 1894) by Hermann Kobold (#?)
Also observed (Mar 31, 1902) by Guillaume Bigourdan (#?)
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Virgo (RA 12 19 45.2, Dec +06 00 23)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.6 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 366) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3155, also showing most of lenticular galaxy NGC 4269; the linear rainbow is part of the glare from 8th-magnitude HD 107238
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3155, also showing most of NGC 4269
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region near the pair, also showing part of NGC 4260
(Despite adjustments, this photomosaic suffers from considerable glare from 8th-magnitude HD 107238)

SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3155, also showing lenticular galaxy NGC 4269 and part of spiral galaxy NGC 4260

IC 3156 (= PGC 39703)
Discovered (Feb 12, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (86)
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type SBc(s)) in Virgo (RA 12 19 44.2, Dec +09 08 55)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 363) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3156
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3156
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3156

IC 3157 (= PGC 39716)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (862)
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Virgo (RA 12 19 47.9, Dec +12 25 20)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 374) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3157
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3157
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3157

IC 3158
Recorded (Feb 12, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
Perhaps a magnitude 14.4 star in Virgo (RA 12 19 49.9, Dec +09 17 22)
Per Dreyer, IC 3158 (Schwassmann #87, 1860 RA 12 12 41, NPD 79 55.8) is "extremely faint, considerably small, extremely questionable". The position precesses to RA 12 19 49.0, Dec +09 17 32, but there is nothing there save for some stars (which is perhaps to be expected, given the statement "extremely questionable"). Per Corwin, Adelaide Ames and Dorothy Carlson stated that the object was only a star, but not which one. The most obvious choice is the star about 0.3 arcmin southeast of the IC position, so that is the one listed above; but there is really no way to know which star Schwassmann recorded, and in a catalog of clusters and nebulae, it hardly matters whether that choice is right or wrong.

IC 3159 (= PGC 139797)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (863)
A magnitude 15.9 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Virgo (RA 12 19 53.2, Dec +11 40 28)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3159
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3159
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3159, adjusted to reduce glare from 8th-magnitude HD 107256

IC 3160
Recorded (Feb 12, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A magnitude 14.4 star in Virgo (RA 12 19 59.9, Dec +09 06 07)
Per Dreyer, IC 3160 (Schwassmann #88, 1860 RA 12 12 52, NPD 80 07.3) is "extremely faint, considerably small". The position precesses to RA 12 20 00.0, Dec +09 06 03, right on the star listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification as the star is certain.

IC 3161
Recorded (Feb 12, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A magnitude 14.7 star in Virgo (RA 12 20 01.2, Dec +08 59 57)
Per Dreyer, IC 3161 (Schwassmann #89, 1860 RA 12 12 53, NPD 80 13.5) is "extremely faint, very small, perhaps a star, connected with following one", the "following one" being IC 3162. The position precesses to RA 12 20 01.1, Dec +08 59 51, just south of the star listed above, with a nearly identical star closely following, so the identification of the pair of IC entries with the pair of stars is certain.
DSS image of the stars listed as IC 3161 and 3162
Above, a 6 arcmin wide region centered on IC 3161 and 3162
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
DSS image of region near the stars listed as IC 3161 and 3162

IC 3162
Recorded (Feb 12, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A magnitude 14.6 star in Virgo (RA 12 20 03.1, Dec +08 59 50)
Per Dreyer, IC 3162 (Schwassmann #90, 1860 RA 12 12 55, NPD 80 13.5) is "extremely faint, very small, perhaps a star, connected with preceding one", the "preceding one" being IC 3161 (which see for images). The position precesses to RA 12 20 03.0, Dec +08 59 51, right on the star listed above, with a nearly identical star closely preceding, so the identification of the pair of IC entries with the pair of stars is certain.

IC 3163
Recorded (Feb 12, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A pair of magnitude 14.7 and 15.9 stars in Virgo (RA 12 20 05.6, Dec +09 15 18)
Per Dreyer, IC 3163 (Schwassmann #90*, 1860 RA 12 12 55, NPD 79 58.0) is a "nebula or star?". The position precesses to RA 12 20 03.0, Dec +09 15 21, but there is nothing there, not even a particularly close star. Per Corwin, Adelaide Ames was the first to suggest that the pair of faint stars just under 3 seconds of time to the east of the IC position was Schwassmann's "object", and Carlson agreed, so the identification has become relatively standard and is better than nothing.

IC 3164
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A pair of magnitude 16.5 and 17.3 stars in Coma Berenices (RA 12 20 04.9, Dec +24 57 21)
Per Dreyer, IC 3164 (Wolf list IV #18, 1860 RA 12 13 01, NPD 64 16.0) is "extremely faint, small, irregular figure, perhaps double star". The position precesses to RA 12 20 04.9, Dec +24 57 21, exactly midway between the pair of faint stars listed above. In modern images the stars are easily seen as separate objects, but per Corwin, on Wolf's plate the pair looks like an unresolved double star, so between the position and the description, the identification is certain.

IC 3165 (= PGC 39749)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-19)
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 20 04.7, Dec +27 58 30)
Apparent size 2.2 by 1.1 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3165
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3165
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3168
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3165, also showing spiral galaxy IC 3168

IC 3166 (possibly =
NGC 4284)
Recorded (Jun 24, 1897) by Lewis Swift
A lost or nonexistent object in Ursa Major (RA 12 19 53.9, Dec +60 41 39)
or a poorly measured reobservation of NGC 4284
Per Dreyer, IC 3166 (Swift list XII (#10), 1860 RA 12 13 08, NPD 28 31.7) is "most extremely faint, small, preceding of 2", the other being IC 3180. The position precesses to RA 12 19 53.9, Dec +60 41 39, but there is nothing there. A similar situation exists for IC 3180, which was recorded on the same night, just to the east of Swift's #10. Corwin supposes that the pair may be NGC 4284 and 4290 with a declination error of 2.6 degrees, but has some concerns about Swift's descriptions of the surrounding star fields (namely a 7.5 magnitude star to the south of #11, and the same star and a 5th magnitude star in the field of #10). There is a 5.5 magnitude star (70 Ursae Majoris) 14 arcmin to the south of the NGC pair, but nothing resembling a 7.5 magnitude star in that region, so Corwin discusses other fruitless efforts to identify the IC objects then concludes by stating that he suspects IC 3166 = NGC 4284, "but..." (in other words, is unwilling to commit himself). So although a duplicate observation of the NGC object is the most likely identification, what Swift observed will probably never be known with any certainty.

IC 3167 (= PGC 39795)
Discovered (Feb 12, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (134)
Also recorded (May 7, 1904) by Royal Frost (#?)
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type dSB0?) in Virgo (RA 12 20 18.8, Dec +09 32 43)
Apparent size 1.4 by 0.7 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 407) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3167
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3167
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3167

IC 3168 (= PGC 39793)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-21)
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 20 18.5, Dec +27 55 11)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3168
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3168
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3165 and part of IC 3172
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3168, also showing spiral galaxy IC 3165 and part of spiral galaxy IC 3172

IC 3169 (= SDSS J122021.38+253558.1)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-22)
A magnitude 15.0 elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 20 21.3, Dec +25 35 58)
Per Dreyer, IC 3169 (Wolf list IV #22, 1860 RA 12 13 18, NPD 62 37.5) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 12 20 21.3, Dec +26 35 51, but there is nothing near there save for a 5th magnitude star. Thomson states that Dreyer made a 1 degree transcription error in the NPD, as Wolf's actual NPD was 63 37.5, and adds that Wolf gave an offset from IC 3171 that puts his #22 in exactly the correct position for the galaxy listed above. As a result, it is hardly surprising that the corrected position precesses to RA 12 20 21.6, Dec +25 35 51, on the southeastern edge of the galaxy, and the identification is certain. Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3169
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3169
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3171 and 3176
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3169, also showing elliptical galaxy IC 3171 and spiral galaxy IC 3176

IC 3170 (= PGC 39816)
Discovered (Feb 12, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (91)
Also recorded (May 7, 1904) by Royal Frost (#?)
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sbc(s)) in Virgo (RA 12 20 26.6, Dec +09 25 28)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 417) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3170
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3170
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3170

IC 3171 (= PGC 39796)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-23)
A magnitude 13.7 elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 20 24.0, Dec +25 33 40)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3171
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3171
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3169 and 3176
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3171, also showing elliptical galaxy IC 3169 and spiral galaxy IC 3176

IC 3172 (= SDSS J122024.54+274907.6)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-24)
A magnitude 15.5 spiral galaxy (type Sab(r)?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 20 24.5, Dec +27 49 09)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3172
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3172
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing part of IC 3168
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3172, also showing part of spiral galaxy IC 3168

IC 3173 (= PGC 39823)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (864)
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Virgo (RA 12 20 30.1, Dec +11 20 29)
Apparent size 0.65 by 0.35 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 420) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3173
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3173
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3173

IC 3174 (= PGC 39822)
Discovered (Feb 23, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (135)
Also recorded (May 7, 1904) by Royal Frost (#?)
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type Sb(r)) in Virgo (RA 12 20 29.5, Dec +10 14 44)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 419) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3174
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3174
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3174

IC 3175 (= PGC 39831)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (865)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sb(r)) in Virgo (RA 12 20 33.3, Dec +09 51 14)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 424) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3175
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3175
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3175

IC 3176 (= SDSS J122030.07+253055.5)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-25)
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 20 30.0, Dec +25 30 55)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3176
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3176
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy IC 3169, 3171, 3185 and 3189
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3176, also showing elliptical galaxies IC 3169 and 3171 and spiral galaxies IC 3185 and 3189

IC 3177
Recorded (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A nonexistent object in Coma Berenices (RA 12 20 34.7, Dec +14 07 21)
Per Dreyer, IC 3177 (Frost #866, 1860 RA 12 13 28, NPD 75 06) is "large, very much extended 45, 2.5 arcmin across". With such a description, the object should be easy to identify, but there is absolutely nothing at the precessed position of RA 12 20 34.7, Dec +14 07 21. Corwin's opinion is that this must have been a plate defect, and every reference lists the object as not found, or nonexistent.

IC 3178
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 17.2 star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 20 35.0, Dec +26 10 12)
Per Dreyer, IC 3178 (Wolf list IV #26, 1860 RA 12 13 32, NPD 63 03.1) is "faint, very small, irregular figure, nucleus". The position precesses to RA 12 20 35.3, Dec +26 10 15, half an arcmin to the north of the star listed above, and both Corwin and Thomson state that there is no doubt that the star is Wolf's #26. However, there has been consideration confusion involving this object and a nearby galaxy (IC 3179, which see for further discussion and images), so while some references list the star as IC 3178, others list it as not found, or don't even have an entry for IC 3178.

IC 3179 (= PGC 89585)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 15.0 elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 20 37.7, Dec +26 09 55)
Per Dreyer, IC 3179 (Wolf list IV #27, 1860 RA 12 13 35, NPD 63 03.4) is "faint, very small, irregular figure, nucleus". The position precesses to RA 12 20 38.3, Dec +26 09 57, on the northeast edge of the galaxy listed above, so the identification should be certain, and both Corwin and Thomson agree with it. However, confusion about the star (IC 3178) preceding the galaxy has led to misidentifications of IC 3179 as IC 3178, and the assignment of IC 3179 to the faint galaxy to its southeast. (As it turns out, we can definitely rule out the fainter galaxy, as Corwin has examined a print of Wolf's plate, and states that the star listed as IC 3178 and the galaxy listed here as IC 3179 are both visible on the print, but the fainter galaxy is not.) Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3179, also showing the star listed as IC 3178; also shown is the galaxy (to the lower left or southeast of IC 3179) sometimes misidentified as IC 3179
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3179, also showing IC 3178
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3179, also showing the star listed as IC 3178

SDSS J122039.57+260936.6 (not =
IC 3179)
Not an IC object but listed here since sometimes misidentified as IC 3179
A magnitude 18(?) galaxy (type unknown) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 20 39.6, Dec +26 09 37)
As noted in the entry for IC 3179 (which see for images), the identification of SDSS J122039.57+260936.6 as that IC object can be definitely ruled out, as it is not visible on a print of Wolf's plate of the region. Apparent size 0.2 by 0.15 arcmin. Apparently nothing else available.

IC 3180 (possibly =
NGC 4290)
Recorded (Jun 24, 1897) by Lewis Swift
A lost or nonexistent object in Ursa Major (RA 12 20 23.1, Dec +60 41 39)
or a poorly measured reobservation of NGC 4290
Per Dreyer, IC 3180 (Swift list XII (#11), 1860 RA 12 13 38, NPD 28 31.7) is "very faint, pretty large, round, 7.5 magnitude star to south, following of 2", the other being IC 3166. The position precesses to RA 12 20 23.1, Dec +60 41 39, but there is nothing there. A similar situation exists for IC 3166, which was recorded on the same night, just to the west of Swift's #11. Corwin supposes that the pair may be NGC 4284 and 4290 with a declination error of 2.6 degrees, but has some concerns about Swift's descriptions of the surrounding star fields (namely a 7.5 magnitude star to the south of #11, and the same star and a 5th magnitude star in the field of #10). There is a 5.5 magnitude star (70 Ursae Majoris) 14 arcmin to the south of the NGC pair, but nothing resembling a 7.5 magnitude star in that region, so Corwin discusses other fruitless efforts to identify the IC objects then concludes by stating that he suspects IC 3180 = NGC 4290, "but..." (in other words, is unwilling to commit himself). So although a duplicate observation of the NGC object is the most likely identification, what Swift observed will probably never be known with any certainty.

IC 3181 (=
NGC 4286 = PGC 39846)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4286)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by Max Wolf (4-28) (and later listed as IC 3181)
A magnitude 13.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 20 42.1, Dec +29 20 44)
The NGC and IC positions are essentially the same, so there is no doubt about the equality of the two entries. The only explanation for the duplication is that Wolf and Dreyer simply happened to miss the connection. (See NGC 4286 for anything else.)

IC 3182
Recorded (Sep 14, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
Three magnitude 15.3, 15.6 and 15.7 stars in Virgo (RA 12 20 48.0, Dec +12 43 42)
Per Dreyer, IC 3182 (Schwassmann #237, 1860 RA 12 13 41, NPD 76 29.7) is "very faint, small, binuclear". The position precesses to RA 12 20 48.0, Dec +12 43 39, near the centroid of a group of three stars. Per Thomson, Carlson described it as a group of three stars, so the identification has been considered certain for at least 70 years.

IC 3183
Recorded (Oct 30, 1899) by
Arnold Schwassmann (9)
A magnitude 14.8 star in Virgo (RA 12 20 48.9, Dec +06 41 13)
Per Dreyer, IC 3183 (Schwassmann #9, 1860 RA 12 13 41, NPD 82 32.1) is "very faint, considerably small, perhaps a star?". The position precesses to RA 12 20 49.5, Dec +06 41 15, almost on top of the star listed above, so the identification is certain. The only caveat is that (per Corwin) Schwassmann's #9 may have included the magnitude 15.4 star an arcmin north-northeast, and although the description of IC 3183 as "considerably small" makes that unlikely, it cannot be ruled out, so some references list this as the pair of stars.

IC 3184 (= PGC 39847)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-29)
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type S) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 20 46.7, Dec +24 54 56)
Per Dreyer, IC 3184 (Wolf list IV #29, 1860 RA 12 13 44, NPD 64 18.5) is "pretty faint, considerably small, extended 40, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 12 20 47.6, Dec +24 54 51, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Steinicke lists the bright spot near the northeast end of the galaxy as a small companion, but the SDSS image shows that it is merely a foreground star. Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3184
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3184
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3184

IC 3185 (= PGC 39874)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-30)
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 20 52.6, Dec +25 25 46)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.2 arcmin. Just to the west of IC 3189.
SDSS image of spiral galaxies IC 3185 and 3189
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3185 and 3189
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair, also showing IC 3176
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies IC 3185 and 3189, also showing spiral galaxy IC 3176

IC 3186 (= PGC 39875)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-31)
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 20 55.9, Dec +24 40 09)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3186
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3186
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3186

IC 3187 (= PGC 39871)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (867)
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Sc(r)) in Virgo (RA 12 20 54.8, Dec +11 09 41)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3. Listed as a member (VCC 443) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3187
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3187
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3187

IC 3188 (= PGC 39872)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (868)
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type Sbc(s)) in Virgo (RA 12 20 55.1, Dec +11 00 31)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 442) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3188
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3188
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3188

IC 3189 (= PGC 3098279)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-32)
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 20 56.2, Dec +25 25 35)
Apparent size 0.45 by 0.25 arcmin. Just to the east of IC 3185, which see for images.

IC 3190
Recorded (Feb 13, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A magnitude 15.2 star in Virgo (RA 12 21 02.4, Dec +09 34 12)
Per Dreyer, IC 3190 (Schwassmann #136, 1860 RA 12 13 55, NPD 79 39.2) is "extremely faint, extremely small". The position precesses to RA 12 21 02.8, Dec +09 34 10, just east of the star listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identity is certain.

IC 3191
Recorded (Nov 20, 1899) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A magnitude 15.6 star in Virgo (RA 12 21 05.1, Dec +07 42 17)
Per Dreyer, IC 3191 (Schwassmann #45, 1860 RA 12 13 57, NPD 81 31.1) is "very faint, very small, round". The position precesses to RA 12 21 05.2, Dec +07 42 16, right on the star listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identity is certain.

IC 3192 (= PGC 39893)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (869)
A magnitude 14.8 elliptical galaxy (type dE3) in Virgo (RA 12 21 04.7, Dec +11 45 14)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 452) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3192
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3192
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3192

IC 3193 (= PGC 39870)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-33)
A magnitude 14.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 21 01.2, Dec +27 53 55)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3193
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3193
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3193

IC 3194 (= SDSS J122109.00+250800.5)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-34)
A magnitude 15.0 elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 21 09.1, Dec +25 08 01)
Apparent size 0.35 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3194
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3194
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3194

IC 3195 (= SDSS J122117.42+254829.7)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-36)
A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 21 17.5, Dec +25 48 29)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3195
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3195
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3195

IC 3196 (= PGC 165092)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (870)
A magnitude 15.9 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Virgo (RA 12 21 26.7, Dec +11 45 28)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3196
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3196
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3196

IC 3197
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 16.4 star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 21 25.8, Dec +25 26 38)
Per Dreyer, IC 3197 (Wolf list IV #37, 1860 RA 12 14 23, NPD 63 46.8) is "faint, very small, round, bright middle". The position precesses to RA 12 21 26.2, Dec +25 26 34, just southeast of the star listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identity is certain.

IC 3198
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 16.1 star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 21 31.2, Dec +26 21 59)
Per Dreyer, IC 3198 (Wolf list IV #38, 1860 RA 12 14 28, NPD 62 51.4) is "extremely faint, small, irregular figure". The position precesses to RA 12 21 30.9, Dec +26 21 58, just west of the star listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identity is certain.

IC 3199 (= PGC 39983)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (871)
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0?) in Virgo (RA 12 21 45.5, Dec +10 35 46)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.6 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 500) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3199
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3199
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 3199
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3199
Celestial Atlas
(IC 3100 - 3149) ←     IC Objects: IC 3150 - 3199     → (IC 3200 - 3249)