Celestial Atlas
(IC 3150 - 3199) ←     IC Objects: IC 3200 - 3249 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 3250 - 3299)
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3200, 3201, 3202, 3203, 3204, 3205, 3206, 3207, 3208, 3209, 3210, 3211, 3212, 3213, 3214, 3215, 3216,
3217, 3218, 3219, 3220, 3221, 3222, 3223, 3224, 3225, 3226, 3227, 3228, 3229, 3230, 3231, 3232, 3233,
3234, 3235, 3236, 3237, 3238, 3239, 3240, 3241, 3242, 3243, 3244, 3245, 3246, 3247, 3248, 3249

Page last updated Dec 27, 2015: Checked revisions in Steinicke's discovery information
WORKING: historical information

IC 3200 (= SDSS J122137.18+264538.7)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-39)
A magnitude 15.3 elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 21 37.2, Dec +26 45 39)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3200
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3200
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3200

IC 3201 (= PGC 3089427)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-40)
A magnitude 15.9 elliptical galaxy (type E2 pec) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 21 40.3, Dec +25 43 34)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.25 arcmin. Two overlapping galaxies and a faint star, or three overlapping galaxy. The size and type are for the largest and brightest member of the apparent group, which may be a physical grouping or simply an accidental overlapping, as there are a large number of faint galaxies in the region.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3201
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3201
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3201

IC 3202 (= PGC 3089316)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-41)
A magnitude 16.4 elliptical galaxy (type E2) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 21 44.2, Dec +27 03 27)
Apparent size 0.65 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3202
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3202
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3202

IC 3203 (= PGC 39984)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-42)
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 21 45.6, Dec +25 53 03)
Based on recessional velocity of 6910 km/sec, IC 3203 is about 320 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 310 to 450 million light years. Given that and an apparent size of 1.5 by 0.2 arcmin, it is about 140 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3203
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3203
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
(The glare at the left is from 5th-magnitude 12 Comae Berenices)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3203

IC 3204 (= PGC 89593)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-43)
A magnitude 15.5 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 21 50.5, Dec +24 14 56)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3204
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3204
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3204

IC 3205 (= PGC 39989)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-44)
A magnitude 14.5 elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 21 50.9, Dec +26 20 29)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3205 and spiral galaxy IC 3206
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3205 and IC 3206
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair, also showing IC 3217
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3205 and spiral galaxy IC 3206, also showing the pair of lenticular galaxies listed as IC 3217

IC 3206 (= PGC 39988)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-45)
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 21 51.3, Dec +26 21 51)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin. (See IC 3205 for images.)

IC 3207 (= SDSS J122152.23+242116.4)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-46)
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 21 52.2, Dec +24 21 16)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3207
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3207
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3207

IC 3208 (= PGC 40005)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (872)
A magnitude 14.7 irregular galaxy (type Im?) in Virgo (RA 12 21 55.5, Dec +11 58 01)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.5 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 512) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of irregular galaxy IC 3208
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3208
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 3208

IC 3209 (= PGC 40038)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (873)
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Virgo (RA 12 22 06.1, Dec +11 45 17)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.2 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 527) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3209
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3209
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3209

IC 3210 (= PGC 39987)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-47)
A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 22 00.8, Dec +28 25 52)
Apparent size 0.55 by 0.55 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3210
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3210
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3210

IC 3211 (= PGC 40034)
Discovered (Feb 13, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (93)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type S(r)d?) in Virgo (RA 12 22 07.3, Dec +08 59 26)
Based on a recessional velocity of 5835 km/sec, IC 3211 is about 270 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin, it is about 65 thousand light years across. It is often incorrectly called NGC 4307A due to its apparent proximity to NGC 4307, but aside from having its own IC listing, the apparently smaller galaxy has nothing to do with the larger one, since it is 200 million light years further away. As a result, although listed as a member (VCC 526) of the Virgo Cluster, IC 3211 also has nothing to do with that grouping.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3211, often incorrectly called NGC 4307A
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3211
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 4307
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3211, often incorrectly called NGC 4307A, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 4307

IC 3212 (= PGC 40036)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-48)
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 22 03.4, Dec +28 11 09)
Apparent size 0.65 by 0.55 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3212
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3212
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3212

IC 3213 (= PGC 40042)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-49)
A magnitude 14.7 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 22 07.7, Dec +23 52 08)
Apparent size 0.75 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3213
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3213
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3213

IC 3214
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-50)
A magnitude 15.8 star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 22 09.1, Dec +27 14 06)
Per Dreyer, IC 3214 (Wolf list IV #50, 1860 RA 12 15 07, NPD 61 59.2) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 12 22 09.3, Dec +27 14 11, just north of the star listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as IC 3214
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the star listed as IC 3214

IC 3215 (= PGC 40040)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-51)
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type Sdm?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 22 10.2, Dec +26 03 06)
Apparent size 1.8 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3215
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3215
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing the star listed as IC 3226
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3215, also showing the star listed as IC 3226

IC 3216 (= SDSS J122211.81+251712.0)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-52)
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type SABa?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 22 11.8, Dec +25 17 12)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3216
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3216
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3216

IC 3217 (= SDSS J122213.07+262316.9 + SDSS J122213.56+262307.6)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-53)
A magnitude 15.0 pair of galaxies in Coma Berenices
J122213.07+262316.9 = A 17th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) at RA 12 22 13.0, Dec +26 23 15
J122213.56+262307.6 = A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) at RA 12 22 13.5, Dec +26 23 08
IC 3217 is generally stated to be a galaxy and a brighter foreground star, but as shown in the images below, there is no foreground star. Instead, there is a brighter galaxy with a very bright nucleus (perhaps it is a Seyfert galaxy?). The galaxies have recessional velocities of 15520 and 15120 km/sec, so they are at essentially the same distance, and odds are that they are a physical pair, although given a lack of any obvious distortion they are probably a few million light years apart. Based on a straightforward calculation, their average recessional veloity of 15320 km/sec indicates a distance of about 715 million light years. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the pair was about 665 million light years away at the time the light by which we see them was emitted, about 680 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and their apparent sizes of 0.25 by 0.1 arcmin for the northwestern galaxy and 0.25 by 0.15 arcmin for the southeastern, each member of the pair is about 50 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of the pair of lenticular galaxies listed as IC 3217
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of the pair
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair, also showing IC 3205 and 3206
SDSS image of the pair of lenticular galaxies listed as IC 3217, also showing elliptical galaxy IC 3205 and spiral galaxy IC 3206

IC 3218 (= PGC 40067)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A magnitude 14.7 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Virgo (RA 12 22 19.6, Dec +06 55 38)
Per Dreyer, IC 3218 (Schwassmann #12, 1860 RA 12 15 12, NPD 82 17.5) is "very faint, pretty large, possibly binuclear". The position precesses to RA 12 22 20.3, Dec +06 55 53, midway between a 15th-magnitude galaxy and a 15th-magnitude star. Per Corwin, this position and Schwassmann's suggestion that the object is binuclear implies that his #12 included both the galaxy and the star; but now the galaxy alone is usually taken to be IC 3218. Apparent size 0.6 by 0.55 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 542) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3218 and the star that was probably part of Schwassmann's 'nova'
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3218 and the star discussed above
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3218

IC 3219 (= SDSS J122215.03+255704.8)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-54)
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 22 15.0, Dec +25 57 04)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.1 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3219
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3219
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
(The bright star is 5th-magnitude 12 Comae Berenices)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3219

IC 3220 (= PGC 40074)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (874)
A magnitude 14.8 elliptical galaxy (type dE6?) in Virgo (RA 12 22 21.7, Dec +10 36 04)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.35 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 546) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3220
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3220
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3220

IC 3221 (= SDSS 122220.14+251701.5)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-55)
A magnitude 15.9 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 22 20.1, Dec +25 17 00)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.1 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3221
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3221
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3221

IC 3222 (= PGC 40065)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-56)
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type SBc pec?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 22 19.5, Dec +28 49 53)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3222
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3222
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3222

IC 3223
Recorded (Feb 13, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A nonexistent object in Virgo (RA 12 22 30.6, Dec +09 29 11)
Per Dreyer, IC 3223 (Schwassmann #137, 1860 RA 12 15 23, NPD 79 44.2) is "very faint, pretty small, among 3 very faint stars". The position precesses to RA 12 22 30.6, Dec +09 29 11, within a triangle formed by three 14th- and 15th-magnitude stars which must be the ones noted by Schwassmann, but there is nothing else there. Corwin notes that each of the stars has been listed as IC 3223 by one person or another, including himself, then points out that since Schwassmann specified that it was among the three stars, it can't be any of them. Odds are that the object was a plate defect, but the plate in question apparently no longer exists; so all that can be stated with certainty is that the object does not exist, either.
SDSS image centered on the position (indicated by a box) of the nonexistent IC 3223
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the NGC position for the nonexistent IC 3223

IC 3224 (= PGC 40100)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (875)
A magnitude 15.6 irregular galaxy (type Irr pec) in Virgo (RA 12 22 36.0, Dec +12 09 30)
The 45 km/sec recessional velocity of IC 3224 simply shows that it is too close to use its recessional velocity to determine its distance, and a single redshift-independent distance estimate of 55 million light years is of unknown accuracy. However, it has been listed as a member (VCC 562) of the Virgo Cluster since the 1930's and the distance estimate agrees with that idea, so the estimate is usually accepted without question. If it is reasonably accurate, the galaxy's apparent size of 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin corresponds to a physical size of about 6 thousand light years, so whatever it is, it is a dwarf galaxy. The bright region on its northeast edge suggests that it may also be a starburst galaxy.
SDSS image of irregular galaxy IC 3224
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3224
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 3224

IC 3225 (= PGC 40111)
Discovered (Nov 4, 1899) by
Arnold Schwassmann (13)
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Scd pec?) in Virgo (RA 12 22 39.0, Dec +06 40 35)
Apparent size 1.8 by 0.6 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 567) of the Virgo Cluster. The off-center position of its nucleus, and the bright region near the end of its southeastern "tail" suggests that it may be two galaxies, a larger one that is the actual IC 3225, and a smaller one passing by or through the larger galaxy. If so, a more detailed view would be of great interest.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3225
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3225
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3229
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3225, also showing spiral galaxy IC 3229

IC 3226
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 16.5 star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 22 35.0, Dec +26 04 02)
(and possibly its magnitude 16.7 companion at RA 12 22 33.3, Dec +26 03 46)
Per Dreyer, IC 3226 (Wolf list IV #58, 1860 RA 12 15 33, NPD 63 09.4) is "very faint, very small, brighter middle like a star, spiral". The position precesses to RA 12 22 35.5, Dec +26 03 59, just northeast of the brighter of a pair of 17th magnitude stars. Corwin feels that star is probably Wolf's #58, but supposes that the second star could have been involved in Wolf's interpretation of the image. (It may have been the reason for his description of the object as spiral, and other references list the object as only the brighter star or both stars on a seemingly random basis.) I suspect Corwin's preference for the brighter star is correct, so I have assigned its position to this entry, but have also listed the second star.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as IC 3226, also showing spiral galaxy IC 3215
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the star listed as IC 3226, also showing IC 3215

IC 3227 (= PGC 40093)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-59)
A magnitude 16.1 spiral galaxy (type Sd?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 22 35.6, Dec +24 05 09)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3227
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3227
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3227

IC 3228 (= SDSS J122239.38+241948.3)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-60)
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 22 39.4, Dec +24 19 48)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3228
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3228
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3228

IC 3229 (generally (mis)identified as PGC 40147)
Recorded (Nov 4, 1899) by
Arnold Schwassmann
Probably a nonexistent object in Virgo (RA 12 22 44.3, Dec +06 40 41)
but usually (mis)identified as a magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type Sdm?) at RA 12 22 52.8, Dec +06 40 48
Per Dreyer, IC 3229 (Schwassmann #14, 1860 RA 12 15 36, NPD 82 32.7) is "extremely faint, extremely small, diffuse, questionable". The position precesses to RA 12 22 44.3, Dec +06 40 41, a few seconds east of IC 3225, but there is nothing there. There is a faint galaxy ten seconds further east, but per Corwin it is unlikely that Schwassmann, whose positions were usually very accurate (his position for IC 3225 is dead-on), would have made such a large error in the position. In addition, Schwassmann couldn't see the object on one of the two plates he took of the region, and noted that even on the other plate it was "on the edge of perceptibility". As a result, it seems likely that his #14 was a minor plate defect or merely random grain clumping, and therefore nonexistent. However, although it is probably not what Schwassmann "observed", PGC 40147 has been almost universally adopted as IC 3229, so it is the object described here and shown in the images on this site as IC 3229. The apparent size of PGC 40147 is 1.0 by 0.3 arcmin. It is listed as a member (VCC 593) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of the spiral galaxy usually identified as IC 3229
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of the supposed IC 3229
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on Schwassmann's position for IC 3229
Also shown are IC 3225 and the galaxy generally identified as IC 3229
SDSS image of region near Schwassmann's position for IC 3229 (shown by a box), also showing spiral galaxy IC 3225, and the spiral galaxy generally identified as IC 3229

IC 3230 (= PGC 40113)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-61)
A magnitude 15.8 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 22 39.6, Dec +27 44 48)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3230
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3230
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3230

IC 3231 (= SDSS J122243.77+244913.7)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-62)
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type SABc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 22 43.7, Dec +24 49 14)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3231
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3231
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
(The glare at right is from 6th-magnitude HD 107655)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3231

IC 3232
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 15.6 star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 22 47.8, Dec +24 25 33)
Per Dreyer, IC 3232 (Wolf list IV #63, 1860 RA 12 15 45, NPD 64 47.8) is "faint, extremely small, nebulous star". The position precesses to RA 12 22 48.0, Dec +24 25 35, almost on top of the star listed above, so save for the fact that it exhibits no nebulosity it exactly matches the IC entry, and the identity is certain.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as IC 3232
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 3232 (the brightest of the 3 stars to the left of the label)

IC 3233 (= PGC 165111)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (876)
A magnitude 15.5 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Virgo (RA 12 22 54.9, Dec +12 33 59)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.1 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3233
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3233
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3233

IC 3234 (= SDSS J122252.15+280645.1)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-64)
A magnitude 15.2 elliptical galaxy (type E0 pec?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 22 52.1, Dec +28 06 46)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin. Apparently interacting with a smaller galaxy just to its east.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3234
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3234
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3234

IC 3235 (= PGC 40155)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (877)
A magnitude 15.7 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 22 57.9, Dec +13 32 43)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3235
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3235
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3235

IC 3236 (= PGC 1374570)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (878)
A magnitude 15.7 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Virgo (RA 12 23 00.2, Dec +10 06 06)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3236
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3236
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3236

IC 3237 (= PGC 18374111)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-65)
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 22 58.0, Dec +28 29 38)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3237
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3237
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3237

IC 3238 (= PGC 40182)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (879)
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 23 06.4, Dec +14 27 32)
Apparent size 0.55 by 0.35 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 617) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3238 and several background galaxies
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3238
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3244
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3238, also showing spiral galaxy IC 3244

IC 3239 (= PGC 40187)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (880)
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type S/Im?) in Virgo (RA 12 23 09.5, Dec +11 43 33)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.3 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 620) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3239
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3239
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3239

IC 3240 (= PGC 165116)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (881)
A magnitude 15.8 spiral galaxy (type SABb?) in Virgo (RA 12 23 07.4, Dec +10 21 43)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3240
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3240
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3240

IC 3241 (= PGC 3089318)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-66)
A magnitude 16.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a pec?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 23 08.4, Dec +26 54 21)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3241
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3241
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3241

IC 3242 (= SDSS J122310.44+261456.0)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-67)
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 23 10.4, Dec +26 14 58)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3242
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3242
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3242

IC 3243 (= PGC 40197)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-68)
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Sd?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 23 11.3, Dec +27 45 56)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3243
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3243
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3243

IC 3244 (= PGC 40196)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (882)
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type Sc(s) pec?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 23 12.3, Dec +14 23 21)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 627) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3244
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3244
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3238
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3244, also showing lenticular galaxy IC 3238

IC 3245
Recorded (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A nonexistent object in Virgo (RA 12 23 17.6, Dec +09 07 24)
Per Dreyer, IC 3245 (Frost #883, 1860 RA 12 16 10, NPD 80 06) is "very faint, pretty large, brighter middle, possible defect". The position precesses to RA 12 23 17.6, Dec +09 07 24 (as shown above), but there is nothing there; but that is hardly surprising, as Adelaide Ames examined the plate (not quite thirty years later) and confirmed Frost's suspicion that the "object" was merely a plate defect, and the IC entry does not correspond to any celestial body.

IC 3246 (= PGC 40202)
Discovered (Sep 14, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (240)
A magnitude 15.3 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Virgo (RA 12 23 17.2, Dec +13 03 06)
Apparent size 0.45 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3246
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3246
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3246

IC 3247 (= PGC 40205, and not =
NGC 4338)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by Max Wolf
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Sd?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 23 14.0, Dec +28 53 35)
Per Dreyer, IC 3247 (Wolf list IV #69, 1860 RA 12 16 13, NPD 60 19.8) is "pretty faint, pretty small, extended 170, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 12 23 14.3, Dec +28 53 56, right on the galaxy, and the description is excellent, so the identification is certain. The only historical confusion involves an erroneous identification of IC 3247 as a duplicate of NGC 4338, which as explained at that entry, is actually a duplicate of NGC 4310. The confusion dates to a 1926 note by Reinmuth, who being unable to find NGC 4338 hazarded a guess that it might be IC 3247. Although most references correctly equate NGC 4338 with NGC 4310, some perpetuated Reinmuth's error, and even now there are places (such as Wikisky) where IC 3247 is incorrectly labeled as NGC 4338. However, per Thomson, d'Arrest stated that what became NGC 4338 was "Extremely difficult due to twilight", and under such viewing conditions d'Arrest couldn't possibly have seen a 15th magnitude object such as IC 3247 (whereas 12th magnitude NGC 4310 would have been barely within the capabilities of his instrument). So although Wolf's position was excellent, and the actual identity of IC 3247 is beyond any doubt, it is appropriate to note (as in the title of this entry) that it is not also equal to NGC 4338. Based on a recessional velocity of 570 km/sec, IC 3247 is about 27 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances peculiar (non-Hubble expansion) velocities can substantially affect the results, so the poor agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 75 to 85 million light years is hardly surprising. Assuming a distance of about 80 million light years, its apparent size of 2.2 by 0.2 arcmin implies that IC 3247 is about 50 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3247
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3247
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3247

IC 3248
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 16.8 star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 23 16.9, Dec +25 33 08)
Per Dreyer, IC 3248 (Wolf list IV #70, 1860 RA 12 16 14, NPD 63 40.3) is "most extremely faint, small, round, brighter middle", and one of a "chain of about 18 nebulae south to north", including IC 3249, 3250 and 3251. The position precesses to RA 12 23 16.4, Dec +25 33 06, less than half an arcmin from the star listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identity is certain.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as IC 3248
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the star listed as IC 3248

IC 3249 (= SDSS J122317.93+252640.7)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-71)
A magnitude 15.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 23 17.9, Dec +25 26 40)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3249
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3249
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3249
Celestial Atlas
(IC 3150 - 3199) ←     IC Objects: IC 3200 - 3249     → (IC 3250 - 3299)