Celestial Atlas
(IC 3200 - 3249) ←     IC Objects: IC 3250 - 3299 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 3300 - 3349)
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3250, 3251, 3252, 3253, 3254, 3255, 3256, 3257, 3258, 3259, 3260, 3261, 3262, 3263, 3264, 3265, 3266,
3267, 3268, 3269, 3270, 3271, 3272, 3273, 3274, 3275, 3276, 3277, 3278, 3279, 3280, 3281, 3282, 3283,
3284, 3285, 3286, 3287, 3288, 3289, 3290, 3291, 3292, 3293, 3294, 3295, 3296, 3297, 3298, 3299

Page last updated Dec 28, 2015: Checked revisions in Steinicke's discovery information
WORKING: historical and physical data

IC 3250
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 16.7 star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 23 17.8, Dec +25 37 43)
Per Dreyer, IC 3250 (Wolf list IV #72, 1860 RA 12 16 16, NPD 63 35.7) is "most extremely faint, small, round, brighter middle", and one of a "chain of about 18 nebulae south to north", including IC 3248, 3249 and 3251. The position precesses to RA 12 23 18.4, Dec +25 37 42, just east of the star listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as IC 3250, also showing the star that is probably IC 3251
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 3250, also showing the probable IC 3251

IC 3251
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 17.2 star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 23 18.9, Dec +25 39 13)
Per Dreyer, IC 3251 (Wolf list IV #73, 1860 RA 12 16 17, NPD 63 34.2) is "most extremely faint, small, round, brighter middle", and one of a "chain of about 18 nebulae south to north", including IC 3248, 3249 and 3250. The position precesses to RA 12 23 19.4, Dec +25 39 12, just east of the star listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is reasonably certain. The main concern about the identification seems to be that the star might be too faint for Wolf to have noticed, and as a result IC 3251 is often listed as nonexistent; but the offset between his position and the star is the same as for the nearby IC 3250 (which see for an image), so it seems more likely than not that he did see it.

IC 3252
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 15.2 star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 23 25.4, Dec +28 37 02)
or that star and a magnitude 16 star at RA 12 23 24.5, Dec +28 37 07
Per Dreyer, IC 3251 (Wolf list IV #74, 1860 RA 12 16 24, NPD 60 36.3) is "faint, small, irregular figure, possible cluster". The position precesses to RA 12 23 25.3, Dec +28 37 06, close to the brighter star listed above, but in between it and the fainter star to its west. As a result some references list the brighter star as the IC object, others list it as the pair, and some (taking their lead from Dreyer, rather than the appearance of the region) list it as a group or cluster. In the image below the label is directly above the pair of stars, and it is left to the reader to decide whether it makes any difference how the entry is defined.
SDSS image of region near the star (or stars) listed as IC 3252
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 3252

IC 3253 (= PGC 40265)
Discovered (1901) by
DeLisle Stewart (363)
A magnitude 11.6 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)c) in Centaurus (RA 12 23 45.0, Dec -34 37 17)
Based on a recessional velocity of 2705 km/sec, IC 3253 is about 125 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates ranging from 90 to 250 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.6 by 1.1 arcmin, it is about 95 thousand light years across.
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3253
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3253
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3253

IC 3254 (probably =
NGC 4336 = PGC 40231)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4336)
Recorded (May 7, 1904) by Royal Frost (and later listed as IC 3254)
A magnitude 12.5 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 23 29.7, Dec +19 25 37)
Per Dreyer, IC 3254 (Frost #884, 1860 RA 12 16 28, NPD 69 46) is "bright, small, round, planetary". The position precesses to RA 12 23 32.4, Dec +19 27 24, a couple of arcmin north-northeast of NGC 4336 (which see for anything else), and nearly on top of a 14th-magnitude star. Corwin points out that since Frost's description hardly fits the galaxy, his observation may have referred to the star; but adds that when Adelaide Ames examined the same plate nearly thirty years later she equated the IC object with NGC 4336, and because of her skill at such work her identification has been generally accepted ever since.

IC 3255 (= PGC 40241)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (885)
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type Sb(s)c pec?) in Virgo (RA 12 23 34.8, Dec +09 38 56)
Based on a recessional velocity of 6465 km/sec, IC 3255 is about 300 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.65 by 0.45 arcmin, it is about 55 thousand light years across. Its appearance suggests a possible galactic collision or its aftermath. It is listed as a member (VCC 649) of the Virgo Cluster, but given its distance is far beyond the Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3255
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3255
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3255

IC 3256 (= PGC 40252 =
NGC 4342)
Discovered (Apr 13, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4342)
Discovered (Apr 23, 1895) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 3256)
A magnitude 12.5 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Virgo (RA 12 23 39.1, Dec +07 03 16)
Per Dreyer, IC 3256 (Bigourdan #291, 1860 RA 12 16 28, NPD 82 09) is "a 12th magnitude star in a small nebula (possibly = III 95 or 96)", the reference to Herschel's observations meaning that Dreyer thought it might be the same as NGC 4341 or 4342 (his indecision about which NGC object might correspond to IC 3256 was due to confusion about the correct identification of those objects, for which see their entries). The position precesses to RA 12 23 36.1, Dec +07 04 24, a little over an arcmin northwest of NGC 4342, and there is nothing else nearby, so it appears that IC 3256 is indeed the same as that NGC object (which see for anything else).

IC 3257
Recorded (Apr 23, 1895) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A lost or nonexistent object in Virgo (RA 12 23 40.1, Dec +07 16 24)
Per Dreyer, IC 3257 (Bigourdan #292, 1860 RA 12 16 32, NPD 81 57) is "extremely faint". The position precesses to RA 12 23 40.1, Dec +07 16 24, but there is nothing there or anywhere near there. Per Corwin, Bigourdan only recorded this object in 1895, and in 1907 said "I can once in a while see this extremely faint object", without making any other measurements. So Bigourdan may have seen something and recorded an erroneous position on the only occasion he bothered to measure it (in which case it is 'lost'), or he occasionally let his effort to observe something outrun his ability to actually do it (in which case it is nonexistent).

IC 3258 (= PGC 39911 = PGC 40264)
Discovered (Sep 14, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (241)
Also recorded (May 10, 1904) by Royal Frost (#?)
A magnitude 13.1 irregular galaxy (type IB(s)m pec?) in Virgo (RA 12 23 44.5, Dec +12 28 43)
Apparent size 1.9 by 1.3 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 664) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of irregular galaxy IC 3258
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3258
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 3258

IC 3259 (= PGC 40273)
Discovered (Apr 23, 1895) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
Also observed (Nov 4, 1899) by Arnold Schwassmann
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)dm?) in Virgo (RA 12 23 48.6, Dec +07 11 11)
Per Dreyer, IC 3259 (Bigourdan #293, Schwassmann #16, 1860 RA 12 16 40, NPD 82 02.1) is "faint, considerably small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 12 23 48.1, Dec +07 11 18, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Apparent size 1.7 by 0.9 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 667) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3259
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3259
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 4341
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3259, also showing lenticular galaxy NGC 4341

IC 3260 (= PGC 40280 =
NGC 4341)
Discovered (Apr 13, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4341)
Discovered (Apr 23, 1895) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 3260)
Also observed (Nov 27, 1900) by Arnold Schwassmann (and later listed as IC 3260)
A magnitude 13.2 lenticular galaxy (type SB0) in Virgo (RA 12 23 53.1, Dec +07 06 25)
Per Dreyer, IC 3260 (Bigourdan #294, Schwassmann #17, 1860 RA 12 16 45, NPD 82 07.0) is "faint, considerably small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 12 23 53.1, Dec +07 06 24, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. The duplicate entry is due to considerable confusion about the NGC objects, for which (and anything else) see NGC 4341.

IC 3261 (probably = PGC 169197)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type SABb?) in Virgo (RA 12 23 52.5, Dec +11 28 53)
Per Dreyer, IC 3261 (Frost #886, 1860 RA 12 16 46, NPD 77 45) is "pretty small, faint star in middle, spiral, doubtful". The position precesses to RA 12 23 52.8, Dec +11 28 24, about an arcmin south of the galaxy listed above, which has a relatively bright starlike center, so the identification seems reasonably certain. However, there is also a larger but much lower surface brightness galaxy (PGC 40289) to the northeast of PGC 169197 which is sometimes identified as this IC object. Per Corwin, the brighter center and smaller positional error for PGC 169197 makes it the more likely candidate for the IC entry, and some references follow his opinion; but Frost's original notes include a diameter estimate of 1 arcmin which better fits the larger galaxy, so some references list it as the IC object. Corwin notes that viewing the original plate might decide the question (for instance, the low surface brightness of the larger galaxy might have made it undetectable, in which case it would be a non-starter), but apparently that has not been possible to date. I presume that PGC 169197 is Frost's #886, but because the other galaxy is sometimes listed as IC 3261, it is discussed immediately below. The apparent size of PGC 169197 is about 0.5 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 169197, which is probably IC 3261, and diffuse spiral galaxy PGC 40289, which is sometimes called IC 3261
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 169197 (IC 3261) and PGC 40289
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 169197, which is probably IC 3261, and diffuse spiral galaxy PGC 40289, which is sometimes called IC 3261

PGC 40289 (probably not
IC 3261)
Probably not an IC object, but listed here because sometimes called IC 3261
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sm?) in Virgo (RA 12 23 54.6, Dec +11 29 26)
A diffuse galaxy of uncertain type. Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 679) of the Virgo Cluster. See IC 3261 for images and a discussion of why PGC 40289 is sometimes identified as that object.

IC 3262 (= PGC 40271)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-75)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type SABab?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 23 48.1, Dec +27 23 40)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3262
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3262
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3269 and 3278
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3262, also showing spiral galaxy IC 3269 and galaxy triplet IC 3278

IC 3263 (= PGC 40270)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-76)
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type SAB(r)ab?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 23 50.5, Dec +28 11 55)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3263
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3263
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3263

IC 3264 (= PGC 3788068)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-77)
A magnitude 15.0 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 23 51.9, Dec +25 33 25)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.25 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3264
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3264
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3264

IC 3265 (not =
NGC 4353)
Recorded (Jan 26, 1900) by Arnold Schwassmann
A magnitude 13.5 star in Virgo (RA 12 23 58.9, Dec +07 48 14)
Per Dreyer, IC 3265 (Schwassmann #48, 1860 RA 12 16 51, NPD 81 25.2) is "pretty faint, small, nuclear, possibly a star". The position precesses to RA 12 23 58.9, Dec +07 48 12, right on the star listed above, so the identification is certain. Corwin notes that Adelaide Ames identified the star as IC 3265 in 1930, so the matter should have been settled fairly early on. But there is occasional confusion about the identification due to the CGCG erroneously posting "I3265 = I3266 (= N4353?)", thereby identifying IC 3265 as NGC 4353 (the galaxy southeast of the star); hence the warning in the title of this entry.
SDSS image of the region near the star listed as IC 3265, also showing irregular galaxy NGC 4353
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 3265, also showing NGC 4353

IC 3266 (=
NGC 4353 = PGC 40303)
Discovered (1881) by Christian Peters (and later listed as NGC 4353)
Discovered (Nov 20, 1899) by Arnold Schwassmann (and later listed as IC 3266)
A magnitude 13.6 irregular galaxy (type IBm?) in Virgo (RA 12 24 00.2, Dec +07 47 03)
Per Dreyer, IC 3266 (Schwassmann #49, 1860 RA 12 16 52, NPD 81 26.3) is "considerably faint, small, binuclear, possibly a star". The position precesses to RA 12 23 59.9, Dec +07 47 07, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. The duplicate entry is due to Peters' position being relatively poor, so that Schwassmann and Dreyer failed to notice the possible connection with NGC 4353 (which see for anything else). Per Corwin, Adelaide Ames noted the identity with NGC 4353 while preparing her Virgo Cluster catalog in 1930; however, CGCG muddied the celestial waters by erroneously posting "I3265 = I3266 (= N4353?)", I3265 being the star listed as IC 3265 (as discussed at that entry).

IC 3267 (= PGC 40317)
Discovered (Apr 23, 1895) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (295)
Discovered (Nov 4, 1899) by Arnold Schwassmann (#?)
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)cd) in Virgo (RA 12 24 05.5, Dec +07 02 26)
Apparent size 1.2 by 1.2 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 697) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3267
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3267
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 4341
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3267, also showing lenticular galaxy NGC 4341

IC 3268 (= PGC 40321)
Discovered (June, 1865) by
Auguste Voigt (4)
Discovered (Nov 4, 1899) by Arnold Schwassmann (#?)
A magnitude 13.3 irregular galaxy (type IAm?) in Virgo (RA 12 24 07.6, Dec +06 36 25)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 699) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of irregular galaxy IC 3268
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3268
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 3268

IC 3269 (= PGC 3788156)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-78)
A magnitude 16.2 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 24 04.2, Dec +27 26 05)
Based on a recessional velocity of 27955 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 3269 is about 1300 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 1170 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 1220 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and the galaxy's apparent size of 0.65 by 0.35 arcmin, it is about 220 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3269
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3269
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3262 and 3278
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3269, also showing spiral galaxy IC 3262 and galaxy triplet IC 3278

IC 3270 (= PGC 3788174)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-79)
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type SABb?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 24 05.8, Dec +27 34 39)
Apparent size 0.55 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3270
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3270
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3270

IC 3271 (= PGC 40337)
Discovered (Nov 20, 1899) by
Arnold Schwassmann (50)
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SABc) in Virgo (RA 12 24 13.9, Dec +07 57 09)
Apparent size 1.0 by 1.0 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 712) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3271
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3271
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3271

IC 3272 (= PGC 1684676)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-80)
A magnitude 15.4 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 24 09.3, Dec +23 17 06)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3272
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3272
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3272

IC 3273 (=
NGC 4356 = PGC 40342)
Discovered (Dec 28, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4356)
Discovered (Jan 23, 1900) by Arnold Schwassmann (95) (and later listed as IC 3273)
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Virgo (RA 12 24 14.6, Dec +08 32 13)
Per Corwin, Herschel and Schwassmann's positions are good, but Schwassmann and Dreyer failed to notice the connection, hence a duplicate entry. Ames was the first to note the duplication, in her 1930 Virgo Cluster catalog. (See NGC 4356 for anything else.)

IC 3274 (= PGC 40344 = "NGC 4360B")
Discovered (Feb 15, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (96)
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Virgo (RA 12 24 14.6, Dec +09 16 02)
As noted above, sometimes incorrectly called NGC 4360B. Apparent size 0.7 by 0.65 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 715) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3274
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3274
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 4360
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3274, also showing elliptical galaxy NGC 4360

IC 3275 (= PGC 165137)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (887)
A magnitude 15.7 spiral galaxy (type (R)Sa pec?) in Virgo (RA 12 24 19.5, Dec +10 26 47)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3275
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3275
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy=
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3275

IC 3276 (= PGC 3788218)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-81)
A magnitude 15.5 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 24 14.0, Dec +25 49 06)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3276
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3276
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy (the star is 7th-magnitude HD 107935)
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3276

IC 3277 (= PGC 4662913)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-82)
A magnitude 15.5 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 24 15.6, Dec +25 33 49)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3277
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3277
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy (the bright star is 6th-magnitude HD 108007)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3277

IC 3278 (= PGC 40345 + two apparent companions)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 15.2 galaxy triplet in Coma Berenices
IC 3278 NED01 = A 17-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) at RA 12 24 14.5, Dec +27 25 24
IC 3278 NED02 = A 16-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) at RA 12 24 15.1, Dec +27 25 24
PGC 40345 = A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) at RA 12 24 15.5, Dec +27 25 06
Per Dreyer, IC 3278 (Wolf list IV #83, 1860 RA 12 17 14, NPD 61 48.0) is "very faint, small, irregular figure, nucleus". The position precesses to RA 12 24 15.4, Dec +27 25 25, on the northeastern edge of a triplet of faint galaxies. LEDA assigns the IC entry to the southernmost of those galaxies, 16th-magnitude PGC 40305, but NED treats the triplet as the IC entry. It is hard to imagine Wolf noticing the one galaxy and not the others, and between that, his position and the reference to an "irregular figure" I feel that IC 3278 must be the entire grouping, so I have adopted the NED designations. The triplet is at least partially a physical grouping as well, as the northern pair of galaxies have similar recessional velocities (in excess of 28000 km/sec), implying a common distance of more than a billion light years; but whether the southern galaxy is associated with the others is unknown, as nothing is known about its radial velocity or distance. The apparent size for PGC 40345 is 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin, for IC 3278 NED02, 0.2 by 0.15 arcmin, and for IC 3278 NED01, 0.25 by 0.1 arcmin.
SDSS image of galaxy triplet listed as IC 3278
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3278
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the triplet, also showing IC 3262 and 3269
SDSS image of region near galaxy triplet listed as IC 3278, also showing spiral galaxies IC 3262 and 3269

IC 3279
Recorded (Sep 14, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A magnitude 12.8 and 13.9 pair of stars in Virgo (RA 12 24 23.4, Dec +12 51 09)
Per Dreyer, IC 3279 (Schwassmann #242, 1860 RA 12 17 18, NPD 76 22.3) is pretty faint, small, perhaps 2 stars". The position precesses to RA 12 24 24.3, Dec +12 51 07, on the brighter (eastern) member of the pair of stars listed above. Corwin says Schwassmann's original notes specified that the eastern star was a magnitude brighter, and although his estimates were off a couple of magnitudes, between the position and the relative brightness of the stars, the identity seems certain.
SDSS image of region near the pair of stars listed as IC 3279
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair of stars listed as IC 3279

IC 3280 (= PGC 40372)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost (888)
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type Sbc(r)) in Virgo (RA 12 24 26.9, Dec +13 14 00)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 729) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3280
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3280
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3280

IC 3281
Recorded (Nov 20, 1899) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A nonexistent object in Virgo (RA 12 24 27.8, Dec +07 49 19)
Per Dreyer, IC 3281 (Schwassmann #51, 1860 RA 12 17 20, NPD 81 24.1) is "pretty bright, pretty small, nuclear, stellar". The position precesses to RA 12 24 27.8, Dec +07 49 19, but there is nothing there. Per Corwin, Schwassmann measured the "object" on his plate twice, describing it as "pretty bright, considerably small, round, nuclear, like a star" on one occasion, and "considerably bright, pretty small, round, like 10th or 9th magnitude star, diameter 25 arcsec", so there was definitely something on the plate, but there is nothing remotely near that brightness (or even a couple of magnitudes fainter) anywhere near his position; so odds are that the object was a plate defect, and IC 3281 represents a nonexistent object.

IC 3282
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 16.8 star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 24 28.0, Dec +25 40 14)
Per Dreyer, IC 3282 (Wolf list IV #84, 1860 RA 12 17 26, NPD 63 33.2) is "extremely faint, very small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 12 24 27.9, Dec +25 40 13, on the star listed above, so the identification seems certain.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as IC 3282
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 3282 (the bright star is 6th-magnitude HD 108007)

IC 3283 (= PGC 3788276)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-85)
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 24 28.1, Dec +27 12 42)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin. (Listed in NED as LEDA 3788276.)
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3283
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3283
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3283

IC 3284 (= PGC 40400)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (889)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type SBc(r)?) in Virgo (RA 12 24 37.5, Dec +10 50 19)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3284
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3284
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3284

IC 3285
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 16.7 star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 24 33.5, Dec +24 51 35)
Per Dreyer, IC 3285 (Wolf list IV #86, 1860 RA 12 17 32, NPD 64 21.8) is "very faint, very small, round, bright middle, in diffuse nebula extended 25". The position precesses to RA 12 24 34.2, Dec +24 51 37, just northeast of the star listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as IC 3285
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 3285

IC 3286 (= PGC 1692968)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-87)
A magnitude 15.0 elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 24 34.5, Dec +23 44 52)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3286
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3286
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3286

IC 3287 (= PGC 4662912)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-88)
A magnitude 17.2 spiral galaxy (type SBm?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 24 37.0, Dec +24 35 41)
Based on a recessional velocity of 16300 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 3287 is about 760 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 710 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 730 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its 0.33 by 0.25 arcmin apparent size, it is about 70 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3287
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3287
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3287

IC 3288 (= PGC 3788335)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-89)
A magnitude 15.5 elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 24 39.3, Dec +24 56 57)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3288
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3288
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3288

IC 3289 (= PGC 40446)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1898) by
Lewis Swift (XI-138)
Also observed (1899?) by Herbert Howe (#?)
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Hydra (RA 12 24 57.4, Dec -26 01 49)
Apparent size 1.0 by 1.0 arcmin.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3289
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3289
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3289

IC 3290 (= PGC 40470)
Discovered (Jan 30, 1898) by
Lewis Swift (XI-137)
Also observed (1899?) by Herbert Howe (#?)
A magnitude 12.0 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB0/a(s)) in Centaurus (RA 12 25 08.8, Dec -39 46 33)
Apparent size 2.0 by 1.4 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3290, also showing part of lenticular galaxy NGC 4373
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3290, also showing part of NGC 4373
Below, a better view of the region (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy IC 3290 and lenticular galaxy NGC 4373
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 3290, also showing NGC 4373
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3290, also showing lenticular galaxy NGC 4373

IC 3291 (= PGC 165140)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (892)
A magnitude 15.5 elliptical galaxy (type E5) in Virgo (RA 12 24 48.3, Dec +12 01 09)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3291
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3291
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3291

IC 3292 (= PGC 40425)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (890)
A magnitude 14.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 24 48.3, Dec +18 11 44)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 751) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3292
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3292
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy (the outline at left is the western edge of M85)
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3292, also showing the western outline of lenticular galaxy NGC 4382, also known as M85

IC 3293 (= PGC 3788417)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (891)
A magnitude 15.7 spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 24 53.5, Dec +17 25 57)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3293
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3293
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3293

IC 3294 (= SDSS J122449.72+253550.9)
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 17(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 24 49.6, Dec +25 35 51)
Per Dreyer, IC 3294 (Wolf list IV #90, 1860 RA 12 17 48, NPD 63 37.5) is "extremely faint, considerably small, diffuse". The position precesses to RA 12 24 49.8, Dec +25 35 56, on the northern edge of the galaxy, so the identification is certain. (Note: In lower-resolution images this object appears nearly stellar, so some references list it as a star.) Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3294
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3294
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3294

IC 3295
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-91)
A nonexistent object in Coma Berenices
Per Corwin, IC 3295 is a plate defect on Wolf's original plate, clearly visible on a print of the plate, so it represents a nonexistent object.

IC 3296 (= PGC 40450)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-92)
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 24 57.7, Dec +24 23 00)
Apparent size 0.55 by 0.35 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3296
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3296
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3296

IC 3297
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 16.7 star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 24 58.0, Dec +26 46 17)
Per Dreyer, IC 3297 (Wolf list IV #93, 1860 RA 12 17 57, NPD 62 27.3) is "very faint, pretty large, round, brighter middle, spiral". The position precesses to RA 12 24 58.3, Dec +26 46 08, just southeast of the star listed above, and the identification is considered reasonably certain. Per Corwin, the star is clearly visible on a print of the plate, but no mention is made of the difference between the description and the star's appearance, so it is presumably considered of little importance (and in any event cannot be due to a plate defect).
SDSS image of region near the star listed as IC 3297, also showing spiral galaxy IC 3308
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 3297, also showing IC 3308

IC 3298 (= PGC 40458)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (893)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sdm?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 25 03.8, Dec +17 00 55)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.3 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 768) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3298
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3298
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3298

IC 3299 (= PGC 3089319)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-95)
A magnitude 17.2 spiral galaxy (type Sb pec?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 25 03.1, Dec +27 22 30)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3299
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3299
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3306
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3299, also showing spiral galaxy IC 3306
Celestial Atlas
(IC 3200 - 3249) ←     IC Objects: IC 3250 - 3299     → (IC 3300 - 3349)