Celestial Atlas
(IC 3300 - 3349) ←     IC Objects: IC 3350 - 3399 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 3400 - 3449)
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3350, 3351, 3352, 3353, 3354, 3355, 3356, 3357, 3358, 3359, 3360, 3361, 3362, 3363, 3364, 3365, 3366,
3367, 3368, 3369, 3370, 3371, 3372, 3373, 3374, 3375, 3376, 3377, 3378, 3379, 3380, 3381, 3382, 3383,
3384, 3385, 3386, 3387, 3388, 3389, 3390, 3391, 3392, 3393, 3394, 3395, 3396, 3397, 3398, 3399

Page last updated Jan 15, 2013
WORKING: Add historical/physical data

IC 3350
Recorded (Feb 15, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A 13th-magnitude star in Virgo (RA 12 26 46.4, Dec +09 26 33)
Per Dreyer, IC 3350 (Schwassmann 102, 1860 RA 12 19 40, NPD 79 46.8) is a "10.5 magnitude star with nebulosity to southwest". The position precesses to RA 12 26 47.0, Dec +09 26 40, almost on top of the star listed above, and even though there is no nebulosity the identification seems certain.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as IC 3350, also showing part of spiral galaxy NGC 4424
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 3350, also showing part of NGC 4424

IC 3351
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A 17th-magnitude star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 26 41.6, Dec +27 36 21)
Per Dreyer, IC 3351 (Wolf list IV #124, 1860 RA 12 19 41, NPD 61 37.1) is "extremely faint, small, irregular figure". The position precesses to RA 12 26 41.2, Dec +27 36 22, right on the star listed above, so the identification is considered certain.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as IC 3351
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 3351

IC 3352
Recorded (Jan 24, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
Probably a nonexistent object in Virgo (RA 12 26 48.2, Dec +08 45 28)
Per Dreyer, IC 3352 (Schwassmann 103, 1860 RA 12 19 41, NPD 80 28.0) is "faint, pretty small, extended". The position precesses to RA 12 26 48.2, Dec +08 45 28 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there. As noted by Corwin, there is a faint galaxy (PGC 94213) a couple of arcmin to the southwest, but aside from the positional error it would probably have been described as "extremely faint" or "most extremely faint", so it is generally thought that #103 was a defect on Schwassmann's plate (which unfortunately no longer exists), and the IC entry represents a nonexistent object.
SDSS image of region near Schwassmann's position for IC 3352, showing PGC 94213, the spiral galaxy that might or more likely might not be the IC object
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the position of IC 3352, also showing PGC 94213

PGC 94213 (near but probably not
IC 3352)
Not an IC object but listed here since near the position of apparently nonexistent IC 3352
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Virgo (RA 12 26 41.6, Dec +08 44 32)
Based on a recessional velocity of 7495 km/sec, PGC 94213 is about 350 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin, it is about 40 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 94213, which might or more likely might not be IC 3352
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 94213; see IC 3352 for a wider image

IC 3353 (= PGC 40741)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sd?) in Virgo (RA 12 26 45.0, Dec +27 54 43)
Per Dreyer, IC 3353 (Wolf list IV #125, 1860 RA 12 19 42, NPD 61 18.7) is "extremely faint, small, irregular figure". The position precesses to RA 12 26 42.1, Dec +27 54 46, less than an arcmin west of the galaxy listed above, so the identification is reasonably certain (however, some references list IC 3353 as a faint star closer to Wolf's position). Based on a recessional velocity of 4410 km/sec, IC 3353 is about 205 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.8 by 0.15 arcmin, it is about 50 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3353
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3353
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy (with NGC 4408 at far right)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3353, also showing part of lenticular galaxy NGC 4408

IC 3354
Recorded (Sep 12, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A 15th-magnitude star in Virgo (RA 12 26 51.5, Dec +12 05 49)
Per Dreyer, IC 3354 (Schwassmann 187, 1860 RA 12 19 46, NPD 77 07.7) is "extremely faint, small, questionable". The position precesses to RA 12 26 52.1, Dec +12 05 46, almost on top of the star listed above, and given the "questionable" nature of the entry, the identification seems certain.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as IC 3354
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 3354

IC 3355 (= PGC 40754)
Discovered (Nov 17, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (251)
A 15th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type Im) in Virgo (RA 12 26 50.7, Dec +13 10 38)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.5 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 945) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of irregular galaxy IC 3355
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3355
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 3355

IC 3356 (= PGC 40761)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (905)
A 15th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type Im) in Virgo (RA 12 26 50.8, Dec +11 33 30)
Apparent size 1.5 by 0.9 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 950) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of irregular galaxy IC 3356
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3356
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also indicating the location of IC 3358
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 3356, also indicating the location of elliptical galaxy IC 3358

IC 3357 (= PGC 40757)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (906)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Virgo (RA 12 26 51.4, Dec +09 46 39)
Based on a recessional velocity of 14075 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 3357 is about 655 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 620 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 635 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.5 by 0.25 arcmin, the galaxy is about 90 thousand light years across. Listed as a member (VCC 946) of the Virgo Cluster, but not really a member, since hundreds of millions of light years further away.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3357
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3357
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3357

IC 3358 (= PGC 40764)
Discovered (Sep 12, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (188)
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type dE4) in Virgo (RA 12 26 54.4, Dec +11 39 48)
Apparent size 1.5 by 0.9 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 951) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3358
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3358
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3358

IC 3359 (= PGC 89605)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-126)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 26 51.3, Dec +23 29 55)
Apparent size 0.45 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3359
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3359
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3359

IC 3360
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A 17th-magnitude star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 26 50.7, Dec +26 02 46)
Per Dreyer, IC 3360 (Wolf list IV #127, 1860 RA 12 19 50, NPD 63 10.6) is "extremely faint, very small, irregular figure". The position precesses to RA 12 26 50.8, Dec +26 02 52, almost exactly on the star listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is considered certain.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as IC 3360
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 3360

IC 3361 (probably = PGC 40759)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type dE4) in Virgo (RA 12 26 54.5, Dec +10 39 55)
Per Dreyer, IC 3361 (Frost 907, 1860 RA 12 19 52, NPD 78 35) is "round, brighter middle, magnitude 15.5". The position precesses to RA 12 26 58.6, Dec +10 38 28, but there is nothing there. Corwin notes two possible candidates for what Frost saw: PGC 165162, a fainter but higher surface brightness galaxy 5 seconds east of the IC position, and PGC 40759, a brighter but lower surface brightness galaxy 5 seconds west of the IC position. The latter has the same size and brightness listed by Adelaide Ames while measuring Frost's plate for her Virgo Cluster catalog thirty years later, and is therefore considered more likely to be what Frost observed (hence its identification with this entry). Apparent size 1.0 by 0.6 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 949) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3361
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3361
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing PGC 165162
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3361, also showing spiral galaxy PGC 165162

PGC 165162 (probably not =
IC 3361)
Probably not an IC object but listed here since one of the candidates for IC 3361
A 17th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Virgo (RA 12 27 04.5, Dec +10 38 46)
As noted above, one of two candidates for a href=discoverers.htm#frost>Frost's 907, or IC 3361; but due to its extreme faintness, less likely to be that object than PGC 40759. Whether in any way related to IC 3361 or not, PGC 165162 is an interesting object, as it has an enormous distance. Based on a recessional velocity of 39595 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that it is about 1845 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 1585 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 1685 million years ago (the 100 million year difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.27 by 0.13 arcmin, it is about 125 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 165162
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 165162; for a wider view, see IC 3361

IC 3362 (= PGC 3089430)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-128)
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABa(r)?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 26 54.3, Dec +26 41 26)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3362
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3362
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3362

IC 3363 (= PGC 40786)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost (908)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type dE7) in Virgo (RA 12 27 03.0, Dec +12 33 40)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.4 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 965) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3363
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3363
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3363

IC 3364 (= SDSS J122704.91+253347.7)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-130)
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S pec?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 27 04.7, Dec +25 33 48)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3364
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3364
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3364

IC 3365 (= PGC 40811)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (909)
A 14th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type Im) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 27 11.5, Dec +15 53 49)
Apparent size 1.7 by 0.7 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 980) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of irregular galaxy IC 3365
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3365
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 3365

IC 3366 (= PGC 213994)
Discovered (Feb 15, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (105)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Virgo (RA 12 27 12.1, Dec +09 24 36)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3366, also showing part of spiral galaxy NGC 4424
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3366, also showing part of NGC 4424
(For a wider view, see NGC 4424)

IC 3367 (= PGC 40812)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-131)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 27 10.0, Dec +26 57 28)
Apparent size 1.25 by 1.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3367
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3367
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
(the glare at bottom right is from 5th magnitude 16 Comae Berenices)
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3367

IC 3368 (= PGC 40835)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (910)
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type dE3 pec?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 27 20.5, Dec +16 25 38)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 994) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3368
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3368
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 792
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3368, also showing spiral galaxy IC 792

IC 3369 (= PGC 40828)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (911)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type dE3) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 27 16.9, Dec +16 01 29)
Apparent size 0.85 by 0.6 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 990) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3369
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3369
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3369

IC 3370 (= PGC 40887)
Discovered (Jan 30, 1898) by
Lewis Swift (XI-139)
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0 pec) in Centaurus (RA 12 27 37.2, Dec -39 20 16)
Apparent size 2.1 by 1.6 arcmin. A 'box-shaped' lenticular galaxy, previously cataloged as a peculiar elliptical.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3370
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3370
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3370

IC 3371 (= PGC 40839)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (912)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Virgo (RA 12 27 22.2, Dec +10 52 00)
Apparent size 1.8 by 0.2 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 995) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3371
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3371
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3371

IC 3372 (= PGC 89606)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 27 24.8, Dec +25 17 12)
Per Dreyer, IC 3372 (Wolf list IV #132, 1860 RA 12 20 24, NPD 63 56.3) is "very faint, very small, brighter middle, spiral". The position precesses to RA 12 27 24.9, Dec +25 17 11, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Per Corwin, a print of the original plate shows what appears to be a star and a superimposed plate defect, so the object is often listed as a star; however, it is actually a very distant galaxy that appears so small that it looks nearly stellar. Based on a recessional velocity of 18885 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 3372 is about 880 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 815 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 840 million years ago (the difference in the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.14 by 0.12 arcmin, the galaxy is about 35 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3372
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3372
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3372

IC 3373 (= SDSS J122727.81+252714.0)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-133)
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 27 27.7, Dec +25 27 11)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3373
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3373
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3373

IC 3374 (= PGC 40876)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (913)
A 15th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type IB(s)m?) in Virgo (RA 12 27 33.4, Dec +10 00 14)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 1021) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of irregular galaxy IC 3374
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3374
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 3374

IC 3375
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-134)
A 16th-magnitude star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 27 40.4, Dec +27 21 54)
Per Dreyer, IC 3375 (Wolf list IV #134, 1860 RA 12 20 41, NPD 61 51.5) is "faint, very small, round, attached 14th magnitude star to southwest". The position precesses to RA 12 27 40.9, Dec +27 21 59, practically on the star listed above, and the brighter star to its southwest seems to confirm the description, so the identity is considered certain.
SDSS image of region centered on the star listed as IC 3375
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 3375

IC 3376 (= PGC 40920)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-135)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SBa) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 27 50.2, Dec +26 59 37)
Apparent size 1.7 by 1.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3376
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3376
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3376

IC 3377 (= PGC 3089512)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-136)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S0/a pec?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 27 51.9, Dec +24 56 34)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.15 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3377
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3377
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3377

IC 3378 (= SDSS J122801.56+171747.3)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (914)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc pec?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 28 01.5, Dec +17 17 47)
Per Dreyer, NGC 3378 (Frost 914, 1860 RA 12 21 05, NPD 71 55) is one of "2 nebulae, 1' apart, magnitude 15.5". The position precesses to RA 12 28 08.9, Dec +17 18 30, and although there is nothing at Frost's exact position, there is a pair of galaxies separated by about an arcmin, only 1.5 arcmin to the west; so the western member of the pair must be IC 3378, and the eastern IC 3379. This agrees with the listings in NED, but not in all other references, so the reader may run across contradictory identifications. Apparent size 0.4 by 0.25 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxies IC 3378 and 3379
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3378 and 3379
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies IC 3378 and 3379

IC 3379 (= PGC 40955)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (914)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 28 04.1, Dec +17 18 22)
Per Dreyer, NGC 3379 (Frost 914, 1860 RA 12 21 05, NPD 71 55) is one of "2 nebulae, 1' apart, magnitude 15.5". The position precesses to RA 12 28 08.9, Dec +17 18 30, and although there is nothing at Frost's exact position, there is a pair of galaxies separated by about an arcmin, only 1.5 arcmin to the west; so the western member of the pair must be IC 3378 (which see for images), and the eastern IC 3379. It is on that basis that the two entries are assigned to the galaxies as shown here. This agrees with the listings in NED, but LEDA assigns both IC numbers to the brighter galaxy, so the reader may run across contradictory identifications. Apparent size 0.55 by 0.2 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 1066) of the Virgo Cluster, but not really a member, as much further away.

IC 3380 (= PGC 3089432)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-137)
A 16th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 28 05.5, Dec +26 40 24)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.25 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3380
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3380
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3380

IC 3381 (= PGC 40985)
Discovered (Sep 12, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (192)
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type dE3 N) in Virgo (RA 12 28 14.8, Dec +11 47 22)
The galaxy's recessional velocity of 675 km/sec is too small in comparison to peculiar (non-Hubble expansion) velocities to provide a reliable distance estimate, and the corresponding value of 30 million light years is considerably less than redshift-independent distance estimates of 40 to 60 million light years, which suggest that it is a member of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies (it is listed as a member (VCC 1087) of the Cluster). If about 50 million light years away, its apparent size of 1.35 by 0.9 arcmin corresponds to about 20 thousand light years across. As a result, it is classified as a dwarf elliptical, with a brighter than usual nucleus.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3381
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3381; the vertical streak is due to 8th-magnitude HD 108560
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3381
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing PGC 40995 and 41035
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3381, also showing PGC 40995 and 41035

IC 3382 (= PGC 40954)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost (915)
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 28 13.6, Dec +13 34 16)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.2 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 1064) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3382
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3382
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3382

IC 3383 (= PGC 40970)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (916)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type dE3 N) in Virgo (RA 12 28 12.4, Dec +10 17 51)
Apparent size 0.95 by 0.65 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 1075) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3383
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3383
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3383

IC 3384 (= PGC 89610)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-138)
A 16th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type Idm?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 28 12.5, Dec +25 05 29)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of irregular galaxy IC 3384
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3384
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 3384

IC 3385 (= SDSS J122814.95+252557.4)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-139)
A 17th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sdm?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 28 15.1, Dec +25 25 55)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3385
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3385
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3385

IC 3386 (= PGC 41007)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost (917)
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type dE5?) in Virgo (RA 12 28 24.0, Dec +13 11 43)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 1101) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3386
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3386
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3386

IC 3387 (= PGC 40994)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-141)
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 28 18.8, Dec +27 59 45)
Apparent size 0.35 by 0.25 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3387
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3387
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3387

IC 3388 (= PGC 41018)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost (918)
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type dE3?) in Virgo (RA 12 28 28.1, Dec +12 49 25)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 1104) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3388
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3388
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3393
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3388, also showing elliptical galaxy IC 3393

IC 3389 (= SDSS J122823.52+275041.8)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-142)
A 16th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 28 23.6, Dec +27 50 42)
Per Dreyer, IC 3389 (Wolf list IV #142, 1860 RA 12 21 25, NPD 61 22.8) is "very faint, small, irregular figure". The position precesses to RA 12 28 24.4, Dec +27 50 42, on the eastern member of a pair of very faint galaxies; but that object is probably too faint for Wolf to have observed, and if he had been able to observe it, too small for him to have thought it anything but a star. So the only possible indentification is with the brighter western galaxy, listed above. Based on a redshift of 37995 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 3389 is about 1770 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 1530 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 1625 million years ago (the nearly 100 million year difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.2 by 0.13 arcmin, it is about 90 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3389
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3389
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3389

IC 3390 (= SDSS J122828.57+244833.5)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-143)
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SBa?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 28 28.7, Dec +24 48 32)
Apparent size 0.45 by 0.35 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3390
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3390
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3390

IC 3391 (= PGC 41013)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (919)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sdm?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 28 27.4, Dec +18 24 55)
Apparent size 1.75 by 1.25 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3391
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3391
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3391

IC 3392 (= PGC 41061)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (920)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAb?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 28 43.2, Dec +14 59 57)
Apparent size 2.6 by 1.0 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 1126) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3392
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3392
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3392

IC 3393 (= PGC 41054)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost (921)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type dE7 N) in Virgo (RA 12 28 41.7, Dec +12 54 59)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.4 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 1122) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3393
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3393
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3388
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3393, also showing elliptical galaxy IC 3388

IC 3394 (= PGC 41073)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-144)
A 16th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 28 41.1, Dec +26 47 56)
Apparent size 0.85 by 0.65 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3394
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3394
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3394

IC 3395 (= SDSS J122844.49+250205.0)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-146)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 28 44.6, Dec +25 02 06)
Apparent size 0.45 by 0.25 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxies IC 3395 and 3396
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3395 and 3396
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxies
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxies IC 3395 and 3396

IC 3396 (= SDSS J122844.97+250300.7)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-147)
A 16th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 28 45.1, Dec +25 02 59)
Apparent size 0.25 by 0.15 arcmin. (See IC 3395 for images.)

IC 3397 (= SDSS J122846.55+254354.9)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-148)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb(r)?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 28 46.7, Dec +25 43 54)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3397
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3397
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3399
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3397, also showing the star listed as IC 3399

IC 3398
Recorded (Nov 17, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A 15th-magnitude star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 28 58.2, Dec +13 33 54)
Per Dreyer, IC 3398 (Schwassmann 279, 1860 RA 12 21 54, NPD 75 39.6) is "considerably faint, very small". The position precesses to RA 12 28 59.1, Dec +13 33 55, just east of the star listed above, and there is nothing else close enough to be a reasonable candidate, so the identification is certain.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as IC 3398
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 3398

IC 3399
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A 16th-magnitude star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 28 56.2, Dec +25 41 44)
Per Dreyer, IC 3399 (Wolf list IV #149, 1860 RA 12 21 56, NPD 63 31.7) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 12 28 56.1, Dec +25 41 49, almost exactly on the star listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain. (See IC 3397 for a wide-field view showing IC 3399.)
Celestial Atlas
(IC 3300 - 3349) ←     IC Objects: IC 3350 - 3399     → (IC 3400 - 3449)