Celestial Atlas
(IC 3500 - 3549) ←     IC Objects: IC 3550 - 3599 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 3600 - 3649)
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3550, 3551, 3552, 3553, 3554, 3555, 3556, 3557, 3558, 3559, 3560, 3561, 3562, 3563, 3564, 3565, 3566,
3567, 3568, 3569, 3570, 3571, 3572, 3573, 3574, 3575, 3576, 3577, 3578, 3579, 3580, 3581, 3582, 3583,
3584, 3585, 3586, 3587, 3588, 3589, 3590, 3591, 3592, 3593, 3594, 3595, 3596, 3597, 3598, 3599

Page last updated Dec 11, 2016
WORKING: Add historical/physical information

IC 3550 (= "NGC 4559C")
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-218)
A 17th-magnitude emission region in Coma Berenices (RA 12 35 51.8, Dec +27 55 57)
An emission region in NGC 4559. Apparent size 0.45 by 0.25 arcmin.
SDSS image of emission region IC 3550, a star-forming region in spiral galaxy NGC 4559, also showing the foreground star listed as IC 3554
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide region centered on IC 3550, also showing IC 3554
Below, a 6 arcmin wide image of NGC 4559, showing IC 3550, 3551, 3552, 3554, 3555, 3563 and 3564
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4559, showing emission regions IC 3350, 3351, 3552 and 3555, and the foreground star listed as IC 3554

IC 3551
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-219)
An emission region in Coma Berenices (RA 12 35 53.8, Dec +27 57 50)
Part of NGC 4559.
SDSS image of emission region IC 3551, a star-forming region in spiral galaxy NGC 4559
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3551; see IC 3550 for a wide-field view

IC 3552
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-220)
An emission region in Coma Berenices (RA 12 35 54.0, Dec +27 59 36)
Part of NGC 4559.
SDSS image of emission regions IC 3552 and 3555, star-forming regions in spiral galaxy NGC 4559
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3552 and 3555; see IC 3550 for a wide-field view

IC 3553
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A 16th-magnitude star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 35 55.9, Dec +26 11 36)
Per Dreyer, IC 3553 (Wolf list IV #221, 1860 RA 12 28 59, NPD 63 02.0) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 12 35 56.1, Dec +26 11 42, practically on top of the star listed above, so the identification is certain.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as IC 3553, also showing spiral galaxies IC 3543 and 3546
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 3553, also showing IC 3543 and 3546

IC 3554
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A 16th-magnitude star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 35 55.2, Dec +27 55 39)
Per Dreyer, IC 3554 (Wolf list IV #222, 1860 RA 12 29 00, NPD 61 18.0) is a "nebula involved in I 92 (2 seconds to west, 1.8 arcmin to south)", (WH) I 92 being NGC 4559, on which IC 3554 is superimposed. The position precesses to RA 12 35 56.0, Dec +27 55 42, practically on top of the star listed above, so the identification is certain. Located within an arcmin of IC 3550, which see for images.

IC 3555
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-223)
An emission region in Coma Berenices (RA 12 35 56.0, Dec +27 59 24)
Part of NGC 4559.
SDSS image of emission regions IC 3552 and 3555, star-forming regions in spiral galaxy NGC 4559
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3555 and 3552; see IC 3550 for a wide-field view

IC 3556 (= PGC 42005, and not =
NGC 4536, NGC 4558 or NGC 4563)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by Max Wolf
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 35 58.5, Dec +26 57 56)
Per Dreyer, IC 3556 (Wolf list IV #225, 1860 RA 12 29 02, NPD 62 15.7) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 12 35 58.6, Dec +26 58 00, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. However, per Corwin, four modern catalogs have still managed to misidentify the galaxy as NGC 4536, 4558 or 4563, hence the warning in the title for this entry. Based on a recessional velocity of 7395 km/sec, IC 3556 is about 345 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.75 by 0.45 arcmin, it is about 75 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3556, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 4558
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3556
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Also shown are NGC 4556, 4557, 4558 and 4563, and IC 3559 and 3561
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3556, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 4536, 4558 or 4563; also shown is the triplet of stars listed as NGC 4557, elliptical galaxy NGC 4556, lenticular galaxy NGC 4557, spiral galaxy NGC 4563, lenticular galaxy IC 3559 and lenticular galaxy IC 3561

IC 3557 (= PGC 42015)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (975)
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 08.2, Dec +16 38 28)
(and possibly some of its fainter companions)
Per Dreyer, IC 3557 (Frost #975, 1860 RA 12 29 05, NPD 72 37) has a "brighter middle, magnitude 15.5". The position precesses to RA 12 36 07.2, Dec +16 36 42, just under 2 arcmin south of a small cluster of distant galaxies that appears to be generally accepted as including the IC object. The brightest member of the cluster would be the main contributor to Frost's observation, so its properties and position are the ones adopted for this entry. How many other cluster members should be considered part of the IC object depends upon the resolution of Frost's plate, which I do not know, but plates from that era show less detail than even "amateur" images taken today, and Corwin states that the IC object is "a double (at least) galaxy" within the cluster. Based on a recessional velocity of 23505 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 3557 is about 1095 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 1000 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 1035 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin, the main galaxy is about 175 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3557
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3557
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3557

IC 3558 (= PGC 165253 + a foreground star)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost (976)
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Virgo (RA 12 36 02.8, Dec +11 50 58)
and a 16th-magnitude star at RA 12 36 02.9, Dec +11 51 08
Per Dreyer, IC 3558 (Frost #976, 1860 RA 12 29 05, NPD 77 23) is "double; faint, round, 12 arcsec distance north and south". The position precesses to RA 12 36 09.5, Dec +11 50 42, about 1.6 arcmin east of the galaxy listed above, but the description perfectly fits the galaxy and the star to its north and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is reasonably certain. (Note that the description of the object as a double nebula indicates that the IC listing should include both the galaxy and the foreground star.) Based on a recessional velocity of 28140 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 3558 is about 1310 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 1175 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 1230 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin, the galaxy is about 140 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 165253 and the foreground star with which it comprises IC 3558
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3558
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the object
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 165253 and the foreground star with which it comprises IC 3558

IC 3559 (= PGC 42012)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-226)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 03.4, Dec +26 59 16)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.15 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3559, also showing part of lenticular galaxy IC 3556
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3559, also showing part of IC 3556
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
(Also shown are NGC 4556, 4557, 4558 and 4563, and IC 3556, 3560 and 3561)
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3559, also showing elliptical galaxy NGC 4556, the triplet of stars listed as NGC 4557, lenticular galaxy NGC 4558, spiral galaxy NGC 4563, lenticular galaxy IC 3556, spiral galaxy IC 3560 and spiral galaxy IC 3561

IC 3560 (= PGC 3089322)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-227)
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 03.8, Dec +27 04 44)
Apparent size 0.65 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3560
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3560
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing 4557 and 4558 and IC 3559
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3560, also showing the triplet of stars listed as NGC 4557, lenticular galaxy NGC 4558, and lenticular galaxy IC 3559

IC 3561 (= PGC 42013)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-228)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S0/a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 04.7, Dec +26 54 00)
Apparent size 0.75 by 0.25 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3561
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3561
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Also shown are NGC 4556, 4558 and 4563 and IC 3556 and 3559
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3561, also showing elliptical galaxy NGC 4556, lenticular galaxy NGC 4558, spiral galaxy NGC 4563 and lenticular galaxies IC 3556 and 3559

IC 3562 (= PGC 42021)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost (977)
A 15th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type dI?) in Virgo (RA 12 36 10.7, Dec +09 55 22)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.25 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 1654) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of irregular galaxy IC 3562
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3562
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 3562

IC 3563
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-229)
An emission region in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 07.1, Dec +27 55 36)
Per Corwin, the emission region is blended with IC 3564 and a foreground star to their south on a print of Wolf's plate, but since Wolf listed the two separately, the two emission regions must have appeared as separate objects on the original plate. Part of NGC 4559.
SDSS image of emission region IC 3563 and star cloud IC 3564, which are parts of spiral galaxy NGC 4559
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3563 and 3564
Below, a 6 arcmin wide image of NGC 4559, showing IC 3550, 3551, 3552, 3554, 3555, 3563 and 3564
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4559, showing emission regions IC 3350, 3351, 3552 and 3555, and the foreground star listed as IC 3554

IC 3564
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-230)
A star cloud in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 08.0, Dec +27 55 40)
Per Corwin, the emission region is blended with IC 3563 (which see for a closeup image) and a foreground star to their south on a print of Wolf's plate, but since Wolf listed the two separately, the two emission regions must have appeared as separate objects on the original plate. Part of NGC 4559.

IC 3565 (= PGC 1787382)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-231)
A 16th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 12.3, Dec +26 45 22)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3565
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3565
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3565

IC 3566
Recorded (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost (980)
Probably a nonexistent object in Virgo (approximate RA 12 36 20.8, Dec +11 09 42)
Per Dreyer, IC 3566 (Frost #980, 1860 RA 12 29 16, NPD 78 04) is "cometic, round with 1 arcmin tail at 110". The position precesses to RA 12 36 20.8, Dec +11 09 42 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there. Per Corwin, although Frost's description was that of a comet and the object was also identified as cometary by Adelaide Ames in a list of otherwise unidentifiable NGC/IC objects, no effort to associate the observation with any known comet has succeeded; so although this could represent the only observation of an otherwise unknown cometary body, Corwin concludes that the "object" was almost certainly a plate defect, and therefore nonexistent.
SDSS image of region near the position of the nonexistent IC 3566 (as indicated by a box); also shown are spiral galaxies NGC 4567 and 4568 and IC 3578
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the position of the apparently nonexistent IC 3566
NGC/IC objects shown are NGC 4567 and 4568, and IC 3578

IC 3567 (= PGC 42044)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost (979)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc(s)) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 22.6, Dec +13 36 11)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 1660) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3567
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3567
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3567

IC 3568 (= PGC 41662), the Lemon Slice Nebula
Discovered (Aug 31, 1900) by
Robert Aitken
An 11th-magnitude planetary nebula in Camelopardalis (RA 12 33 06.9, Dec +82 33 51)
Apparent size 0.15 arcmin for the outer fainter region, about one third that for the brighter central region.
HST image of planetary nebula IC 3568
Above, a 20 arcsec wide closeup of IC 3568
(Image Credits: Howard Bond ( STScI), Robin Ciardullo (Penn State Univ), NASA/ESA)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the nebula
DSS image of region near planetary nebula IC 3568

IC 3569 (almost certainly =
NGC 4561 = PGC 42020)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4561)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by Royal Frost (and later listed as IC 3569)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)dm) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 08.1, Dec +19 19 18)
Per Dreyer, IC 3569 (Frost #978, 1860 RA 12 29 18, NPD 69 56) is "considerably small, spiral, 2 brighter resolvable, faint star in middle, faint star involved". The position precesses to RA 12 36 18.7, Dec +19 17 42, about 3 arcmin southeast of NGC 4561 (which see for anything other than historical information). There is nothing else in the area, so either the IC object is NGC 4561 and Frost's position is off (leading to the duplicate entry), or his #978 is a nonexistent object. The entry does appear to match NGC 4561, as the faint star near the northern edge of the galaxy and its bright central region would correspond to the two stars in the IC description, so the identification as NGC 4561 is considered reasonably certain.

IC 3570
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A 17th-magnitude star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 18.2, Dec +24 04 42)
Per Dreyer, IC 3570 (Wolf list IV #233, 1860 RA 12 29 20, NPD 65 09.0) is "extremely faint, small, irregular figure, 13th magnitude star to northwest". The position precesses to RA 12 36 18.1, Dec +24 04 42, right on the star listed above, and the brighter (albeit 15th-magnitude) star to the northwest confirms the identity.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as IC 3570
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 3570

IC 3571 (= PGC 2793674)
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-234)
A 17th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type Irr?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 19.9, Dec +26 05 03)
Apparent size 0.45 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of irregular galaxy IC 3571
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3571
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 4565 and IC 3579
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 3571, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 4565 and the star listed as IC 3579

IC 3572
Recorded (Sep 8, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A pair of 15th-magnitude stars in Virgo (RA 12 36 28.0, Dec +11 37 05)
Per Dreyer, IC 3572 (Schwassmann 205, 1860 RA 12 29 23, NPD 77 36.6) is "extremely faint, very small, very questionable". The position precesses to RA 12 36 27.6, Dec +11 37 06, just west of the mid-point of the pair of stars listed above, so the identification is certain.
SDSS image of region near the pair of stars listed as IC 3572
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 3572

IC 3573 (= PGC 165255)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost (981)
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABbc?) in Virgo (RA 12 36 27.1, Dec +11 45 35)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3573
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3573
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3573

IC 3574 (= PGC 42052)
Discovered (Sep 18, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (206)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Virgo (RA 12 36 27.7, Dec +12 24 20)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 1665) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3574
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3574
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3574

IC 3575 (= PGC 42062)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost (982)
A 16th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type dE4?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 32.4, Dec +13 44 50)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 1674) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3575
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3575
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3575

IC 3576 (= PGC 42074)
Discovered (Nov 8, 1899) by
Arnold Schwassmann (27)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBm?) in Virgo (RA 12 36 37.8, Dec +06 37 17)
Apparent size 2.2 by 1.8 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 1678) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3576
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3576
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3576

IC 3577
Recorded (Sep 13, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A nonexistent object in Virgo (RA 12 36 36.4, Dec +11 53 49)
Per Dreyer, IC 3577 (Schwassmann 207, 1860 RA 12 29 32, NPD 77 19.9) is "very faint, pretty small, diffuse, 13th magnitude star involved to northeast". The position precesses to 12 36 36.4, Dec +11 53 49 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there save for a faint star just to the northeast. Per Corwin, the IC object must have been a defect on Schwassmann's plate just to the southwest of the star. Some references list the star as the IC object, but the description shows that Schwassmann meant his #207 to refer to the supposed nebulosity, and the star (which per Corwin is #207a in Schwassmann's list) though "involved" with the nonexistent nebula was not considered to be part of it; so the IC object itself does not exist.
SDSS image of region centered on the position of the nonexistent IC 3577 (as indicated by a box)
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the position of the nonexistent IC 3577

IC 3578 (= PGC 42079)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost (984)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type dSB0?) in Virgo (RA 12 36 39.5, Dec +11 06 05)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.55 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 1684) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3578
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3578
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3578

IC 3579
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A 17th-magnitude star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 32.8, Dec +26 06 15)
Per Dreyer, IC 3579 (Wolf list IV #236, 1860 RA 12 29 36, NPD 63 07.5) is "extremely faint, small, irregular figure, others near". The position precesses to RA 12 36 32.9, Dec +26 06 13, right on the star listed above, so the identification is certain. (See the wide-field view of IC 3571 for an image of IC 3579.)

IC 3580 (= SDSS J123629.23+181801.7)
Discovered (May 7, 1904) by
Royal Frost (983)
A 16th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type dE1?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 29.2, Dec +18 17 59)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3580
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3580
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3580

IC 3581 (= PGC 42076)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-237)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (SBab?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 38.1, Dec +24 25 44)
Apparent size 1.05 by 0.75 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3581
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3581
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3581

IC 3582 (= PGC 1768338)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-238)
A 16th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 36.9, Dec +26 14 05)
Per Dreyer, IC 3582 (Wolf list IV #238, 1860 RA 12 29 40, NPD 62 59.6) is "faint, very small, cometic, brighter middle, others near". The position precesses to RA 12 36 36.8, Dec +26 14 07, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Despite that almost everyone has misidentified PGC 42060 (the brighter galaxy to the southwest) as IC 3582; but (per Corwin) both galaxies appear stellar on a print of Wolf's plate, so there is no reason to believe that Wolf meant to record the other galaxy, let alone made what would have been a very uncharacteristic error in its position. Apparent size 0.2 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3582
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3582
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing PGC 42060
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3582, also showing spiral galaxy PGC 42060, which is often misidentified as IC 3582

PGC 42060 (not =
IC 3582)
Not an IC object but listed here since often misidentified as IC 3582
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 30.4, Dec +26 12 01)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 42060
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 42060; for a wider view see IC 3582

IC 3583 (= PGC 42081, and with
NGC 4569 = Arp 76)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1892) by Isaac Roberts
Also observed (May 10, 1904) by Royal Frost
A magnitude 12.6 irregular galaxy (type IBm? pec) in Virgo (RA 12 36 43.7, Dec +13 15 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 3583 (Roberts, Frost, 1860 RA 12 29 40, NPD 75 58.5) is "very much extended, 13th magnitude star attached on southeast, 2 stars of 12th magnitude near".
Physical Information: Listed as a member (VCC 1686) of the Virgo Cluster. Its recessional velocity of 1120 km/sec corresponds to a Hubble distance of about 50 million light years, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 25 to 55 million light years, and it probably is an actual member of the Cluster. Whether it is a companion of NGC 4569, with which it comprises Arp 76, is another matter. A study of stripping of gas from NGC 4569 as it moves through the Virgo Cluster states that there is some indication that the two galaxies are interacting, in which case they would be physical as well as apparent companions; but since their recessional velocities differ by nearly 1500 km/sec, they would not remain companions for long even if they are companions now. Assuming a distance of about 50 million light years, IC 3583's apparent size of 2.8 by 1.2 arcmin corresponds to about 40 thousand light years. (Note: The Hubble site page linked below has a caption stating that the galaxy is about 30 million light years away; but unless it is a foreground galaxy and not a member of the Virgo Cluster or a companion of NGC 4569, that can't be correct.) (Magnitude from LEDA)
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 3583, also showing part of NGC 4569 (also known as M90), with which it comprises Arp 76
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 3583, also showing part of NGC 4569 (which see)
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of irregular galaxy IC 3583, also known as part of Arp 76
Below, a 2.4 by 2.8 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit ESA/Hubble & NASA)
HST image of irregular galaxy IC 3583, also known as part of Arp 76

IC 3584
Recorded (Sep 13, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A 15th-magnitude star in Virgo (RA 12 36 45.2, Dec +12 13 58)
Per Dreyer, IC 3584 (Schwassmann 208, 1860 RA 12 29 41, NPD 76 59.8) is "very faint, very small, perhaps a 14th magnitude star". The position precesses to RA 12 36 45.2, Dec +12 13 55, right on the star listed above, so the identification is certain.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as IC 3584
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 3584

IC 3585 (= PGC 42067)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-239)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SA0(s)?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 39.8, Dec +26 49 50)
Apparent size 1.1 by 1.0 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3585
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3585
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3585

IC 3586 (= PGC 42099)
Discovered (Nov 23, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann (263)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type dE2 pec?) in Virgo (RA 12 36 54.9, Dec +12 31 13)
Apparent size of central region 1.3 by 1.0 arcmin; outer regions cover 1.9 by 1.7 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 1695) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 3586
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3586
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 3586

IC 3587 (= PGC 42083)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-240)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 48.3, Dec +27 32 59)
Apparent size 1.6 by 0.25 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3587
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3587
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3587

IC 3588 (=
NGC 4571 = PGC 42100)
Discovered (Jan 14, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4571)
Discovered (Nov 23, 1900) by Arnold Schwassmann (and later listed as IC 3588)
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(r)d) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 56.4, Dec +14 13 03)
Per Dreyer, IC 3588 (Schwassmann #293, 1860 RA 12 29 53, NPD 75 00.6) is "considerably faint, pretty large, a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 12 36 56.2, Dec +14 13 07, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. The NGC position was also good, so there shouldn't have been a duplicate entry, but (per Corwin) Schwassmann misidentified the 15th magnitude star on the western side of the galaxy as NGC 4571 (which see for anything else), and thought his #293 was a new discovery. As a result two essentially identical observations led to a double listing.

IC 3589
Recorded (Nov 27, 1900) by
Arnold Schwassmann
A 15th-magnitude star in Virgo (RA 12 37 01.3, Dec +06 56 13)
Per Dreyer, IC 3589 (Schwassmann 29, 1860 RA 12 29 54, NPD 82 17.5) is "very faint, small, round, stellar". The position precesses to RA 12 37 00.8, Dec +06 56 13, just west of the star listed above, so the identification is certain. There is a galaxy (IC 3591, which see for images) just southeast of the star, but (per Corwin) Schwassmann recorded both objects in the same "zone" and their relative positions are accurate, so there is no doubt that IC 3589 is the star, and not a duplicate listing of IC 3591.

IC 3590 (= PGC 1803149)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-241)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 50.7, Dec +27 16 41)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 3590
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3590
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 3590

IC 3591 (= PGC 42108)
Discovered (Nov 8, 1899) by
Arnold Schwassmann (30)
A 14th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type IBm) in Virgo (RA 12 37 02.8, Dec +06 55 34)
Apparent size 1.25 by 0.7 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 1699) of the Virgo Cluster.
SDSS image of irregular galaxy IC 3591 and the star listed as IC 3589
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3591 and IC 3589
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3589
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 3591 and the star listed as IC 3589

IC 3592 (= PGC 42097)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-242)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 53.2, Dec +27 51 45)
Apparent size 1.05 by 0.45 arcmin. Also pointlessly known as NGC 4559A (pointlessly since it has a perfectly good IC listing, and isn't particularly close to its NGC namesake.)
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3592
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3592
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3592

IC 3593 (= PGC 42098)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-243)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S(r)ab?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 53.8, Dec +27 44 55)
Apparent size 0.65 by 0.45 arcmin. Also pointlessly known as NGC 4559B (pointlessly since it has a perfectly good IC listing, and isn't particularly close to its NGC namesake.)
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3593
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3593
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3593

IC 3594
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A 17th-magnitude star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 36 56.5, Dec +26 06 57)
Per Dreyer, IC 3594 (Wolf list IV #244, 1860 RA 12 30 00, NPD 63 06.9) is "extremely faint, very small, irregular figure". The position precesses to RA 12 36 56.7, Dec +26 06 49, just south of the star listed above, so the identification would be reasonably certain even without any other information. As it turns out the slight error in position is due to the fact that the "irregular figure" refers to the star and a small plate defect superimposed on the star which (per Corwin) is visible on a print of Wolf's plate. If the plate defect had not been present, perhaps Wolf would not have bothered to record the object; but since the star is not separately listed it is a valid identification of the IC entry, and as entitled to its entry as any of the many other stars in the NGC/IC.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as IC 3594, also showing the star listed as IC 3579 and spiral galaxy PGC 42060, which is often misidentified as IC 3582
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 3594, also showing IC 3579 and PGC 42060

IC 3595 (= PGC 1693589 + PGC 1693713)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A pair of 16th-magnitude galaxies in Coma Berenices
PGC 1693589 = A spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) at RA 12 37 06.1, Dec +23 46 49
PGC 1693713 = A spiral galaxy (type S0/a?) at RA 12 37 06.3, Dec +23 47 13
Per Dreyer, IC 3595 (Wolf list IV #245, 1860 RA 12 30 08, NPD 65 26.4) is "extremely faint, small, irregular figure". The position precesses to RA 12 37 06.0, Dec +23 47 20, on the northwestern edge of the northern member of the pair of galaxies listed above, so the identification is certain. (Note: NED lists only the northern galaxy as IC 3595, but such a close pair would appear to be a single object on Wolf's plate, so the IC entry should refer to both of them.) The apparent size of PGC 1693589 is 0.45 by 0.1 arcmin, and of PGC 1693713 is 0.45 by 0.35 arcmin. Nothing else is known, so whether the galaxies have any connection save for their IC listing is also unknown; but since there is no obvious interaction between them they are probably an optical double, and not a physical pair.
SDSS image of spiral galaxies PGC 1693589 and 1693713, which comprise IC 3595
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of the pair of galaxies listed as IC 3595
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair, also showing IC 3597
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies PGC 1693589 and 1693713, which comprise IC 3595; also shown is spiral galaxy IC 3597

IC 3596
Recorded (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf
A nonexistent object in Coma Berenices (RA 12 37 19.3, Dec +26 31 14)
Per Dreyer, IC 3596 (Wolf list IV #246, 1860 RA 12 30 23, NPD 62 42.5) is "very faint, small, irregular figure, near double star". The position precesses to RA 12 37 19.3, Dec +26 31 14 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there save for the double star noted in the description. Per Corwin, there is a plate defect visible on a print of Wolf's plate near the double star, so Wolf #246 is the defect and IC 3596 represents a nonexistent object.
SDSS image of region near the position of the nonexistent IC 3596 (indicated by a box)
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the position of the nonexistent IC 3596

IC 3597 (= PGC 86325)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-247)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBd?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 37 24.6, Dec +23 51 49)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.55 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3597
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3597
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 3595
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3597, also showing the pair of spiral galaxies listed as IC 3595

IC 3598 (= PGC 42137)
Discovered (May 1, 1894) by
Isaac Roberts
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(r)ab?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 37 21.0, Dec +28 12 32)
Apparent size 1.4 by 0.45 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3598
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3598
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3598

IC 3599 (= PGC 42154)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1903) by
Max Wolf (4-249)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABb pec?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 37 41.1, Dec +26 42 29)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.35 arcmin. Listed as a Seyfert galaxy (type S1n).
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 3599
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 3599
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 3599
Celestial Atlas
(IC 3500 - 3549) ←     IC Objects: IC 3550 - 3599     → (IC 3600 - 3649)