Celestial Atlas
(IC 300 - 349) ←IC Objects: IC 350 - 399 Link for sharing this page on Facebook→ (IC 400 - 449)
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Page last updated July 9, 2017
Removed tags not accessible on mobile devices, updated text formatting
Checked Corwin positions, updated Steinicke databases, added/checked Dreyer entries
Updated image formatting & images where possible
LATER TASKS: historical / physical information

IC 350 (= PGC 13731)
Discovered (Oct 14, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Eridanus (RA 03 44 36.6, Dec -11 48 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 350 (Javelle #119, 1860 RA 03 37 59, NPC 102 14.2) is "faint, small, round, very diffuse".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 9280 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 350 is about 430 to 435 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 415 to 420 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 420 to 425 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.15 by 0.9 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 140 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 350 overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, an SDSS image overlaid on a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 350
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 350

IC 351
Discovered (Dec 5, 1890) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 11.9 planetary nebula in Perseus (RA 03 47 33.0, Dec +35 02 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 351 (Barnard [A.N.] (3017), 1860 RA 03 38 33, NPD 55 22.6) is "a planetary nebula equal to a 10th magnitude star, 9th magnitude star 14 seconds of time to west and 2 arcmin to south". (3017 refers to a note published by Barnard in the Astronomische Nachricten of that number.) Barnard's note actually puts the 9th magnitude star (BD+34 732) 14s east of the planetary nebula, but the error in Dreyer's description does not affect the IC position, which exactly matches Barnard's. It precesses to RA 03 47 30.9, Dec +35 04 43, a couple of arcmin north of the planetary nebula, but there is nothing similar nearby and the 9th-magnitude star's position and additional details about the field in Barnard's note make the identity absolutely certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.27 by 0.23 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near planetary nebula IC 351
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 351
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the planetary nebula
SDSS image of planetary nebula IC 351

IC 352 (= PGC 176624)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Eridanus (RA 03 47 37.4, Dec -08 43 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 352 (Javelle #589, 1860 RA 03 40 52, NPD 99 10.4) is "faint, very small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.6 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 352
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 352
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 352
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy IC 352

IC 353 (= LBN 601)
Discovered (Dec 6, 1893) by
Edward Barnard
A reflection and emission nebula in Taurus (near RA 03 53, Dec +25 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 353 (Barnard [A.N.] (3253), 1860 RA 03 45, NPD 64 30) is "very faint, most extremely large, very diffuse". (3253 refers to a note and finding chart published by Barnard in the Astronomische Nachricten of that number; unfortunately the finding chart does not show the nebulosities, just stars and a coordinate grid, but a later publication, partially reproduced below, does show many of the nebulosities; also see the IC2 note above the entry for IC 336). Per Corwin, this is one of several extremely faint diffuse emission and reflection nebulae attributed to Barnard in this region, including IC 336, 341, 353, 354 and 360, but although Barnard did the sketch showing the nebulae, Dreyer chose which ones to add to the IC, and estimated their position from Barnard's finding chart and sketch. Some of the IC objects correspond to obvious smudges on Barnard's sketch, but others do not, so it is hard to understand Dreyer's choices. In particular, Barnard's sketch shows nothing at all at the location Dreyer used for IC 353, so perhaps Dreyer meant to use a different 'smudge' and misrecorded its position. The position he did use for IC 353 precesses to RA 03 53, Dec +25.9 (rounding off to the same rough values as in the IC), just north of a very faint nebulosity extending westward from HD 24367 and 24368, just southeast of the position, to the area near HD 24152 and 24178, directly west of it. The part of the nebulosity passing through Dreyer's right ascension is just south of his position, and agrees with Corwin's position for IC 353, so I have used that for the position in the description for this entry, and as the center of the image below.
Physical Information: Apparent size about 30 by 10 arcmin.
MNRAS 57,12,1897 sketch of nebulosity near the Pleiades labeled to show the location of emission nebulae IC 336, 341, 353, 354 and 360
Above, Barnard's sketch of the region near the Pleiades
(The label is at the location Dreyer used for IC 353, though there is nothing on Barnard's sketch)
Below, a 1 degree wide DSS image centered on IC 353, with considerable image enhancement
(The original image had a severe photomosaic artifact at lower right, so a 'normal' image is not shown)
DSS image of region near emission nebula IC 353

IC 354
Discovered (Dec 6, 1893) by
Edward Barnard
A reflection nebula in Taurus (near RA 03 53, Dec +23 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 341 (Barnard [A.N.] (3253), 1860 RA 03 45, NPD 67) is "very faint, most extremely large, very diffuse". (3253 refers to a note and finding chart published by Barnard in the Astronomische Nachricten of that number; unfortunately the finding chart does not show the nebulosities, just stars and a coordinate grid, but a later publication, partially reproduced below, does show many of the nebulosities; also see the IC2 note above the entry for IC 336). Per Corwin, this is one of several extremely faint diffuse emission and reflection nebulae attributed to Barnard in this region, including IC 336, 341, 353, 354 and 360, but although Barnard did the sketch showing the nebulae, Dreyer chose which ones to add to the IC, and estimated their position from Barnard's finding chart and sketch. Some of the IC objects correspond to obvious smudges on Barnard's sketch, but others do not, so it is hard to understand Dreyer's choices. For IC 354, Dreyer's choice of a very obvious smudge stretching well to the west of HD 24518 makes the identification relatively easy, and the position he (very roughly) estimated for its brighter eastern portion precesses to RA 03 53.3, Dec +23.4, is only a little "off" the central part of the nebulosity, whose equally rough position is shown above and used for the center of the image below.
Physical Information: The apparent size of the nebulosity shown in the image is about 50 by 15 arcmin.
MNRAS 57,12,1897 sketch of nebulosity near the Pleiades labeled to show the location of emission nebulae IC 336, 341, 353, 354 and 360
Above, Barnard's sketch of the region near the Pleiades
(The smudge below the label is what Dreyer took to be IC 354)
Below, a 1 degree wide DSS image centered on IC 354, with considerable image enhancement
(The original image had a severe photomosaic artifact at upper left, so a 'normal' image is not shown)
DSS image of region near emission nebula IC 354

IC 355 (= PGC 14052)
Discovered (Dec 15, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc?) in Taurus (RA 03 53 46.2, Dec +19 58 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 355 (Javelle #590, 1860 RA 03 45 39, NPD 70 24.8) is "very faint, small, round, diffuse".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.6 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below). A Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 1). Per Corwin, the apparent companion at the end of the eastern spiral arm is at RA 03 53 47.4, Dec +19 58 26. NED lists it as J035346.53+195817.8, with a magnitude of about 19; and based on the images below, it has an apparent size of about 0.1 by 0.075 arcmin. Its color suggests that it is an irregular or spiral galaxy, but its image could just as easily correspond to a lenticular or elliptical galaxy. Similarly, there is no way to tell whether the image shows an interacting pair, or an optical double.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 355
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 355
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 355
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 355

IC 356 (= PGC 14508 =
Arp 213)
Discovered (prior to 1879) by Lewis Swift
Discovered (Aug 23, 1889) by Edward Barnard
Discovered (Nov 7, 1890) by William Denning
A magnitude 10.6 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)ab pec) in Camelopardalis (RA 04 07 46.9, Dec +69 48 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 356 (Barnard [A.N.] (3097), Denning, 1860 RA 03 53 19, NPD 20 34.4) is "pretty faint, pretty large, brighter middle, 8.5 magnitude star 4 arcmin to north". Swift's paper mentions Denning's discovery, Barnard's remark that he had previously noticed the nebula, and the fact that it was one of numerous nebulae that he observed prior to 1879 but presumed were already known.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 7.4 by 4.6 arcmin (from the images below).
NOAO image of region near spiral galaxy IC 356 superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a NOAO image superimposed on a 12 arcmin wide DSS background centered on IC 356
(Image Credit above and below Karen Weiss and Patrice Cooper/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
Below, an 8 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
NOAO image of spiral galaxy IC 356 superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing areas

IC 357 (= PGC 14384)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1867) by
Truman Safford
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b?) in Taurus (RA 04 03 44.0, Dec +22 09 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 357 (Safford 73, 1860 RA 03 55 31, NPD 68 14.1) is "faint, small, round, nucleus = 13.5 magnitude star".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.05 by 0.85 arcmin for the central galaxy, and of about 1.5 by 1.25 arcmin for very faint outer regions (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 357
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 357
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 357
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 357

IC 358 (= PGC 14382)
Discovered (Feb 17, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Taurus (RA 04 03 42.9, Dec +19 53 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 358 (Javelle #120, 1860 RA 03 55 33, NPD 70 29.0) is "very small, diffuse, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.15 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 358
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 358
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 358
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 358

IC 359 (= PGC 14653)
Discovered (Dec 25, 1891) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Taurus (RA 04 12 28.3, Dec +27 42 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 359 (Swift list X (#14), 1860 04 04 51, NPD 62 39.8) is "most extremely faint, pretty large, round". The position precesses to RA 04 13 27.6, Dec +27 41 57, but there is nothing there. There is, however, a suitable candidate (the galaxy listed above) exactly 1 minute of time to the west, so this appears to be a case of a careless single-digit error in the position, and the identification is considered certain. Per Corwin, the error in the RA led to considerable confusion about the identification of the object, but the only current database that uses any other identification is NGC 2000.0, which copies Lynds' 1965 Catalog of Bright Nebulae misidentification as Lynds 782, a reflection nebula at J2000 RA 04 18.6, Dec +28 17, about a degree and a half northeast of the actual IC 359.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.7 by 1.7 arcmin (from the images below).
Above, a 2.2 arcmin wide closeup of IC 359
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 359
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 359
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 359
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of lenticular galaxy IC 359

Lynds 782 (not =
IC 359)
Not an IC object but listed here since sometimes misidentified as IC 359
A reflection nebula in Taurus (RA 04 18.6, Dec +28 17)
Physical Information: Also known as Cederblad 30.
DSS image of reflection nebula Lynds 782, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 359
Above, a 24 arcmin wide region centered on Lynds 782

IC 360 (perhaps = LBN 786?)
Discovered (Dec 6, 1893) by
Edward Barnard
A lost object in Taurus (position essentially unknown)
or perhaps an emission nebula near RA 04 10 48, Dec +25 43
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 341 (Barnard [A.N.] (3253), 1860 RA 04 06, NPD 64 20) is "very faint, most extremely large, very diffuse". (3253 refers to a note and finding chart published by Barnard in the Astronomische Nachricten of that number; unfortunately the finding chart does not show the nebulosities, just stars and a coordinate grid, but a later publication, partially reproduced below, does show many of the nebulosities; also see the IC2 note above the entry for IC 336). Per Corwin, this is one of several extremely faint diffuse emission and reflection nebulae attributed to Barnard in this region, including IC 336, 341, 353, 354 and 360, but although Barnard did the sketch showing the nebulae, Dreyer chose which ones to add to the IC, and estimated their position from Barnard's finding chart and sketch. Some of the IC objects correspond to obvious smudges on Barnard's sketch, but others do not, so it is hard to understand Dreyer's choices. The case of IC 360 is particularly puzzling, as Dreyer's position (J2000 RA 04 14.5, Dec +26.0) is well to the east of the region sketched by Barnard, so he presumably meant to record a completely different position. Under these circumstances, it is probably best to treat IC 360 as lost, but we can essay a guess at Dreyer's intentions by supposing that his declination is more or less correct, and choosing one of the easternmost smudges on Barnard's sketch. That places us on the smudge to the southeast of a line of three stars, as shown by the label "IC 360" on a copy of Barnard's sketch, below. The position shown above is the brightest portion of the nebula thereby indicated, and is used for the center of the image below. Whether the nebulosity thus identified is actually IC 360 is another matter. I wouldn't place any great confidence in the identification, but since every other identification I've seen corresponds to a region outside Barnard's sketch, it is presumably no better or worse than any other guess (which is more or less equivalent to saying that the object is lost).
Physical Information:
MNRAS 57,12,1897 sketch of nebulosity near the Pleiades labeled to show the location of emission nebulae IC 336, 341, 353, 354 and 360
Above, Barnard's sketch of the region near the Pleiades
(The smudge below the label may or may not be what Dreyer took to be IC 360)
Below, a 2 degree wide digitally enhanced DSS image centered on what may or may not be IC 360
DSS image, considerably enhanced, of region near what may or may not be the otherwise lost emission nebula IC 360

IC 361 (= OCL 393)
Discovered (Feb 11, 1893) by
William Denning
A magnitude 11.7 open cluster (type II1r) in Camelopardalis (RA 04 18 55.4, Dec +58 14 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 361 (Denning, 1860 RA 04 07 24, NPD 32 03) is "faint, large, a nebulous cluster?"
Physical Information: Apparent size 7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near open cluster IC 361
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 361

IC 362 (= PGC 14782)
Discovered (Oct 14, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.2 lenticular galaxy (type E/SAB0?) in Eridanus (RA 04 16 42.4, Dec -12 12 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 362 (Javelle #121, 1860 RA 04 10 09, NPD 102 33.0) is "pretty bright, very small, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.15 by 1.35 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 362
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 362
Below, a 2.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 362
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of the core of lenticular galaxy IC 362

IC 363 (= PGC 14847)
Discovered (Sep 16, 1890) by
Sherburne Burnham
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Taurus (RA 04 18 55.4, Dec +03 01 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 363 (Burnham [A.N.] (3048), 1860 RA 04 11 38, NPD 87 18) is "extremely faint, 9th magnitude star 3 arcmin to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 363
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 363
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 363
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy IC 363

IC 364 (= PGC 14854)
Discovered (Jan 6, 1894) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0? pec) in Taurus (RA 04 19 06.7, Dec +03 11 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 364 (Javelle #591, 1860 RA 04 11 47, NPD 87 09.1) is "very faint, very small, round, suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.85 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below). Distinguished by an overall outline at a considerable angle relative to the central bar.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 364
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 364
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 364
Below, a 1 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy IC 364

IC 365 (= PGC 14860)
Discovered (Jan 12, 1894) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0(rs)a?) in Taurus (RA 04 19 14.2, Dec +03 20 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 365 (Javelle #592, 1860 RA 04 11 55, NPD 86 59.4) is "pretty bright, small, irregular figure, suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.05 by 0.6 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 365
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 365
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 365
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy IC 365

IC 366 (= PGC 14887)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1890) by
Sherburne Burnham
A magnitude 14.7 elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Taurus (RA 04 19 41.5, Dec +02 21 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 366 (Burnham [A.N.] (3048), 1860 RA 04 12 17, NPD 87 59.2) is "extremely faint, 3 arcmin southeast of (NGC) 1550".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.65 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 366, also showing lenticular galaxy NGC 1550
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 366, also showing NGC 1550
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 366
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of elliptical galaxy IC 366

IC 367 (= PGC 14917)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0(rs)a?) in Eridanus (RA 04 20 41.0, Dec -14 46 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 367 (Javelle #122, 1860 RA 04 14 16, NPD 105 07.3) is "pretty bright, pretty large, diffuse".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.7 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 367
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 367
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 367
Below, a 1.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy IC 367

IC 368 (= PGC 14994)
Discovered (Oct 15, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SAB0?) in Eridanus (RA 04 22 42.7, Dec -12 36 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 368 (Javelle #123, 1860 RA 04 16 11, NPD 102 56.8) is "extremely small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 368
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 368
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 368
Below, a 1 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy IC 368

IC 369 (= PGC 15020)
Discovered (Oct 13, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Eridanus (RA 04 23 28.2, Dec -11 47 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 369 (Javelle #124, 1860 RA 04 16 55, NPD 102 07.2) is "faint, small, round, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.85 by 0.85 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 369
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 369
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 369
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of lenticular galaxy IC 369

IC 370 (= PGC 15029)
Discovered (Feb 9, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc?) in Eridanus (RA 04 24 01.7, Dec -09 23 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 370 (Javelle #593, 1860 RA 04 17 20, NPD 99 43.6) is "extremely faint, small, diffuse".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.4 by 0.95 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 370
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 370
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide monochrome DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 370
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 370

IC 371
Recorded (Dec 8, 1885) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.4 star in Eridanus (RA 04 30 12.5, Dec -00 33 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 371 (Bigourdan #145, 1860 RA 04 23 03, NPD 90 52) is "stellar, extremely small, a nebulosity?". The position precesses to RA 04 30 11.1, Dec -00 33 28, a third of an arcmin northwest of the star listed above. Per Corwin, Bigourdan's micrometric measurements of this and another star that he mistook for NGC 1586 (due to the NGC position being wrong) are sufficiently accurate to specify exactly which objects he observed, so the identity is certain.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as IC 371
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 371

IC 372 (= PGC 177340)
Discovered (Feb 11, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Eridanus (RA 04 30 04.2, Dec -05 00 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 372 (Javelle #594, 1860 RA 04 23 09, NPD 95 19.1) is "faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.9 by 0.45 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 372 overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a SDSS image overlaid on a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 372
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 372

IC 373 (= PGC 15335)
Discovered (Feb 11, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0(rs)a?) in Eridanus (RA 04 30 42.8, Dec -04 52 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 373 (Javelle #595, 1860 RA 04 23 48, NPD 95 10.9) is "faint, very small, round, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of the bright core 0.8 by 0.75 arcmin; of the faint outer ring about 2.1 by 1.7 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 373 overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a SDSS image overlaid on a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 373
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 373

IC 374 (= PGC 15474)
Discovered (Oct 28, 1891) by
Rudolf Spitaler
A magnitude 14.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Taurus (RA 04 32 32.8, Dec +16 38 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 374 (Spitaler 4, 1860 RA 04 24 32, NPD 73 40.0) is "faint, small, round, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.1 by 0.45 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 374
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 374
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 374
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy IC 374

IC 375 (= PGC 88275)
Discovered (Oct 13, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b? pec) in Eridanus (RA 04 31 03.2, Dec -12 58 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 375 (Javelle #125, 1860 RA 04 24 34, NPD 103 16.7) is "very faint, diffuse, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.4 by 0.85 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 375
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 375
Below, a 1.75 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 375
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of spiral galaxy IC 375

IC 376 (= PGC 952848)
Discovered (Oct 14, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle (126)
A magnitude 14.7 lenticular galaxy (type SAB0/a?) in Eridanus (RA 04 31 13.8, Dec -12 26 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 376 (Javelle #126, 1860 RA 04 24 42, NPD 102 44.0) is "faint, irregular figure". The position precesses to RA 04 31 13.8, Dec -12 25 43, just north of the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Unfortunately, some databases have incorrectly assigned IC 376 to the brighter galaxy to the southeast, which is actually IC 377 (perhaps the error would not have been made if Javelle or Dreyer had listed IC 376 as the 1st of 2 and IC 377 as the 2nd of 2, but that is no excuse for the blunder, so it might have been made anyway).
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 376, also showing IC 377 (which is often misidentified as IC 376)
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 376, also showing IC 377
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of IC 376 and 377
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 376 and spiral galaxy IC 377 (which is often misidentified as IC 376)
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide DSS image of IC 376
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 376
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of IC 376
PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of lenticular galaxy IC 376

IC 377 (= PGC 15366, and not =
IC 376)
Discovered (Oct 14, 1891) by Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type S(rs)ab?) in Eridanus (RA 04 31 16.5, Dec -12 27 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 377 (Javelle #127, 1860 RA 04 24 45, NPD 102 45.4) is "faint, irregular figure". The position precesses to RA 04 31 16.7, Dec -12 27 08, right on the northern outline of the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Unfortunately, some databases have incorrectly listed this galaxy as IC 376 (which see for images), which is actually the fainter galaxy to the northwest (perhaps the error would not have been made if Javelle or Dreyer had listed IC 376 as the 1st of 2, and IC 377 as the 2nd of 2, but there is no good reason for the blunder, so it might have been made anyway).
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 377 (which is often misidentified as IC 376), also showing the actual IC 376
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 377, also showing IC 376
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of IC 376 and 377
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 376 and spiral galaxy IC 377 (which is often misidentified as IC 376)
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of IC 377
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 377 (which is often misidentified as IC 376)
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 377 (which is often misidentified as IC 376)

IC 378 (= PGC 954841)
Discovered (Oct 13, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Eridanus (RA 04 31 27.9, Dec -12 17 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 378 (Javelle #128, 1860 RA 04 24 57, NPD 102 36.1) is "a star, strongly nebulous".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.95 by 0.65 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 378
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 378
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 378
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of lenticular galaxy IC 378

IC 379 (= PGC 15428)
Discovered (Feb 9, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b?) in Eridanus (RA 04 31 51.0, Dec -07 14 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 379 (Javelle #596, 1860 RA 04 25 03, NPD 97 32.5) is "very faint, small, round, diffuse".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.1 by 1.05 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 379
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 379
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 379
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 379

IC 380 (= PGC 15398)
Discovered (Oct 13, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type SABab?) in Eridanus (RA 04 31 41.3, Dec -12 55 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 380 (Javelle #129, 1860 RA 04 25 12, NPD 103 13.8) is "very faint, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.75 by 0.45 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 380
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 380
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 380
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 380

IC 381 (= PGC 15917; also mis-listed as "NGC 1530A")
Discovered (Aug 26, 1889) by
William Denning
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc) in Camelopardalis (RA 04 44 28.6, Dec +75 38 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 381 (Denning (#1), 1860 RA 04 26 05, NPD 14 38.7) is "faint, small, brighter middle, 12th magnitude star to northwest".
Warning About Non-Standard Designations: The use of letters attached to NGC designations is common but confusing, as the same letter is often used for several objects, leading to data for one object being assigned to a different one. For that reason, "NGC 1530A" and similar designations should never be used to identify an object.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.7 by 1.3 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 381
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 381
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 381
Below, a 1.75 by 3.0 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
(Some but not all image flaws removed)
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 381

IC 382 (= PGC 15691, and almost certainly not =
NGC 1632)
Discovered (Feb 6, 1893) by Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc?) in Eridanus (RA 04 37 55.6, Dec -09 31 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 382 (Javelle #597, 1860 RA 04 31 14, NPD 99 48.9) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, small nucleus". The position precesses to RA 04 37 54.5, Dec -09 31 52, on the southwest outline of the galaxy, so the identification is certain. (As noted in the entry for NGC 1632 (which see), some references (almost certainly incorrectly) list that NGC entry as being the same as IC 382, so the reader should beware of such possible misidentifications.)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.9 by 1.3 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 382, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 1632
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 382
Below, a 2.4 by 3.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 382, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 1632
Below, a 2 by 3 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 382, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 1632

IC 383 (= PGC 1371560)
Discovered (Dec 15, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.8 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Taurus (RA 04 38 58.0, Dec +09 53 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 383 (Javelle #598, 1860 RA 04 31 19, NPD 80 23.4) is "very faint, small, diffuse, 11.5 magnitude star to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.8 by 0.75 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 383
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 383
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 383

IC 384 (= PGC 2816418)
Discovered (Dec 13, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Eridanus (RA 04 39 18.3, Dec -07 50 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 384 (Javelle #599, 1860 RA 04 32 32, NPD 98 07.0) is "faint, extremely small, round, 11th magnitude star to north".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.55 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 384 overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a SDSS image overlaid on a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 384
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 384

IC 385 (= PGC 15746)
Discovered (Feb 9, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type SAB0(rs)a? pec) in Eridanus (RA 04 39 31.5, Dec -07 05 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 385 (Javelle #600, 1860 RA 04 32 44, NPD 97 22.3) is "very faint, very small, round, diffuse".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.3 by 0.6 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 385
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 385
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 385
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of lenticular galaxy IC 385

IC 386 (= PGC 15769, and probably =
NGC 1632)
Discovered (1886) by Frank Muller (and later listed as NGC 1632)
Discovered (Feb 6, 1893) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 386)
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type SB(rs)0+) in Eridanus (RA 04 39 58.6, Dec -09 27 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 386 (Javelle #601, 1860 RA 04 33 18, NPD 99 44.0) is "very faint, very small, a very little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 04 39 58.7, Dec -09 27 21, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. As noted in the entry for NGC 1632 (which see for anything else), IC 386 is probably the same as that poorly recorded object. Given the considerable uncertainty of that equality, it would probably be best to refer to the galaxy by its IC designation, but as is usual in cases where there is an NGC entry available (no matter how poor), the NGC listing takes precedence. (The exception is that some references misidentify NGC 1632 as IC 382; in those cases IC 386 uses its IC designation.)
Physical Information: Given the probable duplicate entry, see NGC 1632 for anything else.

IC 387 (= PGC 15831)
Discovered (Feb 9, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)c?) in Eridanus (RA 04 41 44.2, Dec -07 05 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 387 (Javelle #602, 1860 RA 04 34 57, NPD 97 21.5) is "extremely faint, pretty large, very diffuse, difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.75 by 1.3 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 387 overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 387
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 387

IC 388 (= PGC 1021211 + PGC 1021186)
Discovered (Jan 28, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle
Three stars and two galaxies in Eridanus
Northern star is about magnitude 16, at RA 04 41 53.1, Dec -07 18 09
Eastern star is about magnitude 15, at RA 04 41 55.4, Dec -07 18 39
Southwestern star = magnitude 15.3, at RA 04 41 52.7, Dec -07 18 36
PGC 1021211 = A magnitude 15.2 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) at RA 04 41 52.4, Dec -07 18 16
PGC 1021186 = A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) at RA 04 41 54.3, Dec -07 18 23
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 388 (Javelle #130, 1860 RA 04 35 06, NPD 97 34.2) is "very faint, very diffuse, small star involved".
Physical Information: Galaxy PGC 1021211 has an apparent size of about 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin, and PGC 1021186 an apparent size of about 0.4 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of the three stars and two galaxies that comprise IC 388, also showing IC 389
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 388, also showing IC 389
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of IC 388
DSS image of the three stars and two galaxies (PGC 1021211 and 1021186) that comprise IC 388
Below, a 1 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the stars and galaxies that comprise IC 388
PanSTARRS image of the three stars and two galaxies (PGC 1021211 and 1021186) that comprise IC 388

IC 389 (= PGC 15840)
Discovered (Jan 18, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Eridanus (RA 04 41 59.6, Dec -07 18 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 389 (Javelle #131, 1860 RA 04 35 12, NPD 97 34.7) is "faint, small, round, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.35 by 1.0 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 389, also showing IC 388
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 389, also showing IC 388
Below, a 1.75 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 389
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of lenticular galaxy IC 389

IC 390 (= PGC 15844)
Discovered (Jan 28, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type SAB0(s)a?) in Eridanus (RA 04 42 03.9, Dec -07 12 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 390 (Javelle #132 = #603, 1860 RA 04 35 16, NPD 97 28.4) is "very faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.1 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 390 overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas; also shown are parts of IC 388 and IC 389
Above, a SDSS image overlaid on a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 390
Also shown are parts of IC 388 and 389
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of IC 390
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 390

IC 391 (= PGC 16402)
Discovered (Nov 7, 1890) by
William Denning
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)cd?) in Camelopardalis (RA 04 57 21.1, Dec +78 11 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 391 (Denning (2), 1860 RA 04 36 20, NPD 12 04) is "faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.05 by 0.9 arcmin (from the images below). Probably a starburst galaxy.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 391
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 391
Below, a 1.1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 391
Below, a 1.1 arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
'Raw' HST closeup of spiral galaxy IC 391

IC 392 (= PGC 15973)
Discovered (Jan 6, 1894) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Orion (RA 04 46 25.8, Dec +03 30 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 392 (Javelle #604, 1860 RA 04 39 05, NPD 86 44.8) is "pretty bright, small, round, nucleus = 12.5 magnitude star".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.4 by 0.9 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 392
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 392
Below, a 1.75 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 392
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 392

IC 393 (= PGC 16028)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1891) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Eridanus (RA 04 47 51.8, Dec -15 31 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 393 (Javelle #133, 1860 RA 04 41 31, NPD 105 46.8) is "faint, very small, irregular figure, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.9 by 0.8 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 393
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 393
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 393
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of lenticular galaxy IC 393

IC 394
Recorded (Dec 5, 1888) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A nonexistent object in Eridanus (RA 04 48 52.3, Dec -06 17 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 394 (Bigourdan #146, 1860 RA 04 42 02, NPD 96 32) is "very faint, diffuse, a very small cluster?". The position precesses to RA 04 48 52.3, Dec -06 17 03 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there. Per Corwin, Bigourdan only made one observation of it, near NGC 1667, and wrote "Suspected only. Its existence is not at all certain." It therefore appears certain that IC 394 does not exist.
SDSS image of region near the nonexistent IC 394, showing spiral galaxy NGC 1667
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on nonexistent IC 394, also showing NGC 1667

IC 395 (= PGC 16095, and perhaps but probably not =
NGC 1671)
Discovered (Oct 20, 1889) by Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a? pec) in Orion (RA 04 49 34.0, Dec +00 15 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 395 (Swift list IX (#15), 1860 RA 04 42 13, NPD 90 00.0) is "extremely faint, very small, round, faint star close to east". The second IC adds a corrected RA (per Howe) of 04 42 23. The corrected position precesses to RA 04 49 33.7, Dec +00 14 51, on the southwestern outline of the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Whether the description of the star field is of any help is hard to say. There is a 15th-magnitude star on the eastern side of the galaxy, but the 14th-magnitude star an arcmin to the west is more obvious. Perhaps the fainter star appeared to be part of the nebula, and Swift reversed the direction of the brighter one? (Note: There has been a general adoption of a tentative suggestion that IC 395 might be a reobservation of Swift's otherwise lost or nonexistent NGC 1671 (which see about that), but the positional error involved is so huge that the supposed identity with the NGC entry should almost certainly be rejected, and the galaxy referred to only as IC 395.)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.3 by 1.0 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 395
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 395
Below, a 1.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 395

IC 396 (= PGC 16423)
Discovered (Oct 19, 1890) by
William Denning
A magnitude 12.1 spiral galaxy (type S(rs)ab?) in Camelopardalis (RA 04 57 59.1, Dec +68 19 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 396 (Denning (3), 1860 RA 04 43 36, NPD 21 53.4) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle and nucleus, faint double star to southeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.5 by 1.7 arcmin. A starburst galaxy?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 396
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 396
Below, a 4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 396
Below, a 1.5 by 1.3 arcmin wide HST image of part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
'Raw' HST detail of spiral galaxy IC 396

Corwin lists a questionable but possible IC 397 at RA 05 01 06.3, Dec +40 25 30
(Steinicke uses that identification)
Corwin lists an even more questionable possibility at RA 05 00 46.2, Dec +40 25 53

IC 397
Discovered (Jan 1, 1891) by
Rudolf Spitaler
A lost or nonexistent object in Auriga (RA 05 01 07.0, Dec +40 25 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 397 (Spitaler #5, 1860 RA 04 51 24, NPD 49 47.0) is "faint, small". The position precesses to RA 05 01 07.0, Dec +40 25 51 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there but scattered stars. Per Corwin, Spitaler recorded the object twice, so it may be real; but if so, something must be wrong with the position, such as a misidentified comparison star. Regardless of the explanation, at least for now the object is lost, and likely to remain so.
DSS image of region near the nonexistent IC 397
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the NGC position of IC 397

IC 398 (= PGC 16433)
Discovered (Dec 13, 1887) by
Frank Muller
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)ab? pec) in Eridanus (RA 04 58 12.6, Dec -07 46 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 398 (Ormond Stone (Muller #198), 1860 RA 04 51 27, NPD 98 00) is "extremely faint, pretty large, extended 5, diffuse".
Discovery Notes: Dreyer credited Stone as the author of the paper listing the observation, but that paper states that Muller was the actual observer, whence the credit for him (added to the IC entry in parentheses).
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.45 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 398
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 398
Below, a 1.75 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 398
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 398

IC 399 (= PGC 16582)
Discovered (Feb 25, 1892) by
Rudolf Spitaler
A magnitude 15.4 irregular galaxy (type IAB(s)m? pec) in Eridanus (RA 05 01 44.1, Dec -04 17 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 399 (Spitaler 35, 1860 RA 04 54 48, NPD 94 29.7) is "very faint, very small, southeast of (NGC) 1741".
Physical Information: Interacting with peculiar galaxy group NGC 1741 (which see for additional images). Apparent size of about 0.5 by 0.45 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 399, also showing galaxy group NGC 1741, which is also known as Arp 259 and Hickson Compact Group 31
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 399, also showing NGC 1741
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of irregular galaxy IC 399
Below, a 0.5 arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, processing C. Seligman)
HST closeup of irregular galaxy IC 399
Below, a 2.7 arcmin wide HST image of the region between IC 399 and NGC 1741
(Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, Acknowledgment Stephen Byrne)
HST image of region between irregular galaxy IC 399 and NGC 1741, which is also known as Arp 259 and Hickson Compact Group 31
Celestial Atlas
(IC 300 - 349) ←IC Objects: IC 350 - 399→ (IC 400 - 449)