Celestial Atlas
(IC 4300 - 4349) ←     IC Objects: IC 4350 - 4399 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 4400 - 4449)
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4350, 4351, 4352, 4353, 4354, 4355, 4356, 4357, 4358, 4359, 4360, 4361, 4362, 4363, 4364, 4365, 4366,
4367, 4368, 4369, 4370, 4371, 4372, 4373, 4374, 4375, 4376, 4377, 4378, 4379, 4380, 4381, 4382, 4383,
4384, 4385, 4386, 4387, 4388, 4389, 4390, 4391, 4392, 4393, 4394, 4395, 4396, 4397, 4398, 4399

Page last updated Jan 14, 2016
WORKING: Finish historical and physical information

IC 4350 (= PGC 49628)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1898) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(r)0/a pec) in Hydra (RA 13 57 13.9, Dec -25 14 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4350 (= Swift list XI (#163), 1860 RA 13 49 26, NPD 114 32.2) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, faint star close to south". The position precesses to RA 13 57 17.5, Dec -25 13 22, just northeast of the galaxy listed above, and the star on its southern border makes the identity certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 6200 km/sec, IC 4350 is about 290 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 2.1 by 1.1 arcmin, it is about 175 thousand light years across. Its 1.6 by 0.35 arcmin northeastern extension is about 135 thousand light years long.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4350
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4350
Below, a 3.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4350

IC 4351 (= PGC 49676)
Discovered (1901) by
Robert Innes
A magnitude 11.7 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)b?) in Hydra (RA 13 57 53.8, Dec -29 18 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4351 (= Innes (#10), 1860 RA 13 49 48, NPD 118 38) is "small, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 7.0 by 0.9 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4351
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4351
Below, an 8.0 arcmin long image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Capella Observatory; used by permission)
Capella Observatory image of spiral galaxy IC 4351

IC 4352 (= PGC 49726)
Discovered (May 19, 1898) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Centaurus (RA 13 58 25.1, Dec -34 31 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4352 (= Swift list XI (#164), 1860 RA 13 50 00, NPD 123 51.0) is "several extremely faint stars in most extremely faint nebula, 2 stars 8 north" ("8" is clarified in Swift's original paper as "8th magnitude").
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4352
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4352
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4352

IC 4353
Recorded (Jun 1, 1897) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A nonexistent object in Canes Venatici (RA 13 57 03.7, Dec +37 43 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4353 (= Bigourdan #413, 1860 RA 13 51 03, NPD 51 33) is "extremely faint, perhaps very faint star and nebula, 8.4 magnitude star 3 arcmin to northeast". The position precesses to RA 13 57 03.3, Dec +37 45 54, but there is nothing there save for a 9th magnitude star 3 arcmin east (instead of northeast) of Bigourdan's position. Steinicke suggests that what Bigourdan actually observed was a 15th magnitude star to the southwest of the brighter star, which has the advantage of thereby placing the 9th magnitude star to its northeast instead of to its east. However, that is not significant, as (per Corwin) the IC2 position, although it matches Bigourdan's original position for his #413, is incorrect. When (years later) Bigourdan did his "big list", which gives detailed information about all his measurements and discoveries, he stated that the object was (in the coordinates of his 1897 observation) about 9.8 seconds of time west and 2.3 arcmin south of his reference star (namely, the aforementioned "8.4 magnitude star 3 arcmin to northeast"). Applying these offsets to the star's 1897 coordinates and precessing to J2000, one obtains RA 13 57 03.7, Dec +37 43 45 as the position of IC 4353 (whence the position above). There is still nothing there, so it appears that IC 4353 does not exist. This conclusion is strengthened by Bigourdan's detailed comment, which roughly translates as "Object of doubtful aspect which could be a small cluster, perhaps accompanied by a little nebulosity". Most of the objects stated by Bigourdan as being of "doubtful aspect" have proven to be "fausse images", and it appears that this is the case for IC 4353.
SDSS image of region near Bigourdan's corrected position for IC 4353, also showing NGC 5378 and the IC2 position for IC 4353
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on "IC 4353", also showing NGC 5378
(The boxes indicate the IC2 and corrected Bigourdan positions for IC 4353)

IC 4354 (= PGC 49731)
Discovered (May 30, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Virgo (RA 13 58 30.8, Dec -12 36 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4354 (= DeLisle Stewart #383, 1860 RA 13 51 04, NPD 101 54) is "extremely faint, very small, extremely extended 110░".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.25 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4354
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4354
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4354

IC 4355 (= PGC 49690)
Discovered (Jul 2, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 58 06.0, Dec +28 25 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4355 (= Javelle #1286, 1860 RA 13 51 44, NPD 60 54.5) is "faint, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4355
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4355
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4355

IC 4356 (= PGC 49759)
Discovered (Jun 19, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 58 45.0, Dec +37 29 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4356 (= Javelle #1287, 1860 RA 13 52 44, NPD 51 48.6) is "faint, very small, stellar nucleus equivalent to 15th magnitude star". The position precesses to RA 13 58 44.0, Dec +37 30 28, only an arcmin north of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby that could fit the description, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 15050 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 4356 is about 700 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 660 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, almost 680 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin, the galaxy is about 95 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 4356, also showing NGC 5394 and NGC 5395, collectively known as Arp 84
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4356, also showing NGC 5394 and 5395
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 4356

IC 4357 (= PGC 49879)
Discovered (Jul 3, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sbc? pec) in Canes Venatici (RA 14 00 43.7, Dec +31 53 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4357 (= Javelle #1288, 1860 RA 13 54 32, NPD 57 25.3) is "faint, small, round, gradually very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4357
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4357
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4357

IC 4358 (= PGC 50092)
Discovered (April 1905) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type Sbc? pec) in Virgo (RA 14 03 34.1, Dec -10 09 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4358 (= Wolf (4013), 1860 RA 13 56 08, NPD 99 28.5) is "pretty large, much extended 120░; spiral nebula to east (IC 971)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.15 by 0.25 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4358, also showing IC 971
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4358, also showing IC 971
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4358

IC 4359 (= PGC 50248)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Centaurus (RA 14 05 23.3, Dec -45 16 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4359 (= DeLisle Stewart #388, 1860 RA 13 56 37, NPD 134 36) is "extremely faint, very small, extended 170░, between 2 faint stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.65 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4359
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4359
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4359

IC 4360 (= PGC 94256)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type (R)SBab?) in Virgo (RA 14 04 21.3, Dec -11 25 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4360 (= DeLisle Stewart #385, 1860 RA 13 56 40, NPD 100 44) is "extremely faint, extremely small, extended 35░".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.85 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4360
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4360
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4360

IC 4361 (= PGC 50131)
Discovered (May 30, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Virgo (RA 14 04 07.5, Dec -09 46 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4361 (= DeLisle Stewart #384, 1860 RA 13 56 41, NPD 99 05) is "extremely faint, very small, considerably extended 150░".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4361
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4361
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4361

IC 4362 (= PGC 50246)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Centaurus (RA 14 05 22.1, Dec -41 49 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4362 (= DeLisle Stewart #389, 1860 RA 13 56 46, NPD 131 08) is "very faint, small, very extended 175░".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.75 by 0.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4362
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4362
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4362

IC 4363 (= PGC 1070328)
Discovered (May 30, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)b?) in Virgo (RA 14 04 12.3, Dec -09 38 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4363 (= DeLisle Stewart #386, 1860 RA 13 56 47, NPD 98 58) is "extremely faint, very small, considerably extended 150░".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.45 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4363
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4363
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4363

IC 4364 (= PGC 50149)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Virgo (RA 14 04 19.8, Dec -09 59 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4364 (= DeLisle Stewart #387, 1860 RA 13 56 47, NPD 99 19) is "extremely faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.75 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4364
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4364
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4364

IC 4365 (=
NGC 5437 = PGC 50113)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1883) by Wilhelm Tempel (and later listed as NGC 5437)
Discovered (May 12, 1896) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 4365)
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 03 47.3, Dec +09 31 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4365 (= Bigourdan #319, 1860 RA 13 56 54, NPD 79 48) is a "13th magnitude star in very faint, small nebula [perhaps = (NGC) 5438]". The position precesses to RA 14 03 48.0, Dec +09 31 32, on the eastern periphery of PGC 50113, which is NGC 5437, so the identification is certain. Per Corwin, the duplicate entry was caused by Bigourdan mangling the identifications of the nebulae he observed in the area, save for NGC 5438. Whether that was the cause of Dreyer's supposing that IC 4365 might be the same as NGC 5438, or whether the IC2 comment is a typographical error for "[perhaps = (NGC) 5437]" is not addressed in any of the references I have used.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 5437 for anything else.

IC 4366 (= PGC 50230)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)c pec) in Centaurus (RA 14 05 11.3, Dec -33 45 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4366 (= DeLisle Stewart #390, 1860 RA 13 56 58, NPD 123 05) is "very faint, very small, considerably extended 170░".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.4 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4366
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4366
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4366

IC 4367 (= PGC 50266)
Discovered (Jan 30, 1898) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(r)c) in Centaurus (RA 14 05 36.4, Dec -39 12 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4367 (= Swift list XI (#165), 1860 RA 13 57 16, NPD 128 32.1) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, between 2 stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.75 by 1.75 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4367
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4367
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4367

IC 4368 (= PGC 170329)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Virgo (RA 14 04 46.3, Dec -09 57 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4368 (= DeLisle Stewart #391, 1860 RA 13 57 17, NPD 99 17) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 4368
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4368
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 4368

IC 4369 (= PGC 50134 =
HCG 70E)
Discovered (Jul 3, 1896) by Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.4 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 14 04 05.9, Dec +33 19 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4369 (= Javelle #1289, 1860 RA 13 57 59, NPD 56 00.4) is "very faint, small, round, diffuse". The position precesses to RA 14 04 06.5, Dec +33 19 12, on the eastern border of the galaxy listed above, so the identification is certain. Per Corwin, Javelle's measurements of the nebulae he observed in this region precisely identify what he observed, but modern catalogs have badly mangled many of the identifications; for instance, LEDA misidentifies IC 4369 as IC 4371.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.35 arcmin. As it happens, HCG 70 is actually two sets of galaxies, a trio consisting of HCG 70a, b and c (the larger galaxies at center and left of center), and a more than twice as distant quartet consisting of the other "members" of the Group (the four "smaller" galaxies, not really smaller but simply further away).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4369, also showing IC 4370 and IC 4371, and other members of Hickson Compact Group 70
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4369, also showing IC 4370 and 4371 and HCG 70
Below, a 6.0 arcmin wide labeled SDSS image of HCG 70
SDSS image of Hickson Compact Group 70, showing the IC and PGC designations for each member of the Group
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of IC 4369
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4369

IC 4370 (= PGC 50138 =
HCG 70D)
Discovered (Jul 3, 1896) by Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type Sc? pec) in Canes Venatici (RA 14 04 10.0, Dec +33 20 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4370 (= Javelle #1290, 1860 RA 13 58 03, NPD 55 58.9) is "faint, small, irregular figure, gradually brighter middle, 14th magnitude star near". The position precesses to RA 14 04 10.4, Dec +33 20 43, on the eastern border of the galaxy listed above, so the identification is certain (per Corwin, what Javelle thought a nearby "14th magnitude star" was probably the nucleus of PGC 50139). As noted in the entry for IC 4369, Javelle's positions precisely identify what he observed, but modern catalogs have badly mangled many of the identifications; for instance, LEDA misidentifies the galaxy that Javelle mistook for a 14th magnitude star as IC 4370.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.35 arcmin. As it happens, HCG 70 is actually two sets of galaxies, a trio consisting of HCG 70a, b and c (the larger galaxies at center and left of center), and a more than twice as distant quartet consisting of the other "members" of the Group (the four "smaller" galaxies, not really smaller but simply further away).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4370, also showing IC 4369 and IC 4371, and other members of Hickson Compact Group 70
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4370, also showing IC 4369 and 4371 and HCG 70
Below, a 6.0 arcmin wide labeled SDSS image of HCG 70
SDSS image of Hickson Compact Group 70, showing the IC and PGC designations for each member of the Group
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of IC 4370, also showing part of PGC 50139
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4370, also showing part of PGC 50139, which is often misidentified as IC 4370

IC 4371 (= PGC 50140 =
HCG 70B)
Discovered (Jul 3, 1896) by Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type S0(r)a? pec) in Canes Venatici (RA 14 04 10.9, Dec +33 18 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4371 (= Javelle #1291, 1860 RA 13 58 04, NPD 56 01.3) is "faint, small, round, very little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 04 11.5, Dec +33 18 19, on the eastern edge of the galaxy listed above, so the identification is certain. As noted in the entry for IC 4369, Javelle's positions precisely identify what he observed, but modern catalogs have badly mangled many of the identifications; for instance, LEDA misidentifies IC 4371 as IC 4369.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.85 by 0.55 arcmin. As it happens, HCG 70 is actually two sets of galaxies, a trio consisting of HCG 70a, b and c (the larger galaxies at center and left of center), and a more than twice as distant quartet consisting of the other "members" of the Group (the four "smaller" galaxies, not really smaller but simply further away).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4371, also showing IC 4369 and IC 4370, and other members of Hickson Compact Group 70
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4371, also showing IC 4369 and 4370 and HCG 70
Below, a 6.0 arcmin wide labeled SDSS image of HCG 70
SDSS image of Hickson Compact Group 70, showing the IC and PGC designations for each member of the Group
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of IC 4371
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4371, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 4369

IC 4372 (= PGC 184370)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Virgo (RA 14 05 46.0, Dec -10 53 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4372 (= DeLisle Stewart #392, 1860 RA 13 58 16, NPD 100 13) is "extremely faint, considerably small, extended 75░".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.65 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4372
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4372
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4372

IC 4373 (= PGC 50274)
Discovered (Jun 15, 1895) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type (R)S0/(r)a?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 05 43.1, Dec +25 13 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4373 (= Javelle #1292, 1860 RA 13 59 18, NPD 64 05.8) is "faint, small, round, nuclear, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.95 by 0.9 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 4373
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4373
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 4373

IC 4374 (= PGC 50385)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1898) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0/(r)a?) in Hydra (RA 14 07 29.8, Dec -27 01 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4374 (= Swift list XI (#166), 1860 RA 13 59 34, NPD 116 20.4) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 1.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 4374
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4374
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 4374

IC 4375 (=
NGC 5488 = PGC 50423)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1837) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5488)
Discovered (April, 1900) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 4375)
A magnitude 11.7 spiral galaxy (type SABbc?) in Centaurus (RA 14 08 02.9, Dec -33 18 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4375 (= DeLisle Stewart #393, 1860 RA 13 59 42, NPD 122 38) is "extremely faint, extremely small, extremely extended 15░, stellar nucleus, star to southwest".
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 5488 for anything else.

IC 4376
Recorded (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A line of three stars in Centaurus (RA 14 10 50.5, Dec -30 47 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4376 (= DeLisle Stewart #394, 1860 RA 14 02 41, NPD 120 09) is "faint, small, extremely extended 40░". The position precesses to RA 14 10 49.1, Dec -30 48 48, but there is nothing there. However, per Corwin, the line of three stars a little over an arcmin north-northeast of the IC2 position is generally considered to be what Stewart observed, having first been suggested by the Helwan observatory, then by Andris while working on the ESO catalog, then by Corwin himself and by Steinicke; and although the angle of the line of stars is about 25░ counter-clockwise from the IC2 description, such a line would otherwise perfectly fit that description, so I see no reason to dispute the general opinion.
SDSS image of region near the line of stars presumed to be IC 4376, also showing the IC2 position for the object
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the IC2 position for IC 4376
Also shown is the line of stars thought to be the IC object

IC 4377 (= PGC 51013)
Discovered (Jun 20, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Apus (RA 14 16 58.6, Dec -75 38 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4377 (= DeLisle Stewart #397, 1860 RA 14 03 25, NPD 164 59) is "most extremely faint, very small, much extended 180░, very much brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 16 59.3, Dec -75 38 26, on the southern periphery of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain. The only problem is Stewart's statement that the position angle is 180░, though it is actually about 95░; but given the lack of any other candidate that error is apparently considered irrelevant.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 0.9 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4377
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4377
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4377

IC 4378 (= PGC 50711)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Centaurus (RA 14 12 09.5, Dec -34 15 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4378 (= DeLisle Stewart #395, 1860 RA 14 03 51, NPD 123 36) is "very faint, very small, extended 150░". The position precesses to RA 14 12 08.0, Dec -34 15 40, on the northern periphery of the galaxy listed above, and its description and position relative to its southern companion, IC 4379, make the identification certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.95 by 0.55 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 4378 and spiral galaxy IC 4379
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4378 and IC 4379
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the pair
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 4378 and spiral galaxy IC 4379

IC 4379 (= PGC 50710)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Centaurus (RA 14 12 10.1, Dec -34 16 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4379 (= DeLisle Stewart #396, 1860 RA 14 03 51, NPD 123 37) is "very faint, very small, extended 90░". The position precesses to RA 14 12 08.0, Dec -34 16 40, just south of the galaxy listed above, and its description and position relative to its northern companion, IC 4378 (which see for images), make the identification certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.25 arcmin.

IC 4380 (= PGC 50565)
Discovered (Jun 29, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 10 02.1, Dec +37 33 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4380 (= Javelle #1293, 1860 RA 14 04 08, NPD 51 47.2) is "faint, small, round, diffuse". The position precesses to RA 14 10 01.7, Dec +37 33 02, right on the galaxy listed above, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4380
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4380
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4380

IC 4381 (=
NGC 5008 = PGC 50629 = HCG 71A)
Discovered (May 18, 1862) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 5008)
Discovered (Jun 15, 1895) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 4381)
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 10 57.0, Dec +25 29 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4381 (= Javelle #1294, 1860 RA 14 04 36, NPD 63 51.3) is "faint, considerably small, round, binuclear". The position precesses to RA 14 10 58.4, Dec +25 29 01, about an arcmin southeast of the galaxy listed above. This is the same error as for IC 4382, observed by Javelle on the same night, so his two nebulae have the same relative position as the galaxies listed here as the corresponding IC objects, making their identification essentially certain. Per Corwin, the duplicate listing was due to an error of an hour of time in d'Arrest's right ascension, making the extra entry inevitable. (Due to the large error in the NGC position, many references call this object IC 4381, instead of NGC 5008.)
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 5008 for anything else.

IC 4382 (= PGC 50635 =
HCG 71B)
Discovered (Jun 15, 1895) by Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 11 02.3, Dec +25 31 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4382 (= Javelle #1295, 1860 RA 14 04 41, NPD 63 49.9) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle, (NGC) 5498 11 arcmin to north". The position precesses to RA 14 11 03.3, Dec +25 30 25, about an arcmin southeast of the galaxy listed above. This is the same error as for IC 4381, observed by Javelle on the same night, so his two nebulae have the same relative position as the galaxies listed here as the corresponding IC objects, making their identification essentially certain. The reference to NGC 5498, which is 12 arcmin north of Javelle's position but only 11 arcmin north of PGC 50635, confirms the presumed error in the measured positions of IC 4381 and 4382, and makes their identification absolutely certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.85 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4382, which is also known as HCG 71B; also shown is NGC 5008, also known as HCG 71A, and the other members of Hickson Compact Group 71
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image showing IC 4382, NGC 5008, and other members of HCG 71
Below, a labeled 4.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of Hickson Compact Group 71
Labeled SDSS image of NGC 5008, IC 4382, PGC 50640 and PGC 50641, which comprise Hickson Compact Group 71
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of IC 4382
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4382, which is also known as HCG 71B

IC 4383 (= PGC 50716 = PGC 50730 = "NGC 5504B")
Discovered (May 26, 1894) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)b? pec?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 12 12.7, Dec +15 52 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4383 (= Bigourdan #416, 1860 RA 14 05 33, NPD 73 29) is "1.7 arcmin northwest of (NGC) 5504 (no description)". The position precesses to RA 14 12 14.3, Dec +15 51 26, less than an arcmin southeast of the galaxy listed above, which is 1.8 arcmin northwest of NGC 5504, so the identification ought to be simple and certain. However, per Corwin, several references misidentify PGC 50713, the fainter galaxy 2.3 arcmin due north of NGC 5504, as IC 4383; hence its discussion immediately below. (IC 4383 is sometimes pointlessly called NGC 5504B due to its proximity to NGC 5504.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.45 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4383, also showing PGC 50713, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 4383, and NGC 5504
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4383, also showing NGC 5504 and PGC 50713
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4383

PGC 50713 (= "NGC 5504C" but not =
IC 4383)
Not an IC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 5504C or misidentified as IC 4383
A magnitude 15.7 spiral galaxy (type Sdm?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 12 16.0, Dec +15 52 48)
Historical Misidentification: As noted in the entry for IC 4383, this galaxy is sometimes misidentified as that IC object. In addition, it is often called NGC 5504C due to its general proximity to NGC 5504.
Physical Information: For anything else see "NGC 5504C"
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 50713, which is sometimes called NGC 5504C, and often misidentified as IC 4383
Above, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 50713; for a wider-field image see IC 4383

IC 4384 (= PGC 50690)
Discovered (Jun 14, 1895) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 11 55.9, Dec +27 06 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4384 (= Javelle #1296, 1860 RA 14 05 37, NPD 62 13.6) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle and nucleus, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.1 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 4384
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4384
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 4384

IC 4385
Recorded (May 14, 1904) by
Royal Frost
Perhaps a compact group of stars in Centaurus (RA 14 14 31.7, Dec -42 19 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4385 (= Frost #1095, 1860 RA 14 06 02, NPD 131 39) is "very small, round, a little brighter middle" (Frost's notes give a diameter of 0.2 arcmin). The position precesses to RA 14 14 43.0, Dec -42 18 25, in a completely stellar field with no obvious choice as to which if any group of stars represents Frost's observation. Various databases misidentify the object as PGC 50880 (hence its entry immediately below), but per Corwin that galaxy is far too faint to have shown up on Frost's plate, and its 14 arcmin error in position would be so unusual as to make it a very unlikely candidate even if it were much brighter. Instead, Corwin suggests the compact asterism of half a dozen stars 2.3 arcmin west-southwest of Frost's position as what he actually observed, with the caveat that it may be impossible to determine the correct identity of IC 4385.
DSS image showing a region centered on Frost's position for IC 4385, and the asterism suggested by Corwin as the most likely candidate for the observation
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image showing Frost's position for IC 4385, and Corwin's suggestion

PGC 50880 (not =
IC 4385)
Not an IC object but listed here since often misidentified as IC 4385
A magnitude 17.5(?) irregular galaxy (type Irr?) in Centaurus (RA 14 14 38.4, Dec -42 04 26)
Historical Misidentification: As noted in the entry for IC 4385, often misidentified as that object, but far too faint and with too unlikely a position to have any chance of actually being the IC object.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.35 by 0.25 arcmin; nothing else available.
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy PGC 50880, which is often misidentified as IC 4385
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 50880
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the galaxy
DSS image of irregular galaxy PGC 50880, which is often misidentified as IC 4385

IC 4386 (= PGC 50905)
Discovered (May 14, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)dm pec?) in Centaurus (RA 14 15 02.3, Dec -43 57 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4386 (= Frost #1096, 1860 RA 14 06 18, NPD 133 18) is "faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.4 by 1.35 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxies IC 4386 and IC 4387
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4386, also showing IC 4387
Below, a 4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxies
DSS image of spiral galaxies IC 4386 and IC 4387

IC 4387 (= PGC 50904)
Discovered (May 14, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)m pec?) in Centaurus (RA 14 15 01.5, Dec -43 59 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4387 (= Frost #1097, 1860 RA 14 06 18, NPD 133 20) is "faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.75 arcmin. Probably a companion of IC 4386, which see for images.

IC 4388 (= PGC 50964)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Centaurus (RA 14 16 03.5, Dec -31 45 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4388 (= DeLisle Stewart #398, 1860 RA 14 07 52, NPD 121 07) is "very faint, very small, round, suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 1.0 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4388, also showing IC 4391
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4388, also showing IC 4391
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4388

IC 4389 (= PGC 51000)
Discovered (May 14, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Centaurus (RA 14 16 46.2, Dec -40 33 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4389 (= Frost #1098, 1860 RA 14 08 09, NPD 129 54) is "very faint, very small, round, diffuse".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.85 by 0.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4389
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4389
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4389

IC 4390 (= PGC 51015)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)bc?) in Centaurus (RA 14 16 59.3, Dec -44 58 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4390 (= DeLisle Stewart #401, 1860 RA 14 08 11, NPD 134 20) is "extremely faint, very small, much extended 5░, stellar nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 0.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4390
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4390
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4390

IC 4391 (= PGC 50988)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Centaurus (RA 14 16 27.0, Dec -31 41 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4391 (= DeLisle Stewart #400, 1860 RA 14 08 16, NPD 121 03) is "very faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4391, also showing IC 4388
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4391, also showing IC 4388
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4391

IC 4392
Recorded (July 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A line of 4 or 5 stars in Virgo (RA 14 15 53.2, Dec -13 03 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4392 (= DeLisle Stewart #399, 1860 RA 14 08 21, NPD 102 28) is "extremely faint, very small, much extended 80░, faint star to southeast, suspected". The position precesses to RA 14 15 54.5, Dec -13 07 13, but there is nothing there save a completely stellar field. However, per Corwin, there is a line of a few faint stars with the correct position angle just over 4 arcmin north of the IC2 position, and the 16th magnitude star just below the east end of the line fits "faint star to southeast", so though Corwin doubts there is any way to be certain that is what Stewart observed, he believes it is probably the correct identification, and that opinion appears to be generally accepted.
DSS image of region near Stewart's position for IC 4392, also showing the line of stars that is probably what he observed
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Stewart's position, also showing the probable IC 4392

IC 4393 (= PGC 51061)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Centaurus (RA 14 17 49.2, Dec -31 20 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4393 (= DeLisle Stewart #402, 1860 RA 14 09 41, NPD 120 42) is "considerably faint, small, extremely extended 75░".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 0.3 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4393
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4393
Below, a 3.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4393

IC 4394
Recorded (Apr 24, 1900) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
Probably a nonexistent object in Bo÷tes (RA 14 16 31.3, Dec +39 41 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4394 (= Bigourdan #418, 1860 RA 14 10 49, NPD 49 39) is "extremely faint, small, round". The position precesses to RA 14 16 32.8, Dec +39 41 58, but there is nothing there. Per Corwin, Bigourdan's position for his comparison star was 10 seconds of time too far to the east, but there is still nothing in the resulting position for his #418. Assuming that Bigourdan misidentified the comparison star but the measured offsets were correct also fails to turn up any suitable candidate; so it appears that the single observation Bigourdan made of the object was probably one of his "fausse images".
SDSS image of region centered on Bigourdan's position for the probably nonexistent IC 4394
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on Bigourdan's position for IC 4394

IC 4395 (= PGC 51033)
Discovered (Jun 14, 1895) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type Sab? pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 17 20.8, Dec +26 51 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4395 (= Javelle #1297, 1860 RA 14 11 04, NPD 62 29.9) is "faint, small, round, nuclear, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.25 by 1.2 arcmin. A Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2). Vr 10945 km/sec (z = .036515) Possibly a pair with PGC 166374, hence the entry immediately below, and perhaps the reason for its distorted appearance.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies IC 4395 and PGC 166374
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4395, also showing PGC 166374
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxies IC 4395 and PGC 166374

PGC 166374
Not an IC object but listed here because possibly a pair with
IC 4395
A magnitude 17(?) spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 17 18.8, Dec +26 51 36)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.1 arcmin. Vr 11000 km/sec (z = .036700). Possibly a pair with IC 4395, which see for images.

IC 4396 (= PGC 51050)
Discovered (Jun 6, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type Sbc? pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 17 30.3, Dec +28 48 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4396 (= Javelle #1298, 1860 RA 14 11 18, NPD 60 33.1) is "faint, small, diffuse".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.65 by 0.45 arcmin. A one-armed starburst galaxy.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4396
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4396
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4396

IC 4397 (= PGC 51073)
Discovered (Jun 23, 1889) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 17 58.7, Dec +26 24 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4397 (= Bigourdan #419, Javelle #1299, 1860 RA 14 11 40, NPD 62 56.3) is "faint, considerably small, round, brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin. A Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4397, also showing IC 4399
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4397, also showing IC 4399
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4397

IC 4398 (= PGC 51082)
Discovered (Jul 6, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 18 03.3, Dec +28 51 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4398 (= Javelle #1300, 1860 RA 14 11 51, NPD 60 29.1) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4398
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4398
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4398

IC 4399 (= PGC 51100)
Discovered (Jun 23, 1889) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)b?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 18 24.0, Dec +26 23 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4399 (= Bigourdan #420, Javelle #1301, 1860 RA 14 12 05, NPD 62 58.1) is "faint, considerably small, round, nuclear, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4399, also showing IC 4397 and NGC 5553
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4399, also showing IC 4397 and NGC 5553
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4399
Celestial Atlas
(IC 4300 - 4349) ←     IC Objects: IC 4350 - 4399     → (IC 4400 - 4449)