Celestial Atlas
(IC 4400 - 4449) ←     IC Objects: IC 4450 - 4499 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 4500 - 4549)
Click here for Introductory Material
QuickLinks:
4450, 4451, 4452, 4453, 4454, 4455, 4456, 4457, 4458, 4459, 4460, 4461, 4462, 4463, 4464, 4465, 4466,
4467, 4468, 4469, 4470, 4471, 4472, 4473, 4474, 4475, 4476, 4477, 4478, 4479, 4480, 4481, 4482, 4483,
4484, 4485, 4486, 4487, 4488, 4489, 4490, 4491, 4492, 4493, 4494, 4495, 4496, 4497, 4498, 4499

Page last updated Feb 21, 2014

IC 4450 (= PGC 51939)
Discovered (Jul 27, 1895) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 32 12.4, Dec +28 33 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4450 (= Javelle #1322, 1860 RA 14 26 04, NPD 60 50.6) is "faint, considerably small, diffuse, 10.5 magnitude star to northeast". The position precesses to RA 14 32 11.9, Dec +28 32 11, an arcmin south of the the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is reasonably certain. (There is a 10th magnitude star nearby, and although it is to the northwest rather than the northeast, confusion about directions is so common in visual observations that the mere presence of the star confirms the identification more than the error in its direction negates it.)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 9100 km/sec, IC 4450 is about 420 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.05 by 0.45 arcmin, it is about 130 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4450
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4450
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4450

IC 4451 (= PGC 52094)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 11.7 elliptical galaxy (type E4??) in Centaurus (RA 14 34 37.0, Dec -36 17 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4451 (= DeLisle Stewart #408, 1860 RA 14 26 04, NPD 125 40) is "very faint, very small, round, star 0.5 arcmin to north". The position precesses to RA 14 34 37.1, Dec -36 17 04, right on the galaxy listed above, and the star to its north makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.1 arcmin?

IC 4452 (= PGC 51951)
Discovered (Jul 8, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 32 27.4, Dec +27 25 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4452 (= Javelle #1323, 1860 RA 14 26 17, NPD 61 58.3) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 14 32 27.7, Dec +27 24 31, an arcmin south of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification seems certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.45 by 0.45 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4452
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4452
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4452

IC 4453 (= PGC 52084)
Discovered (Feb 22, 1898) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.2 lenticular galaxy (type SB0??) in Hydra (RA 14 34 28.6, Dec -27 31 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4453 (= Swift XI (#172), Howe, 1860 RA 14 26 20, NPD 116 54.1) is "pretty bright, extremely small, round, faint star close". The position precesses to RA 14 34 29.0, Dec -27 31 10, right on the galaxy listed above, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.0 arcmin?

IC 4454 (= PGC 1539655)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 16.6 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 33 16.6, Dec +17 42 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4454 (= Frost #1115, 1860 RA 14 26 44, NPD 71 40) is "faint, extremely small, round, a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 33 17.2, Dec +17 42 54, practically on the northeast rim of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4454
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4454
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4454

IC 4455 (=
NGC 5664 = PGC 52033)
Discovered (Jun 6, 1885) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 5664)
Discovered (July, 1899) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 4455)
A 14th-magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Sa??) in Libra (RA 14 33 43.7, Dec -14 37 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4455 (= DeLisle Stewart #410, 1860 RA 14 26 49, NPD 104 01) is "extremely faint, considerably small, considerably extended 30░". The position precesses to RA 14 34 28.5, Dec -14 38 02, but there is nothing there. However, per Corwin NGC 5664, which lies 45 seconds of time to the west, has essentially the same declination and fits the description perfectly, so it is almost certain that IC 4455 is a reobservation of the NGC object (so certain that Corwin's suggestion appears to have been universally accepted).
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 5664 for anything else.

IC 4456 (= PGC 1502760)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 34 09.1, Dec +16 11 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4456 (= Frost #1116, 1860 RA 14 27 31, NPD 73 12) is "faint, small, round, diffuse". The position precesses to RA 14 34 07.4, Dec +16 11 00, half an arcmin west of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.75 by 0.25 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4456
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4456
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4456

IC 4457 (= PGC 1553586)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 15.2 elliptical galaxy (type E3??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 34 28.9, Dec +18 13 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4457 (= Frost #1117, 1860 RA 14 27 56, NPD 71 10) is "faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 34 27.9, De +18 13 03, a third of an arcmin southewest of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 4458
Recorded (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
Probably a line of stars in Centaurus (RA 14 38 05.0, Dec -39 28 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4458 (= DeLisle Stewart #411, 1860 RA 14 28 25, NPD 128 51) is "extremely faint, extremely small, extended 100░". The position precesses to RA 14 37 09.5, Dec -39 27 46, in a completely stellar field. However, the line of 3 or so stars less than an arcmin to the south-southeast could easily appear to be an object extended at about 100░, so the identification given above seems reasonable. Thomson, Corwin and Steinicke all agree that this is the most likely identification. However, most references have identified PGC 52300, which lies a minute to the east and 2 arcmin to the south, as IC 4458, so that misidentification is discussed in the entry immediately below.
DSS image of region near the line of stars that is probably IC 4458, also showing Stewart's position
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Stewart's position showing the probable IC 4458

PGC 52300 (not =
IC 4458, but also = PGC 597454)
Not an IC object but listed here because usually misidentified as IC 4458
A magnitude 16(?) spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Centaurus (RA 14 38 06.0, Dec -39 30 20)
Historical Identification: Although, as noted in the entry for IC 4458, this galaxy is usually misidentified as that object, Thomson states that the large error in both right ascension and declination required to make that correct is very unlikely, and Corwin adds that the galaxy is far too faint to have been seen on the plate examined by Stewart, so there is no possibility that this object is IC 4458. (As shown in the title, LEDA lists two PGC entries at this position, but as is common in such cases, fails to notice that the positions are identical.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy 52300, which is usually identified as IC 4458
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 52300
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image on the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy 52300, which is usually identified as IC 4458

IC 4459 (= PGC 52087)
Discovered (Jul 9, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 34 32.2, Dec +30 58 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4459 (= Javelle #1324, 1860 RA 14 28 32, NPD 58 24.9) is "faint, pretty large, extended north-south, gradually a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 14 34 32.5, Dec +30 58 11, on the southern rim of the galaxy listed above, and the description fits perfectly, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 4460 (= PGC 52089)
Discovered (Jul 6, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 34 36.5, Dec +30 16 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4460 (= Javelle #1325, 1860 RA 14 28 39, NPD 59 07.6) is "faint, small, diffuse, gradually a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 34 41.4, Dec +30 15 30, about 1.6 arcmin southeast of the galaxy listed above, but the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification seems certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.45 by 0.35 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4460
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4460
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4460

IC 4461 (= PGC 52120, and not = PGC 52119)
Discovered (Jun 22, 1895) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 16(?) spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 35 00.3, Dec +26 31 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4461 (= Javelle #1326, 1860 RA 14 28 49, NPD 62 51.6) is "faint, very small, round, nuclear, mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 14 35 01.1, Dec +26 31 32, just southeast of PGC 52120, so that object is probably IC 4461, as listed above; but it is almost as common to have PGC 52119, the spiral galaxy to its northeast, misidentified as IC 4461, so a little more work is required to show that the identification in this entry is correct. For that reason, the first image below shows the three galaxies in the area (PGC 52119, 52120 and 52123) that are identified as IC 4461 or 4462 in one reference or another, and the precessed positions of Javelle's #1326 and #1327, which were listed by Dreyer as IC 4461 and 4462. As can be seen in that image, the relative position of Javelle's measurements perfectly fits the galaxies to the northwest of his precessed positions (PGC 52120 and 52119, respectively), but does not fit the northern pair of galaxies (PGC 52119 and 52123), which therefore cannot be IC 4461 and 4462. The common error of Javelle's relative positions suggests a common cause for those errors, and per a private communication from Corwin that is indeed the case. Javelle used the BD catalog position for his comparison star, which had an error that led to identical errors in his positions. Using the correct position for the comparison star puts Javelle's positions right on the galaxies, so there is now no doubt that PGC 52120 is IC 4461, PGC 52119 is IC 4462, and PGC 52123, although connected to IC 4462 as a member of Arp 95, is not an IC object at all.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies PGC 52119 and 52120 and lenticular galaxy PGC 52123, also showing Javelle's original positions for IC 4461 and 4462, thereby suggesting that PGC 52120 is IC 4461 and PGC 52119 is IC 4462
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the region near IC 4661, showing Javelle's IC2 positions
Below, the same image showing the correct IC and PGC labels for the galaxies
SDSS image of spiral galaxies IC 4461 and 4662 (which is often misidentified as IC 4661), and lenticular galaxy PGC 52123, which is often misidentified as IC 4662
Below, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4461 and 4462, and PGC 52123
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies IC 4461 and 4662 (which is often misidentified as IC 4661), and lenticular galaxy PGC 52123, which is often misidentified as IC 4662
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the correct IC 4661
SDSS image of PGC 52120, which is the correct IC 4661

IC 4462 (= PGC 52119, and not PGC 52123, but with that galaxy =
Arp 95)
Discovered (Jun 22, 1895) by Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)b?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 35 01.9, Dec +26 32 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4462 (= Javelle #1327, 1860 RA 14 28 51, NPD 62 50.9) is "faint, small, round". The position precesses to RA 14 35 03.0, Dec +26 32 14, slightly south of and in between PGC 52119 and 52123. As discussed in the entry for IC 4461 (which see), it is absolutely certain that the northwestern member of the pair is IC 4462, but it is not unusual to find that galaxy misidentified as IC 4461, and the eastern member of the pair misidentified as IC 4462, hence the emphasis on the correct identification in the title for this entry.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.65 by 0.45 arcmin. Used in the Arp Atlas as an example of a spiral galaxy with an elliptical companion (PGC 52123). A starburst galaxy.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4462 (which is often misidentified as IC 4461) and lenticular galaxy PGC 52123 (which is often misidentified as IC 4662), which comprise Arp 95
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide closeup of Arp 95; for other views, see IC 4461

PGC 52123 (not =
IC 4462, but with that galaxy = Arp 95)
Not an IC object, but listed here as a member of Arp 95, and often misidentified as IC 4462
A magnitude 15(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 35 04.2, Dec +26 32 27)
Historical Identification: As discussed in the entry for IC 4461 (which see for images), often misidentified as IC 4462.
Physical Information:Apparent size 0.55 by 0.35 arcmin. Used in the Arp Atlas as an example of a spiral galaxy (IC 4462, which see for an image) with an elliptical companion.

IC 4463 (= PGC 52175)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 14.1 elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 35 49.0, Dec +16 01 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4463 (= Frost #1118, 1860 RA 14 29 13, NPD 73 22) is "faint, very small, round". The position precesses to RA 14 35 49.5, Dec +16 01 13, right on the galaxy and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 4464 (= PGC 52286)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 11.8 lenticular galaxy (type SB0??) in Centaurus (RA 14 37 48.9, Dec -36 52 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4464 (= DeLisle Stewart #412, 1860 RA 14 29 15, NPD 126 16) is "very faint, small, round, nuclear, wisp at 45░". The position precesses to RA 14 37 51.5, Dec -36 52 40, right on the galaxy listed above, and its 45░ position angle probably led Stewart to conclude there was some kind of wispy extension in that direction, so it appears that the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 4465 (= PGC 1488159)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 15.5 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 35 51.1, Dec +15 34 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4465 (= Frost #1119, 1860 RA 14 29 18, NPD 73 49) is "very faint, very small, a little extended 180░". The position precesses to RA 14 35 55.4, Dec +15 34 13, about an arcmin east of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is probably certain. There is a problem with the position angle being more like 80░ instead of 180░. Corwin suggests this may be a typographical error, or that there may have been a flaw on the plate that influenced the description, but considers Frost's position good (the error in position is about the same as the round-off error in Dreyer's positions), and considering the lack of any other candidates in the region, feels that the identification must be correct.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.55 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4465
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4465
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4465

IC 4466 (= PGC 52228 + PGC 4540592)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A pair of galaxies in Bo÷tes
PGC 52228 = A magnitude 15(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec) at RA 14 36 48.2, Dec +18 20 38
PGC 4540592 = A magnitude 15.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0? pec) at RA 14 36 47.9, Dec +18 20 33
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4466 (= Frost #1120, 1860 RA 14 30 14, NPD 71 03) is "faint, very small, a little extended". The position precesses to RA 14 36 45.1, Dec +18 20 20, just over half an arcmin west of the galaxy listed above (which is about the same as the round-off error in his measurements), and it fits the description, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Combined apparent size 0.8 by 0.65 arcmin, including extensions. Apparently a bi-nuclear polar ring galaxy; undoubtedly the result of a collision between two galaxies.
SDSS image of region near the interacting pair of galaxies listed as IC 4466, also showing IC 4467
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4466, also showing IC 4467
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the interacting pair
SDSS image of the interacting pair of galaxies listed as IC 4466

IC 4467 (= PGC 1557696)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 15.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 36 53.6, Dec +18 22 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4467 (= Frost #1121, 1860 RA 14 30 20, NPD 71 01) is "faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 36 51.0, Dec +18 22 21, just over half an arcmin west of the galaxy listed above (which is about the same as the round-off error in his measurements), the same error as in his position for the nearby IC 4466, and the description fits so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 4467
Above, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of IC 4467; for a wider view, see IC 4466

IC 4468 (= PGC 52324)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type SBc??) in Libra (RA 14 38 26.8, Dec -22 22 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4468 (= DeLisle Stewart #413, 1860 RA 14 30 32, NPD 111 46) is "faint, pretty large, considerably extended 160░, considerably brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 38 29.7, Dec -22 22 32, barely off the southern rim of the galaxy listed above, and the description fits perfectly, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 4469 (= PGC 52258)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 37 20.6, Dec +18 14 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4469 (= Frost #1122, 1860 RA 14 30 50, NPD 71 09) is "faint, pretty large, extremely extended 110░". The position precesses to RA 14 37 21.2, Dec +18 14 25, half an arcmin south of the galaxy listed above (about the same as the round-off error for Frost's measurements) and the description is perfect, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image region near of spiral galaxy IC 4469
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4469
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxySDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4469

IC 4470 (= PGC 51696)
Discovered (Jul 11, 1887) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Ursa Minor (RA 14 28 22.8, Dec +78 53 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4470 (= Bigourdan #421, 1860 RA 14 30 53, NPD 10 29) is a "cluster, extremely faint, small, possibly nebulous". The position precesses to RA 14 28 07.6, Dec +78 53 50, about an arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification seems certain. Due to a supposed problem with the position noted beow, I checked Bigourdan's original paper (#421 is on page 87 of the 1901 Comptes Rendu), and found that his position precesses to RA 14 28 07.8, Dec +78 53 25, which is even closer to the galaxy (only half an arcmin to the north-northwest), and includes a note that the "cluster" is somewhat extended at 90░, with an apparent size of 1 arcmin by 40 arcsec, which fits the orientation of the galaxy, and makes the identity even more certain. Keep that certainty in mind if you read the following, as it does not make the identity any less certain. One reference states that Bigourdan measured his offsets relative to NGC 5712, which is about a minute and a third of time to the east, but recorded a difference of only 17 seconds of time between the two. That would lead to a minute of time error in the right ascension, and place Bigourdan's object well to the east of its actual location. However, I find it hard to believe that Bigourdan could have made such an error in either his measurement or reduction and then somehow ended up with an almost perfect position. The supposed measurement error is almost certainly a mistake or misinterpretation made at some later date. If Bigourdan measured the offset in time units, he could have inadvertantly left out the whole minute of time in a later paper. However, it seems more likely that he measured the offsets in arcmin (as is usually done), then converted them to time units where necessary. At the Celestial Equator, a minute and a third difference in right ascension would correspond to 20 arcmin; but near the Celestial Poles the hour circles of right ascension are much closer together, and the two galaxies are only a little over 4 arcmin apart. If that 4+ arcmin were incorrectly converted to right ascension as if the galaxies were near the Celestial Equator, it would correspond to only 17 seconds, and a failure to realize that is probably where the supposed "error" arose.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.25 arcmin.
DSS image region near of spiral galaxy IC 4470, also showing NGC 5712
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4470, also showing NGC 5712
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxyDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4470

IC 4471 (=
NGC 5697 = PGC 52207)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5697)
Discovered (Jun 6, 1894) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 4471)
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type Sbc? pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 36 32.0, Dec +41 41 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4471 (= Bigourdan #321, 1860 RA 14 31 01, NPD 47 43) has "no description". The position precesses to RA 14 36 26.7, Dec +41 40 22, about an arcmin southwest of NGC 5697, and there is nothing else of note in the region, so if IC 4471 corresponds to any nebula it must be a reobservation of NGC 5697, as shown in the title for this entry. Per Corwin, the observation made by Bigourdan on the date shown above was very rough, and although it might correspond to the double star to the west of NGC 5697, if it did Bigourdan would surely have mentioned the presence of the much brighter NGC object. Five years later (on May 4, 1899), he made another observation of the region and perfectly measured the position of NGC 5697, but could find no hint of his "nova". The fact that neither observation refers to more than one nebula makes it almost certain that this is indeed a duplicate entry.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 5697 for anything else.

IC 4472 (= PGC 52410)
Discovered (May 15, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Lupus (RA 14 40 10.5, Dec -44 18 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4472 (= Frost #1124, 1860 RA 14 31 02, NPD 133 44) is "large, extremely extended 180░, between 2 stars north and south, doubtful". The position precesses to RA 14 40 05.9, Dec -44 20 24, less than an arcmin southwest of the southern half of the galaxy listed above, and the description makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 0.4 arcmin.
DSS image region near of spiral galaxy IC 4472
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4472
Below, a 3.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxyDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4472

IC 4473 (= PGC 52287 + PGC 4540631)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A pair of galaxies in Bo÷tes
PGC 52287 = A magnitude 14.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec) at RA 14 37 54.0, Dec +15 51 49
PGC 4540631 = A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type SBb? pec) at RA 14 37 54.4, Dec +15 51 39
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4473 (= Frost #1123, 1860 RA 14 31 19, NPD 73 32) is "very small, cometic (like a comet), 170░". The position precesses to RA 14 37 55.4, Dec +15 51 29, on the southeastern rim of a pair of galaxies that would look very much like Frost's description, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of PGC 52287 is about 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin; of PGC 4540631, about 0.55 by 0.5 arcmin. An interacting pair.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 52287 and spiral galaxy PGC 4540631, the pair of galaxies that comprise IC 4473
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4473
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 52287 and spiral galaxy PGC 4540631, the pair of galaxies that comprise IC 4473

IC 4474 (= PGC 1687216)
Discovered (Jul 28, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)ab?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 38 22.4, Dec +23 25 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4474 (= Javelle #1328, 1860 RA 14 32 03, NPD 65 57.8) is "faint, very small, round, nuclear". The position precesses to RA 14 38 21.8, Dec +23 25 45, well within the western outline of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4474, also showing IC 4475
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4474, also showing IC 4475
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4474

IC 4475 (= PGC 52325)
Discovered (Jul 28, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 38 23.2, Dec +23 20 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4475 (= Javelle #1329, 1860 RA 14 32 04, NPD 66 03.3) is "faint, very small, nuclear, stellar". The position precesses to RA 14 38 23.0, Dec +23 20 15, within the northern outline of the galaxy listed above, and although there are other galaxies nearby they are much fainter, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 4476 (= PGC 170358)
Discovered (Apr 15, 1899) by
Sherburne Burnham
A magnitude 14.3 elliptical galaxy (type E3??) in Libra (RA 14 39 51.8, Dec -16 14 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4476 (= Burnham, 1860 RA 14 32 08, NPD 105 38.1) is a "nebula, 7th magnitude star 5 arcmin to northeast". The position precesses to RA 14 39 51.9, Dec -16 14 27, well within the northern outline of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 4477 (= PGC 52327)
Discovered (Jul 24, 1895) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 38 35.3, Dec +28 27 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4477 (= Javelle #1330, 1860 RA 14 32 30, NPD 60 56.2) is "faint, very small, diffuse, 12th magnitude star 2 seconds west, 15 arcsec north". The position precesses to RA 14 38 35.8, Dec +28 27 24, on the southeastern rim of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.55 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4477, also showing IC 4479
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4477, also showing IC 4479
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4477

IC 4478 (= PGC 52363)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 14.3 elliptical galaxy (type E3??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 39 12.6, Dec +15 52 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4478 (= Frost #1125, 1860 RA 14 32 37, NPD 73 32) has a "brighter middle, magnitude 15". The position precesses to RA 14 39 13.2, Dec +15 51 39, about an arcmin south of the galaxy listed above, but there is nothing else nearby so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 4479 (= PGC 52338)
Discovered (Jul 24, 1895) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type Sbc? pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 38 45.9, Dec +28 30 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4479 (= Javelle #1331, 1860 RA 14 32 40, NPD 60 53.3) is "faint, considerably small, nuclear, diffuse". The position precesses to RA 14 38 45.6, Dec +28 30 19, practically dead center on the galaxy listed above, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.3 arcmin. Based on nearly identical recessional velocities, certainly in the same region as PGC 214309, and probably a physical companion.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4479 and its probable companion, PGC 214309, also showing IC 4477
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4479, also showing IC 4477
Below, a 2.0 arcmin SDSS image of IC 4479 and PGC 214309
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4479 and its probable companion, PGC 214309

PGC 214309
Not an IC object but listed here since a probable physical companion to
IC 4479
A magnitude 16.5(?) spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 38 41.8, Dec +28 29 53)
Apparent size 0.45 by 0.25 arcmin. Based on nearly identical recessional velocities, certainly in the same region as IC 4479 (which see for images), and probably a physical companion.

IC 4480 (= PGC 52394)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 39 45.6, Dec +18 29 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4480 (= Frost #1126, 1860 RA 14 33 14, NPD 70 55) is "faint, small, round, diffuse, star in middle". The position precesses to RA 14 39 44.2, Dec +18 28 43, less than an arcmin southwest of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.55 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4480
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4480
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4480

IC 4481 (= PGC 1501729)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 15.7 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 40 10.1, Dec +16 08 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4481 (= Frost #1127, 1860 RA 14 33 31, NPD 73 16) is "considerably faint, very small, round, diffuse". The position precesses to RA 14 40 06.4, Dec +16 07 45, right on a 17th magnitude star less than an arcmin southwest of the galaxy listed above, but it is highly unlikely that Frost would have recorded such a faint star and failed to notice the brighter galaxy to its northeast, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is reasonably certain. (Thomson lists several errors of omission or commission involving IC 4481 in various databases, but it appears that most references contain more or less correct information about the object, and at least nothing else seems to have been misidentified as IC 4481.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 4482 (= PGC 52408)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 15.1 spiral galaxy (type Scd??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 40 12.4, Dec +18 56 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4482 (= Frost #1128, 1860 RA 14 33 39, NPD 70 28) is "faint, small, round". The position precesses to RA 14 40 08.0, Dec +18 55 46, about an arcmin southwest of the galaxy listed above, but there is nothing else nearby, so the identification seems reasonably certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 4483 (= PGC 52417)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 40 19.4, Dec +16 41 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4483 (= Frost #1129, 1860 RA 14 33 44, NPD 72 44) is "extended 200░, a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 40 18.2, Dec +16 39 47, a little over an arcmin south of the galaxy listed above. There is nothing else nearby and the description perfectly fits the object, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.45 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4483
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4483
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4483

IC 4484 (= PGC 52837)
Discovered (Jul 18, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Apus (RA 14 47 44.9, Dec -73 18 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4484 (= DeLisle Stewart #414, 1860 RA 14 33 56, NPD 162 43) is "extremely faint, extremely extended 140░, suspected". The position precesses to RA 14 47 41.7, Dec -73 18 44, practically on the western rim of the galaxy listed above, and the description perfectly fits the object, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.6 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 4485 (= PGC 52419)
Discovered (Jul 8, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 40 31.4, Dec +28 40 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4485 (= Javelle #1332, 1860 RA 14 34 27, NPD 60 44.1) is "faint, small, diffuse". The position precesses to RA 14 40 31.6, Dec +28 39 45, less than half an arcmin south of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.45 arcmin. Perhaps a starburst galaxy.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4485
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4485
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4485

IC 4486 (= PGC 52496, and not =
PGC 54281)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by Royal Frost
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 41 52.2, Dec +18 34 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4486 (= Frost #1130, 1860 RA 14 35 21, NPD 70 50) is "very faint, very small, round, diffuse". The position precesses to RA 14 41 50.5, Dec +18 33 59, less than half an arcmin southwest of the galaxy listed above, which makes the identification essentially certain (in fact, Frost's original position falls right on the southwest rim of the galaxy, but Dreyer's polar distance is slightly rounded off). Unfortunately, PGC 54281, the slightly brighter galaxy a few arcmin to the west, is almost always misidentified as IC 4486. Per a private communication from Corwin, this misidentification was apparently made in the CGCG catalog, and spread from there to practically every other catalog. Presumably someone looked at the region and assumed that the two brighter galaxies must have been what Frost recorded, but his positions show that the two fainter galaxies must be what he actually recorded, and (per a suggestion by Corwin) Frost probably mistook the bright nucleus of the southwesternmost galaxy for a star. As a result of the relatively long-standing misidentification of IC 4486 and 4487, any earlier use of their IC designations is almost certainly wrong, and it would be safest to identify these objects by their PGC designations.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4486, which is almost always misidentified as IC 4487, also showing the actual IC 4487 and PGC 54281, which is almost always misidentified as IC 4486, and Frost's positions for IC 4486 and 4487
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4486, also showing IC 4487 and PGC 54281
(Frost's original positions are shown by boxes)
Below, the image above showing only the galaxies and their correct designations
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4486, which is almost always misidentified as IC 4487, also showing the actual IC 4487 and PGC 54281, which is almost always misidentified as IC 4486
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4486, which is almost always misidentified as IC 4487

IC 4487 (= PGC 1565670, and not =
PGC 52496)
A magnitude 16(?) lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 42 01.1, Dec +18 38 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4487 (= Frost #1131, 1860 RA 14 35 33, NPD 70 47) is "faint, extremely small, round, a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 42 02.3, Dec +18 37 01, about 1.2 arcmin south of the galaxy listed above, which is not as accurate as might be hoped, but there is nothing else nearby and the identification is relatively certain. Unfortunately, as discussed in the entry for IC 4486 (which see), the designation IC 4487 is almost always used to misidentify the galaxy that is actually IC 4486. As a result of the relatively long-standing misidentification of IC 4486 and 4487, any earlier use of their IC designations is almost certainly wrong, and it would be safest to identify these objects by their PGC designations.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.45 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 1565670, which is the correct IC 4487; also shown are IC 4486, which is almost always misidentified as IC 4487, and PGC 54281, which is almost always misidentified as IC 4486
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4487, also showing IC 4486 and PGC 54281
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 1565670, which is the correct IC 4487

PGC 54281 (not =
IC 4486)
Not an IC object but listed here because almost always misidentified as IC 4486
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by Royal Frost
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 41 40.7, Dec +18 33 27)
Historical Identification: See the entry for IC 4486 for a discussion of the long-standing misidentification of this galaxy as IC 4486.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 54281, which is almost always misidentified as IC 4486, also showing the correct IC 4486 and IC 4487
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 54281, showing the correct IC 4486 and 4487
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 54281, which is almost always misidentified as IC 4486

IC 4488 (= PGC 1564980)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 15.5 elliptical galaxy (type E3??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 42 52.6, Dec +18 37 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4488 (= Frost #1132, 1860 RA 14 36 21, NPD 70 48) is "very faint, extremely small, round, a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 42 50.2, Dec +18 36 07, about 1.2 arcmin south southwest of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else in the region, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 4489 (= PGC 1562198)
Discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 15.5 elliptical galaxy (type E3??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 43 16.0, Dec +18 31 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4489 (= Frost #1133, 1860 RA 14 36 45, NPD 70 53) is "very faint, considerably small, round, a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 43 14.3, Dec +18 31 10, just over half an arcmin southwest of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 4490
Recorded (February, 1897) by
Robert Innes
A pair of stars in Centaurus (RA 14 45 21.5, Dec -36 10 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4490 (= Innes (#5), 1860 RA 14 36 45, NPD 125 34.7) is an "oval, around 2 stars of magnitude 9.5 and 10". The position precesses to RA 14 45 22.8, Dec -36 10 24, right on a pair of stars of about the right brightness, but there is no hint of nebulosity, so the obejct is merely the pair of stars. Per Corwin, Innes describes the field perfectly, including the fact that the pair is in the same high-power field as the bright star to their northeast (SAO 205904 = HD 129732), so the identification is certain. There just isn't any nebulosity. Several common types of observing problems could have led to the illusion of nebulosity, but there is no way to know which one applies in this case, and knowing wouldn't change the result.
DSS image of region near the pair of stars listed as IC 4490
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4490

IC 4491 (perhaps =
IC 1055?)
Recorded (July, 1899) by DeLisle Stewart
Probably a lost or nonexistent object in Libra (RA 14 44 28.1, Dec -13 43 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4491 (= DeLisle Stewart #415, 1860 RA 14 36 49, NPD 103 08) is "faint, small, extremely extended 0░" (Stewart's original note adds "(I.C. 1055, J.318, 3m.0 to the east, same dec.)". The position precesses to RA 14 44 28.1, Dec -13 43 45 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there, hence the listing as lost or nonexistent. There is, however, a disputed identification with IC 1055 that depends upon the meaning of Stewart's note. Does it mean he actually observed IC 1055 three minutes of time to the east? or is he merely commenting that according to catalog data it is supposed to be in that position? If the latter, then per Corwin an exact digit error in position and a description reasonably fitting IC 1055 suggest that IC 4491 is probably a reobservation of IC 1055. But if Stewart actually observed IC 1055 on his plate, then (as per Thomson) the two cannot be the same. Various databases accept one view or the other, so sometimes IC 4491 is equated with IC 1055, and sometimes it is listed as nonexistent. Either way, IC 4491's entry only serves as a placeholder for historical discussion.
Physical Information: If a lost or nonexistent object, there is nothing to discuss. If a duplicate entry, see IC 1055 for anything else.
DSS image of region near Stewart's position for IC 4491
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Stewart's position for IC 4491

IC 4492 (= PGC 52536)
Discovered (Jul 10, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.0 elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 42 33.8, Dec +37 27 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4492 (= Javelle #1333, 1860 RA 14 36 59, NPD 51 59.5) is "faint, very small, round, nuclear, stellar". The position precesses to RA 14 42 36.4, Dec +37 24 39, about 2.5 arcmin south southeast of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby so the identification is considered reasonably certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 4493 (=
NGC 5747 = PGC 52638 + PGC 93126)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5747)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1898) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 4493)
A pair of galaxies in Bo÷tes
PGC 52638 = A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) at RA 14 44 20.8, Dec +12 07 55
PGC 93126 = A magnitude 14(?) spiral galaxy (type Sa??) at RA 14 44 20.7, Dec +12 07 43
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4493 (= Bigourdan #422, 1860 RA 14 37 38, NPD 77 17) is "extremely faint, small, round, diffuse, middle mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 14 44 21.7, Dec +12 07 18, less than half an arcmin south southeast of the pair of galaxies listed above, so the identification is certain. (The duplicate entry is due to an error in Herschel's position for NGC 5747, which led Bigourdan (and Dreyer) to presume that he had found a new object.)
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 5747 for anything else.

PGC 52644 (possibly = IC 4494?)
(Perhaps) discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 15(?) spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 44 25.5, Dec +15 33 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4494 (= Frost #1134, 1860 RA 14 37 55, NPD 73 53) is "very faint, very small, round, diffuse". The position precesses to RA 14 44 31.0, Dec +15 31 20, about an arcmin east of three galaxies running in a north-south line: PGC 52645, which is the brightest (and matches the shape specified for the object) but is well to the south of Frost's declination, PGC 52644, which is nearly as bright but is noticeably elongated, and PGC 1486907, which has the same declination as Frost's measurement, but is also elongated and by far the faintest of the three. Under the circumstances, the only hope for a positive identification would be to see if the Bruce Telescope plate examined by Frost still has any marks indicating what objects he recorded, and even if the plate exists any marks have probably been removed, so there is little hope of a certain identification of IC 4494. Given that uncertainty I have decided to create entries for each of the three galaxies mentioned. Corwin expresses a preference for PGC 52645, and most references have followed his lead, but he does so with caution, and other references have adopted PGC 52644; no one seems to have given PGC 1486907 any serious consideration, presumably because of its faintness.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.35 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near Frost's position for IC 4494, showing PGC 52644, PGc 52645 and PGC 1486907
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on Frost's position for IC 4494
Also shown are PGC 52644, PGC 52645 and PGC 1486907
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 52644
SDSS image of PGC 52644

PGC 52645 (possibly = IC 4494?)
Perhaps discovered (May 10, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 15(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 44 27.0, Dec +15 28 52)
Historical Identification: Generally but not universally felt to be the most likely candidate for IC 4494. See the above entry for a discussion of the considerable uncertainty in the identity.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 52645
Above, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 52645; see here for a wider view

PGC 1486907
Not an IC object but listed here since included in the discussion of
IC 4494
A magnitude 16(?) spiral galaxy (type S(r)a?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 44 25.1, Dec +15 31 28)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 1486907
Above, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 1486907; see here for a wider view

IC 4495 (= PGC 52634)
Discovered (Jul 28, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 44 14.5, Dec +23 33 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4495 (= Javelle #1334, 1860 RA 14 37 58, NPD 65 50.6) is "very faint, very small, round". The position precesses to RA 14 44 14.8, Dec +23 33 43, within the northern outline of the galaxy listed above, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 4496 (= PGC 52610)
Discovered (Jul 21, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 43 54.5, Dec +33 24 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4496 (= Javelle #1335, 1860 RA 14 38 09, NPD 56 00.7) is "faint, small, round, nuclear". The position precesses to RA 14 43 58.7, Dec +33 23 37, just over an arcmin southeast of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 4497 (= PGC 52636)
Discovered (Jul 22, 1895) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.1 elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 44 20.7, Dec +28 33 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4497 (= Javelle #1336, 1860 RA 14 38 17, NPD 60 51.2) is "faint, small, round, nuclear, mottled but not resolved, 12.5 magnitude star 5 seconds to east". The position precesses to RA 14 44 20.6, Dec +28 33 09, right on the galaxy listed above, and the star to its east, although not exactly the right magnitude and distance, makes the identification certain. (Thomson notes that Javelle made three measurements of this object, and in his third measurement accidentally reversed the offset from his comparison star; but the paper Dreyer read relied only on the first two measurements, so all modern catalogs are in agreement.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 4498 (= PGC 52667)
Discovered (Jun 22, 1895) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 45 00.8, Dec +26 18 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4498 (= Javelle #1337, 1860 RA 14 38 51, NPD 63 06.4) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 45 00.5, Dec +26 18 02, right on the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 4499 (= GCL 30)
Discovered (Jun 13, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 10.1 globular cluster (type XI) in Apus (RA 15 00 19.1, Dec -82 12 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4499 (= DeLisle Stewart #418, 1860 RA 14 38 58▒, NPD 171 39▒) is a "cluster, very faint, 4 arcmin diameter; 3 faint stars in nebulosity?". The position precesses to RA 15 01 00.7, Dec -82 13 31, within the outline of the cluster, which considering the rough estimate of position is better than expected, and the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 8.0 arcmin? About 55 thousand light years away?
DSS image of region near globular cluster IC 4499
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4499
Celestial Atlas
(IC 4400 - 4449) ←     IC Objects: IC 4450 - 4499     → (IC 4500 - 4549)