Celestial Atlas
(IC 4700 - 4749) ←     IC Objects: IC 4750 - 4799 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 4800 - 4849)
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4750, 4751, 4752, 4753, 4754, 4755, 4756, 4757, 4758, 4759, 4760, 4761, 4762, 4763, 4764, 4765, 4766,
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Page last updated Mar 24, 2014
WORKING: Add physical information

IC 4750 (= PGC 62308 = PGC 93532)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type SAB0/(rs)a?) in Pavo (RA 18 43 02.5, Dec -62 58 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4750 (= DeLisle Stewart #498, 1860 RA 18 29 49, NPD 153 05) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, round, 11th magnitude star 0.5 arcmin to northwest". The position precesses to RA 18 43 02.2, Dec -62 57 36, about 0.7 arcmin north of the galaxy listed above, there is nothing else nearby, and although perhaps involving a typographical error, the star 1.5 arcmin to the northwest makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4815 km/sec, IC 4750 is about 225 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.2 by 0.6 arcmin, it is about 80 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 4750
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4750
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 4750

IC 4751 (= PGC 62317)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.1 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0?) in Pavo (RA 18 43 19.2, Dec -62 06 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4751 (= DeLisle Stewart #501, 1860 RA 18 30 11, NPD 152 14) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 18 43 11.2, Dec -62 06 33, just under an arcmin west of the galaxy listed above, and between that and the reasonable consistency of Stewart's measurements for this and the galaxy just to its east (IC 4753), the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.25 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 4751 and elliptical galaxy IC 4753
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered between IC 4751 and 4753
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of IC 4751
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 4751

IC 4752 (= PGC 62323)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Pavo (RA 18 43 46.7, Dec -64 04 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4752 (= DeLisle Stewart #502, 1860 RA 18 30 14, NPD 154 13) is "extremely faint, very small, round, very faint star 1 arcmin southeast". The position precesses to RA 18 43 45.5, Dec -64 05 29, only half an arcmin south of the galaxy listed above, and the star just under an arcmin southeast of the galaxy makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4752
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4752
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4752

IC 4753 (= PGC 62319)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.5 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Pavo (RA 18 43 32.5, Dec -62 06 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4753 (= DeLisle Stewart #503, 1860 RA 18 30 29, NPD 152 14) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 18 43 29.1, Dec -62 06 29, just off the western rim of the galaxy listed above, and between that and the reasonable consistency of Stewart's measurements for this and the galaxy just to its west (IC 4751), the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.75 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 4751 and elliptical galaxy IC 4753
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered between IC 4751 and 4753
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of IC 4753
DSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 4753

IC 4754 (= PGC 62331)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(r)b?) in Pavo (RA 18 44 00.2, Dec -61 59 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4754 (= DeLisle Stewart #504, 1860 RA 18 30 53, NPD 152 07) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, stellar nucleus, perhaps ring". The position precesses to RA 18 43 51.3, Dec -61 59 24, just off the western rim of the galaxy listed above, and the description fits, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.3 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4754
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4754
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4754

IC 4755 (= PGC 62349)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Pavo (RA 18 45 01.1, Dec -63 41 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4755 (= DeLisle Stewart #505, 1860 RA 18 31 34, NPD 153 49) is "very faint, very small, extremely extended 90, stellar nucleus". The position precesses to RA 18 44 58.5, Dec -63 41 13, just barely above the northern rim of the galaxy listed above and the description fits, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.35 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4755
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4755
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4755

IC 4756 (= OCL 94)
Recorded (1859) by
Thomas Webb
Discovered (1896) by Solon Bailey
A magnitude 4.6 open cluster (type III2m) in Serpens (RA 18 38 54.0, Dec +05 26 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4756 (= Bailey, 1860 RA 18 32 02, NPD 84 40) is a "cluster, compressed". The position precesses to RA 18 38 54.9, Dec +05 27 13, close to the center of the relatively large cluster, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Note: In his very popular "Celestial Ojects for Common Telescopes" (originally published in 1859, and reprinted many times over the years) Webb stated "Very large subdivided group, chiefly 9 and 10 mgs. (1880 RA)18h 32m, (Dec)+5 5'." This corresonds to J2000 RA 18 37 55, Dec +05 11 05, on the southwestern outskirts of IC 4756, and the description fits, so it appears that Webb observed the cluster at some time prior to 1859, but his book was intended for the general public, not serious astronomers, so Dreyer would not have had any reason to suspect that it contained any new discoveries, and Bailey's much later paper was the first notice he took of the cluster.
Physical Information: Apparent size 40 arcmin?
DSS image of region near open cluster IC 4756
Above, a 45 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4756

IC 4757 (= PGC 62327)
Discovered (Sep 14, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Pavo (RA 18 43 55.7, Dec -57 10 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4757 (= DeLisle Stewart #506, 1860 RA 18 32 05, NPD 147 18) is "extremely faint, extremely small, considerably extended 50". The position precesses to RA 18 44 02.0, Dec -57 10 16, only 0.9 arcmin east southeast of the galaxy listed above, and the description fits, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.45 by 0.55 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4757
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4757
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4757

IC 4758 (= PGC 62381)
Discovered (Aug 27, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SABc?) in Pavo (RA 18 46 18.2, Dec -65 45 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4758 (= DeLisle Stewart #509, 1860 18 32 23, NPD 155 53) is "very faint, small, round". The position precesses to RA 18 46 23.8, Dec -65 45 00, less than 0.7 arcmin northeast of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.15 by 0.8 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4758
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4758
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4758

IC 4759 (= PGC 62366 + (PGC 62367 = PGC 335967))
Discovered (Jul 20, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A pair of interacting galaxies in Pavo
PGC 62366 = A magnitude 16(?) peculiar galaxy (type S? pec) at RA 18 45 40.6, Dec -63 05 06
PGC 62367 = A magnitude 15(?) peculiar galaxy (type S? pec) at RA 18 45 41.3, Dec -63 05 13
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4759 (= DeLisle Stewart #507, 1860 RA 18 32 25, NPD 153 13) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round". The position precesses to RA 18 45 39.6, Dec -63 05 04, within the northwestern outline of the galaxy pair listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: The northwestern member of the pair (PGC 62366) has a recessional velocity of 4980 km/sec, while the southeastern member (PGC 62367) has a recessional velocity of 4920 km/sec. Since they are obviously interacting, their average recessional velocity (4950 km/sec) is the best indicator of their distance (no other distance estimates being available at this time). Based on that, IC 4759 is about 230 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.05 by 0.35 arcmin, PGC 62366 and its tail are about 70 thousand light years across, PGC 62367's overall apparent size of 1.2 by 0.35 arcmin corresponds to about 80 thousand light years, and the entire system's apparent size of 1.4 by 0.7 arcmin corresponds to about 95 thousand light years.
DSS image of region near interacting galaxies PGC 62366 and PGC 62367, which comprise IC 4759
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4759
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the pair of galaxies
DSS image of interacting galaxies PGC 62366 and PGC 62367, which comprise IC 4759

IC 4760 (= PGC 62369)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type SA0(r)?) in Pavo (RA 18 45 45.9, Dec -62 57 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4760 (= DeLisle Stewart #508, 1860 RA 18 32 31, NPD 153 05) is "extremely faint, very small, round, faint star 1 arcmin northwest". The position precesses to RA 18 45 43.4, Dec -62 57 03, just off the northwestern rim of the galaxy listed above, and the star 0.8 arcmin to its northwest makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.75 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 4760
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4760
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 4760

IC 4761 (= PGC 62326)
Discovered (Aug 13, 1903) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(r)bc?) in Telescopium (RA 18 43 55.5, Dec -52 51 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4761 (= Frost #1155, 1860 RA 18 32 41, NPD 142 59) is "very faint, brighter middle, doubtful". The position precesses to RA 18 43 55.4, Dec -52 51 13, practically dead center on the galaxy listed above, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.25 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4761
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4761
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4761

IC 4762
Recorded (Aug 15, 1892) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A pair of stars in Draco (RA 18 32 28.7, Dec +67 51 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4762 (= Bigourdan #332, 1860 RA 18 32 53, NPD 22 16) is "very faint, extremely small, cluster or a star with nebulosity". The position precesses to RA 18 32 29.8, Dec +67 50 39, about 0.8 arcmin south of the pair of stars listed above. As it happens, Bigourdan's 1897 Comptes Rendus paper involved a small error in reducing the original observations for his #332 from the equinox of 1900 to that of 1860, and Dreyer used those (incorrect) values in the IC2 entry. But as noted by Corwin, precessing the original observations (as shown in Bigourdan's "big list") yields a position that falls right on the western member of the pair of stars, making the identification certain.
DSS image of region near the pair of stars listed as IC 4762
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4762
(The magnitude 6.7 star at the bottom was Bigourdan's comparison star for this entry)

IC 4763 (=
NGC 6679 = PGC 62026)
Discovered (Oct 25, 1885) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6679)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1891) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 4763)
A magnitude 13.5(?) compact galaxy (type C?) in Draco (RA 18 33 30.4, Dec +67 08 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4763 (= Bigourdan #333, 1860 RA 18 33 36, NPD 22 59) is "very faint, perhaps nebulous star; (NGC) 6677 near". The position precesses to RA 18 33 28.7, Dec +67 07 49, less than half an arcmin southwest of the galaxy listed above, and the reference to the nearby galaxy makes the identity certain. At the time of Bigourdan's observation, NGC 6679 was thought to be several arcmin to the north, so there was no way for Bigourdan or Dreyer to realize that this was that object; hence the duplicate listing.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate listing, see NGC 6679 for anything else.

IC 4764 (= PGC 62396)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Pavo (RA 18 47 07.8, Dec -63 29 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4764 (= DeLisle Stewart #510, 1860 RA 18 33 41, NPD 153 37) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 18 47 01.6, Dec -63 28 48, only 0.7 arcmin west of the center of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.25 by 0.35 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4764, also showing IC 4767
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4764, also showing IC 4767
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4764

IC 4765 (= PGC 62407)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 11.2 elliptical galaxy (type E5?) in Pavo (RA 18 47 18.1, Dec -63 19 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4765 (= DeLisle Stewart #511, 1860 RA 18 33 54, NPD 153 28) is "very faint, small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 18 47 12.1, Dec -63 19 46, on the western rim of the nucleus of the galaxy listed above, and well within its extended outline, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.6 by 2.1 arcmin.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 4765, also showing IC 4766, IC 4767 and IC 4770
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4765, also showing IC 4766, 4767 and 4770
Below, a 5 arcmin wide view of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
(Also shown are IC 4766 and some of IC 4765's nearer companions)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of elliptical galaxy IC 4765, also showing IC 4766 and some of its nearer companions
Below, an 18 by 24 arcmin wide DSS image of the region near IC 4765
Also shown are IC 4764, 4766, 4767, 4769, 4770 and 4771
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 4765, also showing IC 4764, IC 4766, IC 4767, IC 4769, IC 4770 and IC 4771

IC 4766 (= PGC 62421)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0(r)a?) in Pavo (RA 18 47 35.6, Dec -63 17 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4766 (= DeLisle Stewart #512, 1860 RA 18 34 12, NPD 153 25) is "extremely faint, extremely small, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 18 47 29.2, Dec -63 16 42, just over an arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above, and save for galaxies accounted for by Stewart's other observations, there is nothing else nearby that he could have detected, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.45 by 0.45 arcmin.
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of lenticular galaxy IC 4766
Above, a 1.8 arcmin wide image of IC 4766 (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
(For wider views of the region, see IC 4765)

IC 4767 (= PGC 62427)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec) in Pavo (RA 18 47 41.8, Dec -63 24 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4767 (= DeLisle Stewart #513, 1860 RA 18 34 17, NPD 153 33) is "extremely faint, extremely small, much extended 25, considerably brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 18 47 36.3, Dec -63 24 41, less than 0.7 arcmin southwest of the center of the galaxy listed above, the description fits, there is nothing else nearby, and the relative consistency of Stewart's (small) positional error for this and IC 4764 makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 0.5 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 4767, also showing IC 4764, IC 4765 and IC 4770
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4767, also showing IC 4764, 4765 and 4770
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 4767

IC 4768
Discovered (Jun 26, 1895) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A pair of apparent stellar groupings in Scutum
The southwestern region (I) is centered near RA 18 41 04, Dec -05 40.4 (Corwin) or -05 38.4 (Seligman)
The northeastern region (II) is centered near RA 18 41 47, Dec -05 24.3 (Corwin & Seligman)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4768 (= Bigourdan #334, 1860 RA 18 34 22, NPD 95 39) is a "cluster, double, stars scattered". [Bigourdan's original description is (translated and paraphrased): "A pair of clusters (designated I and II). (I) occupies a rectangle 30 arcmin in declination by 15 arcmin in right ascension, formed of scattered stars, with 6 or 7 stars of magnitude 10, several of magnitudes 11 and 12, but most are fainter or much fainter. (II) lies 30 seconds of time east and 10 arcmin north of (I), and is a rounded cluster about 8 arcmin diameter, containing 4 or 5 stars of magnitude 9.5 to 10 and numerous fainter stars, though not as numerous as those in (I). The mean position of the pair is (1900) RA 18 36 25, Dec -05 37."] Bigourdan's position precesses to (1860) RA 18 34 17, NPD 95 39, but he reported the position in Comptes Rendus as RA 18 34 22, NPD 95 39, which is what Dreyer recorded. I have used Bigourdan's original position in precessing to J2000 RA 18 41 45, Dec -05 31 27, which is close to the right ascension listed above for the northeastern cluster (II), and halfway between my declination estimates for (I) and (II), so the identification seems as certain as the star-filled field can allow. Corwin's positions are separated by 43 seconds of time and 16 arcmin; for (I) I have used the center of the brightest blob, so the declinations differ by only 14 arcmin.
Physical Information: Based on Bigourdan's description, the apparent size of (I) is about 30 by 15 arcmin; of (II), about 8 arcmin. Based on (Croatian?) visual observers' reports, this is not an easy object, with the brighter parts of the clusters barely standing out against the background of the Milky Way, and the fainter parts of (I) completely disappearing into that background. One observer appears to have seen only (II), estimating that it is perhaps 5 by 10 arcmin across, with half a dozen or so brighter stars and a few dozen stars overall; the other appears to have observed the entire structure, with (II) standing out as a faint blob, but (I) looking more just a part of the Milky Way, standing out mostly because of its contrast with the dark absorption region to its south. In fact, odds are that none of the stellar blobs are acually physical clusters, but merely regions that appear separated from other parts of the Milky Way by varying amounts of absorption clouds lying between us and them.
DSS image of region centered on open cluster IC 4768(II)
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4768(II)
Below, a 20 by 40 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4768(I)
DSS image of region centered on open cluster IC 4768(I)
Below, a 28 by 44 arcmin DSS image indicating the positions of the images of IC 4768 shown above
(The elliptical areas represent my best guess as to what Bigourdan was describing)
DSS image of region centered on the pair of open clusters listed as IC 4768

IC 4769 (= PGC 62428)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc?) in Pavo (RA 18 47 44.0, Dec -63 09 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4769 (= DeLisle Stewart #514, 1860 RA 18 34 24, NPD 153 17) is "extremely faint, very small, much extended 170, considerably brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 18 47 39.0, Dec -63 08 40, on the northwestern outline of the galaxy listed above, and the description fits, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4535 km/sec, IC 4769 is about 210 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 165 to 210 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.9 by 1.2 arcmin, it is about 115 thousand light years across. Because of its bright nucleus, it is listed as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4769, also showing IC 4771
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4769, also showing IC 4771
Below, a 2.1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4769
Below, an image of the same region showing detail in the core (Image Credit: Gain Lee, Faulkes Telescope Project)
Faulkes Telescope Project image of spiral galaxy IC 4769

IC 4770 (= PGC 62439)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(rs)a?) in Pavo (RA 18 48 10.3, Dec -63 23 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4770(= DeLisle Stewart #515, 1860 RA 18 34 47, NPD 153 31) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 18 48 05.6, Dec -63 22 35, only 0.7 arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.55 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4770, also showing IC 4765, IC 4766 and IC 4767
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4770, also showing IC 4765, 4766 and 4767
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4770

IC 4771 (= PGC 62445)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)bc?) in Pavo (RA 18 48 23.9, Dec -63 14 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4771 (= DeLisle Stewart #516, 1860 RA 18 35 00, NPD 153 23) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 18 48 16.4, Dec -63 14 33, only 0.9 arcmin west of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby that Stewart could have observed, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4771, also showing IC 4766 and IC 4769
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4771, also showing IC 4766 and 4769
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4771

IC 4772 (= PGC 62217)
Discovered (Sep 7, 1898) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Lyra (RA 18 39 56.5, Dc +40 01 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4772 (= Howe list II (#12), 1860 RA 18 35 22, NPD 50 06.0) is "extremely faint, extremely small; (NGC) 6685 two seconds of time east, 2.7 arcmin south". The position precesses to RA 18 39 57.6, Dec +40 01 39, right on the galaxy listed above, and even if the position weren't so accurate, the reference to NGC 6685 would make the identification certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.75 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy galaxy IC 4772, also showing NGC 6685
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4772, also showing NGC 6685
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy galaxy IC 4772

IC 4773 (= PGC 62498)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SAB(r)dm?) in Pavo (RA 18 51 21.4, Dec -69 55 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4773 (= DeLisle Stewart #519, 1860 RA 18 35 44, NPD 160 04) is "extremely faint, difficult". The position precesses to RA 18 51 18.9, Dec -69 55 10, on the northern rim of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.9 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4773
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4773
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4773

IC 4774 (= PGC 62438)
Discovered (Sep 16, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)bc?) in Pavo (RA 18 48 10.5, Dec -57 56 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4774 (= DeLisle Stewart #517, 1860 RA 18 36 08, NPD 148 04) is "extremely faint, small, irregular figure, much brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 18 48 12.6, Dec -57 55 26, only 0.7 arcmin north of the galaxy listed above, the description fits, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4774
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4774
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4774

IC 4775 (= PGC 62447)
Discovered (Sep 16, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Pavo (RA 18 48 26.3, Dec -57 11 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4775 (= DeLisle Stewart #518, 1860 RA 18 36 35, NPD 147 19) is "extremely faint, extremely small, much extended 15, suspected". The position precesses to RA 18 48 31.1, Dec -57 10 22, less than an arcmin northeast of the galaxy listed above (and not far from its northeastern rim), the description fits, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.3 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4775
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4775
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4775

IC 4776
Discovered (1896) by
Williamina Fleming
A magnitude 10.8 planetary nebula in Sagittarius (RA 18 45 50.8, Dec -33 20 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4776 (= Fleming #77, 1860 RA 18 36 40, NPD 123 29) is a "planetary, stellar". The position precesses to RA 18 45 51.7, Dec -33 20 37, on the eastern outline of the planetary nebula listed above, and there is nothing similar nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 18 by 10 arcsec.
DSS image of region near planetary nebula IC 4776
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4776
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the planetary nebula
DSS image of planetary nebula IC 4776
Below, another view of the region above (Image Credits Corradi et al; post-processing by Courtney Seligman)
Corradi et al image of planetary nebula IC 4776

IC 4777 (= PGC 62440)
Discovered (Aug 13, 1903) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(rs)a pec?) in Telescopium (RA 18 48 11.2, Dec -53 08 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4777 (= Frost #1156, 1860 RA 18 36 52, NPD 143 17) is "very faint, planetary, a little extended". The position precesses to RA 18 48 08.2, Dec -53 08 23, only 0.6 arcmin northwest of the center of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.75 by 0.7 arcmin. Listed as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy2).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4777
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4777
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4777
Below, a 0.44 by 0.30 arcmin wide image of the galaxy's bright center (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
'Raw' HST image of central region of spiral galaxy IC 4777

IC 4778 (= PGC 62472)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type (R')S0/a?) in Pavo (RA 18 50 00.4, Dec -61 43 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4778 (= DeLisle Stewart #520, 1860 RA 18 37 07, NPD 151 51) is "considerably faint, very small, considerably extended 35". The position precesses to RA 18 49 59.6, Dec -61 42 10, just under an arcmin north of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.05 by 0.85 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 4778
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4778
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 4778

IC 4779 (= PGC 62480)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)ab?) in Pavo (RA 18 50 30.4, Dec -63 00 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4779 (= DeLisle Stewart #521, 1860 18 37 19, NPD 153 09) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, extremely faint star 0.3 arcmin to west". The position precesses to RA 18 50 31.0, Dec -63 00 05, just north of the northern outline of the galaxy listed above, and the star on its western rim makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4779
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4779
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4779

IC 4780 (= PGC 62470)
Discovered (Sep 16, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pavo (RA 18 49 56.3, Dec -59 15 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4780 (= DeLisle Stewart #522, 1860 RA 18 37 40, NPD 149 23) is "extremely faint, very small, a little extended 120". The position precesses to RA 18 49 59.8, Dec -59 14 07, just over an arcmin north northeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.75 by 0.45 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4780
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4780
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4780

IC 4781 (= PGC 62505)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0(r)a?) in Pavo (RA 18 51 37.7, Dec -62 47 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4781 (= DeLisle Stewart #523, 1860 RA 18 38 32, NPD 152 56) is "3 most extremely faint stars in nebulosity". The position precesses to RA 18 51 40.2, Dec -62 46 51, less than an arcmin north northeast of the galaxy listed above. Presuming the nucleus of the galaxy represents one of the three "stars" the description fits, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 4781
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4781
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 4781

IC 4782 (= PGC 62495)
Discovered (Sep 16, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Telescopium (RA 18 50 54.5, Dec -55 29 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4782 (= DeLisle Stewart #524, 1860 RA 18 39 16, NPD 145 38) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, suspected". The position precesses to RA 18 50 53.9, Dec -55 28 51, only 0.6 arcmin north of the galaxy listed above. The Bruce plate should have shown only the very small nucleus of such a low surface brightness galaxy, and probably didn't record its even fainter neighbor at all, so the description fits and the identification is essentially certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.25 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4782
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4782
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4782

IC 4783 (= PGC 62502)
Discovered (Sep 16, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pavo (RA 18 51 33.4, Dec -58 48 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4783 (= DeLisle Stewart #525, 1860 RA 18 39 18, NPD 148 57) is "extremely faint, very small". The position precesses to RA 18 51 32.1, Dec -58 47 47, only an arcmin north of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4783
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4783
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4783

IC 4784 (= PGC 62527)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pavo (RA 18 52 48.0, Dec -63 15 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4784 (= DeLisle Stewart #526, 1860 RA 18 39 36, NPD 153 34) is "considerably faint, small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 18 52 53.8, Dec -63 24 37, but there is nothing there. Per Corwin, Stewart made a 10 arcmin error in his declination (presumably a transcription error that put it too far south), and as a result the IC2 had the same error. Precessing a corrected version of Stewart's original position yields a position of RA 18 52 51.4, Dec -63 15 02, barely outside the northeastern outline of the galaxy listed above, so given the fact that even today single-digit errors are all too common, the identification is essentially certain. (Corwin suggests that Stewart might also have been able to detect the galaxy to the southeast of IC 4784, but the star on its northeastern rim probably made it hard for him to notice its nebular nature.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.75 by 1.4 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 4784
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4784
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 4784

IC 4785 (= PGC 62528)
Discovered (Sep 16, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(rs)b?) in Pavo (RA 18 52 55.2, Dec -59 15 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4785 (= DeLisle Stewart #527, 1860 RA 18 40 40, NPD 149 24) is "extremely faint, very small, irregular figure, stellar nucleus". The position precesses to RA 18 52 59.1, Dec -59 14 31, just off the northeastern rim of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.4 by 1.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4785
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4785
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4785

IC 4786 (= PGC 62526)
Discovered (Sep 16, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.1 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Telescopium (RA 18 52 44.5, Dec -56 41 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4786 (= DeLisle Stewart #528, 1860 RA 18 40 55, NPD 146 51) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, much extended 0". The position precesses to RA 18 52 45.0, Dec -56 41 30, right on the northeastern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits, and although there is another galaxy not far to the north, it is too faint for Stewart to have observed, and does not fit the description; so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.75 by 0.2 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4786
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4786
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4786

IC 4787 (= PGC 62579)
Discovered (September 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)m?) in Pavo (RA 18 56 03.9, Dec -68 40 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4787 (= DeLisle Stewart #530, 1860 RA 18 41 05, NPD 158 51) is "extremely faint, diffuse". The position precesses to RA 18 56 06.1, Dec -68 41 09, right on the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.0 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4787
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4787
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4787

IC 4788 (= PGC 62555)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.3 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pavo (RA 18 54 40.9, Dec -63 27 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4788 (= DeLisle Stewart #529, 1860 RA 18 41 23, NPD 153 36) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, extremely extended 35". The position precesses to RA 18 54 40.7, Dec -63 26 16, less than an arcmin north of the galaxy listed above, the description fits, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.2 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4788
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4788
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4788

IC 4789 (= PGC 62582)
Discovered (Aug 27, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)c?) in Pavo (RA 18 56 18.6, Dec -68 34 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4789 (= DeLisle Stewart #531, 1860 RA 18 41 24, NPD 158 44) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round". The position precesses to RA 18 56 22.1, Dec -68 34 06, on the eastern rim of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.65 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4789
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4789
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4789

IC 4790 (= PGC 62590)
Discovered (September 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(rs)bc?) in Pavo (RA 18 56 31.8, Dec -64 55 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4790 (= DeLisle Stewart #532, 1860 RA 18 42 52, NPD 155 06) is "considerably bright, small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 18 56 34.4, Dec -64 55 56, on the southeastern rim of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.8 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4790
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4790
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4790

IC 4791 (= PGC 1588608)
Discovered (Apr 1, 1899) by
Sherburne Burnham
A magnitude 14.8 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Hercules (RA 18 49 01.2, Dec +19 19 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4791 (= Burnham, 1860 RA 18 42 55, NPD 70 49.5) is a "nebula; 6th magnitude star 2 arcmin to east". The position precesses to RA 18 49 01.3, Dec +19 19 49, right on the galaxy listed above, and though (as noted by Corwin) Dreyer incorrectly placed the comparison star to the east, Burnham's paper states that the nebula is to the east, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 4791
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 4791
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 4791

IC 4792 (= PGC 62573)
Discovered (Sep 16, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Telescopium (RA 18 55 41.9, Dec -56 24 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4792 (= DeLisle Stewart #533, 1860 RA 18 43 56, NPD 146 35) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, much extended 160, between 2 stars, suspected". The position precesses to RA 18 55 42.3, Dec -56 24 55, only 0.7 arcmin south of the galaxy listed above, the description fits, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.95 by 0.35 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4792
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4792 (with glare from magnitude 6.8 HD 174851)
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4792

IC 4793 (= PGC 62599)
Discovered (Aug 13, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pavo (RA 18 56 55.6, Dec -61 23 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4793 (= DeLisle Stewart #534, 1860 RA 18 44 09, NPD 151 33) is "extremely faint, very small, considerably extended 130". The position precesses to RA 18 56 55.1, Dec -61 22 46, about 1.2 arcmin north of the galaxy listed above, but the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.5 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4793
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4793
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4793

IC 4794 (= PGC 62605)
Discovered (Aug 13, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Pavo (RA 18 57 09.6, Dec -62 05 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4794 (= DeLisle Stewart #535, 1860 RA 18 44 12, NPD 152 15) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 18 57 08.0, Dec -62 04 45, only 0.7 arcmin north northwest of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 4794
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4794
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 4794

IC 4795 (= PGC 62608)
Discovered (Aug 13, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pavo (RA 18 57 16.3, Dec -61 36 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4795 (= DeLisle Stewart #536, 1860 RA 18 44 26, NPD 151 46) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, extremely extended 40". The position precesses to RA 18 57 15.0, Dec -61 35 42, only 0.9 arcmin north of the galaxy listed above, the description fits, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.15 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4795
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4795
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4795

IC 4796 (= PGC 62588)
Discovered (Aug 13, 1903) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 12.3 lenticular galaxy (type SB0(s)a?) in Telescopium (RA 18 56 27.8, Dec -54 12 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4796 (= Frost #1157, 1860 RA 18 44 56, NPD 144 23) is "14th magnitude, brighter middle, near edge of plate". The position precesses to RA 18 56 20.3, Dec -54 12 45, less than half an arcmin west of the outline of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby that isn't otherwise accounted for, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.9 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 4796, also showing IC 4797
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4796, also showing IC 4797
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 4796

IC 4797 (= PGC 62589)
Discovered (Aug 13, 1903) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 11.3 elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Telescopium (RA 18 56 29.6, Dec -54 18 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4797 (= Frost #1158, 1860 RA 18 45 02, NPD 144 28) is "14th magnitude, brighter middle, near edge of plate". The position precesses to RA 18 56 27.1, Dec -54 17 44, right on the northern part of the galaxy listed above, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8 by 1.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 4797, also showing IC 4796
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4797, also showing IC 4796
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of elliptical galaxy IC 4797

IC 4798 (= PGC 62630)
Discovered (Aug 13, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.2 lenticular galaxy (type SA0(s)a? pec) in Pavo (RA 18 58 20.8, Dec -62 07 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4798 (= DeLisle Stewart #537, 1860 RA 18 45 24, NPD 152 17) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 18 58 20.1, Dec -62 06 30, on the northern rim of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.75 by 1.1 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 4798
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4798
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 4798

IC 4799 (= PGC 62643)
Discovered (Aug 13, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)ab?) in Pavo (RA 18 58 56.4, Dec -63 55 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4799 (= DeLisle Stewart #539, 1860 RA 18 45 28, NPD 154 06) is "very faint, small, round, stellar nucleus, ring, 2 wisps". The position precesses to RA 18 58 52.2, Dec -63 55 27, on the northwestern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.55 by 1.05 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4799
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4799
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4799
Celestial Atlas
(IC 4700 - 4749) ←     IC Objects: IC 4750 - 4799     → (IC 4800 - 4849)