Celestial Atlas
(IC 4800 - 4849) ←     IC Objects: IC 4850 - 4899 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 4900 - 4949)
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4850, 4851, 4852, 4853, 4854, 4855, 4856, 4857, 4858, 4859, 4860, 4861, 4862, 4863, 4864, 4865, 4866,
4867, 4868, 4869, 4870, 4871, 4872, 4873, 4874, 4875, 4876, 4877, 4878, 4879, 4880, 4881, 4882, 4883,
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Page last updated Apr 13, 2014
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IC 4850, Nova Aquilae 1899
Recorded (1901) by
Williamina Fleming
A nova remnant in Aquila (RA 19 20 24.07, Dec -00 08 01.2)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4850 (= Fleming #82, 1860 RA 19 13 15, NPD 90 23) is "planetary, stellar". The position precesses to RA 19 20 26.1, Dec -00 07 37, only 0.6 arcmin northeast of the position (per Corwin) shown above, so if this were a permanent feature such as a planetary nebula, the identification would be obvious and certain. However, being the remnant of Nova Aquilae 1899 (as was known at the time of Fleming's observation) there is nothing obvious about which very faint star is the nova remnant. If Corwin's position is accurate, the remnant is the fainter western member of the double star shown below; but he states that he would feel more comfortable about the identification if he could find more accurate historical (and presumably, modern) positions.
Discovery Note: The (only known?) historical position for the nova (other than Fleming's) was published by Pickering (in Astrophysical Journal 13 (1901), pp. 173-176). That position (1900 RA 19 15.3, Dec -00 19) precesses to RA 19 20 25.9, Dec -00 07 52, which differs from Fleming's position by only a quarter arcmin, and since the precision of Pickering's paper allows a round-off error of up to half an arcmin, the two positions can be considered essentially identical.
Physical Information: The nova was not visible on plates taken on or prior to Nov 1, 1898. It was first noticed in early 1899 (whence its name), reaching a maximum magnitude of 5.5 before fading to 7th magnitude on a plate taken Apr 21, 1899, and to 10th magnitude by Oct 27 of that year. In July 1900 it was 12th magnitude, and was undoubtedly fainter than 13th magnitude when Fleming recorded emission lines from it characteristic of a planetary nebula (per Pickering, when it was brighter additional emission lines were observed that are not always seen in more ordinary nebulae). Presuming that the fainter western member of the double star shown in the images below is the correct object, it is now about 17th magnitude.
DSS image of region near Nova Aquilae 1899, also known as IC 4850
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the remnant of Nova Aquilae 1899
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Corwin's position (the western member of the double star)
DSS image of region near Nova Aquilae 1899, also known as IC 4850

IC 4851 (= PGC 63189)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SAB(r)ab?) in Pavo (RA 19 25 29.3, Dec -57 40 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4851 (= DeLisle Stewart #586, 1860 RA 19 13 42, NPD 147 55) is "considerably faint, very small, extremely extended 15, very much brighter middle, suspected". The position precesses to RA 19 25 31.5, Dec -57 39 05, just over an arcmin north of the nucleus of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.65 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4851
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4851
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4851

IC 4852 (= PGC 63204)
Discovered (Aug 13, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(s)bc pec) in Pavo (RA 19 26 25.3, Dec -60 20 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4852 (= DeLisle Stewart #587, 1860 RA 19 14 03, NPD 150 36) is "considerably faint, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 19 26 23.5, Dec -60 19 58, on the western rim of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.3 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4852
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4852
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4852

IC 4853 (= PGC 63304)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pavo (RA 19 30 47.2, Dec -71 04 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4853 (= DeLisle Stewart #591, 1860 RA 19 15 10, NPD 161 21) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, a little extended 170". The position precesses to RA 19 30 54.6, Dec -71 04 25, about 0.6 arcmin west northwest of the galaxy listed aabove, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.25 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4853
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4853
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4853

IC 4854 (=
IC 4855 = PGC 63223)
Discovered (August 1901) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 4854)
Recorded (Sep 17, 1901) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 4855)
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(rs)bc?) in Pavo (RA 19 27 21.1, Dec -59 18 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4854 (= DeLisle Stewart #588, 1860 RA 19 15 14, NPD 149 34) is "very faint, considerably small, round". The position precesses to RA 19 27 21.4, Dec -59 17 45, about 1.2 arcmin north of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain. (See IC 4855 for a discussion of the duplicate listing.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.3 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4854
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4854
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4854

IC 4855 (=
IC 4854 = PGC 63223)
Discovered (August 1901) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 4854)
Recorded (Sep 17, 1901) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 4855)
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(rs)bc?) in Pavo (RA 19 27 21.1, Dec -59 18 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4855 (= DeLisle Stewart #589, 1860 RA 19 15 20, NPD 149 34) is "extremely faint, very small, round, suspected". The position precesses to RA 19 27 27.3, Dec -59 17 44, about 1.4 arcmin northeast of the galaxy also listed as IC 4854, and there is nothing else in the region, so there is no doubt that the two entries represent the same object. (Presumably Stewart did not notice the similar position and description for the two listings, and Dreyer supposed that if Stewart listed two objects there were two nebulae in the region, and gave each an IC entry.)
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see IC 4854 for anything else.

IC 4856 (= PGC 63226)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.7 irregular galaxy (type IB(s)m pec?) in Telescopium (RA 19 27 30.8, Dec -54 54 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4856 (= DeLisle Stewart #590, 1860 RA 19 16 09, NPD 145 10) is "extremely faint, extremely small, double nebula, suspected". The position precesses to RA 19 27 30.0, Dec -54 53 39, less than 0.9 arcmin north of the galaxy listed above, the description fits the irregular shape and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 4856, also showing NGC 6788
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4856, also showing NGC 6788
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of irregular galaxy IC 4856

IC 4857 (=
IC 4858 = PGC 63256)
Discovered (August 1901) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 4857)
Recorded (Sep 17, 1901) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 4858)
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)cd pec?) in Pavo (RA 19 28 39.1, Dec -58 46 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4857 (= DeLisle Stewart #592, 1860 RA 19 16 33, NPD 149 02) is "very faint, considerably short, round". The position precesses to RA 19 28 33.5, Dec -58 45 31, just under an arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain. (See IC 4858 for a discussion of the duplicate listing.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.1 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4857
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4857
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4857

IC 4858 (=
IC 4857 = PGC 63256)
Discovered (August 1901) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 4857)
Recorded (Sep 17, 1901) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 4858)
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)cd pec?) in Pavo (RA 19 28 39.1, Dec -58 46 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4858 (= DeLisle Stewart #593, 1860 RA 19 16 39, NPD 149 01) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, probably spiral; suspected". The position precesses to RA 19 28 39.3, Dec -58 44 30, about 1.5 arcmin north of the galaxy also listed as IC 4857, the description fits and there is nothing else in the region, so there is no doubt that the two entries represent the same object. (Presumably Stewart did not notice the similar position for the two listings, and Dreyer supposed that if Stewart listed two objects there were two nebulae in the region, and gave each an IC entry.)
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see IC 4857 for anything else.

IC 4859 (= PGC 63302)
Discovered (September 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)ab pec?) in Pavo (RA 19 30 46.7, Dec -66 18 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4859 (= DeLisle Stewart #595, 1860 RA 19 16 55, NPD 156 36) is "extremely faint, small, considerably brighter middle, almost stellar nucleus". The position precesses to RA 19 30 46.4, Dec -66 19 16, just south of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.15 by 0.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4859
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4859
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4859

IC 4860 (= PGC 63326)
Discovered (September 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)c pec?) in Pavo (RA 19 31 27.4, Dec -67 22 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4860 (= DeLisle Stewart #596, 1860 RA 19 17 14, NPD 157 39) is "extremely faint, small, round". The position precesses to RA 19 31 26.0, Dec -67 22 10, on the western rim of the galaxy listed above, and the only nearby galaxy corresponds to another of Stewart's observations, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.75 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4860, also showing IC 4862
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4860, also showing IC 4862
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4860

IC 4861 (= PGC 63274)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pavo (RA 19 29 16.5, Dec -57 34 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4861 (= DeLisle Stewart #594, 1860 RA 19 17 25, NPD 147 51) is "very faint, extremely small, considerably extended 25, suspected". The position precesses to RA 19 29 12.1, Dec -57 34 22, only 0.6 arcmin west of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.15 by 0.25 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4861
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4861
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4861

IC 4862 (= PGC 63334)
Discovered (September 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc?) in Pavo (RA 19 31 40.1, Dec -67 19 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4862 (= DeLisle Stewart #597, 1860 RA 19 17 26, NPD 157 37) is "extremely faint, small, considerably brighter middle, a little extended 0". The position precesses to RA 19 31 37.1, Dec -67 20 08, only 0.8 arcmin south southwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and the only other galaxy in the region corresponds to another of Stewart's entries, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.5 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4862, also showing IC 4860
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4862, also showing IC 4860
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4862

IC 4863
Recorded (Jul 6, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
Discussed but probably not observed (1898) by Herbert Howe
A lost or nonexistent object in Sagittarius (RA 19 28 38.9, Dec -36 11 57)
or perhaps (per Corwin) a double star at RA 19 27 51.5, Dec -36 13 02
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4863 (= Swift list XI (#184), Howe, 1860 RA 19 19 00, NPD 126 28.7) is a "close double star, nebulous? (Howe says not)". The position precesses to RA 19 28 18.9, Dec -36 12 00, about 2/3 of an arcmin west of a pair of stars that are probably what Howe observed, but are certainly not what Swift recorded, as Swift's XI-184 was described by him as "bright, extremely small, a little extended", and the 15th magnitude stars that make up Howe's pair would not have been described as "bright". Unfortunately, there is nothing at Swift's position (1900 RA 19 22 00, Dec -36 24.1 = J2000 RA 19 28 38.9, Dec -36 11 57), so unless there is a convincing candidate for what Swift saw, IC 4863 is lost or nonexistent. (A double star suggested by Corwin is a good match for the description, but is well to the west of Swift's position, so although it is a reasonable candidate, its identification as IC 4863 cannot be considered certain.)
Discovery Notes: As noted above, Swift's list XI-184 (1900 RA 19 22 00, Dec -36 24.1) is "bright, extremely small, a little extended". As it happens, Swift published a separate discussion of the object in what is called his "short" list 2, as noted by Howe in a discussion (MNRAS 58, p. 522) of observations he made in the first half of 1898. He writes "In Swift's List No. 2, at 19h 22m 00s, -36 24'.1, there is an object which he described as "B, eS, vE, stellar, close nebulous D*?". [This translates as "bright, extremely small, very extended, stellar, perhaps a close nebulous double star". There can be no doubt that the object in question is Swift's XI-184, as its position is the same, and save for being more detailed the description is essentially identical.] Howe continues, "In this position I found nothing, but about 20s preceding it (that is, to its west) there seemed to be a close double, the star being elongated at 100." Subtracting 20 seconds of time from Swift's position makes Howe's position (1900) RA 19 21 40, Dec -36 24.1, which precesses to exactly the position listed by Dreyer (as noted by Corwin). As stated above, there is a faint double that matches Howe's description just east of that position, and since Dreyer used Howe's position, perhaps that should be considered to be IC 4863; but if the IC object is supposed to be what Swift observed, it is probably lost or nonexistent. Corwin suggests that the double star lying another 27 seconds of time to the west (which does match Swift's description) could be the object observed by Swift; but whether it is actually what Swift observed can only be a matter of opinion.
DSS image of region near Swift's position for IC 4863
     Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Dreyer's (and Howe's) position for IC 4863, showing Swift's position for his XI-184, and (above their names) the double star probably observed by Howe and the one suggested by Corwin as being what Swift observed.

IC 4864 (= PGC 63494)
Discovered (Sep 22, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type (R')SAB(s)a?) in Octans (RA 19 40 05.8, Dec -77 33 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4864 (= DeLisle Stewart #599, 1860 RA 19 19 53, NPD 167 52) is "extremely faint, very small, extremely extended 70, very faint star 1 arcmin to southwest". The position precesses to RA 19 40 17.3, Dec -77 34 05, about 0.9 arcmin southeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.4 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4864
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4864
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4864

IC 4865
Recorded (Nov 11, 1897) by
Robert Innes
A pair of stars in Telescopium (RA 19 30 50.3, Dec -46 41 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4865 (= Innes (#9), 1860 RA 19 20 36, NPD 136 59) is "faint, perhaps stellar nucleus; magnitude 9.5 star attached on southeast". The position precesses to RA 19 30 52.0, Dec -46 41 54, only 0.3 arcmin east of the pair of stars listed above, and the star to their southeast, though fainter than stated, confirms the identity.
DSS image of region near the pair of stars listed as IC 4865
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4865

IC 4866 (= PGC 63376)
Discovered (Aug 14, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(s)b?) in Pavo (RA 19 34 34.7, Dec -61 08 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4866 (= DeLisle Stewart #598, 1860 RA 19 22 08, NPD 151 27) is "considerably faint, small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 19 34 35.0, Dec -61 09 25, just south of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.05 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4866
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4866
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4866

IC 4867 (=
IC 1301 = PGC 63207)
Discovered (Apr 15, 1890) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1301)
Discovered (Jun 21, 1901) by Sherburne Burnham (and later listed as IC 4867)
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Cygnus (RA 19 26 31.9, Dec +50 07 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4867 (= Burnham, 1860 RA 19 22 45, NPD 40 09) is "small; two 7th magnitude stars 3 arcmin to northeast (= IC 1301?)". The position precesses to RA 19 26 27.4, Dec +50 07 53, about 0.8 arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above, and the stars to the northeast make the identification certain. Although Dreyer suggested that this might be a duplication of IC 1301, Swift's position for IC 1301 (and even Howe's partial correction of Swift's position) was so far off that only the description of the starfield gave Dreyer reason to wonder whether the two entries might refer to the same object; and since he couldn't be certain of that, a separate entry was the only way to ensure that the nebula corresponding to IC 4867 would be properly cataloged.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see IC 1301 for anything else.

IC 4868
Recorded (Oct 16, 1895) by
Robert Innes
A pair of stars in Telescopium (RA 19 33 33.3, Dec -45 53 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4868 (= Innes (#10), 1860 RA 19 23 23, NPD 136 11.2) is "extremely small, a little extended, magnitude 9.4". The position precesses to RA 19 33 33.1, Dec -45 53 35, dead on HD 183845, which is the same as the star (CPD -46 9730) specified by Innes as being the object in question, so the identification is certain. The only problem is that Innes thought it might be nebulous, as it appeared to him (per Corwin) to be "an even patch of light 3 arcsec by 2 arcsec"; but in fact, it is merely a very close double. (Corwin suggests that some of the faint nearby stars may have helped give Innes the impression of some nebulosity being involved.)
DSS image of region near the pair of stars listed as IC 4868
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4868

IC 4869 (= PGC 63398)
Discovered (Aug 14, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)dm pec?) in Pavo (RA 19 36 02.4, Dec -61 01 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4869 (= DeLisle Stewart #601, 1860 RA 19 23 44, NPD 151 30) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle, faint star 1 arcmin to southwest". The position precesses to RA 19 36 10.7, Dec -61 12 06, but there is nothing there. However, (per Thomson) this is one of several objects for which Stewart appears to have made a 10 arcmin error in the declination, and correcting for that (namely, changing Stewart's position from 1900 RA 19 27.3, Dec -61 25 to 1900 RA 19 27.3, -61 15) yields a precessed position of RA 19 36 08.8, Dec -61 01 59, on the eastern rim of the galaxy listed above, and the star to its southwest makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.25 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4869
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4869
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4869

IC 4870 (= PGC 63432)
Discovered (September 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.1 irregular galaxy (type Im pec?) in Pavo (RA 19 37 37.7, Dec -65 48 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4870 (= DeLisle Stewart #603, 1860 RA 19 23 53, NPD 156 07) is "very faint, small, faint star involved". The position precesses to RA 19 37 30.5, Dec -65 48 58, about 0.8 arcmin west southwest of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.9 arcmin. IC 4870 is usually listed as a barred galaxy due to its appearance in earth-based images, but as the HST image shows, the light from its core is contaminated by foreground stars that provide most of its brilliance, and it is not a barred galaxy. Similarly, it is listed as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2) due to its bright core, but since the light involved is from a star, it is not a Seyfert galaxy, either.
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 4870
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4870
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of irregular galaxy IC 4870
Below, a 24 arcsec wide image of the central part of the galaxy (the bright spot at right is a star)
(Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, Courtney Seligman)
'Raw' HST image of the 'core' of irregular galaxy IC 4870
Below, the image above superimposed on the DSS closeup to show the region covered
'Raw' HST image of the 'core' of irregular galaxy IC 4870 superimposed on a DSS background to show the region covered

IC 4871 (=
IC 4872 = PGC 63395)
Discovered (August 1901) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 4871)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1901) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 4872)
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)d?) in Pavo (RA 19 35 42.1, Dec -57 31 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4871 (= DeLisle Stewart #600, 1860 RA 19 23 56, NPD 147 49) is "very faint, small, extremely extended 15". The position precesses to RA 19 35 39.5, Dec -57 31 08, less than 0.4 arcmin west of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain. (See IC 4872 for a discussion of the duplicate listing.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.8 by 0.4 arcmin. (The NED states that one reference lists a z of 0.149518 for this galaxy, but that would put it about 1760 million light years away and make it almost two million light years across, which is impossible; so that recessional velocity must belong to another object (quite possibly a quasar in the same region, as I've run into such an error before), and been mistakenly assigned to this one.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4871
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4871
Below, a 4.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4871

IC 4872 (=
IC 4871 = PGC 63395)
Discovered (August 1901) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 4871)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1901) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 4872)
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)d?) in Pavo (RA 19 35 42.1, Dec -57 31 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4872 (= DeLisle Stewart #602, 1860 RA 19 24 02, NPD 147 49) is "very faint, small, extremely extended 5". The position precesses to RA 19 35 45.5, Dec -57 31 07, less than half an arcmin east of the galaxy listed as IC 4871, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain. Stewart must have failed to notice that his #601 and 602 had essentially the same position and description, and Dreyer must have supposed that if Stewart listed two objects there were two nebulae in the region, so he gave each an IC entry, resulting in the duplicate entry (one of three such pairs for Stewart on this page).
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see IC 4871 for anything else.

IC 4873 (= PGC 63382)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Telescopium (RA 19 34 54.6, Dec -46 08 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4873 (= Frost #1159, 1860 RA 19 24 41, NPD 136 26) is "faint, small, round, faint star in middle". The position precesses to RA 19 34 52.2, Dec -46 08 08, on the western rim of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain. (The "faint star in middle" appears to simply be a relatively bright nucleus.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.95 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4873
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4873
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4873

IC 4874 (= PGC 63403)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc?) in Telescopium (RA 19 36 21.5, Dec -47 15 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4874 (= Frost #1160, 1860 RA 19 26 03, NPD 137 34) is "faint, small, round, faint star in middle". The position precesses to RA 19 36 21.0, Dec -47 15 52, right on the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.9 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4874
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4874
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4874

IC 4875 (= PGC 63433)
Discovered (Aug 31, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 13.8 irregular galaxy (type Im? pec) in Telescopium (RA 19 37 38.7, Dec -52 04 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4875 (= Frost #1161, 1860 RA 19 26 41, NPD 142 22) is "faint, small, round, a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 19 37 33.4, Dec -52 03 42, about 1.1 arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 4875, also showing IC 4877
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4875, also showing IC 4877
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of irregular galaxy IC 4875

IC 4876 (= PGC 63434)
Discovered (Aug 31, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)cd?) in Telescopium (RA 19 37 42.7, Dec -52 50 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4876 (= Frost #1162, 1860 RA 19 26 45, NPD 143 09) is "faint, small, round, a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 19 37 43.7, Dec -52 50 41, right on the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.05 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4876
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4876
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4876

IC 4877 (= PGC 63443)
Discovered (Aug 31, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Telescopium (RA 19 37 55.8, Dec -51 59 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4877 (= Frost #1163, 1860 RA 19 26 59, NPD 142 17) is "faint, small, round, a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 19 37 50.6, Dec -51 58 39, about 1.1 arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.3 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 4877, also showing IC 4875
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4877, also showing IC 4875
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 4877

IC 4878 (= PGC 63467)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pavo (RA 19 38 49.7, Dec -58 13 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4878 (= DeLisle Stewart #604, 1860 RA 19 27 00, NPD 148 31) is "extremely faint, extremely small, much extended 40". The position precesses to RA 19 38 49.4, Dec -58 12 33, a little over 1 arcmin north of the galaxy listed above, the description fits, and although there is another galaxy not far to the west, it is too faint for Stewart to have noticed, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.35 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4878
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4878
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4878

IC 4879 (= PGC 63480)
Discovered (Aug 31, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec) in Telescopium (RA 19 39 36.5, Dec -52 22 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4879 (= Frost #1164, 1860 RA 19 28 46, NPD 142 41) is "faint, small, round, a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 19 39 40.1, Dec -52 22 18, about 0.6 arcmin east southeast of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4 arcmin. The galaxy appears to have two nuclei, a central eastern one, and another near its distorted western rim. This may mean that it is actually an interacting pair. The position above is for the eastern nucleus.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4879
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4879
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4879

IC 4880 (= PGC 63508)
Discovered (Oct 3, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Telescopium (RA 19 40 30.9, Dec -56 24 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4880 (= DeLisle Stewart #607, 1860 RA 19 29 00, NPD 146 43) is "extremely faint, very small, round". The position precesses to RA 19 40 29.8, Dec -56 24 12, just above the northeastern rim of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.45 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4880
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4880
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4880

IC 4881 (= PGC 63506)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)bc?) in Telescopium (RA 19 40 26.0, Dec -55 51 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4881 (= DeLisle Stewart #606, 1860 RA 19 29 02, NPD 146 10) is "extremely faint, very small, round". The position precesses to RA 19 40 26.4, Dec -55 51 13, on the northern rim of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.75 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4881
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4881
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4881

IC 4882 (= PGC 63505)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)b?) in Telescopium (RA 19 40 23.2, Dec -55 11 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4882 (= DeLisle Stewart #605, 1860 RA 19 29 04, NPD 145 30) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round". The position precesses to RA 19 40 22.2, Dec -55 11 13, just north of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.95 by 0.9 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4882
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4882
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4882

IC 4883 (= PGC 63537)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)b?) in Telescopium (RA 19 42 00.6, Dec -55 32 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4883 (= DeLisle Stewart #608, 1860 RA 19 30 39, NPD 145 51) is "very faint, very small, much extended 170". The position precesses to RA 19 41 59.6, Dec -55 31 55, just above the northeastern end of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.45 by 0.45 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4883
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4883
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4883

IC 4884 (= PGC 63546)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type SA0/a?) in Pavo (RA 19 42 41.0, Dec -58 07 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4884 (= DeLisle Stewart #609, 1860 RA 19 30 55, NPD 148 26) is "extremely faint, extremely small, considerably extended 170". The position precesses to RA 19 42 41.3, Dec -58 06 49, just above the northeastern end of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.45 by 0.4 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 4884
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4884
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 4884

IC 4885 (= PGC 63577)
Discovered (Aug 14, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)c?) in Pavo (RA 19 43 51.8, Dec -60 39 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4885 (= DeLisle Stewart #610, 1860 RA 19 31 59, NPD 150 58) is "very faint, extremely small, extremely extended 85, stellar nucleus". The position precesses to RA 19 44 13.9, Dec -60 38 35, nearly 1.4 arcmin east of the galaxy listed above, but the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 0.35 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4885
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4885
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4885

IC 4886 (= PGC 63555)
Discovered (Aug 31, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type Sb? pec) in Telescopium (RA 19 43 14.5, Dec -51 48 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4886 (= Frost #1165, 1860 RA 19 32 30, NPD 142 07) is "faint, small, round, much brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 19 43 17.9, Dec -51 47 37, less than an arcmin east northeast of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 12745 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 4886 is about 595 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 565 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 575 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 1.3 by 0.65 arcmin, the galaxy is about 210 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4886
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4886
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4886

IC 4887 (= PGC 63681)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)ab?) in Pavo (RA 19 48 20.9, Dec -69 35 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4887 (= DeLisle Stewart #613, 1860 RA 19 33 32, NPD 159 55) is "considerably bright, small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 19 48 21.1, Dec -69 35 03, on the northern rim of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.95 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4887
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4887
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4887

IC 4888 (= PGC 63609)
Discovered (Aug 31, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type E/SA0?) in Telescopium (RA 19 44 52.2, Dec -54 27 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4888 (= Frost #1166, 1860 RA 19 33 42, NPD 144 47) is "faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 19 44 51.4, Dec -54 27 22, right on the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.95 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 4888, also showing part of IC 4889
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4888, also showing part of IC 4889
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 4888

IC 4889 (=
IC 4891 = PGC 63620)
Discovered (1899) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 4891)
Discovered (Aug 31, 1904) by Royal Frost (and later listed as IC 4889)
A magnitude 11.1 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Telescopium (RA 19 45 15.1, Dec -54 20 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4889 (= Frost #1167, 1860 RA 19 34 00, NPD 144 41) is "brighter middle, magnitude 10". The position precesses to RA 19 45 08.4, Dec -54 21 19, on the southwestern rim of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain. (See IC 4891 for a discussion of the double listing.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 2.1 arcmin. Listed as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2).
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 4889
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4889
Below, a 3.2 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of elliptical galaxy IC 4889

IC 4890 (= PGC 63631)
Discovered (Oct 3, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc pec?) in Telescopium (RA 19 45 35.4, Dec -56 32 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4890 (= DeLisle Stewart #612, 1860 RA 19 34 00, NPD 146 51) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, round, faint star 1 arcmin to south". The position precesses to RA 19 45 28.5, Dec -56 31 17, about 1.7 arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above, but there is nothing else nearby and the star to its south makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 1.05 arcmin. The recessional velocity of the galaxy just to its south (PGC 3911934 = 2MASXJ19453401-5633345) is unknown, so whether it is a physical companion and responsible for the distorted appearance of IC 4890, or merely an optical double, is also unknown.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4890, also showing lenticular galaxy PGC 3911934
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4890, also showing PGC 3911934
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the possible pair
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4890, also showing lenticular galaxy PGC 3911934

PGC 3911934
Not an IC object but listed here since possibly a physical companion to
IC 4890
A magnitude 16.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Telescopium (RA 19 45 34.0, Dec -56 33 35)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.45 by 0.15 arcmin. Recessional velocity unknown, so whether it is a physical companion and responsible for the distorted appearance of IC 4890 (which see for images), or merely an optical double, is also unknown.

IC 4891 (=
IC 4889 = PGC 63620)
Discovered (1899) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 4891)
Discovered (Aug 31, 1904) by Royal Frost (and later listed as IC 4889)
A magnitude 11.1 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Telescopium (RA 19 45 15.1, Dec -54 20 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4891 (= DeLisle Stewart #611, 1860 RA 19 34 07, NPD 144 31) is "considerably bright, small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 19 45 13.9, Dec -54 11 17, but there is nothing there. However, this appears to be one of several galaxies for which Stewart made a 10 arcmin error in his declination, as IC 4889, which lies about 10 arcmin due south, perfectly fits his description. Applying the presumed one-digit error to his position (that is, changing 1900 RA 19 37.3, Dec -54 26 to 1900 RA 19 37.3, Dec -54 36) yields a precessed position of 19 45 14.7, Dec -54 21 43, just below the southern rim of the galaxy listed above, so the equality with IC 4889 seems certain.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see IC 4889 for anything else.

IC 4892 (= PGC 63709)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pavo (RA 19 49 31.5, Dec -70 13 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4892 (= DeLisle Stewart #614, 1860 RA 19 34 22, NPD 160 34) is "extremely faint, small, extremely extended 10". The position precesses to RA 19 49 26.6, Dec -70 13 53, less than half an arcmin southwest of the nucleus of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 0.4 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4892
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4892
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4892

IC 4893 (= PGC 63726)
Discovered (Sep 21, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Pavo (RA 19 50 33.1, Dec -72 30 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4893 (= DeLisle Stewart #615, 1860 RA 19 34 26, NPD 162 51) is "extremely faint, very small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 19 50 37.3, Dec -72 30 46, just off the southeast rim of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.55 by 0.4 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4893
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4893
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4893

IC 4894 (= PGC 63662)
Discovered (Aug 31, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc pec?) in Telescopium (RA 19 46 59.1, Dec -51 50 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4894 (= Frost #1168, 1860 RA 19 36 12, NPD 142 11) has a "brighter middle, magnitude 15". The position precesses to RA 19 46 58.8, Dec -51 50 56, within the southern outline of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else that Frost could have seen nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4894
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4894
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4894

IC 4895 (=
NGC 6822 = PGC 63616), Barnard's Galaxy
Discovered (Aug 17, 1884) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as NGC 6822)
Discovered (Jul 16, 1906) by Max Wolf (and later listed as IC 4895)
A magnitude 8.7 irregular galaxy (type IB(s)m?) in Sagittarius (RA 19 44 56.6, Dec -14 48 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4895 (= Wolf ([A. N.] 4207), 1860 RA 19 37 06, NPD 105 09.4) is a "group of nebulae, 25 arcmin diameter". The position precesses to RA 19 45 01.6, Dec -14 49 26, well within the very large figure of the galaxy listed above, so the identification is certain. (Wolf's "group of nebulae" actually represents various clusters and star-forming regions within the galaxy.)
Discovery Notes: See NGC 6822 for a discussion of the duplicate listing.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 6822 for anything else.

IC 4896 (= PGC 63698)
Discovered (Oct 3, 1901) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Pavo (RA 19 49 04.9, Dec -58 58 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4896 (= DeLisle Stewart #616, 1860 RA 19 37 11, NPD 149 19) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, round, between 2 extremely faint stars". The position precesses to RA 19 49 03.3, Dec -58 58 39, just off the northwestern outline of the galaxy listed above, there is nothing else nearby, and the 13th and 14th magnitude stars to the northwest and southeast of the galaxy make the identification certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4896
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4896
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4896

IC 4897 (= PGC 63703)
Discovered (Aug 31, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b?) in Telescopium (RA 19 49 19.6, Dec -51 52 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4897 (= Frost #1169, 1860 RA 19 38 37, NPD 142 12) has a "brighter middle, magnitude 16". The position precesses to RA 19 49 22.8, Dec -51 51 30, about 0.7 arcmin northeast of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.75 by 0.45 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4897
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4897
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4897

IC 4898
Discovered (Aug 16, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A lost or nonexistent object in Sagittarius (RA 19 47 46.8, Dec -33 19 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4898 (= Swift list XII (#14), 1860 RA 19 38 45, NPD 123 39.7) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, extremely dif, several faint stars near". (Note: dif is usually read as "diffuse", but in list XII Swift appears to use it for "difficult", and given the rest of his description that seems more appropriate.) The position precesses to RA 19 47 46.8, Dec -33 19 20 (whence the position above), in a completely stellar field, but (per Corwin) none of the small stellar groups near the position are bright enough to have been noticed by Swift. In addition, the only galaxy within a 4 degree wide region that might be considered a suitable candidate requires substantial errors in both right ascension and declination, and is therefore very unlikely to be what Swift observed. So IC 4898 is almostly certainly lost or nonexistent.
DSS image of region near Swift's position for the apparently nonexistent IC 4898
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Swift's position for IC 4898

IC 4899 (= PGC 63799)
Discovered (Sep 21, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Pavo (RA 19 54 26.5, Dec -70 35 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 4899 (= DeLisle Stewart #617, 1860 RA 19 39 14, NPD 160 57) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, very faint star 1 arcmin to southwest". The position precesses to RA 19 54 23.6, Dec -70 35 59, just below the southern outline of the galaxy listed above, there is nothing else nearby, and the star to the southwest makes the identification certain. (There is also a brighter star superimposed on the galaxy, but Stewart presumably thought that was part of the nebula; in fact it may be the main reason he even noticed the object.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 4899
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 4899
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 4899
Celestial Atlas
(IC 4800 - 4849) ←     IC Objects: IC 4850 - 4899     → (IC 4900 - 4949)