Celestial Atlas
(IC 450 - 499) ←     IC Objects: IC 500 - 549 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 550 - 599)
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Page last updated Sep 2, 2017
WORKING: Update physical / historical information

IC 500 (= PGC 23011)
Discovered (Feb 11, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (618)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Puppis (RA 08 12 39.6, Dec -16 03 04)
Based on a recessional velocity of 4560 km/sec, IC 500 is about 210 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.1 by 0.45 arcmin, it is about 70 thousand light years across.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 500
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 500
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 500

IC 501 (= PGC 23305)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (154)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(r)ab?) in Cancer (RA 08 18 47.6, Dec +24 32 14)
(Per Corwin, Wolf listed this as a new discovery in his first "Nebel-liste" based on Heidelberg Bruce plates, but Dreyer realized it was a rediscovery of IC 501, and managed to avoid a duplicate listing.) Apparent size 0.55 by 0.45 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 501
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 501
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 501

IC 502 (= PGC 23469)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (619)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Cancer (RA 08 22 03.7, Dec +08 45 09)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.55 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 502
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 502
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 502

IC 503 (= PGC 23474)
Discovered (1888) by
Frederick Pechüle
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Hydra (RA 08 22 10.7, Dec +03 16 05)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.9 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 503
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 503
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 503

IC 504 (= PGC 23495)
Discovered (Mar 8, 1888) by
Lewis Swift (VII-11)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/(r)a?) in Hydra (RA 08 22 41.1, Dec +04 15 44)
Apparent size 1.9 by 1.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 504
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 504
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 504

IC 505 (= PGC 23528)
Discovered (Mar 8, 1888) by
Lewis Swift (VII-12)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Hydra (RA 08 23 21.7, Dec +04 22 21)
Apparent size 2.2 by 1.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 505
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 505
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 506
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 505, also showing elliptical galaxy IC 506

IC 506 (= PGC 23536)
Discovered (Mar 8, 1888) by
Lewis Swift (VII-13)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Hydra (RA 08 23 30.8, Dec +04 17 57)
Apparent size 1.2 by 1.1 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 506
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 506
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 505
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 506, also showing lenticular galaxy IC 505

IC 507 (almost certainly =
NGC 2590 = PGC 23616)
Discovered (Feb 26, 1878) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 2590)
Discovered (Feb 3, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 507)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)bc?) in Hydra (RA 08 25 01.9, Dec -00 35 30)
Per Dreyer, IC 507 (Swift list VIII (#47), 1860 RA 08 18 28±, NPD 89 59.6) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, very little elongated, between 2 stars". The second IC adds "Not found by Howe (3 nights)." The position precesses to RA 08 25 37.7, Dec -00 26 46, but there is nothing there, as previously noted by Howe. The identification of IC 507 rests on two errors, one of which is known to have been made, and the other is a reasonable possibility. Per Corwin, Dreyer made a mistake of about half a minute of time in precessing Swift's 1890 position to the equinox of 1860, and the corrected position is 10 arcmin due north of NGC 2590. Swift's description of his #47 is a good fit to the NGC object (which see for anything else), so there is a good chance that he made a "single-digit" error of 10 arcmin in the declination, and if so the identification of IC 507 as a duplicate listing of NGC 2590 would be certain.

IC 508 (= PGC 23762)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (155)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBm?) in Cancer (RA 08 28 22.4, Dec +25 07 29)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 508
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 508
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 508

IC 509 (= PGC 23936)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (156)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)c) in Cancer (RA 08 32 03.5, Dec +24 00 38)
Apparent size 1.9 by 1.7 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 509
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 509
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 509

IC 510 (= PGC 23940)
Discovered (Mar 20, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (620)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc pec) in Hydra (RA 08 32 11.0, Dec -02 09 45)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 510
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 510
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 510

IC 511 (= PGC 24838 =
NGC 2646, and not = PGC 24397)
Discovered (Jul 27, 1883) by Wilhelm Tempel (and later listed as NGC 2646)
Also observed (Sep 1, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 511)
Until Aug 21, 2017, thought to be PGC 24397; but now known to be NGC 2646
A magnitude 12.1 lenticular galaxy (type SB0(r)a?) in Camelopardalis (RA 08 50 22.0, Dec +73 27 47)
Historical Misidentification: Per Dreyer, IC 511 (Swift list VIII (#48), 1860 RA 08 25 22, NPD 16 01.0) is "very faint, small, considerably extended, 2 stars to southeast". The position precesses to RA 08 40 55.8, Dec +73 30 01, less than an arcmin northeast of PGC 24397, and although (as noted by Corwin) there are two stars to the northwest instead of the southeast, it was long presumed that PGC 24397 was what Swift observed, with an accidental reversal of directions for the two stars (which is not an uncommon mistake). But although reasonable, that was proven wrong on Aug 21, 2017. As discussed below, Swift's right ascension almost certainly had a large error, and the fact that his position fell near PGC 24397 was merely a coincidence. However, since the mistaken identification is well established in the literature, PGC 24397 is discussed in the next entry as a warning about the mistake.
The Fly In The Ointment: Swift recorded four nebulae on Sep 1, 1888, but save for his list VIII #48 (which became IC 511), none of their positions corresponds to an obvious nebular candidate. Until recently, one (IC 895) was thought to be lost or nonexistent, and the other two (IC 1028 and IC 1045) were associated with dubious candidates. However, in August 2017 it was shown that all three suffered from a 10 minute error in their right ascensions (a not unusual error for Swift, who used setting circles to measure positions, instead of micrometric measurements, and sometimes mis-set or mis-read his setting circles), and as a result all three have now been correctly identified with the objects Swift actually observed (see any of the other three IC objects for a detailed discussion). This led me to the question, is it merely a coincidence that PGC 24397 lies close to Swift's recorded position, and all four of his observations on Sep 1, 1888 suffered from a 10 minute error in their right ascension?
A Corrected Identification Of IC 511: If, as for the other three objects observed by Swift on the night in question, we add 10 minutes of time to the 1860 position of IC 511 (that is, change it to 1860 RA 08 35 22), the corrected position precesses to RA 08 50 37.9, Dec +73 28 28, which lies only 1.3 arcmin northeast of NGC 2646, a galaxy which perfectly fits Swift's description, including the wide double star to the southeast (for even though the overall galaxy appears round instead of elongated, its bright center, which is all that Swift could have seen, is extended east-west). So it seems probable that IC 511 suffered from the same 10 minute of time error in its position as the other three objects observed by Swift on Sep 1, 1888 (which actually makes more sense than if it were the only one of the four not to suffer from that error), and it is actually a misrecorded observation of NGC 2646.
A Possible Nail In The Coffin For PGC 24397: There is another factor that could be used to determine whether IC 511 is PGS 24397, the object near Swift's recorded position, or NGC 2646, the one 10 minutes of time to the east; namely, though not in the NGC, Swift wrote that his VIII #48 was the southwestern of two nebulae, and his VIII #49 the northeastern, so they should be reasonably close together, in more or less the stated relative position. As shown in the images below there is nothing at all to the east of PGC 24397, but IC 520, which is Swift's VIII #49, lies to the east of NGC 2646, just where it should be if IC 511 is actually NGC 2646. So it appears essentially certain that IC 511 is NGC 2646, and the apparent agreement of Swift's position with that of PGC 24397 is merely an unfortunate accident.
A Caveat And A Conclusion: Swift didn't record IC 511 when he discovered IC 520 (three nights earlier), presumably due to its being much fainter, and though his description of IC 520 includes "another suspected", which may well have been NGC 2646, there is nothing that proves he actually observed both objects on the same night; he may have simply added southwestern and northeastern of two to his VIII #48 and #49 based on their relative positions in the published list. However, even if the "pair" was only based on his list, NGC 2646 is a far better fit to Swift's description, and it is more likely that all four of Swift's observations of Sep 1 suffered from the same error than that only one of them happened to be correct, so there is little reason to doubt that IC 511 is indeed NGC 2646. (As a precaution I ran this by Corwin, and he agrees with my analysis, so I feel confident of the result.)
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 2646 for anything else.
DSS image of region near PGC 24397, which was long misidentified as IC 511, showing that there is nothing to its east
Above, an 18 arcmin wide DSS image showing that there is nothing to the east of PGC 24397
(Also note the two stars to the northwest of the galaxy, instead of the southeast)
Below, an 18 arcmin wide DSS image showing IC 520 to the east of NGC 2646 (= IC 511)
(Also note the two stars to the south southeast of NGC 2646)
DSS image of region near NGC 2646, showing the two stars to its southeast, and the galaxy (IC 520) to its east

PGC 24397 (not =
IC 511)
Not an IC object but listed here since long misidentified as IC 511
Not observed (Sep 1, 1888) by Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type (R)S0(rs)a?) in Camelopardalis (RA 08 40 50.5, Dec +73 29 12)
Historical Misidentification: As discussed in the entry for IC 511, PGC 24397 was long thought to be Swift's list VIII #48, but it is now known that what Swift actually observed was NGC 2646; so this entry serves as a warning about the earlier misidentification.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3625 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), PGC 24397 is about 165 to 170 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.5 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 70 to 75 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 24397, long misidentified as IC 511
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 24397, which is not IC 511
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 24397, long misidentified as IC 511
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 24397, long misidentified as IC 511

IC 512 (= PGC 25451)
Discovered (Aug 23, 1890) by
William Denning (10)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)cd) in Camelopardalis (RA 09 03 50.0, Dec +85 30 05)
Apparent size 2.2 by 1.6 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 512
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 512
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 512

IC 513 (= PGC 23983)
Discovered (Apr 20, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (157)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0°?(rs)) in Hydra (RA 08 33 05.1, Dec -12 21 20)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.8 arcmin.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 513
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 513
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 513

IC 514 (= PGC 24119)
Discovered (Mar 2, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (621)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABb?) in Hydra (RA 08 35 22.3, Dec -02 02 49)
Apparent size 0.75 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 514
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 514
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 514

IC 515 (= PGC 24125)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (622)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a pec?) in Hydra (RA 08 35 31.3, Dec -01 54 04)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 515
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 515
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 516 and NGC 2616
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 515, also showing lenticular galaxies IC 516 and NGC 2616

IC 516 (= PGC 24155)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (623)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Hydra (RA 08 35 50.8, Dec -01 52 18)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 516
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 516
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 515 and NGC 2616
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 516, also showing lenticular galaxies IC 515 and NGC 2616

IC 517 (= PGC 24179)
Discovered (Mar 20, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (624)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABab?) in Hydra (RA 08 36 22.1, Dec -02 03 20)
Apparent size 0.65 by 0.35 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 517
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 517
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 517

IC 518
Recorded (Mar 15, 1890) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A nonexistent object in Hydra (RA 08 36 07.0, Dec +00 41 34)
Historical Identification (Or Lack Thereof): Per Dreyer, IC 518 (Bigourdan #151, 1860 RA 08 29 51, NPD 88 50) is "very faint, perhaps a very small cluster". The position precesses to RA 08 37 03.6, Dec +00 40 58, but there is nothing there save for widely scattered stars. Per Corwin the right ascension in the IC, although correctly copied from Bigourdan's published paper, is off by a minute of time (since Bigourdan stated that the position of IC 518 was the same as the NGC position for NGC 2618), and should have read 08 28 51. This yields a modern position of RA 08 36 03.6, Dec +00 41 08, which is a little east of NGC 2618, but there is still nothing there save for a few randomly scattered stars.
A Third Stab At Bigourdan's Position: Bigourdan made two observations of his #151, on Mar 15, 1890 and Feb 16, 1896, the same nights that he observed NGC 2618, using the same comparison star (BD+1 2137 = TYC 210-1534-1), which per the discussion in the entry for NGC 2618 is about 1 arcmin to the northeast of Bigourdan's position (which he obtained from the 1855 Bonner Durchmusterung, which typically has errors of an arcmin or more). The modern position of the star is J2000 RA 08 36 20.3, Dec +00 46 09, which precesses to (1900) RA 08 31 11.2, Dec +01 06 55, and adding Bigourdan's offsets of -13.2 seconds of time in right ascension and -4' 36" (± 2") in declination, IC 518 should be near (1900) RA 08 30 58, Dec +01 02 19(± 2), which precesses to J2000 RA 08 36 07.0, Dec +00 41 34 (whence the position shown above), but there is still nothing there. So with three strikes we seem to be out of options, and IC 518 is almost certainly nonexistent or irretrievably lost.
SDSS image of region near Bigourdan's position (shown by a box) for the apparently nonexistent IC 518, also showing NGC 2618
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the listed position for IC 518, also showing NGC 2618

IC 519 (= PGC 24389)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (625)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Hydra (RA 08 40 34.4, Dec +02 36 40)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.85 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 519
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 519
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 519

IC 520 (= PGC 24970)
Discovered (Aug 29, 1888) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 11.7 spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)ab?) in Camelopardalis (RA 08 53 42.2, Dec +73 29 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 520 (Swift list VIII (#49), 1860 RA 08 38 26, NPD 15 59.5) is "pretty bright, pretty large, brighter middle, star near". The position precesses to RA 08 53 36.9, Dec +73 29 30, on the northwestern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3485 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 520 is about 160 to 165 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of about 130 to 165 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 2.2 by 1.9 arcmin (from the images below). if is about 100 to 105 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 520
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 520
Below, a 2.75 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 520
Below, a 2.0 by 2.4 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 520

IC 521 (= PGC 24658 + SDSS J084643.28+023221.2)
Discovered (Mar 16, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (626)
A pair of galaxies in Hydra
PGC 24658 = A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0 pec?) at RA 08 46 44.0, Dec +02 32 14
J084643.3+023221 = A 16th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) at RA 08 46 43.3, Dec +02 32 20
Apparent sizes 0.95 by 0.6 arcmin and 0.25 by 0.15 arcmin. Almost certainly an interacting system, as aside from the apparent distortion caused by their interaction, both have nearly identical recessional velocities. Note: Given the large difference in brightness between the two galaxies involved in this system, only the brighter one could have been seen by Javelle, so strictly speaking only PGC 24658 is part of IC 521. However, since it is part of an interacting pair of galaxies, it seems appropriate to consider the pair as corresponding to the IC entry, even though the fainter galaxy was not a factor in Javelle's observation.
SDSS image of the pair of lenticular galaxies that comprise IC 521
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 521
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the system
SDSS image of region near the pair of lenticular galaxies that comprise IC 521

IC 522 (= PGC 25009)
Discovered (May 8, 1890) by
Lewis Swift (IX-19)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Ursa Major (RA 08 54 35.2, Dec +57 10 00)
Apparent size 1.2 by 1.0 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 522
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 522
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 522

IC 523 (= PGC 24948)
Discovered (Apr 13, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (627)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Cancer (RA 08 53 11.3, Dec +09 08 53)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 523
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 523
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 523

IC 524 (= PGC 25198)
Discovered (Feb 18, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (628)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Hydra (RA 08 58 12.9, Dec -19 11 33)
Apparent size 1.05 by 0.65 arcmin.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 524
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 524
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 524

IC 525 (= PGC 25344)
Discovered (Mar 20, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (629)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Hydra (RA 09 01 22.5, Dec -01 51 13)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.25 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 525
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 525
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 525

IC 526 (= PGC 25401)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (630)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Cancer (RA 09 02 40.8, Dec +10 50 29)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin. Supposedly a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2), but nucleus seems relatively faint for such a designation.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 526
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 526
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 526

IC 527 (= PGC 25821)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1890) by
Lewis Swift (IX-20)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Lynx (RA 09 09 41.8, Dec +37 36 05)
Apparent size 2.1 by 1.9 arcmin (including fainter outer arms).
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 527
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 527
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 527

IC 528 (= PGC 25783),
and with
PGC 25779, 25782 and PGC 25791, = Hickson Compact Group 36
Discovered (Dec 16, 1893) by Stephane Javelle (631)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)S0(rs)ab pec?) in Cancer (RA 09 09 22.6, Dec +15 47 46)
Based on a recessional velocity of 3810 km/sec, IC 528 is about 175 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 195 million light years, but much closer than a second estimate of 285 million light years. Using the 185 million light year average of the lower values and its apparent size of 1.45 by 0.65 arcmin, it is probably about 80 thousand light years across. (NED notes a second recessional velocity measurement of 8635 km/sec, but that is obviously an erroneous attribution almost certainly belonging to PGC 25779.) Although comprising Hickson Compact Group 36 with PGC 25779, 25782 and 25791, IC 528 has no connection to the other galaxies, as it is much closer than any of them.
SDSS image of spiral galaxies IC 528, PGC 25779, PGC 25782 and PGC 25791, which comprise Hickson Compact Group 36, an optical but not physical group of galaxies
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 528 and Hickson Compact Group 36
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the optical grouping
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 528 and the optical companions with which it comprises Hickson Compact Group 36

PGC 25779
with
IC 528, 25782 and 25791 = Hickson Compact Group 36
A 17th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Cancer (RA 09 09 20.3, Dec +15 48 21)
Although comprising Hickson Compact Group 36 with IC 528 (which see for images), PGC 25782 and PGC 25791, PGC 25779 has no connection to the other galaxies, as they have very different distances, and must be merely optical companions. Based on a recessional velocity of 8645 km/sec, PGC 25779 is about 400 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.35 by 0.2 arcmin, it is about 40 thousand light years across.

PGC 25782
with
IC 528, 25779 and 25791 = Hickson Compact Group 36
A 17th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Cancer (RA 09 09 22.2, Dec +15 46 46)
Although comprising Hickson Compact Group 36 with IC 528 (which see for images), PGC 25779 and PGC 25791, PGC 25782 has no connection to the first two, as they are both much closer to us, and are merely optical companions; however, it may be related to PGC 25791, which has a very similar distance. Based on its recessional velocity of 15670 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 25782 is about 730 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was just over 685 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 705 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.5 by 0.15 arcmin, it is about 100 thousand light years across.

PGC 25791
with
IC 528, 25779 and 25782 = Hickson Compact Group 36
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Cancer (RA 09 09 26.4, Dec +15 48 18)
Although comprising Hickson Compact Group 36 with IC 528 (which see for images), PGC 25779 and PGC 25782, PGC 25791 has no connection to the first two, as they are both much closer to us, and are merely optical companions; however, it may be related to PGC 25782, which has a very similar distance. Based on its recessional velocity of 15580 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 25791 is about 725 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was just under 685 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 700 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.45 by 0.1 arcmin, it is about 90 thousand light years across.

IC 529 (= PGC 26295)
Discovered (1890) by
William Denning
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)c?) in Camelopardalis (RA 09 18 33.3, Dec +73 45 30)
Apparent size 3.6 by 1.35 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 529
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of IC 529
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 529

IC 530 (= PGC 26101)
Discovered (Mar 22, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (158)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Cancer (RA 09 15 17.1, Dec +11 53 08)
Apparent size 2.15 by 1.0 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 530
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 530
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 530

IC 531 (= PGC 26258)
Discovered (Mar 9, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (632)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(rs)ab?) in Hydra (RA 09 17 50.8, Dec -00 16 43)
Apparent size 1.8 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 531
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 531
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 531

IC 532
Recorded (Mar 23, 1887) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A lost or nonexistent object in Hydra (RA 09 19 03.0, Dec -16 45 16)
Per Dreyer, IC 532 (Bigourdan #152, 1860 RA 09 12 29, NPD 106 10) is "pretty bright, pretty large, elongated east-west, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 09 19 03.0, Dec -16 45 16 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there nor anywhere near there. Per Corwin this is an unusual case, being one of only seven "novae" discovered by Bigourdan for which he does not give detailed measurements, and the only one of them for which he made more than one observation. It might have been a chance observation of a comet (as can be shown to be the case for IC 2120 and is a possible explanation for IC 4977), though the double observation argues against that, as a comet would probably have moved between times (depending upon how much time actually passed), or it might have been a "Fausse image?" (such as a 'ghost' of the nearby 7th-magnitude star), as suggested by Bigourdan himself. At any rate there is no current explanation for what, based on its description, should be an easy object to find, and it can only be listed as lost or nonexistent.
DSS image of region near the recorded position of the apparently lost or nonexistent IC 532
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the position of IC 532

IC 533 (= PGC 3081596)
Discovered (Feb 18, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (633)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Hydra (RA 09 20 23.3, Dec -03 59 31)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.2 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 533
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 533
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 533

IC 534 (= PGC 26471)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (634)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Hydra (RA 09 21 15.4, Dec +03 09 01)
Apparent size 1.8 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 534
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 534
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 534

IC 535 (= PGC 26524)
Discovered (Mar 20, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (635)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Hydra (RA 09 22 16.2, Dec -01 02 26)
Apparent size 0.65 by 0.45 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 535
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 535
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 535

IC 536 (= PGC 26669)
Discovered (Mar 28, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (159)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Leo (RA 09 24 40.1, Dec +25 06 38)
Apparent size 1.35 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 536
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 536
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 536

IC 537 (= PGC 26717)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (160)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type (R)S0/a?) in Hydra (RA 09 25 22.6, Dec -12 23 31)
Apparent size 1.2 by 1.0 arcmin.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 537
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 537
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 537

IC 538 (=
NGC 2885 = PGC 26811)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2885)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1890) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 538)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type (R)S0/(r)a pec?) in Leo (RA 09 27 18.4, Dec +23 01 12)
Per Dreyer, IC 538 (Bigourdan #154, 1860 RA 09 19 18, NPD 66 23) is a "13th magnitude star in very faint nebulosity (perhaps = h599, whose right ascension was uncertain)", h599 being NGC 2885. The position precesses to RA 09 27 19.2, Dec +23 00 44, just southeast of the galaxy in question, so the identification is certain. The duplicate listing is due to the fact, as noted by Dreyer, that the right ascension of NGC 2885 was very poorly determined (per Corwin, it was about 25 seconds of time too large); but obviously the equality of the listings for IC 538 and NGC 2885 (which see for anything else) was suspected right from the start.

IC 539 (= PGC 26909)
Discovered (Mar 9, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (636)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)Scd?) in Hydra (RA 09 29 08.2, Dec -02 32 57)
Apparent size 1.35 by 1.05 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 539
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 539
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 539

IC 540 (= PGC 26968)
Discovered (Apr 10, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (637)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Leo (RA 09 30 10.2, Dec +07 54 07)
Apparent size 2.4 by 0.35 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 540
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 540
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 540

IC 541
Recorded (Feb 15, 1890) by
Lewis Swift
A lost or nonexistent object in Hydra (RA 09 50 31.3, Dec -04 14 56)
Per Dreyer, IC 541 (Swift list IX (#21), 1860 RA 09 23 29, NPD 93 38.2) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, 10th magnitude star to the south". The position precesses to RA 09 50 31.3, Dec -04 14 56 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there. If not for the "10th magnitude star to the south", almost any faint star or galaxy in the region might be chosen as an all-too-tentative identification of Swift's object; but there are few such stars in the region, and none near anything of interest, so there appears to be no hope of identifying what (if anything) Swift thought he observed.
DSS image of region near the position of the apparently nonexistent IC 541
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on Swift's position for IC 541

IC 542 (= PGC 27012)
Discovered (Apr 22, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (161)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R')SB0/a?(rs)) in Hydra (RA 09 31 06.3, Dec -13 10 54)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.35 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 542
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 542
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 542

IC 543
Recorded (Mar 23, 1887) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A lost or nonexistent object in Hydra (RA 09 31 09.5, Dec -14 46 50)
Per Dreyer, IC 543 (Bigourdan #155, 1860 RA 09 24 29, NPD 104 10) is "very faint, pretty large, elongated, diffuse". The position precesses to RA 09 31 09.5, Dec -14 46 50 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there save for NGC 2902 (a few arcmin to the northwest), which has therefore sometimes been (mis)identified as IC 543, but per Corwin is unlikely to be the same object, as Bigourdan also observed the NGC object in its correct position. After dismissing a couple of other unlikely possibilities Corwin suggests that perhaps the night in question simply had poor seeing, as Bigourdan also recorded two other unidentifiable objects (IC 532 and 759) on the same night. If that were the case, the most likely identification of IC 543 would be with a small group of stars with a separation comparable to a fairly large somewhat elongated galaxy, but there is no such group near the IC position, so there appears to be no satisfactory identification for IC 543, hence its listing as lost or nonexistent.
DSS image of region near the IC position for the apparently nonexistent IC 543, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 2902
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the position of IC 543, also showing NGC 2902

IC 544 (= PGC 27293)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (162)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Leo (RA 09 35 53.3, Dec +24 53 36)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.25 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 544
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 544
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 545
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 544, also showing spiral galaxy IC 545

IC 545 (= PGC 27307)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (163)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sdm?) in Leo (RA 09 36 05.4, Dec +24 56 54)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 545
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 545
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 544
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 545, also showing spiral galaxy IC 544

IC 546 (= PGC 27234)
Discovered (Apr 23, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (164)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Hydra (RA 09 34 50.2, Dec -16 23 06)
Apparent size 1.25 by 0.65 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 546
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 546
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 2924
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 546, also showing elliptical galaxy NGC 2924

IC 547 (= PGC 27309 =
NGC 2947 = IC 2494)
Discovered (May 6, 1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 2947)
Discovered (Apr 20, 1892) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 547)
Discovered (Feb 20, 1898) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 2494)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(r)bc) in Hydra (RA 09 36 05.8, Dec -12 26 14)
Per Dreyer, IC 547 (Javelle #165, 1860 RA 09 29 21, NPD 101 49.0) is "pretty bright, small, round, a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 09 36 07.2, Dec -12 26 27, practically on top of the galaxy, so the identification is certain. The duplicate listing with NGC 2947 (which see for anything else) is due to Leavenworth's position being off by more than 2 minutes of time. The triplicate listing with IC 2494 (which per Corwin appears to make it the only object with entries in all three NGC/IC catalogs) was apparently a mere oversight on Swift's (and Dreyer's) part.

IC 548 (= PGC 27463)
Discovered (Apr 13, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (638)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Leo (RA 09 38 19.3, Dec +09 26 44)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.25 arcmin>
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 548
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 548
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 2939
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 548, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 2939

IC 549 (= PGC 27622)
Discovered (Feb 19, 1894) by
Stephane Javelle (639)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sm?) in Hydra (09 40 43.2, Dec +03 57 34)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.35 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 549
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 549
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 549
Celestial Atlas
(IC 450 - 499) ←     IC Objects: IC 500 - 549     → (IC 550 - 599)