Celestial Atlas
(IC 4950 - 4999) ←     IC Objects: IC 5000 - 5049 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 5050 - 5099)
Click here for Introductory Material
QuickLinks:
5000, 5001, 5002, 5003, 5004, 5005, 5006, 5007, 5008, 5009, 5010, 5011, 5012,
5013, 5014, 5015, 5016, 5017, 5018, 5019, 5020, 5021, 5022, 5023, 5024, 5025,
5026, 5027, 5028, 5029, 5030, 5031, 5032, 5033, 5034, 5035, 5036, 5037, 5038,
5039, 5040, 5041, 5042, 5043, 5044, 5045, 5046, 5047, 5048, 5049

Page last updated May 22, 2014
WORKING 5006/3&7/29&30/46&47: Historical identification

IC 5000 (=
NGC 6901 = PGC 64552)
Discovered (Aug 15, 1863) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 6901)
Discovered (Sep 29, 1891) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 5000)
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)ab?) in Aquila (RA 20 22 21.6, Dec +06 25 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5000 (= Bigourdan #335, 1860 RA 20 15 28, NPD 84 00) is "pretty small, extremely faint star involved". The position precesses to RA 20 22 21.5, Dec +06 26 39, only 0.8 arcmin north of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain. The duplicate listing is due to Marth's position for NGC 6901 being far enough "off" that neither Bigourdan nor Dreyer had any idea that Bigourdan's #335 was the same as Marth's object.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 6901 for anything else.

IC 5001 (= PGC 64681)
Discovered (May 17, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)ab? pec) in Telescopium (RA 20 26 20.2, Dec -54 46 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5001 (= Frost #1201, 1860 RA 20 15 36, NPD 145 12) has a "brighter middle, magnitude 15". The position precesses to RA 20 26 24.3, Dec -54 45 00, about 1.6 arcmin north northeast of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby save for IC 5002, which Frost also recorded, and his relative positions and brightnesses are a good match to those of the galaxies, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.95 by 0.45 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5001, also showing IC 5002
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5001, also showing IC 5002
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5001

IC 5002 (= PGC 64695)
Discovered (May 17, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 13.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Telescopium (RA 20 26 39.8, Dec -54 47 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5002 (= Frost #1202, 1860 RA 20 15 48, NPD 145 14) has a "brighter middle, magnitude 13". The position precesses to RA 20 26 36.5, Dec -54 46 58, about 1.1 arcmin north northwest of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby save for IC 5001, which Frost also recorded, and his relative positions and brightnesses are a good match to those of the galaxies, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5002, also showing IC 5001
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5002, also showing IC 5001
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5002

WORKING HERE: history of identification

IC 5003 (=
IC 5029 = IC 5039 = IC 5046 = PGC 65249)
Discovered (Jun 9, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5046)
Also observed (Jul 26, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5029)
Also observed (Aug 29, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5039)
Also observed (1899?) by Herbert Howe (and later listed as IC 5039)
Also observed (Sep 8, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5003)
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Microscopium (RA 20 43 14.3 Dec -29 51 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5003 (= Swift list XII (#18), 1860 RA 20 16 32, NPD 120 19.4) is "very faint, considerably small, round, in line with 2 stars to southeast". The position precesses to RA 20 25 10.9, Dec -29 52 26, but there is nothing there. (This is the preceding of two galaxies observed by Swift on four different occasions, in four almost completely different places, leading to four IC2 listings for each object; and as a result requiring a long and complex discussion, which I plan to leave for the last task on this page.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.15 by 0.55 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5003
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5003
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5003

IC 5004 (=
NGC 6923 = PGC 64884)
Discovered (Jul 31, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 6923)
Discovered (Jul 22, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5004)
A magnitude 12.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b?) in Microscopium (RA 20 31 39.0, Dec -30 49 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5004 (= Swift list XI (#192), 1860 RA 20 16 40, NPD 121 19.2) is "extremely faint, pretty small, a little extended, 2 stars to south". The position precesses to RA 20 25 22.5, Dec -30 52 12, but there is nothing there. However, (per Corwin) there is a galaxy that fits the description about 6 minutes of time to the east, namely the one listed above; and since Swift's later observations often contained positional errors dwarfing those involved here, the description of the star field trumps the position and makes the identification reasonably certain (or at least certain enough that there is general agreement that it is correct).
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 6923 for anything else.

IC 5005 (= PGC 64657)
Discovered by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)cd?) in Capricornus (RA 20 25 20.1, Dec -25 49 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5005 (= Barnard, 1860 RA 20 16 44, NPD 116 16.5) is "pretty small, round, very gradually brighter middle, faint star close to northwest". The position precesses to RA 20 25 09.0, Dec -25 49 31, about 2.5 arcmin west of the galaxy listed above, but there is nothing else nearby and the star on its northwest rim makes the identification reasonably certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 1.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5005
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5005
Below, a 2.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5005

WORKING HERE: Check Kobold's position

IC 5006
Recorded (Sep 23, 1895) by
Hermann Kobold
A double star in Aquila (RA 20 23 47.0, Dec +06 26 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5006 (= Kobold (#37, K11), 1860 RA 20 16 51, NPD 83 58.6) is a "14th magnitude star in faint, very small, round nebula". The position precesses to RA 20 23 44.5, Dec +06 28 17, but there is nothing there save for NGC 6096, which per Corwin cannot be Kobold's object because he also observed it on the same night. (Corwin also states that Kobold's position falls right on the close double listed above, but the only reference I have seen so far gives a position identical to the one in the IC2, which falls 1.4 arcmin northwest of the pair; hence the note about "WORKING HERE" above.)
SDSS image of region near the double star listed as IC 5006, also showing NGC 6096
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5006, also showing NGC 6096
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5006
SDSS image of region near the double star listed as IC 5006

WORKING HERE: history of identification

IC 5007 (=
IC 5030 = IC 5041 = IC 5047 = PGC 65258)
Discovered (Jun 9, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5047)
Also observed (Jul 26, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5030)
Also observed (Aug 29, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5041)
Also observed (1899?) by Herbert Howe (and later listed as IC 5041)
Also observed (Sep 8, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5007)
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)d?) in Microscopium (RA 20 43 34.3, Dec -29 42 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5007 (= Swift list XII (#19), 1860 RA 20 16 57, NPD 120 09.4) is "most extremely faint, considerably large, round". The position precesses to RA 20 25 35.2, Dec -29 42 22, but there is nothing there. (This is the following of two galaxies observed by Swift on four different occasions, in four almost completely different places, leading to four IC2 listings for each object; and as a result requiring a long and complex discussion, which I plan to leave for the last task on this page.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.3 by 1.65 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5007
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5007
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5007

IC 5008 (= PGC 64929)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)dm pec?) in Pavo (RA 20 32 44.5, Dec -72 41 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5008 (= DeLisle Stewart #673, 1860 RA 20 17 27, NPD 163 10) is "extremely faint, very small, a little extended 90, a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 20 32 48.7, Dec -72 42 19, only 0.7 arcmin north northwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.25 by 0.35 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5008
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5008
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5008

IC 5009 (= PGC 64923)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type SB0(r)a?) in Pavo (RA 20 32 34.2, Dec -72 10 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5009 (= DeLisle Stewart #672, 1860 RA 20 17 31, NPD 162 38) is "very faint, very small, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 20 32 36.9, Dec -72 10 19, on the southeastern rim of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certaion.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5009
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5009
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5009

IC 5010 (almost certainly not =
PGC 64836)
Recorded (Sep 24, 1900) by DeLisle Stewart
A lost or nonexistent object in Pavo (RA 20 30 57.2, Dec -65 55 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5010 (= DeLisle Stewart #671, 1860 RA 20 18 05, NPD 156 23) is "very faint, very small, considerably extended 20, much brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 20 30 57.2, Dec -65 55 25 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there. Most references list PGC 64836 as IC 5010, but as pointed out by Thomson, for that galaxy to be what Stewart recorded would require uncharacteristically large errors in both right ascension and declination, and it doesn't fit the description well enough to justify such a leap; so I've followed his lead and listed IC 5010 as lost or nonexistent, and treated PGC 64836 as a separate object (immediately below).
DSS image of region near Stewart's position for the apparently nonexistent IC 5010
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the position of IC 5010

PGC 64836 (probably not =
IC 5010)
Probably not an IC object but listed here since often (mis?)identified as IC 5010
A magnitude 15.1 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Pavo (RA 20 30 26.7, Dec -66 05 49)
Historical Identification: As noted in the entry for IC 5010, PGC is usually (mis?)identified as that object; but aside from very unlikely errors in its position, the brighter central region that represents all that Stewart could have observed is not "considerably extended" but nearly round, and even its fainter outer regions run north-south, not at a position angle of 20. So it is very unlikely that this is actually IC 5010.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.65 by 0.3 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 64836, which is often (mis?)identified as IC 5010
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 64836
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 64836, which is often (mis?)identified as IC 5010

IC 5011 (probably =
IC 5013 = PGC 64772)
Discovered (Jul 25, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5011)
Discovered (Aug 29, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5013)
A magnitude 11.7 lenticular galaxy (type SB0(s)? pec) in Microscopium (RA 20 28 33.8, Dec -36 01 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5011 (= Swift list XI (#193), 1860 RA 20 18 15, NPD 126 28.6) is "pretty bright, very small, very much extended". The position precesses to RA 20 27 16.7, Dec -36 01 19, but there is nothing there. However, Swift's #194, observed the following month, has a very similar description and lies just over a minute of time to the east, which is a relatively small error for Swift's last year of observation; so (per Corwin) the two observations are almost certainly of the same object, and IC 5011 is almost certainly the same as IC 5013, which is undoubtedly the galaxy listed above.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.65 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5011, also showing elliptical galaxy PGC 64773, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 5013
Above, the image below superimposed on a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5011
(Image Credit & © above and below Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Below, an approximately 2.4 arcmin wide image of IC 5011, also showing PGC 64773
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of lenticular galaxy IC 5011, also showing elliptical galaxy PGC 64773, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 5013
Below, a 25 arcsec wide image of the center of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, Courtney Seligman)
'Raw' HST image of central disc of lenticular galaxy IC 5011

IC 5012 (= PGC 64802)
Discovered (May 17, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)c?) in Pavo (RA 20 29 32.0, Dec -56 44 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5012 (= Frost #1203, 1860 RA 20 18 32, NPD 147 12) is "pretty small, extended 225, a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 20 29 35.1, Dec -56 44 30, just off the eastern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description is a reasonable fit and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification seems certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.5 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5012
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5012
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5012

IC 5013 (=
IC 5011 = PGC 64772)
Discovered (Jul 25, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5011)
Discovered (Aug 29, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5013)
A magnitude 11.7 lenticular galaxy (type SB0(s)? pec) in Microscopium (RA 20 28 33.8, Dec -36 01 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5013 (= Swift list XI (#194), 1860 RA 20 19 25, NPD 126 30.0) is "extremely small, very much extended north-south". The position precesses to RA 20 28 26.4, Dec -36 02 31, about 1.7 arcmin southwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits reasonably well and there is nothing else nearby that Swift would have noticed, so the identification is certain. (There is a faint galaxy (PGC 64773) on the southeastern rim of IC 5013 that is sometimes misidentified as that IC object, so it is discussed in the following entry.) The duplicate listing was due to a poor measurement for IC 5011 (which see for a discussion of the problem).
Physical Information: Given the duplicate listing, see IC 5011 for anything else. (Even though IC 5013 had the more accurate observation, the earlier catalog number is usually used when discussing duplicate listings.)

PGC 64773 (not =
IC 5013)
Not an IC object but listed here since sometimes misidentified as IC 5013
A magnitude 14.0 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Microscopium (RA 20 28 34.9, Dec -36 02 33)
Historical Identification: PGC 64773 is sometimes misidentified as IC 5013, but if Swift had noticed it he would have recorded both galaxies as separate objects, and it does not match the description ("very much extended north-south") for his observation; so it is certainly not the IC object.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.55 by 0.4 arcmin. (See IC 5011 for images.)

IC 5014 (= PGC 65015)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0 pec?) in Pavo (RA 20 35 15.6, Dec -73 27 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5014 (= DeLisle Stewart #674, 1860 RA 20 19 33, NPD 163 56) is "faint, small, brighter middle, between 2 faint stars". The position precesses to RA 20 35 15.3, Dec -73 27 56, about 0.8 arcmin south of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.45 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5014
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5014
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5014

IC 5015 (almost certainly not =
NGC 6925 = PGC 64980)
Recorded (Aug 18, 1897) by Lewis Swift
A lost or nonexistent object in Microscopium (RA 20 28 34.6, Dec -31 42 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5015 (= Swift list XII (#20), 1860 RA 20 19 50, NPD 122 09.6) is "pretty bright, pretty small, round, nearly between 2 stars". The position precesses to RA 20 28 34.6, Dec -31 42 04 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there. The nearest reasonably bright galaxy is NGC 6925, which lies nearly a degree and a half to the east and more than a quarter of a degree to the south of Swift's position; and although the NGC object does lie nearly between two 10th magnitude stars, it is considerably extended, so it does not fit Swift's description, and is almost certainly not what he observed. Despite this, some references list IC 5015 as a duplicate listing of NGC 6925, and not all of them include a warning that the identification is suspect; so it is mentioned here as a warning against giving much (if any) credence to the suggestion.
DSS image of region near Swift's position for the apparently nonexistent IC 5015
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Swift's position for IC 5015

IC 5016 (= PGC 65025)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)c?) in Pavo (RA 20 35 36.9, Dec -72 54 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5016 (= DeLisle Stewart #675, 1860 RA 20 20 14, NPD 163 23) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, 11th magnitude star 1 arcmin to southwest". The position precesses to RA 20 35 37.8, Dec -72 54 51, on the southern rim of the galaxy listed above, there is nothing else nearby, and although the 11th magnitude star is actually to the southeast (a not uncommon confusion about directions), the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 15325 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 5016 is about 715 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 670 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 690 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.5 by 0.45 arcmin, the galaxy is about 95 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5016
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5016
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5016

IC 5017 (= PGC 64902)
Discovered (May 17, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SAB0(rs)?) in Indus (RA 20 32 03.8, Dec -57 35 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5017 (= Frost #1204, 1860 RA 20 21 00, NPD 148 03) has a "brighter middle, magnitude 14.5". The position precesses to RA 20 32 08.9, Dec -57 35 05, only 0.8 arcmin east of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 1.1 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5017
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5017
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5017

IC 5018 (possibly =
IC 4998 and perhaps = PGC 64546)
Possibly recorded (Sep 11, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 4998)
Recorded (Sep 11, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5018)
Probably a lost or nonexistent object in Sagittarius (20 30 31.7, Dec -38 12 53)
but perhaps PGC 64546 = A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)c?) at RA 20 22 10.5, Dec -38 18 30
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5018 (= Swift list XII (#21), 1860 RA 20 21 22, NPD 128 40.7) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, between two 8.5 magnitude stars to southwest and northeast". The position precesses to RA 20 30 31.7, Dec -38 12 53 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there or anywhere near there. As noted above, there is a possibility that IC 5018 and 4998 are badly recorded observations of the same object, and if so, a very slight possibility that they represent PGC 64546. It is most likely that IC 5018 is a lost or nonexistent object, whether it is the same as IC 4998 or not; but see that entry for a further discussion of the matter.
DSS image of region near Swift's position for the probably lost or nonexistent IC 5018
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Swift's position for IC 5018

IC 5019 (almost certainly not =
PGC 64850)
Recorded (Sep 16, 1897) by Lewis Swift
A lost or nonexistent object in Microscopium (RA 20 30 51.7, Dec -36 19 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5019 (= Swift list XI (#195, 1860 RA 20 21 50, NPD 126 47.0) is "very faint, considerably small, round". The position precesses to RA 20 30 51.7, Dec -36 19 07 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there bright enough for Swift to have seen. Several references list PGC 64850 (which see immediately below) as IC 5019, and if the only problem was that it lies about a quarter degree to the south that might be reasonable; but it is not a good fit to the description, and (per Thomson) it is considerably fainter than similarly described galaxies discovered by Swift at such relatively far southern declinations, and for that matter, considerably fainter than other galaxies that were apparently too faint for Swift to notice. So as stated above, IC 5019 is almost certainly lost or nonexistent.
DSS image of region near Swift's position for the apparently nonexistent IC 5019
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Swift's position for IC 5019

PGC 64850 (almost certainly not =
IC 5019)
Almost certainly not an IC object, but listed here since often (mis?)identified as IC 5019
A magnitude 15? spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(r)bc? pec) in Microscopium (RA 20 30 47.1, Dec -36 04 35)
Historical Identification: See IC 5019 for a discussion of why this is almost certainly not that IC object (this entry serving as a warning against such an identification).
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 12020 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 64850 is about 560 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 535 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 545 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 2.0 by 0.5 arcmin, the galaxy is about 300 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 64850, which is often (mis?)identified as IC 5019
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 64850
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 64850, which is often (mis?)identified as IC 5019

IC 5020 (= PGC 64845)
Discovered (Aug 29, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)bc?) in Microscopium (RA 20 30 38.5, Dec -33 29 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5020 (= Swift list XI (#196), 1860 RA 20 21 58, NPD 123 58.7) is "pretty faint, pretty small, a little extended". The position precesses to RA 20 30 48.7, Dec -33 30 49, about 2.7 arcmin southeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8 by 2.0 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5020
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5020
Below, a 3.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5020

IC 5021 (= PGC 64960)
Discovered (May 17, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type SBbc? pec) in Indus (RA 20 33 34.2, Dec -54 31 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5021 (= Frost #1205, 1860 RA 20 22 50, NPD 144 59) is "very small, round disc, magnitude 14". The position precesses to RA 20 33 31.6, Dec -54 30 49, only about 0.6 arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above, and although there is a much larger galaxy not far to the southwest, it is too faint to have registered on the plates used by Frost, so the identification is certain. (However, since the other galaxy is a probable companion of IC 5021, it is discussed in the following entry.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin. Probably an interacting pair with PGC 64953, as they have similar radial velocities and distorted features.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5021, also showing PGC 64953
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5021, also showing PGC 64953
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5021

PGC 64953
Not an IC object but listed here because a probable companion of
IC 5021
A magnitude 14.5(?) spiral galaxy (type SB(s)m?) in Indus (RA 20 33 24.3, Dec -54 31 45)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.55 by 1.4 arcmin. Probably an interacting pair with IC 5021, as they have similar radial velocities and distorted features.
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 64953
Above, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of PGC 64953; see IC 5021 for a wider-field image

IC 5022 (= PGC 65186)
Discovered (Sep 22, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)c?) in Octans (RA 20 41 06.1, Dec -76 26 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5022 (= DeLisle Stewart #676, 1860 RA 20 23 35, NPD 166 56) is "extremely faint, small, round, considerably brighter middle, suspected". The position precesses to RA 20 41 08.0, Dec -76 27 08, well within the southeastern outline of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.75 by 0.5 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5022
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5022
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5022

IC 5023 (= PGC 65109)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type S(r)a?) in Pavo (RA 20 38 10.7, Dec -67 11 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5023 (= DeLisle Stewart #677, 1860 RA 20 25 02, NPD 157 40) is "faint, small, considerably extended 130". The position precesses to RA 20 38 07.5, Dec -67 11 16, less than 0.4 arcmin southwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.45 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5023
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5023
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5023

IC 5024 (= PGC 65160)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)bc?) in Pavo (RA 20 40 09.4, Dec -71 06 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5024 (= DeLisle Stewart #678, 1860 RA 20 25 43, NPD 161 35) is "extremely faint, small, much extended 15". The position precesses to RA 20 40 08.6, Dec -71 06 03, just off the northern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description is a reasonable fit and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of the main body is about 0.95 by 0.8 arcmin; faint extensions of the spiral arms (particularly to the north) span about 1.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5024
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5024
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5024

IC 5025 (= PGC 65304)
Discovered (Sep 22, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Octans (RA 20 44 59.0, Dec -76 59 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5025 (= DeLisle Stewart #679, 1860 RA 20 27 00, NPD 167 28) is "very faint, very small, considerably extended 125, brighter middle, suspected". The position precesses to RA 20 44 51.6, Dec -76 58 34, just north of the western extension of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.55 by 0.2 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5025
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5025
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5025

IC 5026 (= PGC 65426)
Discovered (Sep 22, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Octans (RA 20 48 28.0, Dec -78 04 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5026 (= DeLisle Stewart #681, 1860 RA 20 29 30, NPD 168 34) is "extremely faint, very small, much extended 70, a little brighter middle, suspected". The position precesses to RA 20 48 16.4, Dec -78 04 06, just north of the western extension of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 0.25 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5026
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5026
Below, a 2.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5026

IC 5027 (= PGC 65188)
Discovered (May 17, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sc pec?) in Indus (RA 20 41 08.9, Dec -55 28 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5027 (= Frost #1206, 1860 RA 20 30 25, NPD 145 58) is "round, magnitude 15". The position precesses to RA 20 41 08.8, Dec -55 28 36, just south of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of the main body of the galaxy is about 0.55 by 0.4 arcmin; fainter outer regions span about 0.6 by 0.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5027
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5027
Below, a 0.7 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5027

IC 5028 (= PGC 65250)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.6 irregular galaxy (type IAB(s)m?) in Pavo (RA 20 43 22.2, Dec -65 38 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5028 (= DeLisle Stewart #680, 1860 RA 20 30 47, NPD 156 08) is "very faint, diffuse, 10th magnitude star 2 arcmin to south, suspected". The position precesses to RA 20 43 20.9, Dec -65 38 23, within the northern outline of the galaxy listed above, there is nothing else nearby, and the star to the south makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.3 arcmin.
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 5028
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5028
Below, a 1.75 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of irregular galaxy IC 5028

WORKING HERE: history of identification

IC 5029 (=
IC 5003 = IC 5039 = IC 5046 = PGC 65249)
Discovered (Jun 9, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5046)
Also observed (Jul 26, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5029)
Also observed (Aug 29, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5039)
Also observed (1899?) by Herbert Howe (and later listed as IC 5039)
Also observed (Sep 8, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5003)
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Microscopium (RA 20 43 14.3 Dec -29 51 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5029 (= Swift list XII (#22), 1860 RA 20 31 43, NPD 120 19.9) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, much extended, faint star to southeast, northwestern of 2", the other being IC 5030. The position precesses to RA 20 40 17.5, Dec -29 50 28, but there is nothing there. (This is the preceding of two galaxies observed by Swift on four different occasions, in four almost completely different places, leading to four IC2 listings for each object; and as a result requiring a long and complex discussion, which I plan to leave for the next iteration of this page.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 0.6? arcmin.

WORKING HERE: history of identification

IC 5030 (=
IC 5007 = IC 5041 = IC 5047 = PGC 65258)
Discovered (Jun 9, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5047)
Also observed (Jul 26, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5030)
Also observed (Aug 29, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5041)
Also observed (1899?) by Herbert Howe (and later listed as IC 5041)
Also observed (Sep 8, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5007)
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)d?) in Microscopium (RA 20 43 34.3, Dec -29 42 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5030 (= Swift list XII (#23), 1860 RA 20 32 03, NPD 120 20.9) is "most extremely faint, very small, much extended, very diffuse, southeastern of 2", the other being IC 5029. The position precesses to RA 20 40 37.5, Dec -29 51 25, but there is nothing there. (This is the following of two galaxies observed by Swift on four different occasions, in four almost completely different places, leading to four IC2 listings for each object; and as a result requiring a long and complex discussion, which I plan to leave for the next iteration of this page.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.2? arcmin.

IC 5031 (= PGC 65314)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type Sc? pec) in Pavo (RA 20 45 20.1, Dec -67 32 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5031 (= DeLisle Stewart #682, 1860 RA 20 32 14, NPD 158 02) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round, suspected". The position precesses to RA 20 45 16.8, Dec -67 32 07, less than 0.4 arcmin northwest of the northwestern member of a pair of interacting galaxies, and there is nothing else nearby, so as explained in the Discovery Notes immediately following, the pair must correspond to IC 5031 and 5032, and the galaxy listed above (the northwestern member of the pair) must be IC 5031.
Discovery Notes: Although the pair of galaxies listed here as IC 5031 and 5032 are northwest and southeast of each other, Stewart's positions are due east and west. This means that they do not specify which galaxy is which as clearly as might be hoped. However, since Stewart's list was in order of (1900) right ascension, and Dreyer's IC entries in order of (1860) right ascension, IC 5031 must be the western one and IC 5032 the eastern one, regardless of any difference in their actual or measured declinations. On that basis, the galaxy listed above must be Stewart's #682 and Dreyer's IC 5031, and the one listed in the following entry must be Stewart's #683 and Dreyer's IC 5032.
Physical Information: Apparent size of the main body of the galaxy is about 0.45 by 0.25 arcmin; counting the tail extending toward IC 5032, the galaxy spans 0.65 arcmin.
DSS image of region near interacting spiral galaxies IC 5031 and IC 5032
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5031 and 5032
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the pair
DSS image of interacting spiral galaxies IC 5031 and IC 5032

IC 5032 (= PGC 65317)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec) in Pavo (RA 20 45 22.0, Dec -67 33 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5032 (= DeLisle Stewart #683, 1860 RA 20 32 20, NPD 158 02) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round, suspected". The position precesses to RA 20 45 22.7, Dec -67 32 06, less than 0.4 arcmin northeast of the northwestern member of a pair of interacting galaxies, and only an arcmin north of its southeastern companion. As discussed in the entry for IC 5031, this means that the pair must be IC 5031 and 5032, and the galaxy listed above (the southeastern member of the pair) must be IC 5032.
Physical Information: Apparent size of the main body of the galaxy is about 0.55 by 0.4 arcmin; counting the tail and antitail due to its interaction with IC 5031 (which see for images), the galaxy spans about 0.9 arcmin.

IC 5033 (= PGC 65272)
Discovered (May 17, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Indus (RA 20 43 55.0, Dec -57 20 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5033 (= Frost #1208, 1860 RA 20 32 51, NPD 147 49) is "very small, round, a little brighter middle, magnitude 15". The position precesses to RA 20 43 48.3, Dec -57 19 12, about 1.2 arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5033
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5033
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5033

IC 5034 (= PGC 65261)
Discovered (May 17, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc?) in Indus (RA 20 43 41.6, Dec -57 01 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5034 (= Frost #1207, 1860 RA 20 32 52, NPD 147 31) has a "brighter middle, magnitude 14.5". The position precesses to RA 20 43 46.7, Dec -57 01 12, just off the northeastern rim of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.65 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5034, also showing IC 5035
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5034, also showing IC 5035
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5034

IC 5035 (= PGC 65285)
Discovered (May 17, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 15.1 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Indus (RA 20 44 14.5, Dec -57 07 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5035 (= Frost #1209, 1860 RA 20 33 21, NPD 147 38) is "very small, round, a little brighter middle, magnitude 15". The position precesses to RA 20 44 16.3, Dec -57 08 07, only 0.5 arcmin south southeast of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.75 by 0.35 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5035, also showing IC 5034
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5035, also showing IC 5034
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5035

IC 5036 (= PGC 65296)
Discovered (May 17, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 15.5 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Indus (RA 20 44 37.5, Dec -57 37 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5036 (= Frost #1210, 1860 RA 20 33 44, NPD 148 07) is "faint, pretty small, much extended 125". The position precesses to RA 20 44 43.1, Dec -57 37 03, about 0.9 arcmin northeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.2 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5036
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5036
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5036

IC 5037 (= PGC 65327)
Discovered (May 17, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Indus (RA 20 45 39.3, Dec -58 26 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5037 (= Frost #1211, 1860 RA 20 34 30, NPD 148 56) is "faint, pretty small, much extended 170". The position precesses to RA 20 45 35.8, Dec -58 25 55, just over an arcmin north northwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.25 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5037
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5037
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5037

IC 5038 (= PGC 65365)
Discovered (Aug 23, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(s)cd?) in Pavo (RA 20 46 51.5, Dec -65 00 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5038 (= DeLisle Stewart #684, 1860 RA 20 34 32, NPD 155 31) is "very faint, very small, round, almost stellar". The position precesses to RA 20 46 52.6, Dec -65 00 49, within the northern outline of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5038, also showing IC 5042
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5038, also showing IC 5042
Below, a 1.75 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5038

IC 5039 (=
IC 5003 = IC 5029 = IC 5046 = PGC 65249)
Discovered (Jun 9, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5046)
Also observed (Jul 26, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5029)
Also observed (Aug 29, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5039)
Also observed (1899?) by Herbert Howe (and later listed as IC 5039)
Also observed (Sep 8, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5003)
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Microscopium (RA 20 43 14.3 Dec -29 51 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5039 (= Swift list XI (#197), Howe, 1860 RA 20 34 41, NPD 120 21.1) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, very much extended, southwestern of 2", the other being IC 5041. The position precesses to RA 20 43 14.7, Dec -29 51 12, within the eastern outline of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Notes: Swift observed this object (and the "northeastern of 2", which is IC 5041) on several occasions, recording different (wrong) positions on every occasion, and as a result Dreyer assigned eight IC entries to the two galaxies. When Howe observed the region he found only the two objects, which he felt best fit Swift's #197 (= IC 5039) and #199 (= IC 5041), so for those entries Dreyer used Howe's correct positions, while the other six entries have Swift's terrible positions. However, since tradition assigns the lowest numerical entry to multiple listings for a given object, the two galaxies are not called IC 5039 and 5041, but IC 5003 (which see for a discussion of the mess Swift made of this, and how the tangle was unraveled) and 5007.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate listings, see IC 5003 for anything else.

IC 5040 (= PGC 65615)
Discovered (Sep 22, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)cd?) in Octans (RA 20 52 19.5, Dec -76 41 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5040 (= DeLisle Stewart #686, 1860 RA 20 34 56, NPD 167 11) is "considerably bright, small, round, suspected". The position precesses to RA 20 52 15.4, Dec -76 40 22, only 0.9 arcmin north northwest of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.55 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5040
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5040
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5040

IC 5041 (=
IC 5007 = IC 5030 = IC 5047 = PGC 65258)
Discovered (Jun 9, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5047)
Also observed (Jul 26, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5030)
Also observed (Aug 29, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5041)
Also observed (1899?) by Herbert Howe (and later listed as IC 5041)
Also observed (Sep 8, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5007)
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)d?) in Microscopium (RA 20 43 34.3, Dec -29 42 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5041 (= Swift list XI (#199), Howe, 1860 RA 20 35 01, NPD 120 12.2) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, much extended, very difficult, northeastern of 2", the other being IC 5039. The position precesses to RA 20 43 34.1, Dec -29 42 15, dead center on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Notes: Swift observed this object (and the "southwestern of 2", which is IC 5039) on several occasions, recording different (wrong) positions on every occasion, and as a result Dreyer assigned eight IC entries to the two galaxies. When Howe observed the region he found only the two objects, which he felt best fit Swift's #197 (= IC 5039) and #199 (= IC 5041), so for those entries Dreyer used Howe's correct positions, while the other six entries have Swift's terrible positions. However, since tradition assigns the lowest numerical entry to multiple listings for a given object, the two galaxies are not called IC 5039 and 5041, but IC 5003 (which see for a discussion of the mess Swift made of this, and how the tangle was unraveled) and 5007.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate listings, see IC 5007 for anything else.

IC 5042 (= PGC 65394)
Discovered (Aug 23, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pavo (RA 20 47 46.0, Dec -65 05 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5042 (= DeLisle Stewart #685, 1860 RA 20 35 26, NPD 155 35) is "very faint, very small, round, almost stellar". The position precesses to RA 20 47 46.5, Dec -65 04 41, within the northern outline of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.25 by 0.75 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5042, also showing IC 5038
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5042, also showing IC 5038
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5042

IC 5043 (= PGC 65355)
Discovered (May 17, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 15.6 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Indus (RA 20 46 38.3, Dec -56 59 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5043 (= Frost #1212, 1860 RA 20 35 52, NPD 147 29) is "faint, small, extended 210". The position precesses to RA 20 46 43.9, Dec -56 58 44, about 0.8 arcmin east northeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.25 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5043
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5043
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5043

IC 5044 (= PGC 65515)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.5 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Pavo (RA 20 50 41.6 Dec -71 53 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5044 (= DeLisle Stewart #687, 1860 RA 20 36 04, NPD 162 28) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round". The position precesses to RA 20 50 35.5, Dec -71 57 25, but there is nothing in the region save for a pair of galaxies about 3 arcmin to the north of Stewart's position. Fortunately, Stewart recorded both galaxies (as his #687 and #688), so both were listed by Dreyer (as IC 5044 and 5045), and although Stewart's declinations are off by more than usual, his relative positions match those of the galaxies reasonably well, so we can be certain that the western galaxy (the one listed above) is IC 5044, and the eastern is IC 5045.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.35 arcmin.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 5044, also showing spiral galaxy IC 5045
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5044, also showing IC 5045
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 5044

IC 5045 (= PGC 65525)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Pavo (RA 20 50 49.9, Dec -71 54 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5045 (= DeLisle Stewart #688, 1860 RA 20 36 10, NPD 162 29) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round". The position precesses to RA 20 50 41.8, Dec -71 58 24, and as in the case of IC 5044, is over 3 arcmin south of the appropriate candidate (in this case, the galaxy listed above); but as mentioned in the previous entry, the fact that there is nothing in the region but the two galaxies, and their relative positions are a reasonable match for Stewart's positions makes the identifications certain despite the unusually large error in Stewart's declinations.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.35 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5045
Above, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of IC 5045; for a wider-field image see IC 5044

WORKING HERE: history of identification

IC 5046 (=
IC 5003 = IC 5029 = IC 5039 = PGC 65249)
Discovered (Jun 9, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5046)
Also observed (Jul 26, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5029)
Also observed (Aug 29, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5039)
Also observed (1899?) by Herbert Howe (and later listed as IC 5039)
Also observed (Sep 8, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5003)
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Microscopium (RA 20 43 14.3 Dec -29 51 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5046 (= Swift list XI (#200), 1860 RA 20 36 12, NPD 120 25.0) is "extremely faint, pretty small, much extended, 2 very faint stars to southeast, southwestern of 2", the other being IC 5047. The position precesses to RA 20 44 45.5, Dec -29 54 52, but there is nothing there.
Discovery Notes: See IC 5039.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate listings, see IC 5003 for anything else.

WORKING HERE: history of identification

IC 5047 (=
IC 5007 = IC 5030 = IC 5041 = PGC 65258)
Discovered (Jun 9, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5047)
Also observed (Jul 26, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5030)
Also observed (Aug 29, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5041)
Also observed (1899?) by Herbert Howe (and later listed as IC 5041)
Also observed (Sep 8, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5007)
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)d?) in Microscopium (RA 20 43 34.3, Dec -29 42 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5047 (= Swift list XI (#201), 1860 RA 20 36 18, NPD 120 15.0) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, much extended, very difficult, northeastern of 2", the other being IC 5046. The position precesses to RA 20 44 50.9, Dec -29 44 51, but there is nothing there.
Discovery Notes: See IC 5041.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate listings, see IC 5007 for anything else.

IC 5048 (= PGC 65570)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)bc?) in Pavo (RA 20 51 40.6, Dec -71 48 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5048 (= DeLisle Stewart #689, 1860 RA 20 37 13, NPD 162 19) is "extremely faint, very small". The position precesses to RA 20 51 38.7, Dec -71 48 14.4, just off the southwestern rim of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby that isn't accounted for by another of Stewart's discoveries, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.65 by 0.55 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5048, also showing IC 5051
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5048, also showing IC 5051
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5048

IC 5049 (probably = PGC 65378 + PGC 65377)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
Probably a pair of galaxies in Microscopium
PGC 65378 = A magnitude 13.3 elliptical galaxy (type E2? pec) at RA 20 47 23.8, Dec -38 25 05
PGC 65377 = A magnitude 14.1 elliptical galaxy (type E1? pec) at RA 20 47 23.4, Dec -38 24 48
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5049 (= Swift list XI (#202), 1860 RA 20 37 49, NPD 128 59.2) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round". The position precesses to RA 20 46 53.3, Dec -38 28 46, but there is nothing there. However, the double galaxy listed above lies about 13 arcmin to the northeast of Swift's position, and since there is nothing else in the region and such errors were not uncommon in Swift's later years, the identification is reasonable and probably correct.
Warning About Notation: The pair of galaxies are sometimes referred to as IC 5049A and IC 5049B, but references that use such designations often disagree about which is "A" and which "B", so such usage should be avoided, and unique identifiers (such as the PGC designations) used instead.
Physical Information: Apparent size of the northwestern component (PGC 65377) is about 0.95 by 0.75 arcmin; of the southeastern (PGC 65378), about 1.25 by 0.95 arcmin.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxies PGC 65378 and 65377, which probably comprise IC 5049
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the probable IC 5049
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the pair
DSS image of elliptical galaxies PGC 65378 and 65377, which probably comprise IC 5049
Celestial Atlas
(IC 4950 - 4999) ←     IC Objects: IC 5000 - 5049     → (IC 5050 - 5099)