Celestial Atlas
(IC 5000 - 5049) ←     IC Objects: IC 5050 - 5099 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 5100 - 5149)
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5076, 5077, 5078, 5079, 5080, 5081, 5082, 5083, 5084, 5085, 5086, 5087, 5088,
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Page last updated Jul 20, 2014
WORKING: Add physical information

IC 5050 (= PGC 65310)
Discovered (Oct 13, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SAB(r)b?) in Aquarius (RA 20 45 15.1, Dec -05 37 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5050 (= Javelle #1403, 1860 RA 20 37 51, NPD 96 08.1) is "faint, considerably small, diffuse, very small elongated nucleus". The position precesses to RA 20 45 16.0, Dec -05 37 48, only 0.5 arcmin southeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.45 by 0.9 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5050
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5050
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5050

IC 5051 (= PGC 65618)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pavo (RA 20 52 22.9, Dec -71 47 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5051 (= DeLisle Stewart #690, 1860 RA 20 37 55, NPD 162 18) is "extremely faint, very small". The position precesses to RA 20 52 19.2, Dec -71 47 08, only a third of an arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby that isn't accounted for by another of Stewart's discoveries, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.65 by 0.4 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5051, also showing IC 5048
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5051, also showing IC 5048
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5051

IC 5052 (= PGC 65603)
Discovered (Aug 23, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 10.5 spiral galaxy (type SBd?) in Pavo (RA 20 52 03.0, Dec -69 11 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5052 (= DeLisle Stewart #692, 1860 RA 20 38 43, NPD 159 44) is "faint, large, extremely extended 140, 4 arcmin long". The position precesses to RA 20 52 08.4, Dec -69 13 05, on the southwestern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.2 by 1.2 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5052
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5052
Below, a 6 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy IC 5052
Below, a 1.2 by 3.5 arcmin image of part of the galaxy (North at upper left) (Image Credit ESA/HST/NASA)
HST image of part of spiral galaxy IC 5052

IC 5053 (= PGC 65662)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec) in Pavo (RA 20 53 36.0, Dec -71 08 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5053 (= DeLisle Stewart #694, 1860 RA 20 39 25, NPD 161 40) is "considerably faint, very small, brighter middle, 11th magnitude star 2 arcmin north". The position precesses to RA 20 53 31.1, Dec -71 08 56, on the southwestern extension of the galaxy listed above, there is nothing else nearby and the star to its north makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 0.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5053
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5053
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5053

IC 5054 (= PGC 65665)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(r)a?) in Pavo (RA 20 53 45.2, Dec -71 01 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5054 (= DeLisle Stewart #695, 1860 RA 20 39 32, NPD 161 33) is "considerably faint, very small, between 2 faint stars". The position precesses to RA 20 53 35.2, Dec -71 01 55, only about 0.9 arcmin southwest of the galaxy listed above, there is nothing else nearby, and the stars on either side of the galaxy make the identification certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 0.45 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5054
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5054
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5054

IC 5055 (= PGC 65643)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sc pec?) in Pavo (RA 20 52 57.1, Dec -68 26 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5055 (= DeLisle Stewart #693, 1860 RA 20 39 42, NPD 158 58) is "very faint, brighter middle, suspected". The position precesses to RA 20 52 51.5, Dec -68 26 57, only half an arcmin west southwest of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.35 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5055
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5055
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5055

IC 5056
Recorded (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A nonexistent object in Microscopium (RA 20 48 59.3, Dec -39 11 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5056 (= DeLisle Stewart #691, 1860 RA 20 39 53, NPD 129 42) is "faint, considerably large, extremely extended 150". The position precesses to RA 20 48 59.3, Dec -39 11 15 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there. Per Corwin, there are no "spindle" galaxies within several degrees of the position, and Stewart found nothing else on the short-exposure (one-hour) Bruce plate involved, so this is probably a plate defect, and therefore a nonexistent object. However, various galaxies have been suggested as candidates over the years, so they are discussed in the following entries as a warning against such misidentifications.
DSS image of region near the IC2 position for the nonexistent IC 5056
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the IC2 position for IC 5056, also showing PGC 65452

PGC 65452 (not =
IC 5056)
Not an IC object but listed here since often misidentified as IC 5056
A magnitude 14.5(?) spiral galaxy (type SBc? pec) in Microscopium (RA 20 49 12.7, Dec -39 13 23)
Historical Identification: Although PGC 65452 lies only a few arcmin from Stewart's position for IC 5056, the offset would require a very unlikely combination of errors, and the galaxy does not fit his description, so it is almost certainly not IC 5056 (which as noted in its entry, was probably a plate defect). However, it is listed as IC 5056 in some places (such as LEDA), so it is listed here as a warning about the misidentification.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.45 arcmin (including its faint southern extension).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 65452, which is often misidentified as IC 5056
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 65452
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 65452, which is often misidentified as IC 5056

PGC 131465 (not =
IC 5056)
Not an IC object but listed here since it could be misidentified as IC 5056
A magnitude 14.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Microscopium (RA 20 48 28.3, Dec -38 51 21)
Historical Identification: Despite requiring a 20 arcmin error in Stewart's declination, Corwin once suggested that PGC 131465 might be IC 5056, but he has retracted his suggestion because the part of the galaxy bright enough to be seen on Stewart's one-hour Bruce plate is not significantly extended, and therefore does not match the description. However, once such suggestions are made they have a way of creeping back into circulation, so this entry serves as a warning about any future misidentification.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.05 by 0.5 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 131465, which was once misidentified as IC 5056
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 131465
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 131465, which was once misidentified as IC 5056

IC 5057
Recorded (Jul 27, 1884) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 15(?) star in Aquarius (RA 20 47 13.5, Dec +00 19 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5057 (= Bigourdan #436, 1860 RA 20 40 04, NPD 90 12) is "extremely faint, nebulous star or extremely small nebula". The position precesses to RA 20 47 14.2, Dec +00 18 38, within the NGC 6962 group of galaxies, but which object in that group is Bigourdan's #436 is not obvious. However, it turns out that the problem is simply the round-off error in Dreyer's positions. As noted by Corwin, Bigourdan's original position (1900 RA 20 42 07.4, Dec -00 02 37) precesses to RA 20 47 14.6, Dec -00 19 23, just east of the star listed above, and Bigourdan's mention of the brighter star 1.5 arcmin south southwest makes the identification certain.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as IC 5057, also showing NGC 6961, NGC 6962, NGC 6964, NGC 6967 and IC 5061
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5057, also showing NGC 6961, 6962, 6964 and 6967, and IC 5061

IC 5058 (=
NGC 6965 = PGC 65376)
Discovered (Aug 27, 1857) by R. J. Mitchell (and later listed as NGC 6965)
Discovered (Oct 2, 1891) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 5058)
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Aquarius (RA 20 47 20.4, Dec +00 29 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5058 (= Bigourdan #438, 1860 RA 20 40 12, NPD 90 02) is "extremely faint, distinct from (NGC) 6963". The position precesses to RA 20 47 21.8, Dec +00 28 39, only half an arcmin southeast of PGC 65376, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification with that galaxy is certain. However, several of the NGC objects in the region have a long history of misidentifications, including this one (for instance, LEDA misidentifies NGC 6965 as NGC 6963, and as a result, so does Wikisky).
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 6965 for anything else.

IC 5059 (= PGC 65539)
Recorded (May 17, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Indus (RA 20 51 13.4, Dec -57 41 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5059 (= Frost #1213, 1860 RA 20 40 22, NPD 148 12) is "very faint, small, round, diffuse". The position precesses to RA 20 51 16.2, Dec -57 41 02, just off the northeastern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5059
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5059
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5059

IC 5060 (= PGC 65695)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pavo (RA 20 54 46.0, Dec -71 38 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5060 (= DeLisle Stewart #696, 1860 RA 20 40 22, NPD 162 09) is "extremely faint, extremely small, between 2 faint stars". The position precesses to RA 20 54 38.3, Dec -71 37 46, only about 0.7 arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.2 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5060
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5060
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5060

IC 5061
Recorded (Jul 27, 1884) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
Also recorded (Aug 15, 1887) by Basilius Engelhardt
Three magnitude 15 stars in Aquarius (RA 20 47 37.2, Dec +00 20 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5061 (= Bigourdan #439, 1860 RA 20 40 28, NPD 90 11) is "extremely faint, very small cluster, perhaps nebulous" (Bigourdan's paper says "cluster of 3 or 4 stars"). The position precesses to RA 20 47 38.1, Dec +00 19 42, just southeast of the group listed above. Taking into account a 1.3 second of time error in the position of Bigourdan's comparison star, his position is only a fraction of a second due east of the group, and given his description of the object, the identification is certain.
SDSS image of region near the three stars listed as IC 5061, also showing NGC 6962, NGC 6964 and NGC 6967, and the star listed as IC 5057
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5061, also showing NGC 6962, 6964 and 6967 and IC 5057
(IC 5057 is the star to the west of NGC 6962, the galaxy its label overlaps)

IC 5062 (not =
NGC 6968)
Recorded (Oct 7, 1891) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 15 and 16 pair of stars in Aquarius (RA 20 48 10.3, Dec -08 21 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5062 (= Bigourdan #336, 1860 RA 20 40 38, NPD 98 53) is a "13.5 magnitude star with extremely faint star and nebula, 13th magnitude star 1 arcmin west". The position precesses to RA 20 48 09.7, Dec -08 22 15, but there is nothing near there save for NGC 6968 (which does not match the description and was separately observed by Bigourdan on the same night he recorded his #336), and an otherwise stellar field. However, there is a double star just north of Dreyer's position that would fit the description if Bigourdan was unable to see it as double, and (per Corwin) using Bigourdan's measurements instead of Dreyer's rounded-off position exactly matches the position of the pair, so the identification of IC 5062 shown above is certain. (Note: Some references, ignoring the reasons noted above that rule out NGC 6968 as IC 5062, mistakenly equate the two; hence the warning in the title for this entry.)
DSS image of region near the pair of stars listed as IC 5062, also showing NGC 6968
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5062, also showing NGC 6968

IC 5063 (= PGC 65600)
Recorded (May 17, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 11.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0(s)a? pec) in Indus (RA 20 52 02.3, Dec -57 04 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5063 (= Frost #1214, 1860 RA 20 41 05, NPD 147 35) has a "brighter middle, magnitude 13". The position precesses to RA 20 51 53.4, Dec -57 03 56, on the western rim of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.9 by 1.9 arcmin. Listed as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2). A member of a class of galaxies referred to as luminous infrared galaxies because most of their radiation is emitted in the infrared. Given the appearance of its DSS image, perhaps a polar ring galaxy.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5063
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5063
Below, a 4.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5063
Below, 1.2 arcmin wide infrared (Image Credit & © Lisa Kewley; used by permission) and DSS images of the galaxy's nucleus
Infrared image of central portion of lenticular galaxy IC 5063, compared to a DSS image of the same region

IC 5064 (= PGC 65634)
Recorded (May 17, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(s)a?) in Indus (RA 20 52 38.1, Dec -57 13 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5064 (= Frost #1215, 1860 RA 20 41 41, NPD 147 45) has a "brighter middle, magnitude 14". The position precesses to RA 20 52 30.3, Dec -57 13 50, about 1 arcmin west of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.25 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5064
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5064
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5064

IC 5065 (= PGC 65580)
Recorded (Sep 8, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)ab? pec) in Microscopium (RA 20 51 45.8, Dec -29 50 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5065 (= Swift list XII (#24), 1860 RA 20 41 44, NPD 120 20.5) is "very faint, pretty small, round". The position precesses to RA 20 50 15.5, Dec -29 49 30, but there is nothing there. However, the galaxy listed above is at nearly the same declination, and although it is a minute and a half of time to the east of Swift's position, that sort of error is typical of his later observations, and there is nothing else in the region that Swift could have seen. That alone might not be a convincing argument, but fortunately Swift noted (though Dreyer did not) the presence of an 8th magnitude star on the northern margin of his field of view, and as a result the magnitude 7 star north northwest of the galaxy makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.75 arcmin for the main part of the galaxy, 1.6 by 1.25 arcmin including fainter extensions.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5065
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5065, also showing the star that confirms the identity
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5065

IC 5066 (= PGC 65768)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type (R)Sab?) in Pavo (RA 20 57 02.9, Dec -73 08 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5066 (= DeLisle Stewart #697, 1860 RA 20 42 10, NPD 163 41) is "very faint, very small, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 20 57 04.4, Dec -73 09 27, less than 0.7 arcmin south of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 12325 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 5066 is about 575 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 545 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 560 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.65 by 0.65 arcmin, the galaxy is about 105 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5066
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5066
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5066

IC 5067 (perhaps = LBN 353?)
Recorded (Sep 7, 1899) by
Thomas Espin
A lost object in Cygnus (near RA 20 47 50.2, Dec +44 21 54)
or perhaps an emission nebula at RA 20 47 36, Dec +42 54 12
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5067 (= Espin (#3), 1860 RA 20 42 56, NPD 46 09) is "faint". The position precesses to RA 20 47 50.2, Dec +44 21 54 (whence the "lost" position above), in an empty area to the west of the Pelican Nebula, so the position gives no indication of what Espin observed, and it might be best to consider IC 5067 as lost. However, the region is filled with emission nebulae, and odds are that what Espin meant to record was one of them. For reasons related to the relative brightnesses recorded by Espin for his #3, #4 and #5, Corwin proposes that the best candidate for IC 5067 is the elongated nebula to the northwest of IC 5068. Whether that is correct or not seems impossible to prove, especially since it lies more than a degree to the southwest of Espin's position, whereas his other observations were reasonably accurate; but since it is a commonly quoted identification, it is listed above as a possibility and is shown in the second and third images below.
Discovery Notes: Max Wolf's paper (A. N. 3048) of June 10, 1891 describes the region in Cygnus near the North American Nebula as photographed on a 3 hour plate taken on June 1 of that year. The description of the region is very general and includes no actual positions, so Dreyer may have ignored the paper because he was not aware of it, or because it included nothing that could help him identify any particular object. Certainly, in the case of IC 5067 there is nothing in Wolf's paper that would help to identify what Espin might have seen; so although Wolf is sometimes listed as the discoverer of IC 5067, it is more appropriate to say that he happened to take a photograph of the region, but failed to provide a description deserving of any credit for this particular entry.
Physical Information: If lost, there is nothing to say. If as identified by Corwin, the apparent size is about 45 by 17 arcmin.
DSS image of region near the IC2 position for the apparently lost IC 5067
Above, a 1.5 degree wide DSS image centered on the IC2 position for IC 5067, also showing part of IC 5070
Below, a 3.5 degree wide DSS image centered on IC 5068, also showing NGC 7000 and IC 5070, and Corwin's IC 5067
DSS image of region near IC 5068, also showing part of NGC 7000 and IC 5070, and the nebulosity tentatively identified by Corwin as IC 5067
Below, a 45 arcmin wide DSS image showing Corwin's IC 5067
DSS image of Corwin's suggestion for IC 5067

IC 5068 (= LBN 328)
Discovered (Sep 7, 1899) by
Thomas Espin
An emission nebula in Cygnus (RA 20 50 27.0, Dec +42 29 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5068 (= Espin (#4), 1860 RA 20 44 52, NPD 47 59) is "very faint". The position precesses to RA 20 49 55.6, Dec +42 32 12, on a patch of nebulosity that is a reasonable fit to the description, and although the position is a few arcmin west northwest of the center of the nebula as defined above (per Corwin's database), the identification is considered certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size about 35 by 30 arcmin.
DSS image of region near emission nebula IC 5068, also showing part of NGC 7000 and IC 5070
Above, a 3.5 degree wide DSS image centered on IC 5068, also showing part of NGC 7000 and IC 5070
Below, a 45 arcmin wide DSS image of the emission nebula
DSS image of emission nebula IC 5068

IC 5069 (= PGC 65870)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(rs)bc?) in Pavo (RA 21 00 10.3, Dec -71 48 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5069 (= DeLisle Stewart #698, 1860 RA 20 45 47, NPD 162 20) is "extremely faint, small, round". The position precesses to RA 20 59 58.6, Dec -71 47 58, about 1.1 arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so lthe identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.25 by 1.1 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5069
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5069
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5069

IC 5070 (= LBN 350), The Pelican Nebula
Recorded (June 10, 1891) by
Max Wolf
Discovered (Sep 7, 1899) by Thomas Espin
A magnitude 8(?) emission nebula in Cygnus (RA 20 51 00.0, Dec +44 23 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5070 (= Espin (#5), 1860 RA 20 46 00, NPD 46 09) is "faint, diffuse". The position precesses to RA 20 50 55.8, Dec +44 22 22, within the brightest part of the emission nebula listed above (near the "nape of the neck" of the "Pelican"), so the identification is certain. (Note: the position listed above is taken from Corwin's database.)
Discovery Notes: Max Wolf took the first photograph of the region near the North American Nebula on December 12, 1890. In addition, in a paper (A. N. 3048) of June 10, 1891 he described the region near that nebula as photographed on a 3 hour plate taken on June 1 of that year. His description of the region is very general and gives no actual positions, so even if Dreyer was aware of the paper it would have been of no use in trying to determine the nature or positions of objects to be placed in the IC2. There is no doubt that Wolf's photographs recorded the Pelican, and his description of the region, though vague, almost certainly includes that nebula; so he probably deserves some credit for the discovery, and is often given sole credit in modern discussions. However, Espin's accurate position for the nebula was far more useful to Dreyer, so in any discussion of the NGC/IC catalogs Espin must be given credit as discoverer or co-discoverer of IC 5070.
Physical Information: The Pelican Nebula is part of a more than a hundred light year wide region of ionized and neutral hydrogen which includes its more famous companion, the North America Nebula (NGC 7000). The apparent separation and shapes of the nebulae are due to clouds of obscuring dust lying between us and them. What star or stars are responsible for heating the gas was long unknown. Recently the 2MASS infrared telescope, concentrating on the area obscured by dust, has shown that there is a very massive O-type star in the general area of the nebulae that is the most likely source of the ultraviolet radiation stimulating their visible-light emissions. Estimates of the distance of the North American and Pelican nebulae vary considerably, ranging from as little as 1500 light years to as much as 2200 light years. Given that, the 84 by 64 arcmin apparent size of IC 5070 corresponds to perhaps 45 light years.
DSS image of region near emission nebula IC 5070, also known as the Pelican Nebula
Above, a 2.2 degree wide DSS image centered on IC 5070
Below, a 1 degree DSS image centered on the brightest part of the nebula
DSS image of central part of emission nebula IC 5070, also known as the Pelican Nebula
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide DSS image centered between IC 5070 and NGC 7000 (the North American Nebula)
DSS image showing region near emission nebula NGC 7000, also known as the North American Nebula, and emission neebula IC 5070, also known as the Pelican Nebula
Below, another image of the region (Image credit & © Luc Viatour GFDL/CC; used by permission)
Luc Viatour image of region near emission nebulae NGC 7000 and IC 5070, also known as the North American and Pelican nebulae
Below, a closer view of the Pelican Nebula (Image Credit Hunter Wilson, Wikimedia Commons)
Hunter Wilson image of IC 5070, also known as the Pelican Nebula

IC 5071 (= PGC 65915)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)bc?) in Pavo (RA 21 01 19.9, Dec -72 38 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5071 (= DeLisle Stewart #699, 1860 RA 20 46 47, NPD 163 11) is "considerably bright, small, extremely extended 20, stellar nucleus". The position precesses to RA 21 01 18.8, Dec -72 38 47, almost dead center on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.0 by 0.75 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5071
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5071
Below, a 4.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5071

IC 5072 (= PGC 65938)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Pavo (RA 21 01 56.6, Dec -72 59 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5072 (= DeLisle Stewart #700, 1860 RA 20 47 20, NPD 163 31) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round". The position precesses to RA 21 01 59.9, Dec -72 58 42, only 0.6 arcmin north northeast of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5072
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5072
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5072

IC 5073 (= PGC 65992)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc?) in Pavo (RA 21 03 19.7, Dec -72 41 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5073 (= DeLisle Stewart #701, 1860 RA 20 48 54, NPD 163 14) is "extremely faint, small, round". The position precesses to RA 21 03 23.2, Dec -72 41 29, on the southeastern rim of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.05 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5073
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5073
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5073

IC 5074 (= PGC 65902)
Recorded (Sep 19, 1903) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)c? pec) in Pavo (RA 21 01 00.5, Dec -63 09 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5074 (= Frost #1216, 1860 RA 20 49 14, NPD 153 40) is "round, planetary, magnitude 14". The position precesses to RA 21 00 54.1, Dec -63 07 38, about 1.6 arcmin north northwest of the galaxy listed above, but the description fits and there is nothing else nearby so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5074
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5074
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5074

IC 5075 (= PGC 66040)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Pavo (RA 21 04 37.8, Dec -71 52 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5075 (= DeLisle Stewart #702, 1860 RA 20 50 25, NPD 162 24) is "very faint, small, considerably bright middle". The position precesses to RA 21 04 30.1, Dec -71 51 17, just under an arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.85 by 0.4 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5075
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5075
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5075

IC 5076 (= LBN 394)
Discovered (Sep 13, 1895) by
Isaac Roberts
A reflection nebula in Cygnus (RA 20 55 34.5, Dec +47 23 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5076 (= Roberts, 1860 RA 20 51 11, NPD 43 07.0) is "very faint, very large, a little extended north-south, stars involved". The position precesses to RA 20 55 54.7, Dec +47 25 08, just east of the nebula listed above, and although the right ascension is off by 20 seconds of time, the error is small in comparison with the size of the nebula, the description fits perfectly and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 11 by 8 arcmin.
Caelum Observatory image of reflection nebula IC 5076
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image of IC 5076 (Image Credit & © Caelum Observatory; used by permission)

IC 5077 (= PGC 66197)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type S(rs)bc?) in Pavo (RA 21 08 53.8, Dec -73 38 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5077 (= DeLisle Stewart #704, 1860 RA 20 54 12, NPD 164 12) is "extremely faint, extremely small, 10th magnitude star 2 arcmin northwest". The position precesses to RA 21 08 58.2, Dec -73 38 41, only 0.4 arcmin southeast of the galaxy listed above, there is nothing else nearby and the star to its northwest makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.45 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5077
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5077
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5077

IC 5078 (= PGC 65960)
Discovered (Aug 7, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)c?) in Capricornus (RA 21 02 31.2, Dec -16 49 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5078 (= DeLisle Stewart #703, 1860 RA 20 54 45, NPD 107 22) is "extremely extended, near 2nd star of 3; suspected". The position precesses to RA 21 02 36.2, Dec -16 49 07, on the eastern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.1 by 0.9 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5078
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5078
Below, a 4.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5078

IC 5079
Recorded (Nov 26, 1897) by
Robert Innes
A lost or nonexistent object in Indus (RA 21 05 30.2, Dec -56 14 53)
or perhaps A magnitude 11.5 double star at RA 21 05 44.1, Dec -56 13 49
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5079 (= Innes (#11), 1860 RA 20 55, NPD 146 48) is "faint, small, extended, perhaps a very small cluster or ring nebula" (Inne's paper adds that it is elongated by 15 arcsec, and has a brightness equivalent to a 9.7 magnitude star). The position precesses to RA 21 05 30.2, Dec -56 14 53 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there. Corwin has suggested that IC 5079 might be the magnitude 11.5 star northeast of Innes' position, but since that is two magnitudes fainter than the description, feels that such an identification would be a stretch. However, on the image below it appears that Corwin's "star" is actually a double, and on the DSS plate the pair is about 15 arcsec across, which matches Innes' description. So although IC 5079 appears to be lost or nonexistent, there is a possibility that it is Corwin's star.
DSS image of region near the IC2 position of IC 5079, also showing the star suggested by Corwin
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS on the IC2 position for IC 5079, also showing Corwin's star

IC 5080 (= PGC 65956)
Discovered (Oct 13, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.4 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Delphinus (RA 21 02 33.1, Dec +19 12 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5080 (= Javelle #1404, 1860 RA 20 56 09, NPD 71 19.5) is "faint, very small, round, stellar nucleus". The position precesses to RA 21 02 33.8, Dec +19 13 29, only 0.7 arcmin north northeast of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.65 by 0.55 arcmin.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 5080
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5080
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 5080

IC 5081 (= PGC 65971)
Discovered (Oct 13, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Delphinus (RA 21 03 01.2, Dec +19 11 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5081 (= Javelle #1405, 1860 RA 20 56 37, NPD 71 20.9) is "very faint, very small, round, stellar nucleus". The position precesses to RA 21 03 01.9, Dec +19 12 09, about 0.8 arcmin north northeast of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.25 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5081
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5081
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5081

IC 5082 (=
NGC 7010 = PGC 66039)
Discovered (Aug 6, 1823) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7010)
Also observed by Herbert Howe (and listed as a correction for NGC 7010)
Discovered (Aug 27, 1886) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 5082)
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0 pec?) in Aquarius (RA 21 04 39.4, Dec -12 20 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5082 (= Bigourdan #440, 1860 RA 20 57 00, NPD 102 54) is "extremely faint, small". The position precesses to RA 21 04 39.8, Dec -12 20 48, on the southern rim of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain. However, the galaxy happens to be the same as NGC 7010, so this is a duplicate listing. Per Corwin, the cause of the duplication was that Herschel's position was 10 arcmin too far south, and although Howe brought attention to Herschel's error, when Dreyer listed the corrected position for NGC 7010 (1860 RA 20 56 59, NPD 102 53.5) at the end of the IC2 he failed to notice that it was essentially identical to Bigourdan's position.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 7010 for anything else.

IC 5083 (= PGC 66011)
Recorded (Aug 12, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (1899?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 14.2 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Equuleus (RA 21 03 51.4, Dec +11 45 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5083 (= Swift list XI (#203), Howe, 1860 RA 20 57 08, NPD 78 47.4) is "most extremely faint, very small, very difficult; 8th magnitude star 13 seconds of time to east". The position precesses to RA 21 03 51.5, Dec +11 45 45, right on the galaxy listed above, there is nothing else nearby, and the star to the east makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.85 by 0.6 arcmin. A foreground star superimposed on the nucleus partially obscures it.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 5083
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5083
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 5083

IC 5084 (= PGC 66208)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)b? pec) in Pavo (RA 21 09 14.7, Dec -63 17 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5084 (= DeLisle Stewart #705, 1860 RA 20 57 34, NPD 153 51) is "faint, pretty small, extremely extended 155, considerably brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 21 09 06.6, Dec -63 17 27, about 0.9 arcmin west of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.65 by 0.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5084
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5084
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5084

IC 5085 (= PGC 66370)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type S(rs)ab?) in Pavo (RA 21 13 27.5, Dec -74 06 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5085 (= DeLisle Stewart #706, 1860 RA 20 58 34, NPD 164 40) is "very faint, very small, round". The position precesses to RA 21 13 25.1, Dec -74 06 04, on the northwestern rim of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.45 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5085
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5085
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5085

IC 5086 (probably = PGC 66179)
Recorded (Sep 15, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type E/SA0?) in Microscopium (RA 21 08 32.0, Dec -29 46 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5086 (= Swift list XI (#204), 1860 RA 20 59 06, NPD 120 36.0) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, faint star to east". The position precesses to RA 21 07 32.5, Dec -30 02 27, but as in the case of many of Swift's later observations, there is nothing there. The only "nearby" candidate is a minute of time to the east and more than a quarter degree to the north, a combination of positional errors that makes its identification as IC 5086 less than certain; but (as noted by Corwin) the description perfectly fits the candidate, so the identification is as certain as possible under the circumstances.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5086
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5086
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5086

IC 5087 (= PGC 66391)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)b? pec) in Pavo (RA 21 14 21.8, Dec -73 46 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5087 (= DeLisle Stewart #707, 1860 RA 20 59 44, NPD 164 21) is "very faint, very small, 11th magnitude star 3 arcmin northwest". The position precesses to RA 21 14 23.2, Dec -73 46 55, only half an arcmin south southeast of the galaxy listed above, there is nothing else nearby and the star to the northwest makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 16140 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 5087 is about 750 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 705 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 725 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin, the central condensation of the galaxy is about 125 thousand light years across, while its 1.6 arcmin wide extended arms span 330 thousand light years.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5087
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5087
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5087

IC 5088 (= PGC 66219)
Discovered (Oct 19, 1897) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.2 lenticular galaxy (type SA(r)0/a?) in Capricornus (RA 21 09 26.8, Dec -22 52 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5088 (= Howe list I (#16), 1860 RA 21 01 21, NPD 113 26.6) is "extremely faint, very small, difficult". The position precesses to RA 21 09 26.6, Dec -22 52 45, right on the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.45 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5088
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5088
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5088

IC 5089 (= PGC 1065928)
Discovered by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 15.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Aquarius (RA 21 10 54.5, Dec -03 51 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5089 (= Barnard, 1860 RA 21 03 38, NPD 94 25.1) is "extremely faint, very small, brighter middle, faint star 30 arcsec southwest". The position precesses to RA 21 10 57.6, Dec -03 50 59, about 1.1 arcmin northeast of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby. The only problem is that Barnard reversed the direction of the nearby faint star; but as noted by Corwin this is a common error, and the mere presence of the star is enough to make the identification certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.55 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5089
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5089
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5089

IC 5090 (= PGC 66299)
Discovered (Oct 8, 1895) by
Herbert Wilson
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SBb pec?) in Aquarius (RA 21 11 30.5, Dec -02 01 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5090 (= H. C. Wilson, 1860 RA 21 04 16, NPD 92 36.2) is "very faint, small, round, suddenly brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 21 11 31.5, Dec -02 02 00, on the eastern rim of the galaxy listed above and there is no other suitable candidate nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5090
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5090
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5090

(note to self: the bright galaxy to the southeast of IC 5091 is PGC 272245; but is not an NGC/IC object)

IC 5091 (= PGC 66505)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pavo (RA 21 17 36.8, Dec -70 39 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5091 (= DeLisle Stewart #708, 1860 RA 21 04 28, NPD 161 14) is "extremely faint, very small, round". The position precesses to RA 21 17 42.4, Dec -70 39 22, less than half an arcmin north east northeast of the galaxy listed above, the description is reasonable and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification appears certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.45 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5091, also showing IC 5093
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5091, also showing IC 5093
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5091

IC 5092 (= PGC 66452)
Recorded (Sep 19, 1903) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 12.0 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(rs)c?) in Pavo (RA 21 16 14.2, Dec -64 27 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5092 (= Frost #1217, 1860 RA 21 04 32, NPD 155 03) is "pretty large, extended, much brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 21 16 10.0, Dec -64 28 28, right on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.7 by 2.4 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5092
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5092
Below, a 3.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5092

IC 5093 (= PGC 66543)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pavo (RA 21 18 46.3, Dec -70 37 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5093 (= DeLisle Stewart #710, 1860 RA 21 05 34, NPD 161 13) is "most extremely faint, very small, round, suspected". The position precesses to RA 21 18 46.1, Dec -70 38 13, only 0.9 arcmin south of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5093, also showing IC 5091
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5093, also showing IC 5091
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5093

IC 5094 (= PGC 66515)
Discovered (Aug 22, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)c?) in Pavo (RA 21 17 49.4, Dec -66 25 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5094 (= DeLisle Stewart #709, 1860 RA 21 05 56, NPD 157 01) is "very faint, very small, round, star 0.5 arcmin northwest". The position precesses to RA 21 17 57.4, Dec -66 26 15, only an arcmin southeast of the nucleus of the galaxy listed above, there is nothing else nearby, and the star half an arcmin northwest of the nucleus (on the galaxy's northwestern rim in modern images) makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.0 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5094
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5094
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5094

IC 5095 (= PGC 66498)
Recorded (Sep 19, 1903) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type (R)Scd?) in Pavo (RA 21 17 22.1, Dec -59 56 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5095 (= Frost #1218, 1860 RA 21 06 29, NPD 150 31) is "pretty large, extended". The position precesses to RA 21 17 18.3, Dec -59 56 15, less than 0.8 arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above, the description more or less fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is considered certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.35 arcmin. The bright spots east and west of the center of IC 5095 are probably foreground stars, and it is possible that the middle one is also a star; but in the hope that it is actually the nucleus of the galaxy, its position is usually used as that of the IC object, so its coordinates are the ones listed above.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5095
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5095
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5095

IC 5096 (= PGC 66530)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Pavo (RA 21 18 21.6, Dec -63 45 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5096 (= DeLisle Stewart #711, 1860 RA 21 06 54, NPD 154 20) is "faint, pretty large, extremely extended 145, stellar nucleus". The position precesses to RA 21 18 20.7, Dec -63 45 09, right on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size about 3.6 by 0.5 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5096
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5096
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5096
Below, a 1.6 by 2.25 arcmin wide image of part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
'Raw' HST image of part of spiral galaxy IC 5096

IC 5097
Recorded (Sep 5, 1891) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
Probably a small group of stars in Equuleus (RA 21 14 58.1, Dec +04 29 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5097 (= Bigourdan #441, 1860 RA 21 07 57, NPD 86 07) is "extremely faint, stellar, 3 arcmin southeast of (NGC) 7045". The position precesses to RA 21 14 58.1, Dec +04 27 41, which falls in a completely stellar field, implying that what Bigourdan recorded was either a single star or a small grouping of stars. Bigourdan's paper states that his #441 is "almost certainly nebulous", and the position he gives does lie 3.0 arcmin from NGC 7045 (though at a position angle of 140), which is just a pair of stars itself. Since Dreyer rounded off Bigourdan's NPD, his position is not quite the same as that recorded by Bigourdan, which precesses to RA 21 14 58.0, Dec +04 28 09, about 0.2 arcmin west of a star chosen by Thomson as IC 5097, but (per Corwin) Bigourdan's measurements for this and the following entry (IC 5098) were not made to the same accuracy as most of his observations, so the exact position is not as good a guide to what Bigourdan saw as might usually be expected. Based on that and the statement that the object was almost certainly nebulous, Corwin suggests that what Bigourdan observed was the group of three stars directly north of his recorded position; and I agree that this asterism is a better fit for Bigourdan's description, so this entry treats Corwin's suggestion as correct, and that group is the one listed above. However, given the uncertainty inherent in such situations, the identification cannot be considered certain (hence my use of the word "probably" in the identification line), so I have also indicated Thomson's candidate by circling it in the closeup image below.
SDSS image of region near the asterism that is probably IC 5097, also showing the star that is probably IC 5098, and the double star that is NGC 7045; the alternative identifications for IC 5097 and IC 5098 are circled
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5097, also showing IC 5098 and NGC 7045
Below, a 5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the region, also showing the alternative identifications for the IC objects
SDSS image of region near the asterism that is probably IC 5097, also showing the star that is probably IC 5098, and the double star that is NGC 7045; the alternative identifications for IC 5097 and IC 5098 are circled

IC 5098
Recorded (Sep 5, 1891) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
Probably a magnitude 15(?) star in Equuleus (RA 21 14 58.3, Dec +04 30 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5098 (= Bigourdan #442, 1860 RA 21 07 59, NPD 86 05) is "extremely faint, 2.5 arcmin east southeast of (NGC) 7045" (Bigourdan described the object as a single star of magnitude 13.4 or 13.5, with a position angle of 100 relative to NGC 7045). The position precesses to RA 21 15 00.1, Dec +04 29 41, but as in the case of IC 5097 (which see for an image of the field) there is nothing there save for a completely stellar field, so IC 5098 must also be a stellar grouping, and even though the position angles are only estimates, they make it clear that IC 5098 must be somewhere to the north of IC 5097. Based on Bigourdan's description, Thomson suggested the star listed above as the most likely candidate for IC 5098, but Corwin chose the double star to its east. I prefer Corwin's suggestion for IC 5097 (as discussed in its entry), but for IC 5098 I prefer Thomson's. The reason is that although Bigourdan's distances are only estimates, the fact that he placed IC 5098 closer to NGC 7045 than IC 5097 suggests that it should be north or northwest of IC 5097, not northeast; but the caveats mentioned for IC 5097 also apply to IC 5098, so I have shown both the choices I adopted and the ones I rejected in the image posted above.

IC 5099 (= PGC 66633)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pavo (RA 21 21 49.1, Dec -70 58 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5099 (= DeLisle Stewart #712, 1860 RA 21 08 40, NPD 161 35) is "very faint, small, a little extended 10". The position precesses to RA 21 21 54.0, Dec -70 59 47, about 0.9 arcmin south southeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.3 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5099
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5099
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5099
Celestial Atlas
(IC 5000 - 5049) ←     IC Objects: IC 5050 - 5099     → (IC 5100 - 5149)