Celestial Atlas
(IC 5050 - 5099) ←     IC Objects: IC 5100 - 5149 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 5150 - 5199)
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5100, 5101, 5102, 5103, 5104, 5105, 5106, 5107, 5108, 5109, 5110, 5111, 5112, 5113, 5114, 5115, 5116,
5117, 5118, 5119, 5120, 5121, 5122, 5123, 5124, 5125, 5126, 5127, 5128, 5129, 5130, 5131, 5132, 5133,
5134, 5135, 5136, 5137, 5138, 5139, 5140, 5141, 5142, 5143, 5144, 5145, 5146, 5147, 5148, 5149

Page last updated Jun 6, 2014
WORKING: Add physical information

IC 5100 (= PGC 66628)
Discovered (Aug 22, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Pavo (RA 21 21 43.5, Dec -65 55 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5100 (= DeLisle Stewart #713, 1860 RA 21 09 59, NPD 156 32) is "faint small, considerably extended 110". The position precesses to RA 21 21 48.3, Dec -65 56 42, about 0.9 arcmin southeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5075 km/sec, IC 5100 is about 235 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 220 to 315 million light years. Given that and its 1.9 by 0.4 arcmin apparent size, it is about 130 thousand light years across. Since IC 5100 and 5101 may be at the same distance (given the uncertainties of any distance estimate), they may be as little as 400 thousand light years apart, in which case they would almost certainly be a gravitationally bound pair.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5100, also showing part of IC 5101
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5100, also showing part of IC 5101
Below, a 2.1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of  spiral galaxy IC 5100
Below, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered between IC 5100 and 5101
DSS image of region near spiral galaxies IC 5100 and IC 5101

IC 5101 (= PGC 66636)
Discovered (Aug 22, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)bc? pec) in Pavo (RA 21 21 55.7, Dec -65 50 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5101 (= DeLisle Stewart #714, 1860 RA 21 10 12, NPD 156 26) is "considerably faint, small, star in nebulosity". The position precesses to RA 21 21 59.7, Dec -65 50 41, just off the southeastern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description is reasonable and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5140 km/sec, IC 5101 is about 240 million light years away. Given that and its 1.3 by 0.9 arcmin apparent size, it is about 90 thousand light years across. Since IC 5100 and 5101 may be at the same distance (given the uncertainties of any distance estimate), they may be as little as 400 thousand light years apart, in which case they would almost certainly be a gravitationally bound pair.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5101, also showing part of IC 5100
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5101, also showing part of IC 5100
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5101
Below, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered between IC 5100 and 5101
DSS image of region near spiral galaxies IC 5100 and IC 5101

IC 5102 (= PGC 66751)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec) in Pavo (RA 21 26 13.4, Dec -73 18 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5102 (= DeLisle Stewart #715, 1860 RA 21 12 19, NPD 163 55) is "extremely faint, extremely small, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 21 26 19.9, Dec -73 19 15, about 0.8 arcmin southeast of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.55 arcmin. Apparently closely accompanied by four smaller galaxies (or star-forming regions?), and perhaps the dominant member of a large group of fainter galaxies.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5102
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5102
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5102

IC 5103 (= PGC 66841)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(s)bc pec?) in Pavo (RA 21 29 12.5, Dec -74 04 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5103 (= DeLisle Stewart #716, 1860 RA 21 15 02, NPD 164 41) is "extremely faint, very small, round". The position precesses to RA 21 29 17.7, Dec -74 04 53, about 0.8 arcmin south southeast of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 17610 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 5103 is about 820 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 765 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 790 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.95 by 0.6 arcmin, the galaxy is about 210 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5103
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5103
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5103

IC 5104 (= PGC 66622)
Discovered (Oct 26, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Pegasus (RA 21 21 29.2, Dec +21 14 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5104 (= Javelle #1406, 1860 RA 21 15 06, NPD 69 23.7) is "faint, very small, extended north-south, diffuse, 14th magnitude star near". The position precesses to RA 21 21 30.0, Dec +21 11 54, about 2.6 arcmin south of the galaxy listed above, but the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5104
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5104
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5104

IC 5105 (= PGC 66694)
Discovered (Aug 19, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 11.6 elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Microscopium (RA 21 24 22.0, Dec -40 32 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5105 (= Swift list XII (#25), 1860 RA 21 15 27, NPD 131 13.4) is "very faint, very small, round, stars to north and south". The position precesses to RA 21 24 21.6, Dec -40 37 35, over 5 arcmin south of the galaxy listed above, but there is nothing else nearby and the stars to the southwest and northwest appear to make the identification certain.
Physical Information: 3.0 by 1.8 arcmin.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 5105
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5105
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 5105

PGC 66723 (= "IC 5105A")
Not an IC object but sometimes called IC 5105A, despite having no relationship to
IC 5105
A magnitiude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc?) in Microscopium (RA 21 25 30.8, Dec -40 16 25)
Physical Information: 2.2 by 1.1 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 66723, also sometimes called IC 5105A
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 66723
Below, a 2.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 66723, also sometimes called IC 5105A

PGC 66740 (= "IC 5105B")
Not an IC object but sometimes called IC 5105B, despite having no relationship to
IC 5105
A magnitiude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)ab?) in Microscopium (RA 21 26 00.2, Dec -40 50 06)
Physical Information: 1.2 by 0.45 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 66740, also sometimes called IC 5105B
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 66740
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 66740, also sometimes called IC 5105B

IC 5106 (= PGC 66824)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Pavo (RA 21 28 38.1, Dec -70 50 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5106 (= DeLisle Stewart #717, 1860 RA 21 15 44, NPD 161 26) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 21 28 42.1, Dec -70 49 52, on the eastern rim of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: 1.45 by 1.0 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5106
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5106
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5106

IC 5107 (= PGC 66813)
Discovered (Aug 22, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pavo (RA 21 28 14.8, Dec -65 44 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5107 (= DeLisle Stewart #718, 1860 RA 21 16 38, NPD 156 20) is "extremely faint, very small, considerably extended 10". The position precesses to RA 21 28 15.4, Dec -65 43 51, within the northern outline of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: 0.95 by 0.35 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5107
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5107
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5107

IC 5108 (= PGC 66944)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(s)bc?) in Indus (RA 21 32 51.4, Dec -72 39 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5108 (= DeLisle Stewart #719, 1860 RA 21 19 16, NPD 163 16) is "extremely faint, very small, considerably brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 21 32 46.3, Dec -72 39 23, on the western end of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: 1.0 by 0.4 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5108
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5108
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5108

IC 5109 (= PGC 66963)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart (720)
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Indus (RA 21 33 42.7, Dec -74 06 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5109 (= DeLisle Stewart #720, 1860 RA 21 19 47, NPD 164 43) is "very faint, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 21 33 52.9, Dec -74 06 17, only 0.8 arcmin northeast of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: 0.9 by 0.65 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5109
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5109
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5109

IC 5110 (= PGC 66878)
Discovered (Sep 19, 1903) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(r)c? pec) in Indus (RA 21 30 43.3, Dec -60 00 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5110 (= Frost #1219, 1860 RA 21 20 03, NPD 150 36) is "very faint, very little extended". The position precesses to RA 21 30 38.2, Dec -59 59 28, about 0.9 arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: 1.4 by 1.15 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5110
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5110
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5110

IC 5111 (= PGC 66811)
Discovered (Sep 10, 1895) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Aquarius (RA 21 28 10.8, Dec +02 28 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5111 (= Javelle #1407, 1860 RA 21 21 06, NPD 88 07.6) is "faint, small, irregular figure". The position precesses to RA 21 28 11.8, Dec 02 28 50, just off the northeastern rim of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: 0.85 by 0.65 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5111
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5111
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5111

IC 5112
Recorded (Oct 27, 1894) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
Perhaps a pair of stars in Pegasus (RA 21 29 29.5, Dec +06 46 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5112 (= Bigourdan #337, 1860 RA 21 22 32, NPD 83 49) is a "cluster, extremely faint, extremely small". The position precesses to RA 21 29 29.1, Dec +06 47 36, less than 0.5 arcmin southeast of PGC 1307717, and there is nothing else nearby so the identification would seem certain. However, general opinion is that the galaxy in question is too faint for Bigourdan to have seen with his 30 cm telescope, so it is almost certain that it is not what he recorded, and what he thought he saw was probably a faint star or asterism (as was often the case in such situations). Still, given its proximity to the IC2 position the galaxy is discussed in the next entry, in case anyone might otherwise confuse it with IC 5112.
Calculations and Conclusions: Bigourdan's comparison star was "W1 514", a magnitude 7.5 to 8 star at (1900) RA 21 24 40.26, Dec +06 26 37.8. Precessing this to modern coordinates yields J2000 RA 21 29 38.0, Dec +06 52 53, which is essentially the position of magnitude 7.5 HD 204602, so that must be the star he used. The modern position of the star is RA 21 29 37.4, Dec +06 52 47, and it has almost no proper motion, so precessing the modern position to 1900 coordinates should yield an accurate position for the star at the time of Bigourdan's measurements, namely (1900) RA 21 24 39.6, Dec +06 26 32. Adding Bigourdan's offsets of RA -08.02s and Dec -05' 51.6" yields a position for his #337 of (1900) RA 21 24 31.6, Dec +06 20 40. Precessing that to J2000 places IC 5112 at or near RA 21 29 29.5, Dec +06 46 54 (whence the position above), a little over half an arcmin to the south of Dreyer's position (the difference probably being mostly due to round-off errors in converting Bigourdan's position to the equinox of 1860). The position lies just west of a pair of stars of approximate magnitudes 16.5 and 17.0, but there are many individual stars and asterisms in the region that could be what Bigourdan observed, so exactly which star or stars represents IC 5112 is unknown, and the pair noted above are mentioned merely because they are closest to Bigourdan's position. (Note: This argument is essentially the same as that presented by Corwin, save that he leaves out some of the gory details.)
SDSS image of region near Bigourdan's position for IC 5112, also showing PGC 1307717, which is almost certainly not IC 5112, and part of NGC 7074
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the position of IC 5112, also showing PGC 1307717
(Also shown is the northern portion of NGC 7074)

PGC 1307717 (not =
IC 5112)
Not an IC object but listed here since it could be mistaken for IC 5112
A magnitude 16(?) spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc?) in Pegasus (RA 21 29 28.1, Dec +06 47 56)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.45 by 0.4 arcmin. Nothing else available.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 1307717, which could be mistaken for IC 5112
Above, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 1307717; for a wider-field view see IC 5112

IC 5113
Recorded (Jul 31, 1886) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
Probably a magnitude 15(?) star in Pegasus (RA 21 29 40.5, Dec +06 48 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5113 (= Bigourdan #443, 1860 RA 21 22 44, NPD 83 47) is a "cluster, extremely faint, small, perhaps nebulous". The position precesses to RA 21 29 41.0, Dec +06 49 38, but as in the case of IC 5112, there is nothing there that Bigourdan could have seen, save (most likely) some star or group of stars. And as in that case, which star or stars can only be determined (or perhaps it would be better to say guessed at) by doing a detailed calculation based on Bigourdan's actual observation, instead of using Dreyer's rounded-off value for the equinox of 1860.
Calculations and Conclusions: Bigourdan's comparison star was the same as for IC 5112; referring to that discussion, its coordinates were (1900) RA 21 24 39.6, Dec +06 26 32. Adding Bigourdan's offsets of RA +02.96s and Dec -04' 02.3" yields a position for his #443 of (1900) RA 21 24 42.6, Dec +06 22 30. Precessing that to J2000 places IC 5113 at or near RA 21 29 40.5, Dec +06 48 45, dead center on the star listed above. Whether that is actually what Bigourdan observed cannot be known, but it is certainly the most likely candidate.
SDSS image of region near the star that is probably IC 5113
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the star most likely to be IC 5113
(The region near IC 5112 (which see) is just right of center, but is not labeled in this image)

IC 5114 (=
NGC 7091 = PGC 66972)
Discovered (Jul 1, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7091)
Discovered (Jul 9, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5114)
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)dm?) in Grus (RA 21 34 07.7, Dec -36 39 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5114 (= Swift list XI (#206), 1860 RA 21 23 37, NPD 127 19.4) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, 2 stars 30 seconds of time to the east" (Swift's original paper lists the two stars as an "extremely wide" double.). The position precesses to RA 21 32 14.2, Dec -36 42 33, but there is nothing there (which is undoubtedly the main reason for the double listing). However, the description is a reasonable fit to NGC 7091, which lies just under 2 minutes of time to the east, and to the stars to its east; and there is nothing else in the region that Swift could have seen, so there is little doubt about the identity.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate listing, see NGC 7091 for anything else.

IC 5115 (= PGC 66882)
Discovered (Sep 12, 1896) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pegasus (RA 21 30 57.3, Dec +11 45 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5115 (= Swift list XI (#205), 1860 RA 21 23 44, NPD 78 50.1) is "most extremely faint, very small, faint star to east". The position precesses to RA 21 30 30.8, Dec +11 46 39, but (as is often the case for Swift's later observations) there is nothing there. However, the galaxy listed above has nearly the correct declination and with a right ascension less than half a minute of time to the east is much closer than anything else that Swift could have seen in the region, so the identification is reasonably certain.
Physical Information: 0.65 by 0.45 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5115
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5115
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5115

IC 5116 (= PGC 67055)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Indus (RA 21 37 05.6, Dec -70 58 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5116 (= DeLisle Stewart #721, 1860 RA 21 24 18, NPD 161 36) is "considerably faint, small, round, stellar nucleus". The position precesses to RA 21 37 03.3, Dec -70 58 48, right on the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: 1.5 by 1.2 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5116
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5116
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5116

IC 5117
Discovered (1905) by
Williamina Fleming
A magnitude 11.5 planetary nebula in Indus (RA 21 32 31.0, Dec +44 35 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5117 (= Fleming #104, 1860 RA 21 27 11, NPD 46 01) is a "planetary, stellar". The position precesses to RA 21 32 30.1, Dec +44 36 05, only 0.3 arcmin north northwest of the planetary nebula listed above, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: 6.5 by 5.5 arcsec apparent size.
DSS image of region near planetary nebula IC 5117
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5117
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the region close to IC 5117
DSS image of region close to planetary nebula IC 5117
Below, a 15 arcsec wide image of the nebula (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, Courtney Seligman)
HST image of planetary nebula IC 5117

IC 5118 (= PGC 67202)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Indus (RA 21 42 13.8, Dec -71 22 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5118 (= DeLisle Stewart #722, 1860 RA 21 27 29, NPD 162 01) is "very faint, small, considerably extended 35, 10th magnitude star 2 arcmin to southwest". The position precesses to RA 21 40 16.1, Dec -71 23 25, but there is nothing there. However, there is a galaxy (namely, the one listed above) two minutes of time to the east that perfectly fits the description of the galaxy and its star field, and there is nothing else in the region, so the identification of that galaxy as IC 5118 is reasonably certain.
Physical Information: 1.1 by 0.3 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5118
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5118
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5118

IC 5119 (= PGC 66969)
Discovered (Oct 26, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Pegasus (RA 21 33 55.9, Dec +21 50 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5119 (= Javelle #1408, 1860 RA 21 27 32, NPD 68 49.3) is "faint, very small, diffuse, 15th magnitude star attached, 13th magnitude star to north". The position precesses to RA 21 33 57.7, Dec +21 47 54, about 2.5 arcmin south southeast of the galaxy listed above, but the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: 0.95 by 0.3 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5119
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5119
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5119

IC 5120 (= PGC 67093 = PGC 323592 = "NGC 7096A")
Discovered (Sep 19, 1903) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)bc pec?) in Indus (RA 21 38 48.2, Dec -64 21 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5120 (= Frost #1220, 1860 RA 21 27 41, NPD 154 59) is "faint, almost round". The position precesses to RA 21 38 47.5, Dec -64 21 29, only half an arcmin south of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain. (Warning: Calling this NGC 7096A is not only needless but risks confusion, as NGC 7096 itself might be called that in some circumstances.)
Physical Information: 1.85 by 0.5 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5120
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5120
Below, a 2.1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5120

IC 5121 (=
NGC 7096 = PGC 67168)
Discovered (Aug 31, 1836) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7096)
Discovered (Sep 19, 1903) by Royal Frost (and later listed as IC 5121)
A magnitude 11.9 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)a?) in Indus (RA 21 41 19.1, Dec -63 54 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5121 (= Frost #1221, 1860 RA 21 30 18, NPD 155 02) is "planetary, stellar, 13th magnitude" ("stellar" was added by Dreyer; it was not in Frost's paper). The position precesses to RA 21 41 31.4, Dec -64 24 11, but there is nothing there or anywhere near there. However, there is a suitable candidate 30 arcmin to the north, namely NGC 7096. Corwin states that Andris Lauberts appears to have been the first to suggest the equality of the two entries, and supports the suggestion that Frost made a half-degree error in the declination by pointing out that of all the previously recorded objects in the region, NGC 7096 is the only one Frost failed to observe, instead apparently mistaking it for his 'new' #1221. In any event, the identification of IC 5121 as a duplicate listing of NGC 7096 is considered as certain as any such suggestion can be.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate listing, see NGC 7096 for anything else.

IC 5122 (= PGC 67123)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1898) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (S0/a?) in Capricornus (RA 21 39 45.8, Dec -22 24 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5122 (= Howe list II (#13), 1860 RA 21 31 50, NPD 113 02.1) is "extremely faint, very small; (NGC) 7103 and 7104 and IC 1393 near". The position precesses to RA 21 39 46.4, Dec -22 24 17, within the northeastern outline of the galaxy listed above, and the description of the field is correct, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: 0.7 by 0.45 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5122, also showing NGC 7103, NGC 7104 and IC 5124
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5122, also showing NGC 7103 and 7104 and IC 5124
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5122

IC 5123 (= PGC 67283)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)bc?) in Indus (RA 21 44 49.3, Dec -72 25 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5123 (= DeLisle Stewart #724, 1860 RA 21 31 55, NPD 163 04) is "considerably faint, very small, considerably extended 15, 12th magnitude star 1 arcmin to west". The position precesses to RA 21 44 54.3, Dec -72 25 52, only 0.7 arcmin south southeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: 1.2 by 0.35 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5123
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5123
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5123

IC 5124 (= PGC 67127)
Discovered (Sep 30, 1897) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 15.5 lenticular galaxy (S0/a? pec) in Capricornus (RA 21 39 55.2, Dec -22 25 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5124 (= Howe list I (#17), 1860 RA 21 31 59, NPD 113 03.4) is "most extremely faint, small, difficult; another suspected 1 arcmin to south". The position precesses to RA 21
Physical Information: 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5124, also showing NGC 7103, NGC 7104 and IC 5122
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5124, showing NGC 7103 & 7104 and IC 1393 & 5122
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5124

IC 5125 (= PGC 67187)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type S(r)bc? pec) in Indus (RA 21 41 50.1, Dec -52 46 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5125 (= DeLisle Stewart #723, 1860 RA 21 32 14, NPD 143 25) is "faint, extremely small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 21 41 49.9, Dec -52 47 02, only 0.6 arcmin south of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of bright central region about 0.55 by 0.55 arcmin; including faint extensions, about 1.2 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5125
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5125
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5125

IC 5126 (= PGC 3947737)
Discovered (Nov 13, 1895) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Aquarius (RA 21 40 28.6, Dec -06 20 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5126 (= Javelle #1409, 1860 RA 21 32 44, NPD 96 00.0) is "very faint, very small, round, between two 14th magnitude stars". The position precesses to RA 21 40 05.2, Dec -05 22 07, but there is nothing there. However, per Corwin, the problem has a relatively simple solution Javelle misidentified his comparison star, placing his position (and Dreyer's) about a degree to the north of the correct position. If his offsets are applied to the correct comparison star, they land right on the galaxy listed above, and the stars to the northwest and southeast make the identification certain.
Physical Information: 0.6 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5126
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5126
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5126

IC 5127 (=
NGC 7102 = PGC 67120)
Discovered (Oct 16, 1863) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 7102)
Recorded (Oct 27, 1894) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 5127)
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b?) in Pegasus (RA 21 39 44.5, Dec +06 17 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5127 (= Bigourdan #338, 1860 RA 21 32 47, NPD 84 24) is "extremely faint, pretty large, several extremely faint stars and nebulosity". The position precesses to RA 21 39 45.9, Dec +06 13 52, but there is nothing there. However, there is a candidate that fits the description about 4 arcmin to the north (namely NGC 7102), and Corwin notes that the comparison star Bigourdan used for IC 5127 (BD+5 4837) has an unusually large error in its BD position, suggesting that the error in the star's position may have led to a duplicate listing of the NGC object.
Calculations and Conclusions: Per the Vizier database, the position of BD+5 4837 precesses to RA 21 39 50.4, Dec +06 19 45, but there is no star there, and the star that best fits the description of the BD object is at RA 21 39 53.4, Dec +06 22 53, about 3 arcmin north of the BD position. Precessing that to Bigourdan's (1900) equinox puts his comparison star at RA 21 34 54.4, Dec +05 55 44, and adding his offsets of (1900) RA -03.95s, Dec -05' 44.2" yields (1900) RA 21 34 50.4, Dec +05 50 02 as the position of his #338. Precessing that to J2000 yields a modern position of RA 21 39 49.5, Dec +06 17 10, about 1.2 arcmin due east of the center of NGC 7102. If this were an attempt to identify some otherwise unknown object the relatively small positional error and the reasonable description would suffice for a certain identification. So the suggestion that IC 5127 and NGC 7102 represent the same object seems equally certain to be correct.
Physical Description: Given the duplicate listing, see NGC 7102 for anything more.

IC 5128 (= PGC 67232)
Discovered (Jul 24, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0/a?) in Grus (RA 21 43 11.7, Dec -38 58 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5128 (= Swift list XII (#26), 1860 RA 21 34 01, NPD 129 37.8) is "most extremely faint, very small, round, diffuse, star to southwest". The position precesses to RA 21 42 40.1, Dec -38 59 41, but there is nothing there save for a double star. However, there is a galaxy that fits Swift's description just half a minute of time to the east, and since that is a relatively small error for Swift's later years, the identification of IC 5128 as the galaxy listed above seems reasonably certain.
Physical Information: 1.05 by 0.7 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5128
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5128
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5128

IC 5129 (= PGC 67363)
Discovered (Aug 22, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Indus (RA 21 47 46.6, Dec -65 23 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5129 (= DeLisle Stewart #725, 1860 RA 21 36 42, NPD 156 02) has "no description". The position precesses to RA 21 47 46.8, Dec -65 23 25, right on the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: 0.8 by 0.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5129
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5129
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5129

IC 5130 (= PGC 67445)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)bc? pec) in Indus (RA 21 50 24.2, Dec -73 59 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5130 (= DeLisle Stewart #726, 1860 RA 21 37 12, NPD 164 39) is "very faint, very small". The position precesses to RA 21 50 35.4, Dec -74 00 14, just off the southeastern tip of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: 1.8 by 0.5 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5130
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5130
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5130

IC 5131 (= PGC 67352)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (1899?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 12.3 lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 21 47 25.3, Dec -34 53 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5131 (= Swift list XI (#207), Howe, 1860 RA 21 39 01, NPD 125 31.7) is "very faint, very small, round". The position precesses to RA 21 47 25.5, Dec -34 53 01, right on the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: 1.6 by 1.5 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5131
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5131
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5131

IC 5132 (= LBN 497, neighboring
NGC 7129)
Discovered (Sep 25, 1895) by Isaac Roberts
A star and emission nebula in Cepheus (RA 21 42 40.2, 66 10 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5132 (= Roberts, 1860 RA 21 39 08, NPD 24 30) is "(one of) two 13th magnitude stars in very faint nebulosity", the other being IC 5133. The position precesses to RA 21 42 20.4, Dec +66 08 24, within a region filled with stars and nebulosity, but well to the southwest of anything suggestive of Roberts' description; however, his relative positions for the objects are a reasonable match to the pair of stars enveloped in nebulosity to the northeast of his positions, so the identification of those stars and their nebulae as what he recorded seems certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.2 arcmin. IC 5132 and 5133 are outlying parts of the emission region NGC 7129, apparently separated from their larger and brighter neighbor only by obscuring clouds of dust that lie in front of the region.
Capella Observatory image of region near emission nebulae IC 5132 and IC 5133, also showing IC 5134 and NGC 7129
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on IC 5132 and 5133, also showing IC 5134 and NGC 7129
(Image Credits and © above, below and at bottom, Capella Observatory; used by permission)
Below, a 4 arcmin wide image centered on IC 5132 and 5133
Capella Observatory image of emission nebulae IC 5132 and IC 5133
Below, the 12 arcmin wide image above, also showing Roberts' positions for IC 5132 and 5133
Capella Observatory image of region near emission nebulae IC 5132 and IC 5133, also showing IC 5134, NGC 7129 and Roberts' positions for IC 5132 and IC 5133

IC 5133 (= LBN 1181, neighboring
NGC 7129)
Discovered (Sep 25, 1895) by Isaac Roberts
A star and emission nebula in Cepheus (RA 21 42 47.0, 66 10 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5133 (= Roberts, 1860 RA 21 39 13, NPD 24 29) is "(one of) two 13th magnitude stars in very faint nebulosity", the other being IC 5132. The position precesses to RA 21 42 25.4, Dec +66 09 24, within a region filled with stars and nebulosity, but a little southwest of anything suggestive of Roberts' description. (See IC 5132 for images and a discussion of the identification.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.1 arcmin. IC 5132 and 5133 are outlying parts of the emission region NGC 7129, apparently separated from their larger and brighter neighbor only by obscuring clouds of dust that lie in front of the region.

IC 5134 (= part of
NGC 7129)
Recorded (Oct 15, 1895) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A star and emission nebula in Cepheus (RA 21 42 58.9, Dec +66 06 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5134 (= Bigourdan #339, 1860 RA 21 39 44, NPD 24 32) is "a 9.5 magnitude star in nebulosity; IV 75 close", IV 75 meaning William Herschel's IV 75, or NGC 7129. The position precesses to RA 21 42 57.7, Dec +66 06 28, barely north of the star listed above, so the identification is certain. Per Corwin, Bigourdan apparently thought that NGC 7129 represented the numerous fainter nebulosities in the region, and that this star deserved listing as a separate object, whereas NGC 7129 actually includes most of the region of stars and associated nebulae, so IC 5134 represents only a small portion of the NGC object.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 arcmin. See IC 5132 for labeled images, and NGC 7129 for anything else.

IC 5135 (=
NGC 7130 = PGC 67387)
Discovered (Sep 25, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7130)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5135)
Also observed (1899?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 12.1 spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 21 48 19.3, Dec -34 57 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5135 (= Swift list XI (#208), Howe, 1860 RA 21 39 56, NPD 125 35.8) is "very faint, pretty large, round". The position precesses to RA 21 48 20.2, Dec -34 57 00, right on the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain. Per Corwin, Howe is responsible for the dead-on position (though Swift's was not as poor as usual), and the duplicate listing was caused by John Herschel's position being in error by 30 arcmin, making it impossible for Swift, Howe or Dreyer to recognize the equality.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate listing, see NGC 7130 for anything else.

IC 5136 (perhaps =
NGC 7135 = PGC 67425)
Recorded (Sep 15, 1897) by Lewis Swift
Probably a lost or nonexistent object in Piscis Austrinus (RA 21 48 50.5, Dec -33 39 09)
but perhaps A magnitude 11.7 lenticular galaxy (type E/SA0? pec) at RA 21 49 46.0, Dec -34 52 34
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5136 (= Swift list XII (#27), 1860 RA 21 40 30, NPD 124 18.0) is "most extremely faint, small, round". The position precesses to RA 21 48 50.5, Dec -33 39 09 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there, so IC 5136 is usually listed as lost or nonexistent. However, Corwin states that although it would require a huge error in Swift's position this is probably NGC 7135, as Swift's description of the surrounding star field ("wide double star points to it, several pretty bright stars to southeast and northwest") supposedly matches that near the NGC object, and some references have followed his lead (unfortunately, often without any caveats). But although a DSS image of the region near NGC 7315 might be interpreted as agreeing with Swift's description of the star field, I would prefer confirmation by a skilled visual observer, hence my decision to list this as probably lost or nonexistent, and only perhaps a duplicate of NGC 7135.
Physical Information: If lost or nonexistent, there is nothing to say. If a duplicate entry, see NGC 7135.
DSS image of region near Swift's position for the probably lost or nonexistent IC 5136
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Swift's position for IC 5136

IC 5137
Recorded (Aug 22, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A lost or nonexistent object in Indus (RA 21 51 38.0, Dec -65 34 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5137 (= DeLisle Stewart #727, 1860 RA 21 40 37, NPD 156 14) is "extremely faint, small, round, stellar nucleus, spiral?; suspected". The position precesses to RA 21 51 38.0, Dec -65 34 59 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there or anywhere near there. Per Corwin, since the object was seen on only one plate (as indicated by "suspected"), it was probably a plate defect.
DSS image of region near Stewart's position for the probably lost or nonexistent IC 5137
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Stewart's position for IC 5137

IC 5138 (= PGC 67585)
Discovered (Aug 22, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(r)b?) in Indus (RA 21 53 21.6, Dec -68 57 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5138 (= DeLisle Stewart #728, 1860 RA 21 41 49, NPD 159 36) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round, suspected". The position precesses to RA 21 53 29.2, Dec -68 56 48, about 0.8 arcmin northeast of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: 1.0 by 0.55 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5138
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5138
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5138

IC 5139 (= PGC 67447)
Discovered (Aug 18, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.3 lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 21 50 25.6, Dec -30 59 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5139 (= Swift list XII (#28), 1860 RA 21 42 29, NPD 121 37.9) is "very faint, small, a little extended". The position precesses to RA 21 50 41.9, Dec -30 58 50, less than 4 arcmin east northeast of the galaxy listed above (a relatively small error for Swift's later years), the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: 2.0 by 1.0 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5139
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5139
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5139

IC 5140 (= PGC 67613)
Discovered (Aug 22, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type SBcd?) in Indus (RA 21 54 16.0, Dec -67 19 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5140 (= DeLisle Stewart #729, 1860 RA 21 42 56, NPD 157 59) is "extremely faint, very small, much extended 135". The position precesses to RA 21 54 13.2, Dec -67 19 42, on the northern half of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: 2.0 by 0.15 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5140
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5140
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5140

IC 5141 (= PGC 67580)
Discovered (Sep 19, 1903) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)bc?) in Indus (RA 21 53 17.1, Dec -59 29 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5141 (= Frost #1222, 1860 RA 21 43 06, NPD 150 07) is "planetary, stellar, 15th magnitude". The position precesses to RA 21 53 11.1, Dec -59 27 45, just under 2 arcmin north northwest of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: 1.4 by 1.2 arcmin for the brighter part of the galaxy, 2.0 by 1.5 arcmin with its fainter extensions.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5141
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5141
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5141

IC 5142 (= PGC 67640)
Discovered (Aug 22, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SAB(r)cd?) in Indus (RA 21 55 20.4, Dec -65 30 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5142 (= DeLisle Stewart #730, 1860 RA 21 44 28, NPD 156 10) is "extremely faint, very small, round, between 2 stars, suspected". The position precesses to RA 21 55 22.5, Dec -65 30 33, right on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: 1.7 by 0.95 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5142
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5142
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5142

IC 5143 (=
NGC 7155 = PGC 67663)
Discovered (Sep 30, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7155)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5143)
A magnitude 12.2 lenticular galaxy (type SB0(r)?) in Indus (RA 21 56 09.8, Dec -49 31 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5143 (= Swift list XI (#210), 1860 RA 21 47 09, NPD 139 43.1) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round" (Swift's paper adds "in line with two 9th magnitude stars to the southeast; 7th magnitude star (also) to southeast". The position precesses to RA 21 56 15.2, Dec -49 03 28, but (as is all too common with Swift's later observations) there is nothing there. However, Swift's description of the surrounding star field exactly matches that of NGC 7155, which lies just under 30 arcmin to the south (and per Corwin, given the fact that this is most southerly of all Swift's discoveries, would not be a surprising error), so the identification is essentially certain. And of course given the large error in Swift's position, a duplicate listing was inevitable.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate listing, see NGC 7155 for anything else.

IC 5144 (= PGC 1473533)
Discovered by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 15(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0(s)a?) in Pegasus (RA 21 54 09.6, Dec +15 02 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5144 (= Barnard, 1860 RA 21 47 13, NPD 75 33.5) is "faint, small, several faint stars close to the east". The position precesses to RA 21 53 56.9, Dec +15 06 01, to the southwest of IC 5145 (also discovered by Barnard, and therefore definitely not IC 5144), and a few arcmin northwest of more than half a dozen galaxies of various magnitudes, one of which is presumably IC 5144. Unfortunately, which is called IC 5144 may be different depending on which reference you use. Per Corwin the obvious answer is the galaxy listed above, because of the line of stars to its southeast (for the other reasonably bright candidates those stars are to the west, not the east), and even ignoring the line of stars, Barnard's relative position for IC 5144 and 5145 is sufficiently similar to the relative position of the two galaxies chosen here to make the identity of IC 5144 reasonably certain. However, various databases list PGC 67614 or PGC 67621 as IC 5144, and although Corwin states that things were pretty well "sorted out" in the major databases by June 2003, as of June 2014 LEDA and Steinicke still list PGC 67614 as IC 5144, and there is a good chance that PGC 67621 is still listed as IC 5144 somewhere else; so I have chosen to post entries for each of those galaxies immediately below as a warning about the misidentifications.
Physical Information: 0.55 by 0.55 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5144, also showing PGC 67614 and PGC 67621, each of which is sometimes misidentified as IC 5144
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5144, also showing PGC 67614 and 67621
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the region near the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5144
Below, an 18 arcmin wide SDSS image showing IC 5144 and 5145 and Barnard's positions for them
(the identical diagonals show that the most likely candidate for IC 5144 is the galaxy listed here)
SDSS image of region near IC 5144 and IC 5145, also showing Barnard's positions for them

PGC 67614 (not =
IC 5144)
Not an IC object but listed here since sometimes misidentified as IC 5144
A magnitude 15(?) spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pegasus (RA 21 54 20.7, Dec +15 02 39)
Historical Identification: See IC 5144 for a discussion of why this can't be that IC object.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.45 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 67614, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 5144
Above, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 67614; for wide-field images see IC 5144 or PGC 67621

PGC 67621 (not =
IC 5144)
Not an IC object but listed here since sometimes misidentified as IC 5144
A magnitude 15.5(?) spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pegasus (RA 21 54 28.0, Dec +15 01 00)
Historical Identification: See IC 5144 for a discussion of why this can't be that IC object.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.05 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 67621, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 5144; also shown are IC 5144 and PGC 67614, which is also sometimes misidentified as IC 5144
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 67621, also showing PGC 67614 and IC 5144
Below, a 1.1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 67621, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 5144

IC 5145 (= PGC 67619)
Discovered by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Pegasus (RA 21 54 23.1, Dec +15 09 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5145 (= Barnard, 1860 RA 21 47 31, NPD 75 26.2) has "no description". The position precesses to RA 21 54 14.7, Dec +15 13 21, over 4 arcmin north northwest of the galaxy listed above, but there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is considered certain. (Also see IC 5144 for a discussion of how Barnard's relative position for the two objects helps identify the less obvious one.)
Physical Information: 1.7 by 1.0 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5145
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5145
Below, a 2.1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5145

IC 5146 (= OCL 213 = LBN 424), the Cocoon Nebula
Discovered (Jul 28, 1894) by
Max Wolf
Also observed (Aug 13, 1899) by Thomas Espin
A magnitude 7(?) open cluster and emission nebula in Cygnus (RA 21 53 28.7, Dec +47 16 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5146 (= Espin, Wolf, 1860 RA 21 48 06, NPD 43 23.7) is "pretty bright, very large, irregular figure, 9.5 magnitude star in middle". The position precesses to RA 21 53 29.3, Dec +47 15 50, practically dead center on the nebula and the description fits, so the identification is certain (the position shown above is for the "9.5 magnitude star in middle", also known as IC 5146 W42).
Physical Information: The listing is for an open cluster and emission nebula about 12 arcmin in diameter, lying about 4000 light years from Earth. (Some references state that IC 5146 refers only to the cluster, but Dreyer's description obviously refers to the nebula as well.) At that distance the Cocoon's apparent size corresponds to about 15 light years. The "cluster" actually consists of at least two compact groups surrounding massive bright stars, of which one is the bright central star referred to by Dreyer. That star, a spectral type B0 Main Sequence star, is primarily responsible for lighting up the nebula. The Cocoon is a "blister" on the front edge of a large molecular complex that has been exposed to our view by the ionization and outflow of gas heated by the B0V star. Most references suggest that this star is only about 100 thousand years old, but the two or three hundred hot bright young stars in the area have a range of ages averaging a million or so years, suggesting that several episodes of star formation took place in the region, continuing to the present day. The bluish regions are caused by the visible light of the star reflecting off grains of dust, while the pinkish regions are hydrogen emissions (primarily Hα) caused by the ultraviolet radiation of the star. Surrounding the bright nebula is the end of a dark (absorption) nebula, Barnard 168, which separates the emission nebula from the surrounding starry background, enhancing its dramatic appearance.
Misti Mountain image of open cluster and emission nebula IC 5146, the Cocoon Nebula, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing regions
Above, an 18 arcmin wide composite image of IC 5146; note the obscuration around the emission nebula
(Image Credit and © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory (used by permission), overlaid on a DSS background)
Below, an approximately 12 arcmin wide image of the nebula
(Image credit and © Jean-Charles Cuillandre (CFHT) & Giovanni Anselmi (Coelum), CFHT; used by permission)
CFHT image of IC 5146, the Cocoon Nebula

IC 5147 (= PGC 67787)
Discovered (Aug 21, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc?) in Indus (RA 21 59 26.2, Dec -65 26 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5147 (= DeLisle Stewart #731, 1860 RA 21 48 41, NPD 156 07) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round, faint star 2 arcmin to east". The position precesses to RA 21 59 28.5, Dec -65 27 06, on the eastern rim of the galaxy listed above, there is nothing else nearby and the star to the east makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: 1.6 by 0.65 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5147
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5147
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5147

IC 5148 (=
IC 5150)
Discovered (Jun 4, 1894) by Walter Gale (and later listed as IC 5150)
Discovered (Jul 23, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5148)
A magnitude 11.0 planetary nebula in Grus (RA 21 59 35.1, Dec -39 23 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5148 (= Swift list XII (#29), 1860 RA 21 50 33, NPD 130 04.1) is "very faint, large, a little extended, star attached". The position precesses to RA 21 59 04.1, Dec -39 24 08, about 6 arcmin west of the planetary nebula listed above, which is just enough different from Gale's almost equally poor observation to cause the duplicate listing; but the description is a reasonable fit to its appearance (particularly given the bright star to the south southwest, which is undoubtedly Swift's "attached" star) and there is nothing else nearby, so the identity and equality of the two entries is certain.
Physical information: Apparent size 2.25 by 2.2 arcmin.
DSS image of region near planetary nebula IC 5148
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5148
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide mage of the planetary nebula (Image Credit ESO)
ESO image of planetary nebula IC 5148

IC 5149 (= PGC 67770)
Discovered (Sep 8, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type (R)Sa?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 21 58 59.1, Dec -27 24 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5149 (= Swift list XII (#30), 1860 RA 21 50 42, NPD 118 02.8) is "extremely faint, small, round, 6.5 magnitude star 63 seconds of time to east on parallel (of declination)". The position precesses to RA 21 58 43.4, Dec -27 22 51, less than 4 arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above (not a bad error for Swift's later years), and there is a star 62 seconds of time to the east at nearly the same declination (though magnitude 8.5 instead of 6.5, but magnitude estimates in the original NGC/IC are often equally bad or even worse), so the identification is certain. (As noted by Corwin, there is a brighter galaxy to the west, but its greater distance from the star rules it out.)
Physical Information: 1.4 by 0.5 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5149
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5149
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5149
Celestial Atlas
(IC 5050 - 5099) ←     IC Objects: IC 5100 - 5149     → (IC 5150 - 5199)