Celestial Atlas
(IC 5100 - 5149) ←     IC Objects: IC 5150 - 5199 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 5200 - 5249)
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QuickLinks:
5150, 5151, 5152, 5153, 5154, 5155, 5156, 5157, 5158, 5159, 5160, 5161, 5162, 5163, 5164, 5165, 5166,
5167, 5168, 5169, 5170, 5171, 5172, 5173, 5174, 5175, 5176, 5177, 5178, 5179, 5180, 5181, 5182, 5183,
5184, 5185, 5186, 5187, 5188, 5189, 5190, 5191, 5192, 5193, 5194, 5195, 5196, 5197, 5198, 5199

Page last updated Jul 29, 2014
WORKING 5177+: check preliminary IDs, add pix, verify type, position, size
post HLA images: 5152, 57

IC 5150 (=
IC 5148)
Discovered (Jun 4, 1894) by Walter Gale (and later listed as IC 5150)
Discovered (Jul 23, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5148)
A magnitude 11.0 planetary nebula in Grus (RA 21 59 35.1, Dec -39 23 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5150 (= Gale (A. N. 3426), 1860 RA 21 50 44, NPD 130 05.0) is "pretty bright, pretty large, annular". The position precesses to RA 21 59 15.0, Dec -39 25 01, about 4.4 arcmin west southwest of the planetary nebula listed above, and although the position is almost as poor as Swift's, the description is perfect and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain (and as noted in the entry for IC 5148, so is the equality of the two entries).
Physical information: Given the duplicate listing, see IC 5148 for anything else.

IC 5151 (= PGC 67768)
Discovered (Oct 23, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pegasus (RA 21 58 52.6, Dec +03 45 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5151 (Javelle #1410, 1860 RA 21 51 50, NPD 86 54.6) is "faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle and nucleus, mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 21 58 54.5, De +03 45 25, only 0.55 arcmin southeast of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is ertain.
Physical information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8440 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 5151 is about 395 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 380 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 385 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.45 by 0.25 arcmin, it is about 50 thousand light years across. (Note: Some databases list this as a pair of galaxies, but the images shown here indicate that the second object is a foreground star.)
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5151
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5151
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5151

IC 5152 (= PGC 67908)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 10.5 irregular galaxy (type IA(s)m?) in Indus (RA 22 02 41.6, Dec -51 17 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5152 (DeLisle Stewart #732, 1860 RA 21 53 34, NPD 141 57) is "faint, considerably large, considerably extended 150°, considerably brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 22 02 44.0, Dec -51 16 41, just off the northern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits reasonably well and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Notes: Although the galaxy has a position angle of around a hundred degrees and Stewart's description states that it is about 150°, the position of the star on the northwest rim of the galaxy may have given the impression that the galaxy was extended more northwest-southeast than east-west.
Physical information: Apparent size 5.3 by 3.4 arcmin. Essentially at rest relative to the Local Group of galaxies, and probably a member of the Group.
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 5152
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5152
Below, a 6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of irregular galaxy IC 5152
Below, a different 6 arcmin wide image (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of irregular galaxy IC 5152
Below (in next iteration of this page), a ? arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
'Raw' HST image of part of irregular galaxy IC 5152

IC 5153
Recorded (Sep 30, 1891) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 15.6 star in Pegasus (RA 22 00 23.4, Dec +17 51 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5153 (Bigourdan #341, 1860 RA 21 53 42, NPD 72 49) is "extremely faint, perhaps a star; 9.5 magnitude star 1.4 arcmin to southeast". The position precesses to RA 22 00 22.1, Dec +17 51 12, but there is nothing there save a stellar field. In such a case it is best to ignore Dreyer's rounded-off position and refer to Bigourdan's original records. The position he gives for his comparison star (as it happens, the "9.5 magnitude star 1.4 arcmin to southeast") indicates that it is the 11th magnitude star at J2000 RA 22 00 28.9, Dec +17 50 52. Precessing that to the equinox of 1900 and applying Bigourdan's offsets, his #341 should be near (1900) RA 21 55 37.9, Dec +17 22 46, which precesses to J2000 RA 22 00 23.8, Dec +17 51 33. That is less than 10 arcsec southeast of the star listed above, so its identification as IC 5153 is certain.
Discovery Notes: Per Corwin, the 17th magnitude galaxy to the north of the star may have contributed to an impression of nebulosity for the star, but the galaxy is too faint for Bigourdan to have seen, so any contribution it made to the observation is probably coincidental.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as IC 5153
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the star listed as IC 5153
Below, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the star
SDSS image centered on the star listed as IC 5153

IC 5154 (= PGC 67984)
Discovered (Aug 21, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.4 irregular galaxy (type Irr?) in Indus (RA 22 04 29.6, Dec -66 06 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5154 (DeLisle Stewart #733, 1860 RA 21 53 47, NPD 156 47) is "very faint, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 22 04 33.2, Dec -66 06 34, just northeast of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin. Listed as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2) and as a Wolf-Rayet galaxy.
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 5154
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5154
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of irregular galaxy IC 5154

IC 5155
Recorded (Sep 21, 1892) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A pair of stars in Aquarius (RA 22 02 06.3, Dec +00 29 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5155 (Bigourdan #342, 1860 RA 21 54 58, NPD 90 10) is "extremely faint, small, suddenly much brighter middle, 13th magnitude star 1.5 arcmin to east". The position precesses to RA 22 02 08.0, Dec +00 30 21, but there is nothing there save a stellar field. As in the case of IC 5153, the identification requires reference to Bigourdan's original paper. That establishes his comparison star as 8th magnitude HD 209237, at J2000 RA 22 01 48.14, Dec +00 20 04.4. Precessing to the equinox of 1900 and adding Bigourdan's offsets, his #342 should be near (1900) RA 21 56 59.4, Dec +00 00 17, which precesses to J2000 RA 22 02 06.5, Dec +00 29 11, which falls almost exactly between the pair of stars listed above, and although the star supposedly "1.5 arcmin to east" is (as noted by Corwin) actually just west of due south, such confusion about directions is not uncommon, so the identification appears as certain as any.
SDSS image of region near the pair of stars listed as IC 5155
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5155

IC 5156 (= PGC 67932)
Discovered (Oct 16, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)ab pec?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 03 14.7, Dec -33 50 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5156 (Swift list XII (#32), 1860 RA 21 55 04, NPD 124 28.5) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round". The position precesses to RA 22 03 18.1, Dec -33 48 04, a little over 2 arcmin north northeast of the galaxy listed above, but there is nothing else nearby so the identification is considered certain.
Physical information: Apparent size 2.75 by 0.9 arcmin. There is another galaxy to the west of IC 5156 that looks like it could be a companion, but PGC 67907 is actually much further away, so the two galaxies are not connected in any way.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5156
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5156
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5156
Below, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered between IC 5156 and the unrelated PGC 67907
DSS image centered between spiral galaxy IC 5156 and its apparent but actually completely unrelated 'neighbor', PGC 67907

IC 5157 (= PGC 67941)
Discovered (Jul 26, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (1899) by DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.0 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 03 27.1, Dec -34 56 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5157 (Swift list XII (#31), DeLisle Stewart, 1860 RA 21 55 08, NPD 125 37.5) is "pretty bright, pretty small, round, 3 stars in line to northeast". The position precesses to RA 22 03 24.9, Dec -34 57 04, on the southwestern rim of the galaxy listed above, there is nothing else nearby, and the three stars more or less in a line to its east and northeast make the identification certain.
Physical information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 5157
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5157
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 5157
Below (in next iteration of this page), a ? arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
'Raw' HST image of elliptical galaxy IC 5157

IC 5158 (= PGC 68038)
Discovered (Aug 21, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)m?) in Indus (RA 22 06 24.9, Dec -67 31 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5158 (DeLisle Stewart #734, 1860 RA 21 55 31, NPD 158 11) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 22 06 29.3, Dec -67 30 23, less than 0.8 arcmin northeast of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.75 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5158
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5158
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5158

IC 5159
Recorded (Oct 2, 1891) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A star in Aquarius (RA 22 02 40.0, Dec +00 19 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5159 (Bigourdan #343, 1860 RA 21 55 32, NPD 90 20) is "extremely faint, very small, stellar, 11.5 magnitude star 1.5 arcmin to east northeast". The position precesses to RA 22 02 42.3, Dec +00 20 25, but there is nothing there but a completely stellar field. To find out what star or stars Bigourdan recorded, we have to ignore Dreyer's rounded-off position and refer to Bigourdan's original paper. As it happens the position he gives for his comparison star precesses to a nearly empty region, but there is a suitable (12th magnitude) star a couple of arcmin south of his position, at J2000 RA 22 02 49.0, Dec +00 19 14. Presuming that is the correct comparison star, precessing its position to the equinox of 1900 and adding the average of Bigourdan's five offsets yields a position for his #343 near (1900) RA 21 57 32.7, Dec -00 09 44, which precesses to J2000 RA 22 02 40.0, Dec +00 19 13, within 3 arcsec of the star listed above. So other than a negligible uncertainty about the identity of the comparison star, the identification of IC 5159 as the star listed above is certain.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as IC 5159
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5159 (Bigourdan's comparison star must be the one 2.3 arcmin left of center)

IC 5160 (= PGC 67929)
Discovered (Oct 15, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0(rs)a?) in Pegasus (RA 22 03 04.8, Dec +10 55 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5160 (Javelle #1412, 1860 RA 21 56 14, NPD 79 45.5) is "faint, very small, round". The position precesses to RA 22 03 06.8, Dec +10 54 58, only 0.7 arcmin southeast of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.75 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5160
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5160
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5160

IC 5161 (= PGC 68016)
Discovered (Oct 23, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pegasus (RA 22 05 39.0, Dec +09 38 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5161 (Javelle #1413, 1860 RA 21 58 43, NPD 81 07.2) is "faint, round, stellar, mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 22 05 38.4, Dec +09 33 32, but there is nothing there. However, as pointed out by Steve Gottlieb, Javelle used a position for his comparison star that is 5 arcmin too far south, and as a result the NPD for his #1413 is 5 arcmin too large. Using the correct NPD, the position precesses to RA 22 05 38.2, Dec +09 38 32, only 0.3 arcmin west northwest of the galaxy listed above, so the identification is certain.
Physical information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5161
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5161
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5161

IC 5162 (= PGC 68108)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type Sc? pec) in Indus (RA 22 08 02.9, Dec -52 42 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5162 (DeLisle Stewart #735, 1860 RA 21 58 57, NPD 143 24) is "extremely faint, extremely small, very extended 95°". The position precesses to RA 22 08 08.4, Dec -52 43 08, less than 0.8 arcmin east southeast of the galaxy listed above, and although there are other galaxies in the region PGC 68108 is the only one that fits the description, so the identification is certain.
Physical information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.35 arcmin. Given its peculiar appearance, IC 5162 is probably interacting with one or more of its apparent neighbors.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5162
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5162
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5162

IC 5163
Recorded (Sep 17, 1884) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A pair of stars in Pegasus (RA 22 05 46.4, Dec +27 05 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5163 (Bigourdan #444, #445, 1860 RA 21 59 22, NPD 63 36) is "extremely faint, two 13th magnitude stars near". The position precesses to RA 22 05 46.1, Dec +27 04 46, in a completely stellar field. In such cases it is standard practice to refer to Bigourdan's original positions to determine which star or stars he actually recorded. Bigourdan used the same comparison star (HD 209936) for the objects he published in this region (#444 through #447, corresponding to IC 5163, 5164 and 5166), and his (1900) position for the comparison star of RA 22 01 45.3, Dec +26 27 02 is essentially identical to modern calculations of its position at the time, so I've used that position for all calculations involving B. #444-447. In his Observations de Nébuleuses et d'amas stellaires Bigourdan states that despite the difference in their measured positions, the observations corresponding to his #444 and #445 undoubtedly represent the same object, so Dreyer combined the two observations (as shown in the NGC listing), and I have done the same. Adding his average offsets to the position of the comparison star yields a position for IC 5163 near (1900) RA 22 01 12.8, Dec +26 36 10, which precesses to J2000 RA 22 05 47.3, Dec +27 05 21, less than 0.3 arcmin north northeast of the brighter member of the pair of stars listed above, and the position for #445 actually lies between the stars, so the identification is reasonably certain.
Note: In Bigourdan's Observations de Nébuleuses et d'amas stellaires this is not listed by number, but as Objet A and Objet A', following the entry for the lost or nonexistent NGC 7210.
SDSS image of region near the pair of stars listed as IC 5163, also showing the stars listed as IC 5164 and IC 5165
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5163, also showing IC 5164 and 5166
The star below "Bigourdan Objet D" is the last of four objects recorded by Bigourdan near here, but is not in the IC
The pair of brighter stars southwest of IC 5164 are probably the "two 13th magnitude stars near" IC 5163

IC 5164
Recorded (Oct 16, 1898) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A star in Pegasus (RA 22 05 50.4, Dec +27 02 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5163 (Bigourdan #446, 1860 RA 21 59 34, NPD 63 38) is "extremely faint, stellar". The position precesses to RA 22 05 58.2, Dec +27 02 47, in a completely stellar field. In such cases it is standard practice to refer to Bigourdan's original positions to determine which star or stars he actually recorded. Bigourdan used the same comparison star (HD 209936) for the objects he published in this region (#444 through #447, corresponding to IC 5163 (which see for an image of the region), 5164 and 5166), and his (1900) position for the comparison star of RA 22 01 45.3, Dec +26 27 02 is essentially identical to modern calculations of its position at the time, so I've used that position for all calculations involving B. #444-447. Adding Bigourdan's offsets for his #446 to the position of the comparison star yields a position near (1900) RA 22 01 16, Dec +26 33 17, which precesses to J2000 RA 22 05 50.6, Dec +27 02 28, right on the star listed above, so the identification is certain.
Note: In Bigourdan's Observations de Nébuleuses et d'amas stellaires this is not listed by number, but as Objet B, following the entry for the lost or nonexistent NGC 7210.

IC 5165 (= PGC 68196)
Discovered (Aug 21, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)ab?) in Tucana (RA 22 10 07.0, Dec -64 34 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5165 (DeLisle Stewart #736, 1860 RA 21 59 42, NPD 155 16) is "extremely faint, extremely small". The position precesses to RA 22 10 04.8, Dec -64 35 00, within the southwestern outline of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.45 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5165
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5165
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5165

IC 5166
Recorded (Sep 14, 1884) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A star in Pegasus (RA 22 05 58.3, Dec +27 02 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5166 (Bigourdan #447, 1860 RA 21 59 43, NPD 63 37) is "extremely faint, stellar nucleus or very small cluster". The position precesses to RA 22 06 07.2, Dec +27 03 48, in a completely stellar field. In such cases it is standard practice to refer to Bigourdan's original positions to determine which star or stars he actually recorded. Bigourdan used the same comparison star (HD 209936) for the objects he published in this region (#444 through #447, corresponding to IC 5163 (which see for an image of the region), 5164 and 5166), and his (1900) position for the comparison star of RA 22 01 45.3, Dec +26 27 02 is essentially identical to modern calculations of its position at the time, so I've used that position for all calculations involving B. #444-447. Adding Bigourdan's offsets for his #447 to the position of the comparison star yields a position near (1900) RA 22 01 23.6, Dec +26 33 41, which precesses to J2000 RA 22 05 58.2, Dec +27 02 53, right on the star listed above, so the identification is certain.
Note: In Bigourdan's Observations de Nébuleuses et d'amas stellaires this is not listed by number, but as Objet C, following the entry for the lost or nonexistent NGC 7210.

IC 5167
Recorded (Oct 7, 1891) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A star in Aquarius (RA 22 07 31.6, Dec -08 07 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5167 (Bigourdan #344, 1860 RA 22 00 08, NPD 98 49) is "very faint, perhaps nebulous". The position precesses to RA 22 07 31.8, Dec -08 08 06, but there is nothing there but a completely stellar field. As usual, to identify the star or stars recorded by Bigourdan, we ignore Dreyer's rounded-off position and use Bigourdan's original paper (but see the note about round-off errors, below). His comparison star, BD-8 5805 = HD 209999, is a magnitude 9.8 star at J2000 RA 22 07 28.1, Dec -08 12 51. Precessing that to the equinox of 1900 and adding Bigourdan's offsets places his #344 near (1900) RA 22 02 14.5, Dec -08 37 12, which precesses to J2000 RA 22 07 31.4, Dec -08 07 55, a little south of the star listed above and northeast of a somewhat fainter double star. Per Corwin, Bigourdan was clouded out while making his measurements, so the direction of his #344 from his comparison star was accurately determined, but the distance was not. The single star to the north of his position seems a more likely candidate, because the double star is almost certainly too faint for Bigourdan to have seen; but what makes the identification certain is a note Bigourdan added about a neighboring star 2 arcmin to the northwest, which fits only if the single star is IC 5167.
Round-Off Errors: Although this discussion uses Bigourdan's original measurements to determine the position of what he observed, the result only differs from Dreyer's rounded-off position by a fraction of an arcmin. Rounding off a value does not mean that the result is wrong; it only means it isn't as precise, and the "round-off error" can have any value between half the value of the rounded-off digit and zero.
DSS image of region near the star listed as IC 5167
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5167

IC 5168 (= PGC 68133)
Discovered (Aug 31, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)c?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 08 45.5, Dec -27 51 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5168 (Swift list XI (#211), 1860 RA 22 00 48, NPD 118 32.9) is "most extremely faint, very small, much extended, in a triangle with 2 faint stars". The position precesses to RA 22 08 46.6, Dec -27 51 55, just below the southern end of the galaxy listed above, there is nothing else nearby and the description fits, so the identification is certain.
Physical information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.35 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5168, also showing NGC 7214
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5168, also showing NGC 7214
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5168

IC 5169 (= PGC 68198)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type (R')SAB0(r)a pec?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 10 09.9, Dec -36 05 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5169 (DeLisle Stewart #737, 1860 RA 22 01 50, NPD 126 46) is "extremely faint, extremely small, stellar nucleus, spiral or oval". The position precesses to RA 22 10 06.2, Dec -36 04 54, about 0.8 arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else available, so the identification is certain.
Physical information: Apparent size 2.4 by 0.95 arcmin. Listed as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5169
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5169
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5169

IC 5170 (probably = PGC 68283 = PGC 68284 = PGC 191571)
Recorded (1900) by
Joseph Lunt
Probably a magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type SABa?) in Grus (RA 22 12 29.6, Dec -47 13 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5170 (Lunt #1, 1860 RA 22 01 58, NPD 137 51.7) has "no description". The position precesses to RA 22 10 45.5, Dec -47 10 33, but there is nothing there. Fortunately, there is nothing within a degree-wide region centered on Lunt's position save for NGC 7213, which is well to the west, and the galaxy listed above, which is well to the east, and since Lunt's observation was made after the publication of the New General Catalog it seems unlikely that he mistook NGC 7213 for a "new" object, so PGC 68283 is the most likely candidate for what Lunt recorded; but there is no way to be certain of that identification, so although it has been generally accepted, it is listed here as merely "probable".
Physical information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5170
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the probable IC 5170
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5170

IC 5171 (= PGC 68223)
Discovered (1900) by
Joseph Lunt
Almost certainly a magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc?) in Grus (RA 22 10 56.6, Dec -46 04 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5171 (Lunt #2, 1860 RA 22 02 42, NPD 136 47.7) has "no description". The position precesses to RA 22 11 25.4, Dec -46 06 29, over 5 arcmin east southeast of the galaxy listed above, but since there is nothing else nearby, the identification seems reasonably certain (or at least as certain as any of Lunt's discoveries), and has been generally accepted as correct.
Physical information: Apparent size 3.6 by 0.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5171
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5171
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5171

IC 5172 (= PGC 68190)
Discovered (Nov 10, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pegasus (RA 22 09 55.5, Dec +12 49 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5172 (Javelle #1414, 1860 RA 22 03 02, NPD 77 53.9) is "very faint, very small, stellar, 14th magnitude star attached". The position precesses to RA 22 09 52.7, Dec +12 47 15, nearly 2 arcmin south southwest of the galaxy listed above, but the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is reasonably certain despite an unusually large positional error for Javelle. As it turns out, the positional error is due to a nearly 2 arcmin error in the position of his comparison star (BD+12 4763). Precessing the current position of the star to the 1860 equinox used by Javelle, then adding his published offsets, his #1414 should be near (1860) RA 22 03 04.9, Dec +12 08 00, which precesses to J2000 RA 22 09 55.5, Dec +12 49 09, right on the galaxy, so the identification is absolutely certain.
Physical information: Apparent size 0.55 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5172
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5172
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5172

IC 5173 (= PGC 68380 (= PGC 2793430) + PGC 68379 (= PGC 279651)),
the Southern Integral Sign

Discovered (Aug 21, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A galaxy (pair?) in Indus
PGC 68380 = A magnitude 15(?) spiral galaxy (type SBc? pec) at RA 22 14 44.4, Dec 69 21 57
PGC 68379 = A magnitude 15.5(?) spiral galaxy (type S? pec) at RA 22 14 38.0, Dec -69 22 03
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5173 (DeLisle Stewart #740, 1860 RA 22 03 41, NPD 160 03) is "extremely faint, small, much extended 75°". The position precesses to RA 22 14 46.4, Dec -69 21 35, less than half an arcmin northeast of the nucleus of PGC 68380 (and well within its overall outline), the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical information: Generally cataloged as a pair of interacting galaxies with a combined magnitude of 14.5, but this may be a single galaxy with an unusual distribution of star-forming regions. The apparent size of the entire complex is about 2.1 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy (or pair of spiral galaxies) IC 5173, also known as the Southern Integral Sign
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5173
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy (pair?), labeled to show its presumed components
DSS image of spiral galaxy (or pair of spiral galaxies) IC 5173, also known as the Southern Integral Sign, labeled to show its 'components'
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide GALEX (UV) image of IC 5173
GALEX UV image of IC 5173, also known as the Southern Integral Sign

IC 5174 (= PGC 68292)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)b? pec) in Grus (RA 22 12 44.6, Dec -38 10 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5174 (DeLisle Stewart #738, 1860 RA 22 04 18, NPD 128 51) is "extremely faint, extremely small, considerably extended 150°". The position precesses to RA 22 12 37.9, Dec -38 09 39, about 1.4 arcmin west northwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing nearby that isn't accounted for by another IC entry, so the identification is certain.
Physical information: Apparent size 3.8 by 1.0 arcmin (counting the extended arms).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5174, also showing IC 5175
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5174, also showing IC 5175
Below, a 2.5 by 4.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5174

IC 5175 (= PGC 68296)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Grus (RA 22 12 48.2, Dec -38 07 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5175 (DeLisle Stewart #739, 1860 RA 22 04 24, NPD 128 49) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 22 12 43.8, Dec -38 07 39, about 0.9 arcmin west of the nucleus of the galaxy listed above and just off its western rim, and there is nothing else nearby that isn't already accounted for by another IC entry, so the identification is certain.
Physical information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.4 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5175, also showing IC 5174
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5175, also showing IC 5174
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5175

IC 5176 (= PGC 68389)
Discovered (Aug 21, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)bc?) in Tucana (RA 22 14 55.8, Dec -66 50 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5176 (DeLisle Stewart #741, 1860 RA 22 04 26, NPD 157 32) is "very faint, small, extremely extended 30°, star to north". The position precesses to RA 22 15 02.1, Dec -66 50 32, just northeast of the nucleus of the galaxy listed above, and just off its eastern outline. The description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical information: Apparent size 5.0 by 0.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5176
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5176
Below, a 5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5176
Below, a 1.25 by 2.45 arcmin wide image of part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, Joachim Dietrich)
HST image of part of spiral galaxy IC 5176; processing by Joachim Dietrich

WORKING HERE

IC 5177 (= PGC 68244)
Discovered (Oct 23, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type SBb pec?) in Pegasus (RA 22 11 34.3, Dec +11 47 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5177 (Javelle #1415, 1860 RA 22 04 44, NPD 78 51.8) is "faint, small, extended north-south, gradually a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 22 11 36.5, Dec +11 49 31, about 1.8 arcmin north northeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain despite Javelle's unusually large positional error. But as in the case of IC ??, the problem is simply due to an incorrect position for Javelle's comparison star, which is "off" by almost 2 arcmin. (GO THROUGH THE CALCULATIONS ETC HERE)
Physical information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.8? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5177
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 5177
Below, a ? arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5177

IC 5178 (= PGC 68287)
Discovered (Oct 20, 1897) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)c?) in Aquarius (RA 22 12 33.3, Dec -22 57 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5178 (Howe list I (#18), 1860 RA 22 04 46, NPD 113 38.8) is "extremely faint, very small, (NGC) 7220 is 63 seconds of time to the west". The position precesses to RA 22 12 33.9, Dec -22 57 26, within the southern outline of the galaxy listed above, there is nothing else nearby, and the position of NGC 7220 (62 seconds of time to the west) makes the identification certain.
Physical information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5310 km/sec, IC 5178 is about 245 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.0 by 0.75 arcmin, the galaxy is about 70 thousand light years across. (The bright spot on the southern margin of the galaxy is probably a faint foreground star, but some references suggest that it might be a compact galaxy.)
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5178
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5178
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5178

IC 5179 (=
IC 5183 = IC 5184 = PGC 68455)
Discovered (Jul 19, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5184)
Also recorded (Jul 26, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5179)
Also recorded (Sep 20, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5183)
A magnitude 11.8 spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)bc?) in Grus (RA 22 16 08.9, Dec -36 50 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5179 (Swift list XII (#33), 1860 RA 22 05 03, NPD 127 34.2) is "very faint, large, round, star near to south, bright star to southwest".
Physical information: Apparent size 2.4 by 1.2? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5179
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5179
Below, a ? arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5179
Below, a 20 arcsec wide image of the central part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
'Raw' HST image of central part of spiral galaxy IC 5179

IC 5180 (= PGC 68234)
Discovered (Sep 21, 1890) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 13.3 elliptical galaxy (type E2??) in Lacerta (RA 22 11 12.1, Dec +38 55 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5180 (Bigourdan #345, 1860 RA 22 05 12, NPD 51 46) is "very faint, small, suddenly brighter middle".
Physical information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8? arcmin.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 5180
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5180
Below, a ? arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 5180

IC 5181 (= PGC 68317)
Discovered (1900) by
Joseph Lunt
A magnitude 11.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Grus (RA 22 13 21.9, Dec -46 01 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5181 (Lunt (#3), 1860 RA 22 05 48, NPD 136 35.8) has "no description".
Physical information: Apparent size 2.5 by 0.9? arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 5181
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5181
Below, a ? arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5181

IC 5182 (= PGC 68452)
Discovered (Aug 21, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Scd pec?) in Tucana (RA 22 16 05.0, Dec -65 27 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5182 (DeLisle Stewart #742, 1860 RA 22 05 48, NPD 156 09) is "extremely faint, extremely small, brighter middle".
Physical information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.4? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5182
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5182
Below, a ? arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5182

IC 5183 (=
IC 5179 = IC 5184 = PGC 68455)
Discovered (Jul 19, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5184)
Also recorded (Jul 26, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5179)
Also recorded (Sep 20, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5183)
A magnitude 11.8 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Grus (RA 22 16 09.0, Dec -36 50 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5183 (Swift list XII (#34), 1860 RA 22 07 09, NPD 126 32.1) is "pretty bright, considerably small, faint star attached on southeast".
Physical information: Given the duplicate entry, see IC 5179 for anything else.

IC 5184 (=
IC 5179 = IC 5183 = PGC 68455)
Discovered (Jul 19, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5184)
Also recorded (Jul 26, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5179)
Also recorded (Sep 20, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5183)
A magnitude 11.8 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Grus (RA 22 16 09.0, Dec -36 50 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5184 (Swift list XII (#35), 1860 RA 22 07 13, NPD 127 34.2) is "pretty faint, pretty small, a little extended, between two stars to north and south".
Physical information: Given the duplicate entry, see IC 5179 for anything else.

IC 5185 (= PGC 68513)
Discovered (Aug 21, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Tucana (RA 22 17 43.8, Dec -65 51 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5185 (DeLisle Stewart #743, 1860 RA 22 07 24, NPD 156 33) is "extremely faint, very small, brighter middle".
Physical information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5185
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5185
Below, a ? arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5185

IC 5186 (= PGC 68548)
Discovered (Jul 19, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (1899) by DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 11.9 spiral galaxy (type (R')SAB(rs)b?) in Grus (RA 22 18 46.5, Dec -36 48 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5186 (Swift list XII (#36), DeLisle Stewart, 1860 RA 22 08 03, NPD 127 32.2) is "most extremely faint, small, round, faint star near to west".
Physical information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.2? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5186
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5186
Below, a ? arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5186

IC 5187 (= PGC 68536)
Discovered (Jul 16, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Tucana (RA 22 18 18.0, Dec -59 36 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5187 (Frost #1223, 1860 RA 22 08 44, NPD 150 19) is "very small, round, disc, magnitude 14.5".
Physical information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5187, also showing IC 5188
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5187, also showing IC 5188
Below, a ? arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5187

IC 5188 (= PGC 68539)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
Also observed by Royal Frost
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)c?) in Tucana (RA 22 18 26.5, Dec -59 38 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5188 (DeLisle Stewart #744, Frost, 1860 RA 22 08 50, NPD 150 21) is "faint, considerably small, round, considerably brighter middle".
Physical information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.1? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5188, also showing IC 5188
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5188, also showing IC 5187
Below, a ? arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5188

IC 5189
Recorded (Oct 5, 1888) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A star in Aquarius (RA 22 16 14.2, Dec -05 00 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5189 (Bigourdan (#312?), #448, 1860 RA 22 08 55, NPD 95 42) is an "extremely faint star, perhaps nebulous".

IC 5190 (= PGC 68556)
Discovered (Jul 16, 1904) by
Royal Frost
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Tucana (RA 22 19 00.7, Dec -59 52 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5190 (Frost #1224, 1860 RA 22 09 20, NPD 150 35) is "very faint, 2 broad spiral arms, 15th magnitude in middle".
Physical information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.7? arcmin.

IC 5191 (= PGC 68399)
Discovered (December 5, 1888) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a??) in Lacerta (RA 22 15 02.4, Dec +37 18 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5191 (Barnard, 1860 RA 22 09 30±, NPD 53 25±) is "(part of a) Group of 6 nebulae (sketched), including NGC 7240, 7242 and B.449", the last-named being IC 5195.
Physical information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.2? arcmin.

IC 5192 (= PGC 68407)
Discovered (December 5, 1888) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Lacerta (RA 22 15 14.1, Dec +37 16 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5192 (Barnard, 1860 RA 22 09 30±, NPD 53 25±) is "(part of a) Group of 6 nebulae (sketched), including NGC 7240, 7242 and B.449", the last-named being IC 5195.
Physical information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3? arcmin.

IC 5193 (= PGC 68436)
Discovered (December 5, 1888) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 14.5 elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Lacerta (RA 22 15 43.5, Dec +37 14 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5193 (Barnard, 1860 RA 22 09 30±, NPD 53 25±) is "(part of a) Group of 6 nebulae (sketched), including NGC 7240, 7242 and B.449", the last-named being IC 5195.
Physical information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3? arcmin.

IC 5194
Recorded (Oct 27, 1898) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A lost or nonexistent object in Aquarius (RA 22 17 08.0, Dec -15 56 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5194 (Bigourdan #450, 1860 RA 22 09 33, NPD 106 39) is "extremely faint (not found again)".

IC 5195 (= PGC 68435)
Discovered (Oct 16, 1895) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
Perhaps a magnitude 15.4 compact galaxy (type C??) in Lacerta (RA 22 15 41.5, Dec +37 18 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5195 (Bigourdan #449, 1860 RA 22 09 34, NPD 53 24) is "extremely faint, small, 0.5 arcmin south of (NGC) 7242" (Bigourdan's paper states that the position angle is 45°, so Dreyer's description should have read "0.5 arcmin northeast of 7242").
Physical information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3? arcmin.

IC 5196 (= PGC 68591)
Discovered (Aug 21, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Tucana (RA 22 20 11.3, Dec -65 24 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5196 (DeLisle Stewart #745, 1860 RA 22 09 56, NPD 156 06) is "extremely faint, most extremely small, extremely extended 105°, stellar nucleus".
Physical information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.1? arcmin.

IC 5197 (= PGC 68584)
Discovered (Jul 16, 1904) by
Royal Frost)
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type SBb??) in Tucana (RA 22 19 49.4, Dec -60 08 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5197 (Frost #1225, 1860 RA 22 10 08, NPD 150 51) has a "brighter middle, magnitude 15".
Physical information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.5? arcmin.

IC 5198 (=
NGC 7246 = PGC 68512)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1793) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7246)
Discovered (Oct 16, 1898) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 5198)
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sa??) in Aquarius (RA 22 17 42.6, Dec -15 34 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5198 (Bigourdan #451, 1860 RA 22 10 10, NPD 106 22) is "extremely faint, pretty large, round, brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 7246 for anything else.

IC 5199 (= PGC 68574)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Grus (RA 22 19 32.9, Dec -37 32 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 5199 (DeLisle Stewart #746, 1860 RA 22 11 14, NPD 128 13) is "extremely faint, extremely small, considerably extended 160°".
Physical information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.2? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 5199
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 5199
Below, a ? arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 5199
Celestial Atlas
(IC 5100 - 5149) ←     IC Objects: IC 5150 - 5199     → (IC 5200 - 5249)