Celestial Atlas
(IC 5300 - 5349) ←     IC Objects: IC 5350 - 5386 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 1 - 49)
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5350, 5351, 5352, 5353, 5354, 5355, 5356, 5357, 5358, 5359, 5360, 5361, 5362,
5363, 5364, 5365, 5366, 5367, 5368, 5369, 5370, 5371, 5372, 5373, 5374, 5375,
5376, 5377, 5378, 5379, 5380, 5381, 5382, 5383, 5384, 5385, 5386

Page last updated Jun 28, 2013
WORKING: Add positions/physical data (per Steinicke)
WORKING: Add discoverers (per Steinicke)
WORKING: Check size/quality of pix already on page

IC 5350 (= PGC 72396 = PGC 747604)
Discovered (1896) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude galaxy (type E/S0?) in Sculptor (RA 23 47 15, Dec -27 57 28)
A member of galaxy cluster Abell 4038. Based on recessional velocity of 8560 km/sec, about 380 million light years away, in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 285 to 340 million light years. Given that and apparent size of 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin, about 75 thousand light years in diameter.
Wikisky image of IC 5350
Above, closeup of IC 5350
Below, an approximately 15 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky image of IC 5350

IC 5351 (= PGC 72404 = PGC 196629 = PGC 1095714)
Discovered (1889) by
Edward Barnard
A 14th-magnitude galaxy (type E/S0?) in Pisces (RA 23 47 19, Dec -02 18 49)
Based on recessional velocity of 6330 km/sec, about 280 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.95 by 0.8 arcmin, about 75 thousand light years in diameter.
Wikisky image of IC 5351
Above, closeup of IC 5351 (the bright object at its bottom is a foreground star)
Below, an approximately 15 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky image of IC 5351

IC 5352 (= PGC 72405)
Discovered (1889) by
Edward Barnard
A 16th-magnitude galaxy (type S0a?) in Pisces (RA 23 47 20, Dec -02 16 50)
Based on recessional velocity of 6665 km/sec, about 300 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.40 by 0.35 arcmin, about 35 thousand light years in diameter.
Wikisky image of IC 5352
Above, closeup of IC 5352; see IC 5351 for a wide-field view of the region

IC 5353 (= PGC 72421 = PGC 745730)
Discovered (1896) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude galaxy (type S0?) in Sculptor (RA 23 47 29, Dec -28 06 32)
A member of galaxy cluster Abell 4038. Based on recessional velocity of 8240 km/sec, about 370 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 340 to 350 million light years. Given that and apparent size of 1.4 by 1.0 arcmin, about 150 thousand light years in diameter.
Wikisky image of IC 5353
Above, closeup of IC 5353
Below, an approximately 15 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky image of region around IC 5353

IC 5354 (= PGC 72416; accompanied by PGC 85759)
Discovered (1896) by
Lewis Swift
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E5?) in Sculptor (RA 23 47 28, Dec -28 08 10)
A member of galaxy cluster Abell 4038. Based on recessional velocity of 8355 km/sec, about 375 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 340 to 350 million light years. Given that and apparent size of 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin, about 85 thousand light years in diameter. Accompanied by PGC 85759, a 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S0/a?) at RA 23 47 30, Dec -28 08 01. Information for PGC 85759: A member of galaxy cluster Abell 4038. Based on recessional velocity of 7925 km/sec, about 355 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin, about 40 thousand light years in diameter.
Wikisky image of IC 5354 and PGC 85759
Above, closeup of IC 5352 and PGC 85759; see IC 5353 for a wide-field view of the region

IC 5355 (= PGC 72397)
Discovered (1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBcd) in Andromeda (RA 23 47 15, Dec +32 46 58)
Based on recessional velocity of 4855 km/sec, about 215 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 165 to 230 million light years. Given that and apparent size of 1.0 by 0.6 arcmin, about 65 thousand light years in diameter.
Wikisky image of IC 5355
Above, closeup of IC 5355
Below, an approximately 15 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky image of region around IC 5355

IC 5356 (= PGC 72409 = PGC 196634)
Discovered (1889) by
Edward Barnard
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pisces (RA 23 47 24, Dec -02 21 04)
Based on recessional velocity of 6005 km/sec, about 270 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin, about 60 thousand light years in diameter.
Wikisky image of IC 5356
Above, closeup of IC 5356; see IC 5351 for a wide-field view of the region

IC 5357 (= PGC 72408 = PGC 196632)
Discovered (1889) by
Edward Barnard
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB0 pec) in Pisces (RA 23 47 23, Dec -02 18 02)
Based on recessional velocity of 6930 km/sec, about 310 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 1.7 by 1.1 arcmin, about 150 thousand light years in diameter.
Wikisky image of IC 5357
Above, a closeup of IC 5357; also shown are IC 5351, which see for a wide-field view, and IC 5352

IC 5358 (= PGC 72441)
Discovered (Sep 14, 1896) by
Lewis Swift (XI-239)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0? pec) in Sculptor (RA 23 47 45.1, Dec -28 08 28)
Vr of PGC 72441 is 8645 km/sec. Apparent size of IC 5358 is about 3.4 by 1.1 arcmin.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5358 and lenticular galaxy PGC 72437, which is sometimes called IC 5358A
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of IC 5358 and PGC 72437
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 5353 and 5354
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 5358, also showing lenticular galaxy IC 5353 and elliptical galaxy IC 5354

PGC 72437 (= "IC 5358A")
Not an IC object but listed here since sometimes referred to as IC 5358A
A 15th-magnitude galaxy (type E/S0?) in
Sculptor (RA 23 47 43.3, Dec -28 08 37)
Vr of PGC 72437 is 8120 km/sec; so either moving rapidly relative to IC 5358 (which see for images), or a foreground object. Most likely a member of the same cluster of galaxies, but not a physical companion of IC 5358 itself. Apparent size of PGC 72437 is about 0.35 by 0.25 arcmin.

IC 5359 (= PGC 72430)
Discovered (1889) by
Edward Barnard
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pisces (RA 23 47 38, Dec -02 19 02)

IC 5360
Recorded (1897) by
Lewis Swift
An unknown object in Sculptor (RA 23 47 54, Dec -37 03 33)

IC 5361 (=
NGC 7761 = PGC 72641)
Discovered (1886) by Ormond Stone (and later listed as NGC 7761)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1891) by Guillaume Bigourdan (356) (and later listed as IC 5361)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SA(rs)0) in Aquarius (RA 23 51 28.8, Dec -13 22 52)

IC 5362 (= IC 5363 = PGC 72648)
Discovered (1896) by
Lewis Swift (and later recorded as IC 5362)
"Rediscovered" (1897) by Lewis Swift (and later recorded as IC 5363)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S0?) in Sculptor (RA 23 51 37, Dec -28 21 55)

IC 5363 (=
IC 5362, which see)
Discovered (1896) by Lewis Swift (and later recorded as IC 5362)
"Rediscovered" (1897) by Lewis Swift (and later recorded as IC 5363)

IC 5364 (= PGC 72950; accompanied by PGC 72955)
Discovered (1896) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S0/a?) in Sculptor (RA 23 56 25, Dec -29 01 25)
Accompanied by PGC 72955, a 16th-magnitude galaxy (type S pec?) at RA 23 56 24, Dec -29 01 25)

IC 5365
Discovered (1897) by
Lewis Swift
An unknown object in Sculptor (RA 23 57 34, Dec -37 01 30)
No object exists at the recorded location

IC 5366
Discovered (1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
A supposed emission nebula in Cassiopeia (RA 23 57 40, Dec +52 47 30)
No object exists at the recorded coordinates

IC 5367 (= PGC 1670097)
Discovered (1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Pegasus (RA 23 58 39, Dec +22 26 59)

IC 5368 (=
IC 1523, which see, and = PGC 3091908)
Discovered (1890) by Sherburne Burnham (and later recorded as IC 1523)
"Rediscovered" (late 1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later recorded as IC 5368)

NOTE TO SELF FOR IC 5369-5373 (need to clarify before "finalizing" this page): All five of Javelle's positions precess an arcmin south to southwest of the respective galaxies; but neither Corwin nor Thomson notes this. Could the NED precession calculator be flawed, or has the identification of the five galaxies been so long established that such a consistent error didn't seem worth mentioning?

IC 5369 (= PGC 73190)
Discovered (1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Andromeda (RA 23 59 50.6, Dec +32 42 09)
Per Dreyer, IC 5369 (= Javelle 1460, 1860 RA 23 52 41, NPD 58 05.6) is "faint, small, round, with a nucleus". The position precesses to RA 23 59 49.4, Dec +32 41 10, about an arcmin southwest of the galaxy. This is a consistent error for all five nebulae (IC 5369 through 5373) which Javelle discovered in this region on the same night, so a certain identification of one galaxy helps confirm the identity of the others; and as noted for IC 5370 and 5371, there is little doubt of their identification, so the same is true for IC 5369. Based on a recessional velocity of 10085 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 5369 is about 450 million light years away (although a correction for the expansion of the Universe during its light's nearly half-billion year long journey places it about 15 million light years closer at the time that light was emitted). Given that and its apparent size of 1.0 by 0.4 arcmin, it is about 125 thousand light years across. The galaxy is listed as a member of WBL730, a group with an average recessional velocity of about 9850 km/sec which also includes IC 5370, 5371 and 5373 (it probably also includes IC 5372, but that galaxy is not listed as a member).
Wikisky SDSS image of IC 5369
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 5369
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown are IC 5370 and 5372
Wikisky SDSS image of region near IC 5369

IC 5370 (= PGC 5)
Discovered (1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Andromeda (RA 00 00 09.1, Dec +32 44 20)
Per Dreyer, IC 5370 (= Javelle 1461, 1860 RA 23 53 00, NPD 58 03.4) is "pretty bright, small, round, stellar nucleus". The position precesses to RA 00 00 08.5, Dec +32 43 22, about an arcmin south of the galaxy, but as PGC 5 is by far the brightest nearby object, the identification seems certain. (Javelle's positions were usually very precise, but for IC 5369 to 5373, all of which were discovered on the same night, there seems to be a consistent error of about an arcmin to the south; so a certain identification of one galaxy, such as IC 5370 or 5371, helps confirm the identification of the others.) Based on a recessional velocity of 10370 km/sec, IC 5370 is about 460 million light years away (although a correction for the expansion of the Universe during its light's nearly half-billion year long journey places it about 15 million light years closer at the time that light was emitted). Given that and its 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin apparent size, it is about 90 thousand light years across. The galaxy is listed as a member of WBL730, a group with an average recessional velocity of about 9850 km/sec which also includes IC 5369, 5371 and 5373 (it probably also includes IC 5372, but that galaxy is not listed as a member).
Wikisky SDSS image of IC 5370
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 5370
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown are IC 5369, 5371, 5372 and 5373
Wikisky SDSS image of region near IC 5370

IC 5371 (= PGC 24)
Discovered (1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S0?) in Andromeda (RA 00 00 14.8, Dec +32 49 56)
Per Dreyer, IC 5371 (= Javelle 1462, 1860 RA 23 53 05, NPD 57 57.9) is "faint, very small, 15th-magnitude star attached". The position precesses to RA 00 00 13.5, Dec +32 48 52, about an arcmin southwest of the galaxy; but the "attached" star makes the identification certain. (Javelle's positions were usually very precise, but for IC 5369 to 5373, all of which were discovered on the same night, there seems to be a consistent error of about an arcmin to the south; so a certain identification of one galaxy, such as IC 5371, helps confirm the identification of the others.) Based on a recessional velocity of 9385 km/sec, IC 5371 is about 420 million light years away (although a correction for the expansion of the Universe during its light's nearly half-billion year long journey places it about 15 million light years closer at the time that light was emitted). Given that and its apparent size of 0.5 by 0.45 arcmin, it is about 60 thousand light years across. The galaxy is listed as a member of WBL730, a group with an average recessional velocity of about 9850 km/sec which also includes IC 5369, 5370 and 5373 (it probably also includes IC 5372, but that galaxy is not listed as a member).
Wikisky SDSS image of IC 5371
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 5371
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown are IC 5370, 5372 and 5373
Wikisky SDSS image of region near IC 5371

IC 5372 (= PGC 2801010)
Discovered (1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S0?) in Andromeda (RA 00 00 16.3, Dec +32 47 35)
Per Dreyer, IC 5372 (= Javelle 1463, 1860 RA 23 53 07, NPD 58 00.2) is "faint, very small, round, with a nucleus". The position precesses to RA 00 00 15.6, Dec +32 46 34, about an arcmin south of the galaxy. This is a consistent error for all five nebulae (IC 5369 through 5373) which Javelle discovered in this region on the same night, so a certain identification of one galaxy helps confirm the identity of the others; and as noted for IC 5370 and 5371, there is little doubt of their identification, so the same is true for IC 5372. Based on a recessional velocity of 10330 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 5372 is about 460 million light years away (although a correction for the expansion of the Universe during its light's nearly half-billion year long journey places it about 15 million light years closer at the time that light was emitted). Given that and its apparent size of 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin, it is about 75 thousand light years across. IC 5372 is probably an unlisted member of WBL730, a group which includes IC 5369, 5370, 5371 and 5373. Aside from being in the same region as the other galaxies (all of which are shown in the wide-field view of IC 5370), the recessional velocity is within the range of 9385 to 10370 km/sec for the other group members; so it seems odd that it is not listed as a member of the group. The reason may be a deficiency in database listings for IC 5372, which does not show up in Leda (save by its PGC listing), nor in the Wikisky database (which does not recognize either the IC or PGC designation). This suggests that it may have been inadvertently excluded from the WBL database.
Wikisky SDSS image of IC 5372
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 5372
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown are IC 5369, 5370, 5371 and 5373
Wikisky SDSS image of region near IC 5372

IC 5373 (= PGC 36 = PGC 48)
Discovered (1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A 15th-magnitude pair of galaxies in Andromeda (RA 00 00 29.0, Dec +32 46 56)
Per Dreyer, IC 5373 (= Javelle 1464, 1860 RA 23 53 19, NPD 58 00.8) is "pretty bright, small, round, with a stellar nucleus". The position precesses to RA 00 00 27.7, Dec +32 45 58, about an arcmin southwest of the galaxy. This is a consistent error for all five nebulae (IC 5369 through 5373) which Javelle discovered in this region on the same night, so a certain identification of one galaxy helps confirm the identity of the others; and as noted for IC 5370 and 5371, there is little doubt of their identification, so the same is true for IC 5373. The pair consists of a brighter face-on spiral (type Sab?) and a fainter edge-on spiral (type S pec?) which is obviously distorted by the gravitational interaction of the galaxies. Javelle probably only saw the brighter galaxy, but the listed position is for the center of the pair. Based on a recessional velocity of 9805 km/sec, IC 5373 is about 440 million light years away (although a correction for the expansion of the Universe during its light's nearly half-billion year long journey places it about 15 million light years closer at the time that light was emitted). Given that and its apparent size of 0.5 by 0.35 arcmin, it is about 60 thousand light years across. The galaxy is listed as a member of WBL730, a group with an average recessional velocity of about 9850 km/sec which also includes IC 5369, 5370 and 5371 (it probably also includes IC 5372, but that galaxy is not listed as a member).
Wikisky SDSS image of IC 5373
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 5373
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown are IC 5370, 5371 and 5372
(The grossly overexposed (and very false-color) star at far left is a 9th magnitude object)
Wikisky SDSS image of region near IC 5373

IC 5374 (= PGC 79)
Discovered (1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pisces (RA 00 01 05, Dec +04 30 00)

IC 5375 (= PGC 80)
Discovered (1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pisces (RA 00 01 05, Dec +04 32 31)

IC 5376 (= PGC 102)
Discovered (1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Andromeda (RA 00 01 20, Dec +34 31 33)
Listed as a member of WBL732, a group of galaxies with an average recessional velocity of 8870 km/sec, along with PGC 29, 77 and 91.

IC 5377 (= PGC 156)
Discovered (1895) by
Isaac Roberts
A 15th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type Irr?) in Pegasus (RA 00 02 05, Dec +16 35 25)
Based on a recessional velocity of 1050 km/sec, about 45 million light years distant. Given that and its apparent size of 1.0 by 0.6 arcmins, about 15 thousand light years in diameter. In the image below, IC 5378 and IC 5379 are the galaxies at far left. IC 5377 is the diffuse object on the lower right.
Wikisky image of IC 5377, and on the left, IC 5378 and IC 5379

IC 5378 (= PGC 177 + PGC 178)
Discovered (1895) by
Isaac Roberts
A pair of galaxies in Pegasus (RA 00 02 38, Dec +16 38 37 and +16 39 06)
The northern galaxy (PGC 178) is a 15th-magnitude spiral (type SBc pec?), with an apparent size of 0.6 by 0.5 arcmins. The southern galaxy (PGC 177) is a 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?), with an apparent size of 0.6 by 0.6 arcmins. Based on a recessional velocity of 5830 km/sec, the pair is about 260 million light years distant, and given their apparent sizes, each galaxy is about 45 thousand light years in diameter. (Note: In the linked reference for radial velocity, Table 2 shows two entries for IC 5378. The lower entry is actually for IC 5379.) In the image below, north is upwards, and the pair of galaxies at the top is IC 5378. The spiral galaxy near bottom center is IC 5379.
Wikisky image of IC 5378 and IC 5379

IC 5379 (= PGC 185)
Discovered (1895) by
Isaac Roberts
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pegasus (RA 00 02 41, Dec +16 36 01)
Based on recessional velocity of 6280 km/sec, about 280 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.6 by 0.3 arcmins, about 50 thousand light years diameter. In the image above, IC 5379 is the galaxy near bottom center. The pair of galaxies at top right is IC 5378.

IC 5380 (= PGC 188)
Discovered (1903) by
Royal Frost
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Tucana (RA 00 02 49, Dec -66 11 14)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4 arcmins. Distance and size unknown.
Wikisky image of IC 5380

IC 5381 (= PGC 212)
Discovered (1895) by
Isaac Roberts
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Pegasus (RA 00 03 11, Dec +15 57 57)
Based on recessional velocity of 11230 km/sec, about 500 million light years distant. Given that and its apparent size of 1.2 by 0.4 arcmins, about 175 thousand light years in diameter.
Wikisky image of IC 5381

IC 5382 (= PGC 236)
Discovered (1903) by
Royal Frost
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b) in Tucana (RA 00 03 26, Dec -65 11 48)
Based on recessional velocity of 8775 km/sec, about 390 million light years distant. Given that, and its 1.0 by 0.9 arcmin apparent size, about 100 thousand light years diameter.
Wikisky image of IC 5382

IC 5383
Recorded (1903) by
Stephane Javelle
An unknown "lost" object in Pegasus (RA 00 03 49, Dec +16 00 50)
No object exists at the recorded coordinates

IC 5384 (= PGC 287, and usually assumed to be
NGC 7813)
Recorded (1886) by Frank Muller (and later listed as NGC 7813)
Discovered (1899) by Herbert Howe (and later listed as IC 5384)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Cetus (RA 00 04 09.2, Dec -11 59 02)
Per Dreyer, IC 5384 (= Howe, 1860 RA 23 57 00, NPD 102 45.8) is "extremely faint, very small, extended 160; ? = 7813 (meaning, NGC 7813)". In addition, as a correction for the entry for NGC 7813 Dreyer noted, "Howe only found a nebulosity in 23 57 00, NPD 102 45.8, extended 160, 8.5 magnitude star 49 seconds of time to west, two 9th magnitude stars 8 arcmin north (= IC 5384)". On this basis, Dreyer suggested that IC 5384 and NGC 7813 were the same object, and that has been generally presumed to be correct ever since the second Index Catalog was published, more than a century ago. Howe's position precesses to RA 00 04 10.2, Dec -11 59 01, which is within 0.2 arcmin of the galaxy, and the star field is exactly as he described, so the identification of IC 5384 is certain. (Whether its identity with NGC 7813, which see concerning the double listing, is correct is another matter; but given the tradition of a century, this entry assumes that it is.) Based on a recessional velocity of 9040 km/sec, IC 5384 is about 400 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.8 by 0.25 arcmin, it is about 95 thousand light years across.
Wikisky image of IC 5384
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 5384
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky image of region near IC 5384
Below, an 18 arcmin wide region showing IC 5384 and the "original" position of NGC 7813
The two brightest stars at top left and the brighter one at far right agree with Howe's description
Wikisky image of region between NGC 7813 and IC 5384

IC 5385
Recorded (1894) by
Herbert Howe
An unknown "lost" object in Pisces (RA 00 06 23, Dec -00 04 36)
No object exists at the recorded coordinates

IC 5386 (=
NGC 7832, which see, and = PGC 485)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7832)
Discovered (Sep 12, 1896) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5386)
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E+) in Pisces (RA 00 06 28.4, Dec -03 43 00)
Per Dreyer, IC 5386 (= Swift's list XI (#1), Howe, 1860 RA 23 59 19, NPD 94 29.8) is "pretty bright, pretty small, much extended". The position precesses to RA 00 06 29.1, Dec -03 43 01, within 0.2 arcmin of the center of the galaxy, so the identification is certain. The odd thing about this listing is that the position is nearly identical to that obtained by Herschel for NGC 7832, which should have prevented a duplicate listing. A brief discussion by Corwin implies that Swift's position was so poor that it was assumed to be of a new object; and when Howe observed Swift's object (around 1899) and corrected the positional error, neither he nor Dreyer noticed that the new position was the same as that of NGC 7832. Still, such errors are all too common even today, so rather than criticizing those who labored under far more difficult circumstances we should be glad the error was corrected early on, so we don't have to wonder what Swift saw.
Celestial Atlas
(IC 5300 - 5349) ←     IC Objects: IC 5350 - 5386     → (NGC 1 - 49)