Celestial Atlas
(IC 550 - 599) ←     IC Objects: IC 600 - 649 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 650 - 699)
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Page last updated Feb 21, 2014
WORKING (general, + 617-18): Add historical/physical information

IC 600 (= PGC 30041)
Discovered (May 3, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (671)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)dm) in Sextans (RA 10 17 10.9, Dec -03 29 53)
Based on a recessional velocity of 1305 km/sec, IC 600 is about 60 million light years away, in good agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 65 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.5 by 1.2 arcmins, it is about 45 thousand light years across.
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 600
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of IC 600
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 600

IC 601 (= PGC 30086)
Discovered (Apr 10, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (672)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBdm? pec) in Leo (RA 10 18 15.3, Dec +07 02 19)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3 arcmin. A probable companion of IC 602.
SDSS image of spiral galaxies IC 601 and 602
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 601 and 602
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies IC 601 and 602

IC 602 (= PGC 30090)
Discovered (Apr 10, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (673)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (Sc?) in Leo (RA 10 18 19.7, Dec +07 02 56)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin. A probable companion of IC 601, which see for images.

IC 603 (= PGC 30166)
Discovered (May 4, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (674)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(r)a?) in Sextans (RA 10 19 25.0, Dec -05 39 23)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.75 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 603
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 603
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 603

IC 604 (=
NGC 3220 = PGC 30462)
Discovered (Apr 8, 1793) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3220)
Discovered (Aug 8, 1890) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 604)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sd?) in Ursa Major (RA 10 23 44.8, Dec +57 01 35)
Per Dreyer, IC 604 (Swift list IX (#22), 1860 RA 10 14 32, NPD 32 16.0) is "most extremely faint, very small, very much extended (perhaps several faint stars in a line)". The position precesses to RA 10 23 46.8, Dec +57 01 41, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Per Corwin both the NGC and IC positions are good, so Swift must have simply failed to check the NGC, and Dreyer didn't catch the probable duplication. (See NGC 3220 for anything else.)

IC 605 (= PGC 30363)
Discovered (Mar 11, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (675)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Sextans (RA 10 22 24.2, Dec +01 11 56)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.55 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 605
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 605
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 605

IC 606 (= PGC 30448 =
NGC 3217)
Discovered (Mar 4, 1878) by David Todd (and later listed as NGC 3217)
Discovered (Apr 18, 1893) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 606)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Leo (RA 10 23 32.6, Dec +10 57 35)
Per Dreyer, IC 606 (Javelle #676, 1860 RA 10 16 08, NPD 78 20.3) is "very faint, very small, round, diffuse". The position precesses to RA 10 23 34.1, Dec +10 57 19, less than half an arcmin southeast of the galaxy, so the identification is certain. For a discussion of the double listing (and anything else) see NGC 3217.

IC 607 (=
Arp 43 = PGC 30496)
Discovered (Mar 29, 1889) by Lewis Swift (VIII-52)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc) in Leo (RA 10 24 08.7, Dec +16 44 30)
Listed in the Arp Atlas as an example of a spiral galaxy with a faint companion (the small galaxy at lower left). Based on a recessional velocity of 5575 km/sec, IC 607 is about 260 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 2.0 by 1.3 arcmins, about 150 thousand light years across. Its 17th-magnitude apparent companion 2MASX J10241018+1643557 (the 2MASS name being based on its position of RA 10 24 10.2, Dec +16 43 57) appears to be an irregular spiral. Its recessional velocity and actual distance are unknown, but if it is an actual companion, and not a foreground or background galaxy, its apparent size of 0.16 by 0.12 arcmin would correspond to 12 thousand light years.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 607, also known as Arp 43
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 607 and its apparent companion
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 607, also known as Arp 43

IC 608 (= PGC 30500)
Discovered (May 4, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (677)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S? pec) in Sextans (RA 10 24 21.1, Dec -06 02 22)
Based on a recessional velocity of 11240 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 608 is about 520 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 500 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 510 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.8 by 0.55 arcmin, it is about 115 thousand light years across.
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 608
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 608
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 608

IC 609 (= PGC 30600, and with PGC 1097822 =
Arp 44)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1893) by Stephane Javelle (678)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc pec) in Sextans (RA 10 25 35.4, Dec -02 12 55)
Listed in the Arp Atlas as an example of a spiral galaxy with a faint companion (the small galaxy below it). However, there is no real connection between the two, as the radial velocity of the "companion" (PGC 1097822) places it nearly 400 million light years beyond the closer galaxy. Based on a recessional velocity of 5540 km/sec, IC 609 is about 260 million light years distant, in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 220 to 235 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.6 by 0.8 arcmin, it is about 120 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of IC 609, also known as Arp 44
Above, a 2.4 arcmin closeup of Arp 44
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 609
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 609, also known as Arp 44

PGC 1097822 (with
IC 609 = Arp 44)
Not an IC object, but listed here since an optical "companion" of IC 609 and part of Arp 44
A 17th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sd?) in Sextans (RA 10 25 36.4, Dec -02 14 15)
Based on a recessional velocity of 14385 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 1097822 is about 670 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 635 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 650 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.32 by 0.32 arcmin, it is about 60 thousand light years across. Although "part" of Arp 44, it has no actual connection with IC 609 (which see for images), since it is hundreds of millions of light years further away.

IC 610 (= PGC 30670 =
IC 611)
Discovered (Apr 20, 1889) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 610)
Discovered (Apr 22, 1889) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 611)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Leo (RA 10 26 28.5, Dec +20 13 38)
Per Dreyer, IC 610 (Swift list VIII (#53), 1860 RA 10 18 36, NPD 69 03.6) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, considerably extended, extremely difficult". The position precesses to RA 10 26 15.3, Dec +20 13 48, about 13 seconds of time west of the galaxy in question, but the description makes the identification certain. As discussed in the entry for IC 611, although the position for that observation was more accurate, precedence is generally given to the earliest observation, so although the galaxy is referred to as IC 611 in some places, the correct designation is IC 610. Apparent size 1.9 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 610
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 610
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 610

IC 611 (= PGC 30670 =
IC 610)
Discovered (Apr 20, 1889) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 610)
Discovered (Apr 22, 1889) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 611)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Leo (RA 10 26 28.5, Dec +20 13 38)
Per Dreyer, IC 611 (Swift list VIII (#54), 1860 RA 10 18 46, NPD 69 02.6) is "extremely faint, small, a little extended". The position precesses to RA 10 26 25.3, Dec +20 14 47, just northwest of the galaxy, and between that and the description the identification is certain. Swift's more accurate position for IC 611 has led to some references listing the galaxy by that designation, but precedence is generally given to the earliest observation, so it is more properly called IC 610 (which see for anything else).

IC 612 (= PGC 141451)
Discovered (Apr 18, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (679)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Leo (RA 10 27 05.9, Dec +11 03 17)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 612
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 612
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 613 and 615
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 612, also showing elliptical galaxy IC 613 and spiral galaxy IC 615

IC 613 (= PGC 30728)
Discovered (Apr 18, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (680)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Leo (RA 10 27 07.8, Dec +11 00 39)
1.1 by 1.1 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 613
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 613
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 612 and 615
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 613, also showing lenticular galaxy IC 612 and spiral galaxy IC 615

IC 614 (= PGC 30699)
Discovered (May 3, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (681)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)Sab?) in Sextans (RA 10 26 51.9, Dec -03 27 55)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.55 arcmin. A Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2). Probably a collisional ring galaxy.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 614 overlaid on a DSS image to fill in missing areas
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 614
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 614 overlaid on a DSS image to fill in missing areas

IC 615 (= PGC 30751)
Discovered (Apr 18, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (682)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Leo (RA 10 27 22.0, Dec +11 04 58)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.35 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 615
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 615
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 615, also showing IC 612 and 613
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 615, also showing lenticular galaxy IC 612 and elliptical galaxy IC 613

IC 616 (= PGC 31159)
Discovered (Dec 16, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (683)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Leo (RA 10 32 47.5, Dec +15 51 38)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9 arcmin. (Note: PGC 3090487, the apparent companion an arcmin to the south of IC 616, is an optical double nearly a thousand million light years further away.)
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 616
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 616
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 616

PGC 3090487
Not an IC object but listed here since an optical double with
IC 616 (which see for images)
A 17th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb? pec) in Leo (RA 10 32 47.2, Dec +15 50 42)
Based on a recessional velocity of 25205 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PC 3090487 is about 1175 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 1065 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 1110 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin, it is about 95 thousand light years across. Since the galaxy is nearly a thousand million light years further away than IC 616, there is no actual connection between them.

WORKING HERE (historical identification)

IC 617 (= PGC 31153 = western component of
NGC 3280 (= NGC 3295))
Discovered (1880) by Andrew Common (and later listed as NGC 3280)
Discovered (Feb 26, 1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 3295)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1892) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 617)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Hydra (RA 10 32 43.8, Dec -12 38 14)
Per Dreyer, IC 617 (Javelle #179, 1860 RA 10 25 51, NPD 101 55.9) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 10 32 45.6, Dec -12 39 03, just over an arcmin south of NGC 3280; and since Javelle's #180, observed on the same night, is just under an arcmin south of NGC 3296, the relative positions make the identification of Javelle's two "novae" with the NGC objects certain. (Note: Corwin states that Javelle's position falls within arcseconds of the center of the western component of NGC 3280, for which reason IC 617 is generally considered to be only that component of the NGC object; but if so, there must have been an error in the catalog position of Javelle's comparison star (BD-11 2902) that has been taken into account without any comment.) The duplicate listing was caused by poor positions for the NGC identifications, but despite the presumably greater accuracy of Javelle's measurements, precedence is generally given to the earliest observation, so for anything else see NGC 3280.

IC 618 (= PGC 31155 =
NGC 3296)
Discovered (Feb 26, 1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 3296)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1892) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 618)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Hydra (RA 10 32 45.5, Dec -12 43 03)
Per Dryer, IC 618 (Javelle #180, 1860 RA 10 25 51, NPD 102 00.6) is "faint, small, extended east-west, a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 10 32 45.5, Dec -12 43 45, just under an arcmin south of NGC 3296, and since Javelle's #179, observed on the same night, is just over an arcmin south of NGC 3280, the relative positions make the identification of Javelle's two "novae" with the NGC objects certain. (Also see Corwin's note about Javelle's position for IC 617, which involved the same comparison star.) As in the case of IC 617, the duplicate listing was caused by a poor position for the NGC identification, but despite the presumably greater accuracy of Javelle's measurements, precedence is generally given to the earliest observation, so for anything else see NGC 3296.

IC 619 (almost certainly = PGC 31235)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1889) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Leo (RA 10 33 50.0, Dec +12 52 42)
Per Dreyer, IC 619 (Swift list VIII (#55), 1860 RA 10 26 04, NPD 76 44.1) is "most extremely faint, small, round, 3 faint stars to east". Swift's original notes provide more detail about the stars "near to the east", stating that they form a pretty large triangle, with one being a very faint double. The position precesses to RA 10 33 30.7, Dec +12 32 42, but there is absolutely nothing that Swift could have seen anywhere near there. However, Swift's positions were obtained by crude methods (usually by simply checking the setting circles on his telescope, which were often poorly set or read), and are often considerably "off" (as noted by Dreyer in his comments on Swift's observations), so substantial positional errors are an unfortunately common problem with his "novae". The question is therefore whether there is any way to tell what he observed when it could be almost anywhere "near" his position. In this case (per Corwin) the description of the star field seems to firmly settle the matter, as the galaxy listed above has a triangle of stars to its east-southeast that exactly matches Swift's description. The position of the galaxy is 19 seconds of time and 20 arcmins different from Swift's position, which means that without the triangle, IC 619 would almost certainly be listed as lost or nonexistent, and there are catalogs that list it as such; but thanks to the triangle, the identification of IC 619 with PGC 31235 is reasonably certain, despite the large error in Swift's position. Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near Swift's obviously incorrect position for IC 619
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on Swift's position for IC 619
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 31235, which is probably what Swift observed
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 31235, which is probably IC 619
Below, a 15 arcmin wide region centered on PGC 31235, showing the triangle to its east
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 31235, which is probably IC 619

IC 620 (= PGC 2800960)
Discovered (Mar 31, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Leo (RA 10 33 33.4, Dec +11 52 16)
   Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 620 (Javelle #181, 1860 RA 10 26 08, NPD 77 24.8) is "very faint, very small". The position precesses to RA 10 33 33.8, Dec +11 52 00, only a quarter arcmin south of the brighter (southeastern) member of a pair of galaxies (the other being PGC 31215). Unfortunately (per Corwin), the fainter (northwestern) component is often misidentified as the IC object, but if Javelle had seen that galaxy, he would certainly have described the object as a "double". Other than that error, the identification therefore seems certain.
   Physical Information: The pair of galaxies have nearly identical recessional velocities (10080 km/sec for IC 620 and 10165 km/sec for PGC 31215) and appear distorted by a physical interaction, so they are almost certainly a physical pair. Based on their average recessional velocity of 10125 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that they are about 470 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the pair was not quite 455 million light years away at the time the light by which we see them was emitted, a little over 460 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin, IC 620 is about 65 thousand light years across, and PGC 31215's apparent size of 0.35 by 0.15 arcmin corresponds to a size of about 45 thousand light years.
SDSS image of spiral galaxies PGC 2800960 (which is IC 620) and PGC 31215 (which is often misidentified as IC 620)
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 620 and PGC 31215
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies PGC 2800960 (which is IC 620) and PGC 31215 (which is often misidentified as IC 620)

PGC 31215 (not =
IC 620)
Not an IC object, but listed here since often misidentified as IC 620
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Leo (RA 10 33 32.6, Dec +11 52 32)
Almost certainly an interacting pair with the actual IC 620, which see for images and a historical discussion. As also discussed there the pair was about 455 million light years away when the light by which we see them was emitted, about 460 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.35 by 0.15 arcmin, PGC 31215 was about 45 thousand light years across at that time. Its interaction with IC 620 may have considerably changed its appearance since then, but since the light it is currently emitting won't reach us for nearly half a billion years, what we see now is about all we'll ever see.

IC 621 (= PGC 31196)
Discovered (Apr 7, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABb?) in Sextans (RA 10 33 21.0, Dec +02 36 57)
   Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 621 (Javelle #684, 1860 RA 10 26 09, NPD 86 37.5) is "faint, small, round". The position precesses to RA 10 33 23.1, Dec +02 39 18, about 2.4 arcmin north of the galaxy listed above, and in fact closer to PGC 31197, which as a result is often misidentified as IC 621. Per Corwin, the error is due to an incorrect position for Javelle's comparison star (BD+3 2388, an 8th-magnitude star about 9 arcmin to the east), whose BD position is 2.4 arcmin north of its actual position. Correcting for that mistake places Javelle's #684 practically on top of PGC 31196, so the identification is certain.
   Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 621
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 621
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing PGC 31197
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 621, also showing spiral galaxy PGC 31197, which is often misidentified as IC 621

PGC 31197 (not =
IC 621)
Not an IC object, but listed here since often misidentified as IC 621
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Sextans (RA 10 33 21.8, Dec +02 40 49)
Apparent size 0.55 by 0.35 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 31197, which is often misidentified as IC 621
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 31197; for a wide-field view, see IC 621

IC 622 (= PGC 31302 =
NGC 3279)
Discovered (Mar 5, 1878) by David Todd (and later listed as NGC 3279)
Discovered (Jan 29, 1890) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 622)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sd?) in Leo (RA 10 34 42.8, Dec +11 11 48)
   Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 622 (= Swift list IX (#23), 1860 RA 10 27 10, NPD 78 04.7) is "very faint, pretty small, extended, 9th magnitude star to south" (this is an error, as the star is to the north). The position precesses to RA 10 34 34.8, Dec +11 12 01, a few seconds west of the galaxy, but there is nothing else nearby, and the description of the star field, though the position of the 9th magnitude star is reversed, makes the identification certain. (See NGC 3279 for images, a discussion of the duplicate listing, and anything else.)

IC 623 (= PGC 31356)
Discovered (Apr 7, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (685)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Sextans (RA 10 35 21.1, Dec +03 33 29)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.45 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 623
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 623
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 623

IC 624 (= PGC 31426)
Discovered (May 4, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (686)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABa? pec) in Sextans (RA 10 36 15.3, Dec -08 20 04)
Apparent size 2.5 by 0.55 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 624
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 624
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 624

IC 625 (= PGC 31919)
Discovered (Jan 11, 1888) by
Frank Muller (392)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Hydra (RA 10 42 37.8, Dec -23 56 07)
(See Corwin; the problem being a reversal of the sign for the offset) Apparent size 2.1 by 0.5 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 625
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 625
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 625

IC 626 (= PGC 31501)
Discovered (May 5, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (687)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0 pec?) in Sextans (RA 10 36 57.1, Dec -07 01 27)
Apparent size 1.3 by 1.0 arcmin. Nothing is known about its apparent companion, PGC 1025439, so whether they are in any way connected or merely an optical double is also unknown.
DSS image of lenticular galaxies IC 626 and PGC 1025439, which may or may not be physical companions
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 626 and PGC 1025439
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 626
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxies IC 626 and PGC 1025439, which may or may not be physical companions

PGC 1025439
Not an IC object but listed here since possibly a companion of
IC 626
A 17th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Sextans (RA 10 36 53.5, Dec -07 01 45)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin. Nothing else known, so whether it is in any way connected to IC 626 (which see for images) or merely an optical double is also unknown.

IC 627 (= PGC 31543)
Discovered (May 5, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (688)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Sextans (RA 10 37 20.0, Dec -03 21 27)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 627
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 627
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 627

IC 628 (= PGC 31567)
Discovered (May 18, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (182)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)ab) in Sextans (RA 10 37 36.2, Dec +05 36 12)
Apparent size 1.25 by 0.85 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 628
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 628
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 628

IC 629 (= PGC 31513 =
NGC 3312)
Discovered (Mar 26, 1835) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3312)
Discovered (Feb 26, 1887) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 629)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)b pec?) in Hydra (RA 10 37 02.4, Dec -27 33 55)
Per Dreyer, IC 629 (Bigourdan #158, 1860 RA 10 30 28, NPD 116 50) is "very faint, very small star involved, possible cluster". The position precesses to RA 10 37 02.9, Dec -27 33 30, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Per Corwin, the duplicate listing has no obvious explanation, as Herschel's position is nearly identical, and Bigourdan himself noted the equality of the two entries in his "big" catalog (a compilation of all his observations). It may have been a simple oversight by Bigourdan and Dreyer, or they may have been misled by Herschel's statement that his polar distance was uncertain, and the presence of a relatively large number of NGC objects in the field (it is part of the Hydra Cluster of galaxies). In any event, there is no doubt of the equivalence with NGC 3312, which see for anything else.

IC 630 (= PGC 31636)
Discovered (May 5, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (689)
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0 pec?) in Sextans (RA 10 38 33.8, Dec -07 10 15)
Apparent size 1.4 by 0.9 arcmin. A starburst galaxy. 8th-magnitude HD 92200 lies almost directly in front of the galaxy, so glare from the star makes it hard to obtain good images.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 630 and 8th-magnitude star HD 92200
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 630 and HD 92200
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 630

IC 631 (= PGC 155542)
Discovered (May 5, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (690)
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Sextans (RA 10 38 58.9, Dec -07 03 08)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.55 arcmin.
DSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 631
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 631
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 631

IC 632 (= PGC 31673)
Discovered (May 9, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (691)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABab?) in Sextans (RA 10 39 11.8, Dec -00 24 36)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.65 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 632
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 632
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 633
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 632, also showing spiral galaxy IC 633

IC 633 (= PGC 31691)
Discovered (May 9, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (692)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Sextans (RA 10 39 24.1, Dec -00 23 21)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 633
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 633
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 632
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 633, also showing spiral galaxy IC 632

IC 634 (= PGC 31799)
Discovered (Apr 7, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (693)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)a? pec) in Sextans (RA 10 40 55.0, Dec +05 59 29)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.35 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 634
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 634
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 634

IC 635 (= PGC 31858)
Discovered (Jan 15, 1894) by
Stephane Javelle (694)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Leo (RA 10 41 45.3, Dec +15 38 35)
Apparent size 1.4 by 0.45 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 635
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 635
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 635

IC 636 (= PGC 31867)
Discovered (Apr 7, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (695)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Sextans (RA 10 41 50.6, Dec +04 19 50)
Apparent size 1.05 by 0.45 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 636
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 636
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 636

IC 637 (= PGC 31900)
Discovered (Jan 15, 1894) by
Stephane Javelle (696)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec) in Leo (RA 10 42 22.0, Dec +15 21 35)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.65 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 637
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 637
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 637

IC 638 (= PGC 31988)
Discovered (Dec 16, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (697)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABab?) in Leo (RA 10 43 48.0, Dec +15 53 42)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 638
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 638
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 638

IC 639 (= PGC 32129)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1888) by
Lewis Swift (VII-14)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Leo (RA 10 45 52.0, Dec +16 55 47)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 639
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 639
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 639

IC 640
Recorded (Mar 27, 1887) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A lost or nonexistent object in Leo Minor (RA 10 46 49.7, Dec +34 44 51)
Per Dreyer, IC 640 (Bigourdan #159, 1860 RA 10 38 56, NPD 54 31) is "very faint, pretty small, extended, double?". The position precesses to RA 10 46 49.7, Dec +34 44 51, whence the position above, but there is nothing there, save for glare from 8th-magnitude HD 93287, which may have led to the impression of a nebulous object (even modern photographs often show 'ghost' images near bright stars). Per Corwin, Bigourdan himself noted "This is, without doubt, a false image" for both this and his #160 (IC 641). So there is no doubt that this is a nonexistent object.
SDSS image of region near the position recorded for the nonexistent IC 640
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the position of IC 640
Also shown is the star undoubtedly responsible for the false image of the nonexistent object

IC 641
Recorded (Mar 27, 1887) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A lost or nonexistent object in Leo Minor (RA 10 47 50.0, Dec +34 39 47)
Per Dreyer, IC 641 (Bigourdan #160, 1860 RA 10 39 57, NPD 54 36) is "very faint, pretty small, diffuse". The position precesses to RA 10 47 50.0, Dec +34 39 47, whence the position above, but there is nothing there, but there is nothing there, save for glare from 9.5-magnitude HD 93449, which may have led to the impression of a nebulous object (even modern photographs often show 'ghost' images near bright stars). Per Corwin, Bigourdan himself noted "This is, without doubt, a false image" for both this and his #159 (IC 640). So there is no doubt that this is a nonexistent object.
SDSS image of region near the position recorded for the nonexistent IC 641
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the position of IC 641
Also shown is the star probably responsible for the false image of the nonexistent object

IC 642 (= PGC 32278)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1888) by
Lewis Swift (VII-15)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Leo (RA 10 48 08.1, Dec +18 11 19)
Apparent size 2.0 by 1.8 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 642
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 642
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 642

IC 643 (= PGC 32392)
Discovered (Mar 31, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (183)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Leo (RA 10 49 27.2, Dec +12 12 03)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.35 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 643
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 643
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 643

IC 644 (=
NGC 3398 = PGC 32564)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1789) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3398)
Discovered (May 8, 1890) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 644)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa pec?) in Ursa Major (RA 10 51 31.6, Dec +55 23 26)
Per Dreyer, IC 644 (Swift list IX (#24), 1860 RA 10 43 04, NPD 33 51.1) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, a little extended, bright star to southeast, southwestern of 2", the other being IC 646 (which is actually almost directly north of this). The position precesses to RA 10 51 40.0, Dec +55 24 28, about 1.5 arcmin northeast of the galaxy listed above, and the description fits perfectly, so the identity seems certain. However, there is a fainter galaxy (PGC 32587) a little further to the southeast, and although a far less likely candidate, it is sometimes listed as IC 644, so it is discussed immediately below.
   Note: Although it is reasonably certain that PGC 32564 is IC 644, whether it is also NGC 3398 (which see for anything else) is less certain, as discussed at that entry. However, since NGC 3398 is usually identified as PGC 32564, the equality with IC 644 is "standard" terminology.

PGC 32587 (probably not =
IC 644)
Probably not an IC object, but listed here since often misidentified as IC 644
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Ursa Major (RA 10 51 47.4, Dec +55 23 09)
Based on a recessional velocity of 22170 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates a distance of about 1030 million light years. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 950 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 980 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.8 by 0.6 arcmin, it is about 220 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 32587, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 644
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 32587; for a wide-field image see NGC 3398

IC 645 (= PGC 2816724)
Discovered (May 3, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (698)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Sextans (RA 10 50 09.3, Dec -06 02 35)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 645
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 645
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 645

IC 646 (= PGC 32568)
Discovered (May 8, 1890) by
Lewis Swift
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec) in Ursa Major (RA 10 51 35.2, Dec +55 27 56)
Per Dreyer, IC 646 (Swift list IX (#25), 1860 RA 10 43 11, NPD 33 47.2) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, northeastern of 2", the other being IC 644 (which is actually almost directly south of this). The position precesses to RA 10 51 47.1, Dec +55 28 21, about 2 arcmin east of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else near, so the identification would be reasonably certain from the position alone. However, since the difference in declination given by Swift for IC 644 and 646 closely match those of the actual objects, the identification seems even more certain. Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 646
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 646
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 3398 and PGC 32587
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 646, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 3398 and spiral galaxy PGC 32587, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 644

IC 647 (= PGC 946616)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (184)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Hydra (RA 10 50 34.4, Dec -12 51 16)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 647
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 647
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 3411
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 647, also showing elliptical galaxy NGC 3411

IC 648 (= PGC 32522)
Discovered (Mar 31, 1892) by
Stephane Javelle (185)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc(r)?) in Leo (RA 10 51 00.3, Dec +12 17 14)
Apparent size 0.75 by 0.55 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 648
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 648
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 648

IC 649 (= PGC 32506 + PGC 93105)
Discovered (Mar 11, 1893) by
Stephane Javelle (699)
A pair of interacting galaxies in Sextans
PGC 32506 = A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb? pec) at RA 10 50 52.0, Dec +01 09 55
PGC 93105 = A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc? pec) at RA 10 50 52.1, Dec +01 09 43
Based on an average recessional velocity of 11600 km/sec (11575 km/sec for PGC 32506 and 11625 km/sec for PGC 93105), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 649 is about 540 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the pair was about 515 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 525 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin, the larger northern member of the pair (PGC 32506) is about 75 thousand light years across, while the smaller southern member (PGC 93105), with an apparent size of 0.25 by 0.15 arcmin, is about 40 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of interacting spiral galaxies PGC 32506 and PGC 93105, which comprise IC 649
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of IC 649
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near interacting spiral galaxies PGC 32506 and PGC 93105, which comprise IC 649
Celestial Atlas
(IC 550 - 599) ←     IC Objects: IC 600 - 649     → (IC 650 - 699)