Celestial Atlas
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Page last updated Jul 9, 2016
Added Historical/Physical labels, removed title tags, checked Corwin positions
Added/checked original NGC entries, updated to current formatting, added/updates pix, tags
WORKING: Check new Steinicke physical/historical databases

NGC 1100 (= PGC 10438=
HCG 21B)
(A member of Hickson Compact Group 21)

Discovered (Oct 17, 1885) by Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Ormond Stone
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Eridanus (RA 02 45 36.1, Dec -17 41 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1100 (Leavenworth list I (#69), 1860 RA 02 40 35, NPD 108 17.7) is "faint, very small, a little extended, brighter middle and nucleus, 3rd of 3", the others being 1098 and 1099. The first Index Catalog lists a corrected position (per Ormond Stone) of RA 02 39 06, NPD 108 16.9. The corrected position precesses to RA 02 45 36.7, Dec -17 41 23, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.6 by 0.7 arcmin (from images below)
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1100, a member of Hickson Compact Group 21, also showing another member of the Group, NGC 1099
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1100, also showing NGC 1099
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1100, a member of Hickson Compact Group 21
Below, a 15 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image of Hickson Compact Group 21
SDSS image of Hickson Compact Group 21, consisting of NGC 1091, NGC 1092, NGC 1098, NGC 1099 and NGC 1100, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas

NGC 1101 (= PGC 10613)
Discovered (Nov 22, 1876) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Cetus (RA 02 48 14.8, Dec +04 34 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1101 (= GC 5276, Stephan list VIII (#9), 1860 RA 02 40 55, NPD 86 00.5) is "very faint, extremely small, round, brighter middle, 13th magnitude star to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.3 by 0.95 arcmin (from images below)
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1101
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1101
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1101

NGC 1102 (= PGC 10545)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Eridanus (RA 02 47 12.9, Dec -22 12 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1102 (Leavenworth list II (#348), 1860 RA 02 41 09, NPD 112 48.6) is "extremely faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.8 by 0.55 arcmin (from images below)
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1102
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1102
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1102

NGC 1103 (= PGC 10597)
Discovered (Dec 26, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Eridanus (RA 02 48 06.0, Dec -13 57 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1103 (Swift list III (#21), 1860 RA 02 41 19, NPD 104 33.1) is "most extremely faint, small, extended, 15th magnitude star involved, 11th magnitude star to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 0.6 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1103, also showing IC 1853
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1103, also showing IC 1853
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1103

NGC 1104 (= PGC 10634)
Discovered (Nov 6, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0(rs)a? pec) in Cetus (RA 02 48 38.7, Dec -00 16 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1104 (= GC 5277, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 02 41 29, NPD 90 51.7) is "very faint, very small, mottled but not resolved, 14th magnitude star to south".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 6510 km/sec, NGC 1104 is about 300 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.55 by 1.05 arcmin (from image below), it is about ? thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1104
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1104
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1104

NGC 1105 (=
IC 1840 = PGC 10333)
Discovered (Dec 2, 1885) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 1105)
Not observed (date?) by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 1105)
Discovered (Jan 30, 1900) by Herbert Howe (and later listed as IC 1840)
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type SAB0(rs)a? pec) in Cetus (RA 02 43 42.0, Dec -15 42 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1105 (Leavenworth list I (#70), 1860 RA 02 41 35, NPD 106 17.6) is "very faint, very small, round". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 02 45 43 and adds "(nothing in the place given by Leavenworth)". The corrected position precesses to RA 02 52 17.2, Dec -15 42 58, which is close to PGC 10867, and led to its adoption as NGC 1105 by a number of sources (for instance, Wikisky still shows that galaxy). However, even if Howe could not find anything at Leavenworth's position (which precesses to RA 02 48 09.9, Dec -15 42 25), that doesn't mean that his position, nearly a degree to the east of Leavenworth's position, is actually for the same nebula; and in fact as shown above, NGC 1105 is generally equated with IC 1840, which is half a degree to the west of Leavenworth's position. Per Corwin, the explanation is relatively simple. There is indeed nothing at Leavenworth's original position, and in searching for what Leavenworth might have observed Howe found a galaxy a degree to the east that he suggested "might" be Leavenworth's nebula. Dreyer changed that suggestion to a definite statement and listed Howe's position for the galaxy as a corrected position for NGC 1105. However, although Leavenworth's position was poor, he did make a sketch of the region showing a pattern of stars surrounding his nebula that is exactly the same as one surrounding Howe's IC 1840; so there is no doubt that what Leavenworth observed was the future IC 1840, and Howe's effort to find Leavenworth's nebula, instead of being mistakenly assigned to NGC 1105, should have been used for a new IC entry. (Since Howe's object is still sometimes misidentified as NGC 1105, it is discussed immediately below.)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.7 by 0.45 arcmin (from images below)
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1105
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1105
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1105

PGC 10867 (not =
NGC 1105)
Not an NGC object, but listed here since sometimes misidentified as NGC 1105
(Should also be added to Corwin's notngc list? Perhaps already in it?)
Discovered (date?) by Herbert Howe (while looking for NGC 1105)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0(rs)a? pec) in Cetus (RA 02 52 17.9, Dec -15 42 36)
Historical Misidentification: As discussed at the entry for NGC 1105, Herbert Howe discovered this object while trying to identify Leavenworth's NGC 1105. Dreyer mistakenly took Howe's tentative statement that it "might" be the missing NGC object as a definite observation, and instead of assigning it a new IC entry, listed its position as a "correction" to that for NGC 1105. Considering what Dreyer could have done, it would be fair to imagine a nonexistent IC entry giving credit to Howe, an 1860 position of RA 02 45 43, NPD 106 17.6, and a description similar to that for NGC 1105. The position precesses to RA 02 52 17.2, Dec -15 42 58, which is very close to PGC 10867, so there is no doubt that it is the object Howe oberved, and if it had an IC listing, this entry would state "so the identification is certain". However, per the discussion at the entry for NGC 1105 it is equally certain that it is not that object, hence this separate listing.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8970 km/sec, PGC 10867 is about 420 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.25 by 0.7 arcmin (from the image below), it is about ? thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 10867, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 1105
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 10867
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 10867, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 1105

NGC 1106 (= PGC 10792)
Discovered (Sep 18, 1828) by
John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Perseus (RA 02 50 40.5, Dec +41 40 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1106 (= GC 612 = JH 268, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 02 41 39, NPD 48 55.1) is "very faint, very small, very faint star attached on south".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.6 by 1.45 arcmin (from images below)
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1106, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 1105
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1106
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1106, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 1105

NGC 1107 (= PGC 10683)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Cetus (RA 02 49 19.6, Dec +08 05 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1107 (= GC 5278, Marth #74, 1860 RA 02 41 49, NPD 82 29) is "faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.7 by 1.4 arcmin (from the images below)
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1107
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1107
Below, a 3.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1107

NGC 1108 (= PGC 10633)
Discovered (Oct 31, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/SAB0?) in Eridanus (RA 02 48 38.5, Dec -07 57 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1108 (Swift list V (#45), 1860 RA 02 41 53, NPD 98 31.7) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin (from images below)
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1108
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1108
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1108

Warning for NGC 1109, 1111 and 1112
Albert Marth observed eight nebulae, subsequently listed as NGC 1109, 1111, 1112, 1113, 1115, 1116, 1117 and 1127, on a single night in 1863. Of those, only three have positions that seem to more or less reliably correspond to actual objects -- NGC 1115, 1116 and 1127. NGC 1117 can be fit to a nearby galaxy, but its identification is far less certain, and NGC 1113 cannot be convincingly connected to any object. Still, that is not as complicated as the situation for NGC 1109, 1111 and 1112, each of which has two or more candidates for what Marth might have observed, and for several of those candidates, more than one suggestion as to which of Marth's objects a given candidate might correspond to; so for those NGC entries there is little if any hope that there will ever be a convincing argument for which objects correspond to which entries. As a result, for those three NGC listings I have chosen to only discuss the historical difficulties, and have referred any discussion of the physical objects suggested for each entry to their corresponding IC or PGC entries.

NGC 1109 (see
note above)
Recorded (Dec 2, 1863) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 1109)
Perhaps recorded (Jan 7, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1846)
Perhaps recorded (Jan 7, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1850)
Perhaps recorded (Jan 7, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1852)
A lost object in Aries (RA 02 49 38.8, Dec +13 15 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1109 (= GC 5279, Marth #75, 1860 RA 02 42 00, NPD 77 20) is "very faint". The position precesses to RA 02 49 38.8, Dec +13 15 04, as shown above, but there is nothing there. This is one of eight objects observed by Marth on the same night, and one of five for which the identification is very uncertain. Per Corwin, the most reasonable solution for the more or less unidentifiable objects is to assume that their declinations are more or less correct, but their right ascensions are off by some unknown amount. In this case Corwin suggests (and Thomson agrees) that NGC 1109 is probably the object later listed as IC 1846, which is two minutes of time to the west of Marth's position (as shown in the image below); doing that puts "NGC 1109" less than 0.3 arcmin directly south of IC 1846, which means that this is a 'reasonable' though uncertain identification of NGC 1109. As an result, NED states that NGC 1109 = IC 1846, but adds that the identification with NGC 1109 is very uncertain. Meanwhile, LEDA equates IC 1852 with NGC 1109, even though that galaxy is usually identified (with no better reason) as NGC 1112. In addition, although not usually identified as NGC 1109, IC 1850 seems a better candidate than IC 1846, because it has a similar declination and is closer to Marth's position, but it is generally identified (again, with no better reason) as NGC 1111 instead (as noted at the entry for that listing). So with two galaxies unconvincingly identified as NGC 1109, and at least one other that could have been added to the list but could be either NGC 1109 or 1111 or neither, the actual identity of Marth's NGC 1109 is as up in the air as the galaxies themselves, and it should probably be considered lost. However, given its frequent identification with various IC objects it seems appropriate to mention these possibilities as a warning, while referring the reader to the individual IC entries for anything other than this historical discussion of the confusing and unsatisfactory efforts to identify NGC 1109. Per Corwin, if = IC 1846, RA 02 47 43.6, Dec +13 15 19.
DSS image of region near Marth's position for NGC 1109, showing the two objects (IC 1846 and IC 1852) often but probably mistakenly listed as that NGC object; also shown is IC 1850, which despite being in the same region and just as suitable a candidate for NGC 1109 is not mentioned as such
Above, a degree wide DSS image centered on Marth's "lost" NGC 1109, and the candidates for that entry

NGC 1110 (= PGC 10673)
Discovered (Dec 21, 1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sm?) in Eridanus (RA 02 49 09.5, Dec -07 50 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1110 (Leavenworth list II (#349), 1860 RA 02 42 02, NPD 98 24.6) is "extremely faint, pretty large, extended 348°".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.9 by 0.5 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1110
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1110
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1110

NGC 1111 (see
note before NGC 1109)
Recorded (Dec 2, 1863) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 1111)
Perhaps recorded (Jan 7, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1850)
A lost object in Aries (RA 02 49 42.7, Dec +13 14 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1111 (= GC 5280, Marth #76, 1860 RA 02 42 04, NPD 77 21) is "faint, very small, stellar". The position precesses to RA 02 49 42.7, Dec +13 14 03, which is almost the same position Marth recorded for NGC 1109, and as in the case of that "object" there is nothing there, and as in that case, what Marth actually observed is unknown. Corwin suggests (and Thomson agrees) that Marth might have observed IC 1850, which is a minute of right ascension to the west and 1.5 arcmin to the north of Marth's position, but although NED adopts that suggestion (with considerable reservations), IC 1850 could be just as convincingly equated to NGC 1109, so whether it is either NGC 1109 or 1111 or neither is not at all obvious. In addition, LEDA identifies NGC 1111 with PGC 10709 (which see immediately following this entry), so as in the case of NGC 1109 there is no convincing argument as to what Marth might have observed, and NGC 1111 should probably be considered lost, and the galaxies suggested as corresponding to that listing referred to only by their non-NGC designations. Per Corwin, if = IC 1850, RA 02 48 39.4, Dec +13 15 34.
DSS image of region near Marth's position for NGC 1111, showing the two objects (IC 1850 and PGC 10709) often but probably mistakenly listed as that NGC object
Above, a 36 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Marth's lost NGC 1111, and the candidates for that entry

PGC 10709 (probably not =
NGC 1111)
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes misidentified as NGC 1111
A 16th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Aries (RA 02 49 50.6, Dec +13 08 43)
Historical Misidentification: As noted at the entry for NGC 1111, that object is probably lost, as there is no way to choose between the various suggestions for what Marth might have observed when he recorded its existence. However, as one of the objects suggested as possibly being Marth's object, it seems appropriate to discuss PGC 10709 here, if only to point out that any statement that it is NGC 1111 is very suspect.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 9160 km/sec, PGC 10709 is about 425 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.6 by 0.45 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 85 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy PGC 10709, sometimes misidentified as NGC 1111
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 10709
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy PGC 10709, sometimes misidentified as NGC 1111

NGC 1112 (??? =
IC 1852 = PGC 10660) (see note before NGC 1109)
Recorded (Dec 2, 1863) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 1112)
Perhaps recorded (Jan 7, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1852)
A lost object in Aries (RA 02 49 59.7, Dec +13 13 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1112 (= GC 5281, Marth #77, 1860 RA 02 42 21, NPD 77 22) is "faint, pretty small". The position precesses to RA 02 49 59.7, Dec +13 13 01, but there is nothing there. As in the case of NGC 1109 and 1111 Corwin suggests assigning the NGC listing to a galaxy of similar declination but a more western right ascension, in this case IC 1852, which is only 0.4 arcmin north and a minute of time to the west of Marth's position, and in some circumstances such an identification might be readily accepted. As a result Thomson agrees with Corwin, and NED (albeit with a caveat that the identification of NGC 1112 with IC 1852 is very uncertain), and a reasonable case might be made for accepting this identification. However, as in the case of several other objects discovered by Marth on the same night, this explanation is not universally accepted, and although there do not appear to be multiple candidates for NGC 1112, IC 1852 has been equated by LEDA with NGC 1109, and NGC 1112 doesn't even appear in that database. So although it is possible and perhaps even probable that NGC 1112 might be the same as IC 1852, the multiplicity of suggestions about the correspondence between IC 1852 and various NGC objects probably makes it best to consider NGC 1112 as lost, and only mention its possible connection with IC 1852 as a warning against giving any great credence to such statements. (Per Corwin, if = IC 1852, RA 02 49 00.4, Dec +13 13 26.)
DSS image of region near Marth's position for NGC 1112, also showing spiral galaxy IC 1852, which may be Marth's object, but is not universally accepted as being NGC 1112
Above, a 36 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Marth's "lost" NGC 1112, and a candidate for that entry

NGC 1113 (see
note before NGC 1109)
Recorded (Dec 2, 1863) by Albert Marth
A lost or nonexistent object or star in Aries
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1113 (= GC 5282, Marth #78, 1860 RA 02 42 29, NPD 77 17) is "very faint". The position precesses to RA 02 50 07.9, Dec +13 18 00, which falls nearly on a 10th-magnitude star, so it is tempting to presume that although not a nebula, that star was the object observed by Marth. However, per Corwin, the description as "very faint" would only apply to a much fainter nebular or stellar object, and he suggests that Marth's object is more likely to have been the 15th-magnitude star at RA 02 50 05.1, Dec +13 19 39. NED concurs with this, albeit with the caveat that the identification is very uncertain, but LEDA rejects any identification of the NGC object, and I have seen identifications of NGC 1113 involving at least one other 15th magnitude star; so it seems that there is no convincing reason to believe that any object suggested as being NGC 1113 is actually what Marth observed, and it might be best to simply consider the object as lost. (Per Corwin, if identifiable, perhaps RA 02 50 05.1, Dec +13 19 39.)
DSS image of region centered on Marth's postion for NGC 1113, showing the 10th-magnitude star nearly at that position, and the 15th-magnitude star (indicated by a box) suggested by Corwin as the 'actual' NGC 1113; also shown is lenticular galaxy NGC 1115, one of the few objects observed by Marth on the same night that are more or less confidently identifiable
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Marth's position for NGC 1113, showing the 10th-magnitude star near that position, the 15th-magnitude star (in a box) suggested by Corwin as what Marth actually observed, and one of the few identifiable objects observed by Marth on the same night, NGC 1115

NGC 1114 (= PGC 10669)
Discovered (Oct 6, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Eridanus (RA 02 49 07.2, Dec -16 59 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1114 (= GC 611 = JH 269 = JH 2497 = WH III 449, 1860 RA 02 42 35, NPD 107 34.4) is "pretty faint, pretty large, pretty much extended, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.9 by 0.8 arcmin (from the images below)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1114, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image centered on NGC 1114
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1114

NGC 1115 (= PGC 10774)
Discovered (Dec 2, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Aries (RA 02 50 25.3, Dec +13 15 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1115 (= GC 5283, Marth #79, 1860 RA 02 42 46, NPD 77 20) is "very faint". The position precesses to RA 02 50 24.9, Dec +13 14 57, about 1 arcmin due south of a suitable candidate, so the identification is considered certain. (This is one of eight objects observed by Marth on the same night, but one of only three for which the identification is reasonably certain.)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8580 km/sec, NGC 1115 is about 400 million light years away, in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 450 to 520 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.55 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below), it is about ? thousand light years actoss.
DSS  image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1115, also showing NGC 1116
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1115, also showing NGC 1116
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1115

NGC 1116 (= PGC 10781)
Discovered (Dec 2, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Aries (RA 02 50 35.7 Dec +13 20 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1116 (= GC 5284, Marth #80, 1860 RA 02 42 56, NPD 77 15) is "very faint". The position precesses to RA 02 50 35.1, Dec +13 19 56, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. (This is one of eight objects observed by Marth on the same night, but one of only three for which the identification is reasonably certain.)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7625 km/sec, NGC 1116 is about 355 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 390 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.5 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below), it is about ? thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1116, also showing NGC 1115
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1116, also showing NGC 1115
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1116

NGC 1117 (? = PGC 10822) (see
note before NGC 1109)
Recorded (Dec 2, 1863) by Albert Marth
A lost object or a 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Aries (RA 02 51 13.1, Dec +13 11 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1117 (= GC 5285, Marth #81, 1860 RA 02 43 04, NPD 77 25) is "close to a small (faint) star". The position precesses to RA 02 50 42.7, Dec +13 09 55, but there is nothing there. However, per Corwin, there is a galaxy about half a minute to the east and an arcmin or so to the north which might fit the bill, provided that its companion, an almost equally bright galaxy, is assumed to be what Marth took to be "a small star". And although, given the large number of errors made by Marth on the night in question, any identification of a galaxy whose position is not spot on has to be viewed with some suspicion, both NED and LEDA agree that Corwin's suggestion is reasonable (although NED does add its usual caveat about the identification being very uncertain), so although the identification of NGC 1117 with PGC 10822 cannot be considered certain, it is at least a reasonable possibility. Per Corwin, if = IC 1855s, RA 02 51 13.1, Dec +13 11 07; if IC 1855n, RA 02 51 13.0, Dec +13 11 31;
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7625 km/sec, PGC 10822 is about 355 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below), counting its faint outer extensions, it is about 35 thousand light years across. The galaxy is generally regarded as part of a triplet with PGC 200207, the compact galaxy immediately to its east, and PGC 10821, the nearly equally bright galaxy just to its north that Marth may have taken as a faint star; so those are both discussed immediately after this entry.
DSS image of region near the triplet formed by elliptical galaxy PGC 10822, which may be NGC 1117, PGC 200207 and PGC 10821
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 10822, also showing PGC 10821 and PGC 200207
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide image of the triplet
DSS image of elliptical galaxy PGC 10822, which may be NGC 1117; also shown are PGC 200207 and PGC 10821

PGC 10821 (= "NGC 1117A")
Not an NGC object but listed here sime sometimes called NGC 1117A
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in
Aries (RA 02 51 13.0, Dec +13 11 31)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7585 km/sec, PGC 10821 is about 355 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.45 by 0.45 arcmin (from the images referred to), counting its faint outer extensions, it is about ? thousand light years across. It is part of a pair with NGC 1117 (which see for images), and may also be connected with PGC 200207.

PGC 200207
Not an NGC object but listed here since apparently associated with the putative
NGC 1117
A 16th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Aries (RA 02 51 13.6, Dec +13 11 16)
Physical Information: Other than its apparent size of about 0.1 by 0.1 arcmin (from the images referred to), nothing is known about PGC 200207. However, it is generally regarded as part of a triplet with the supposed NGC 1117 (which see for images) and PGC 10821.

NGC 1118 (= PGC 10748)
Discovered (Nov 1, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(rs)a? pec) in Eridanus (RA 02 49 58.7, Dec -12 09 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1118 (Swift list V (#46), 1860 RA 02 43 18, NPD 102 44.7) is "extremely faint, very small, extended east-west".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.0 by 0.75 arcmin (from the images below), including the faint western arm.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1118
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1118
Below, a 4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1118

NGC 1119 (= PGC 10607)
Discovered (Oct 17, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Presumably also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SAB0?) in Eridanus (RA 02 48 17.1, Dec -17 59 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1119 (Leavenworth list I (#72), 1860 RA 02 43 35, NPD 108 36.6) is "faint, extremely small, round (perhaps a faint star?)". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 02 41 47. The corrected position precesses to RA 02 48 16.4, Dec -18 01 26, but there is nothing there. However, there is a reasonable candidate for NGC 1119 just over 2 arcmin due north of Howe's position (*Note to self: Insert Howe's full position here*), and since I can find no mention of any concern about the identification, that galaxy has apparently been considered to be NGC 1119 for more than a century, and on that historical basis alone should continue to be treated as such regardless of whether it is the object Leavenworth actually observed or not.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin (from images below)
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1119
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1119
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1119

NGC 1120 (=
IC 261 = PGC 10664)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 1120)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1891) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 261)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Eridanus (RA 02 49 04.1, Dec -14 28 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1120 (Leavenworth list I (#73), 1860 RA 02 43 35, NPD 105 02.6) is "very faint, small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 02 50 12.5, Dec -14 27 41, but there is nothing there. As a result, when Javelle observed a nebula about a minute of time to the west of Leavenworth's position he thought he had found a new object, and Dreyer agreed, leading to the double listing. However, per Corwin, although Leavenworth's right ascension was poor he left an excellent sketch of the field, and a comparison of his sketch with Javelle's object proves they are the same. Depending upon how long the equivalence of the two listings was unknown, it might be more appropriate to call this object by its IC designation, and only use its NGC entry for historical reference; however, current usage is to call it by its NGC designation, so that is the custom I have followed here.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8520 km/sec, NGC 1120 is about 400 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.7 by 0.9 arcmin (from the images below), it is about ? thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1120
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1120
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1120

NGC 1121 (= PGC 10789)
Discovered (Nov 9, 1884) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SAB0?) in Eridanus (RA 02 50 39.3, Dec -01 44 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1121 (Swift list I (#4), 1860 RA 02 43 46, NPD 92 19.4) is "faint, much extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.95 by 0.4 arcmin (from images below)
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1121
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1121
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1121

NGC 1122 (=
NGC 1123 = PGC 10890)
Discovered (Oct 17, 1786) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1123)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1885) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 1122)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABb?) in Perseus (RA 02 52 51.1, Dec +42 12 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1122 (Swift list II (#25), 1860 RA 02 43 47, NPD 48 22.3) is "very faint, pretty small, round, star near to north". The 1860 position is nearly identical to that for NGC 1123, which ought to have told Swift or Dreyer that the two listings referred to the same object; but neither noticed the identity, leading to the double listing (as noted by Corwin, "these things happen to the best of us"). The position precesses to RA 02 52 49.8, Dec +42 12 25, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain (as it also was for Herschel's century-earlier observation).
Additional Note: Although Herschel's observation was made much earlier, the usual practice is to list duplicate observations by their lowest NGC designation; as a result, Swift's mistaken "discovery" takes precedence in terms of naming the object.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3600 km/sec, NGC 1122 is about 170 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 2.1 by 1.3 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 95 thousand light years across. Per Corwin, there is an apparent companion at RA 02 52 56.4, Dec +42 14 37.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1122
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1122
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1122

NGC 1123 (=
NGC 1122 = PGC 10890)
Discovered (Oct 17, 1786) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1123)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1123)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1885) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 1122)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABb?) in Perseus (RA 02 52 51.1, Dec +42 12 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1123 (= GC 613 = JH 270 = WH II 601, 1860 RA 02 43 48, NPD 48 22.4) is "extremely faint, small, irregularly round, very gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved". As noted at NGC 1122 the NGC positions are essentially identical, which should have relegated Swift's observation to a confirmation of Herschel's discovery; but since standard practice for duplicate entries is to use the lowest NGC designation, this entry has been relegated to a historical footnote.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 1122 for anything else.

NGC 1124 (= PGC 10838)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type (R)S0? pec) in Fornax (RA 02 51 35.9, Dec -25 42 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1124 (Ormond Stone list I (#74), 1860 RA 02 41 40, NPD 116 17.5) is "extremely faint, extremely small, irregularly round, gradually brighter middle, 9th magnitude star 1 arcmin northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin (based on the images below)
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1124
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1124
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1124

NGC 1125 (= PC 10851)
Discovered (Oct 6, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(s)b? pec) in Eridanus (RA 02 51 40.4, Dec -16 39 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1125 (= GC 615 = JH 272 = WH III 450, 1860 RA 02 45 09, NPD 107 12.8) is "very faint, small, a little extended, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.7 by 0.75 arcmin (from the images below). There is an apparent companion (PGC 10845) at RA 02 51 37.6, Dec -16 39 34.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1125
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1125
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1125

NGC 1126 (= PGC 10868)
Discovered (Oct 31, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Eridanus (RA 02 52 18.6, Dec -01 17 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1126 (Swift list V (#47), 1860 RA 02 45 09, NPD 91 51.7) is "most extremely faint, small, round, h273 to east", (JH) 273 being NGC 1132.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.0 by 0.2 arcmin (from the images below)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1126
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1126
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1126

NGC 1127 (= PGC 10889)
Discovered (Dec 2, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(r)ab?) in Aries (RA 02 52 51.9, Dec +13 15 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1127 (= GC 5286, Marth #82, 1860 RA 02 45 12, NPD 77 20) is "very faint". The position precesses to RA 02 52 51.2, Dec +13 14 37, about 1 arcmin nearly due south of a suitable candidate, so the identification is considered reasonably certain. (This is one of eight objects observed by Marth on the same night, but one of only three for which the identification is reasonably certain.)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 9820 km/sec, a straightforward calculation (based on H = 73 km/sec/Mpc) indicates that NGC 1127 is about 435 to 440 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 420 to 425 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 430 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.9 by 0.75 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 110 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1127
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1127
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1127

NGC 1128 (= PGC 11188 + PGC 11189)
Discovered (Oct 8, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A pair of galaxies in Cetus
PGC 11188 = A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) at RA 02 57 41.6, Dec +06 01 21
PGC 11189 = A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) at RA 02 57 41.6, Dec +06 01 37
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1128 (Swift list V (#48), 1860 RA 02 45 13, NPD 84 32.0) is "extremely faint, small, a little extended, 2 faint stars close to west". The position precesses to RA 02 52 35.9, Dec +06 02 38, but there is nothing there. However, per Corwin, Swift's observations in October of 1886 almost all contain an error of 5 minutes of time in the right ascension, perhaps due to an error in the printed position of the star used by Swift to align his setting circles during that period; and applying that correction, the precessed position is less than an arcmin to the northwest of the double galaxy, and Swift's "comment about two pretty faint stars close west is accurate", so the identification appears certain.
Physical Information: The apparent size of PGC 11188 is 0.35 by 0.35 arcmin(?); of PGC 11189 is 0.5 by 0.35 arcmin(?).
SDSS image of region near the pair of elliptical galaxies, PGC 11188 and 11189, that comprise NGC 1128
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1128
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair
SDSS image of the pair of elliptical galaxies, PGC 11188 and 11189, that comprise NGC 1128

NGC 1129 (= PGC 10959)
Discovered (Oct 17, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 18, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 elliptical galaxy (type E5?) in Perseus (RA 02 54 27.4, Dec +41 34 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1129 (= GC 616 = JH 271 = WH II 602, 1860 RA 02 45 22, NPD 49 00.0) is "extremely faint, pretty small, irregularly round, very gradually a little brighter middle, double or faint star to southwest". The position precesses to RA 02 54 23.2, Dec +41 34 30, on the outskirts of the galaxy, so the identification is certain (although the "double or faint star" is actually a faint pair of galaxies).
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 5.0 by 2.5 arcmin (from the images below)
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1129 overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas, also showing NGC 1130, NGC 1131 and IC 265; also shown is PGC 10980, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 1131
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image centered on NGC 1129
Also shown are NGC 1130 and 1131, IC 265 and PGC 10980
Below, a 5.6 by 4.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 1129, also showing NGC 1130 and 1131
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1129, also showing NGC 1130 and NGC 1131

NGC 1130 (= PGC 10951)
Discovered (Dec 8, 1855) by
William Parsons, 3rd Lord Rosse
A magnitude 15.1 lenticular galaxy (type SAB0?) in Perseus (RA 02 54 24.3, Dec +41 36 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1130 (= GC 617, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 02 45 22, NPD 48 58) is "extremely faint, extremely small". The position precesses to RA 02 54 23.3, Dec +41 36 30, which is on the periphery of a faint galaxy just northwest of NGC 1129, so the identification with that galaxy appears to be certain. (NGC 1130 and 1131 were discovered as "knots" near NGC 1129 during an observation of the brighter galaxy, and their positions were recorded as small offsets from NGC 1129's position, so the positions should be more accurate than for objects in some random field.) Despite that, per Corwin, due to the faintness of PGC 10951 and the fact that there are several other galaxies in the region, there has been some question in various references as to which galaxy deserves credit as NGC 1130. However, since the position of what became NGC 1130 was measured by a presumably accurate offset from an absolutely certain starting point, there is no good reason to doubt the identification made here; and the only reason this 'problem' is even mentioned is as a warning that some references may mistakenly equate NGC 1130 with a different galaxy. (Per Corwin, an alternate identification might be with the object at RA 02 54 30.4, Dec +41 36 38)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3? arcmin. (Due to its close association with NGC 1129, refer to that listing for images of NGC 1130.)

NGC 1131 (= PGC 10964)
Discovered (Dec 8, 1855) by
William Parsons, 3rd Lord Rosse
A magnitude 14.6 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Perseus (RA 02 54 34.0, Dec +41 33 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1131 (= GC 618, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 02 45 34, NPD 49 01) is "extremely faint, extremely small". The position precesses to RA 02 54 35.2, Dec +41 33 29, on the periphery of a faint galaxy just southeast of NGC 1129, so the identification with that galaxy appears to be certain. (NGC 1131 and 1130 were discovered as "knots" near NGC 1129 during an observation of the brighter galaxy, and their positions were recorded as small offsets from NGC 1129's position, so the positions should be more accurate than for objects in some random field.) Despite that, per Corwin, due to the faintness of PGC 10964 and the fact that there are several other galaxies in the region (including a much brighter one to its southeast), there has been some question in various references as to which galaxy deserves credit as NGC 1131. However, since the position of what became NGC 1131 was measured by a presumably accurate offset from an absolutely certain starting point, there is no good reason to doubt the identification made here; and the only reason this 'problem' is even mentioned is as a warning that some references may mistakenly equate NGC 1131 with a different galaxy (as an example, a Wikisky search for NGC 1131 shows PGC 10980, the brighter galaxy to the southeast of the actual NGC 1131).
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4? arcmin. (Due to its close association with NGC 1129, refer to that listing for images of NGC 1131.)

PGC 10980 (not =
NGC 1131)
Not an NGC object but listed here because sometimes misidentified as NGC 1131
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Perseus (RA 02 54 44.6, Dec +41 31 42)
Historical Misidentification: As noted in the entry for NGC 1131, even though its identification with PGC 10964 is certain, some references list other objects as that NGC object, and as it happens a Wikisky search for NGC 1131 shows PGC 10980, instead of the correct galaxy. (The temptation to identify NGC 1131 with a brighter object is understandable, but PGC 10980 is much too far from NGC 1129 to have been thought a "knot" in the brighter galaxy by Lord Rosse or his assistants.) Still, although not deserving of its incorrect NGC designation, the fact that it is sometimes identified as such makes it appropriate to discuss it here, instead of in some place where the warning about the misidentification might not be noticed.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4450 km/sec, PGC 10980 is about 205 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.0 by 0.75 arcmin, it is about 60 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy PGC 10980, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 1131
Above, a 1.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 10980; for a wide-field view see NGC 1129

NGC 1132 (= PGC 10891)
Discovered (Nov 23, 1827) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 elliptical galaxy (type E5?) in Eridanus (RA 02 52 51.8, Dec -01 16 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1132 (= GC 619 = JH 273, 1860 RA 02 45 44, NPD 91 51.0) is "extremely faint, pretty large, gradually brighter middle, 8th magnitude star to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 1.3? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1132
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1132
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1132

NGC 1133 (= PGC 10885)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(rs)ab?) in Eridanus (RA 02 52 42.2, Dec -08 48 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1133 (Leavenworth list II (#350), 1860 RA 02 45 56, NPD 99 23.5) is "very faint, very small, a little extended 45°, two stars to northwest and northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.05 by 0.9 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1133
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1133
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1133

NGC 1134 (= PGC 10928 =
Arp 200)
Discovered (Oct 16, 1784) by William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S(rs)ab? pec) in Aries (RA 02 53 41.3, Dec +13 00 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1134 (= GC 620 = WH II 251, 1860 RA 02 46 01, NPD 77 34.9) is "faint, small, irregularly round, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 0.9 arcmin? Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a galaxy with material ejected from the nucleus. Quite possibly a stage in the merger of two galaxies.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1134, also known as Arp 200
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1134
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1134, also known as Arp 200

NGC 1135 (=
NGC 1136 = PGC 10807)
Discovered (Sep 11, 1836) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1135)
Discovered (Dec 5, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1136)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(r)a?) in Horologium (RA 02 50 53.7, Dec -54 58 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1135 (= GC 621 = JH 2498, 1860 RA 02 46 36, NPD 145 32.5) is "faint, round, gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 02 50 45.2, Dec -54 57 49, less than an arcmin northwest of PGC 10807, so the identification with that galaxy should have been relatively certain. However, Herschel listed two galaxies in the region, the other one (GC 622 = JH 2499) being recorded as a few arcmin to the south, and there are two galaxies in the region, so it has been generally assumed for more than a century that the southern observation corresponds to the southern galaxy (listed as NGC 1136), and the northern observation to the northern galaxy (listed as NGC 1135). For that reason, despite the apparent equivalence of Herschel's GC 621 with PGC 10807, tradition is that PGC 10800 (the northern of the two galaxies) is the "actual" NGC 1135, and almost every reference I can find states that NGC 1135 = PGC 10800, and NGC 1136 = PGC 10807. However, Herschel's description of the two objects is identical, whereas the northern galaxy is much fainter than the southern one, and per Corwin if the much fainter northern galaxy really had been Herschel's GC 621, then he would have listed it as "extremely faint" instead of "faint", as it would have been one of the faintest objects ever observed by him. As a result, Corwin suggests (and I agree) that it makes far more sense to assume that GC 621 and 622 are duplicate observations of the same, brighter southern galaxy, with the recorded position for GC 621 being (as already noted above) relatively accurate, and the one for GC 622 being unfortunately well to the south of the correct position, due to an error in reducing its position. For that reason, in this catalog I have equated NGC 1135 and 1136, and relegated PGC 10800, which is still listed as NGC 1135 almost everywhere else, to the lower status of a historically important but mistaken identification.
Physical Information: Although duplicate entries are usually referred to by the lower-numbered NGC designation, since the duplicate entry is not generally recognized, see NGC 1136 for anything else.

PGC 10800 (not =
NGC 1135)
Not an NGC object but listed here because usually misidentified as NGC 1135
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Scd? pec?) in Horologium (RA 02 50 47.2, Dec -54 55 46)
Historical Misidentification: As noted at the entry for NGC 1135, due to an error in the position of GC 622 = JH 2499 = NGC 1136, it was long presumed that NGC 1135 was PGC 10800, the northern of two galaxies in Horologium. It was only recently realized that PGC 10800 was far too faint to have been Herschel's NGC 1135, and NGC 1135 and 1136 were duplicate observations of the same object. Due to this historical error, even though PGC 10800 is not NGC 1135, it is still treated as such in almost all references, so it is appropriate to discuss it here, even though it turns out not to be that NGC object at all.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 13340 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 10800 is about 620 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it takes the light from the object to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 590 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 605 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.7 by 0.35 arcmin (from the image below), it is about 120 thousand light years across.
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 10800, almost always (but almost certainly incorrectly) listed as NGC 1135
Above, a 1 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 10800; for a wide-field view see NGC 1136

NGC 1136 (=
NGC 1135 = PGC 10807)
Discovered (Dec 5, 1834) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(r)a?) in Horologium (RA 02 50 53.7, Dec -54 58 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1136 (= GC 622 = JH 2499, 1860 RA 02 46 45, NPD 145 38.5) is "faint, round, gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 02 50 53.4, Dec -55 03 50, which is 5 arcmin due south of the correct position, and as noted at NGC 1135, this led to the presumption that NGC 1135 and 1136 both had erroneous positions, with NGC 1136 being the southern nebula (which it was), and NGC 1135 being the northern one (which it was not; it was actually a more accurate observation of the same object). This means that the galaxy in question (PGC 10807) ought to be called NGC 1135, since that represented the more accurate measurement, but is instead called NGC 1136 because the less accurate measurement was presumed to correspond to the more southerly nebula.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5610 km/sec, NGC 1136 is about 260 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.4 by 1.2 arcmin(?), it is about 105 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1136, which is almost certainly a duplicate of NGC 1135, also showing spiral galaxy PGC 10800, which is usually misidentified as NGC 1135
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1136, also showing PGC 10800
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1136, which is almost certainly a duplicate of NGC 1135

NGC 1137 (= PGC 10942)
Discovered (Oct 17, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SA(rs)b?) in Cetus (RA 02 54 02.7, Dec +02 57 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1137 (Swift list III (#22), 1860 RA 02 46 57, NPD 87 37.7) is "very faint, pretty small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.3 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1137
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1137
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1137

NGC 1138 (= PGC 11118)
Discovered (Oct 24, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Perseus (RA 02 56 36.4, Dec +43 02 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1138 (= GC 623 = JH 274 = WH III 580, 1860 RA 02 47 30, NPD 47 31.4) is "very faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle, in a triangle with 2 small (faint) stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.65 by 1.3 arcmin (from images below)
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1138
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1138
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1138

NGC 1139 (= PGC 10888)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0(s)a?) in Eridanus (RA 02 52 46.8, Dec -14 31 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1139 (Leavenworth list I (#75), 1860 RA 02 47 35, NPD 105 05.5) is "very faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.0 by 0.85 arcmin (from the images below)
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1139
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1139
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1139

NGC 1140 (= PGC 10966)
Discovered (Nov 22, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Dec 14, 1830) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 irregular galaxy (type IBm? pec) in Eridanus (RA 02 54 33.5, Dec -10 01 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1140 (= GC 624 = JH 275 = JH 2500 = WH II 470, 1860 RA 02 47 46, NPD 100 36.2) is "pretty bright, small, round, stellar".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1500 km/sec, NGC 1140 is about 70 million light years away, in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 55 to 65 million light years. Using the generally accepted distance of about 60 million light years, its apparent size of about 1.8 by 1.0 arcmin corresponds to about 30 thousand light years. Despite being about ten times smaller than the Milky Way Galaxy, NGC 1140 is producing new stars at about the same rate (about a million stars per million years), giving it an exceptionally bright nucleus and a classification as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2).
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 1140
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1140
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of irregular galaxy NGC 1140
Below, a 1.2 by 1.6 arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy (Image Credit ESA/Hubble, NASA)
HST image of irregular galaxy NGC 1140

NGC 1141 (=
NGC 1143 = PGC 11007)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 1141)
Discovered (Nov 17, 1876) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 1143)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0? pec) in Cetus (RA 02 55 09.7, Dec -00 10 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1141 (= GC 5287, Marth #83, 1860 RA 02 47 59, NPD 90 06) is "very faint, small, western of double nebula", the other nebula being NGC 1142. The right ascensions, descriptions and relative positions of Marth's NGC 1141 and 1142 are very similar to those of Stephan's NGC 1143 and 1144, for the very good reason that as shown in their entry titles, they are actually the same pair of galaxies, accurately observed by Stephan, but measured 40 arcmin too far north by Marth. For NGC 1141, Marth's position precesses to RA 02 55 09.7, Dec +00 28 16, but there is nothing there. However, as already noted there is a pair of galaxies 40 arcmin to the south that exactly matches Marth's NGC 1141 and 1142, so despite the error in the declination, there is no doubt that NGC 1141 is the same as NGC 1143 (which see), and NGC 1142 is the same as NGC 1144.
Physical Information: Although standard practice is to use the lower NGC designation for duplicate entries, NGC 1141 is so universally called NGC 1143 that physical information and images are posted at that entry. Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of an elliptical galaxy (NGC 1141/1143) close to and perturbing spiral galaxies (NGC 1142/1144).

NGC 1142 (=
NGC 1144 = PGC 11012)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 1142)
Discovered (Nov 17, 1876) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 1144)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S? pec) in Cetus (RA 02 55 12.2, Dec -00 11 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1142 (= GC 5289, Marth #84, 1860 RA 02 48 01, NPD 90 06) is "pretty faint, small, round, eastern of double nebula", the other nebula being NGC 1141. The right ascensions, descriptions and relative positions of Marth's NGC 1141 and 1142 are very similar to those of Stephan's NGC 1143 and 1144, for the very good reason that as shown in their entry titles, they are actually the same pair of galaxies, accurately observed by Stephan, but measured 40 arcmin too far north by Marth. For NGC 1142, Marth's position precesses to RA 02 55 11.7, Dec +00 28 16, but there is nothing there. However, as already noted there is a pair of galaxies 40 arcmin to the south that exactly matches Marth's NGC 1141 and 1142, so despite the error in the declination, there is no doubt that NGC 1141 is the same as NGC 1143, and NGC 1142 is the same as NGC 1144 (which see).
Physical Information: Although physical information for this object is currently listed at NGC 1144, standard practice is to use the lowest NGC designation, and since both designations are commonly used for this object, physical information and images may be moved to this entry in the next iteration of this page. Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of an elliptical galaxy (NGC 1141/1143) close to and perturbing spiral galaxies (NGC 1142/1144).

NGC 1143 (=
NGC 1141 = PGC 11007, and with NGC 1144 = Arp 118)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 1141)
Discovered (Nov 17, 1876) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 1143)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0? pec) in Cetus (RA 02 55 09.7, Dec -00 10 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1143 (= GC 5288, Stephan list VIII (#10), 1860 RA 02 48 01, NPD 90 45.0) is "extremely faint, small, round, western of 2", the other being NGC 1144. The right ascensions, descriptions and relative positions of Stephan's NGC 1143 and 1144 are very similar to those of Marth's NGC 1141 and 1142, for the very good reason that as shown in their entry titles, they are actually the same pair of galaxies, accurately observed by Stephan, but measured 40 arcmin too far north by Marth. For NGC 1143, Stephan's position precesses to RA 02 55 10.2, Dec -00 10 44, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin? Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of an elliptical galaxy (NGC 1141/1143) close to and perturbing spiral galaxies (NGC 1142/1144).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1143 and its companion, spiral galaxy NGC 1144, which comprise Arp 118
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1143, also showing NGC 1142/1144
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1143 and its companion, spiral galaxy NGC 1144, which comprise Arp 118

NGC 1144 (=
NGC 1142 = PGC 11012, and with NGC 1143 = Arp 118)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 1142)
Discovered (Nov 17, 1876) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 1144)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S? pec) in Cetus (RA 02 55 12.2, Dec -00 11 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1144 (= GC 5290, Stephan list VIII (#11), 1860 RA 02 48 05, NPD 90 45.3) is "extremely faint, small, round, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 1143. The right ascensions, descriptions and relative positions of Stephan's NGC 1143 and 1144 are very similar to those of Marth's NGC 1141 and 1142, for the very good reason that as shown in their entry titles, they are actually the same pair of galaxies, accurately observed by Stephan, but measured 40 arcmin too far north by Marth. For NGC 1144, Stephan's position precesses to RA 02 55 14.2, Dec -00 11 02, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: (Perhaps to be moved to NGC 1142 in a later iteration of this page) Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin? A Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2). Interacting or colliding with NGC 1143, which see for images. Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of an elliptical galaxy (NGC 1141/1143) close to and perturbing spiral galaxies (NGC 1142/1144).

NGC 1145 (= PGC 10965)
Discovered (Dec 11, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Eridanus (RA 02 54 33.5, Dec -18 38 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1145 (= GC 625 = JH 2501, 1860 RA 02 48 08, NPD 109 13.1) is "faint, pretty large, pretty much extended, 2 small (faint) stars to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.2 by 0.5 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1145
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1145
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1145

NGC 1146
Recorded (Jan 29, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A group of stars in Perseus (RA 02 57 37.0, Dec +46 26 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1146 (= GC 5291, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 02 48 09, NPD 44 07.3) is a "cluster, very small, very faint plus nebulosity". The position precesses to RA 02 57 32.7, Dec +46 26 48, just northwest of a faint group of half a dozen or so stars, the brightest four of which are probably what d'Arrest observed. Per Corwin, Wolfgang Steinicke was the first to identify the asterism as the most likely group of stars corresponding to d'Arrest's position, but Dr. Steinicke's current catalog actually identifies the pair of brighter stars just to the southeast of the fainter asterism as NGC 1146. Despite this, Corwin feels that d'Arrest's original notes (which are more detailed than the brief description provided in the NGC) firmly establish the faint asterism as the actual NGC object. In addition, there were earlier suggestions that NGC 1146 might have included some of the other stars to the northwest of the asterism. So although it seems most likely that the asterism identified here (and in the image below) is d'Arrest's "cluster", there is bound to be some disagreement about the identification in various references. However, given the relatively insignificant nature of the group, it probably makes little difference whether the identification is absolutely correct, or only approximately so.
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near the asterism of faint stars that is probably d'Arrest's NGC 1146
Above, a 6 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the asterism of stars that is probably NGC 1146

NGC 1147
Recorded (1886) by
Frank Muller
A lost or nonexistent object in Eridanus (RA 02 55 09.2, Dec -09 07 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1147 (Muller list II (#351), 1860 RA 02 48 30, NPD 99 41.4) is "extremely faint, very small, extended 0°, 9.5 magnitude star 6 arcmin to east". The position precesses to RA 02 55 19.1, Dec -09 07 11, but there is nothing there. In fact per Corwin, there is nothing within 5 degrees of Muller's position that in any way fits his description of the object; so odds are that Muller tried to see more than was there, and recorded a nonexistent object. But whether the object he thought he saw exists or not, it is certainly "lost", and almost certain to remain so.
DSS image of region centered on the NGC position for the apparently nonexistent NGC 1147
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the NGC position for NGC 1147

NGC 1148 (= PGC 11148)
Discovered (Nov 10, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (date?) by Francis Leavenworth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)cd?) in Eridanus (RA 02 57 04.4, Dec -07 41 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1148 (Swift list III (#23), Leavenworth list II (#??), 1860 RA 02 50 10, NPD 98 15.8) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, very difficult, northwestern of 2", the other being NGC 1152.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.35 by 0.8 arcmin (from images below)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1148
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1148
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1148

NGC 1149 (= PGC 11170)
Discovered (Dec 2, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Cetus (RA 02 57 23.9, Dec -00 18 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1149 (Stephan list IX (#??), 1860 RA 02 50 15, NPD 90 52.6) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle, small (faint) star 30 arcsec to west".
Additional Note: Dreyer's numbering of Stephan's published lists combines some originally separate lists, based on the way they were republished in English. Based on their original (French) publication, Steinicke has a different numbering system for those after list 8. In this case, Dreyer's "Stephan's list IX" corresponds to Steinicke's "Stephan's list 11", in which NGC 1198 is entry #6.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin (from images below)
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1149
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1149
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1149
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1050 - 1099) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 1100 - 1149     → (NGC 1150 - 1199)