Celestial Atlas
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Page last updated Sep 16, 2016
Checked Corwin positions, original NGC entries, updated formatting/pix/tags
WORKING: Check updated Steinicke historical and physical databases

NGC 1150 (= PGC 11144)
Discovered (Dec 31, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Eridanus (RA 02 57 01.4, Dec -15 02 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1150 (Leavenworth list I (#76), 1860 RA 02 50 35, NPD 105 36.4) is "very faint, small, round, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8925 km/sec, NGC 1150 is about 415 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.85 by 0.6 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 110 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1150, also showing NGC 1151
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1150, also showing NGC 1151
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1150

NGC 1151 (= PGC 11147)
Discovered (Dec 31, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Eridanus (RA 02 57 04.6, Dec -15 00 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1151 (Leavenworth list I (#77), 1860 RA 02 50 35, NPD 105 36.4) is "extremely faint, small, round (nebulous?), near last" (the "last" being NGC 1150). The second Index Catalog adds "Delete the query (per Howe)"; in other words, the object is nebulous.
Physical Information: About 0.55 by 0.5 arcmin apparent size (from images below).
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1151, also showing NGC 1150
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1151, also showing NGC 1150
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1151

NGC 1152 (= PGC 11182)
Discovered (Nov 10, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0(r)a?) in Eridanus (RA 02 57 33.6, Dec -07 45 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1152 (Swift list III (#24), 1860 RA 02 50 42, NPD 98 19.8) is "most extremely faint, small, round, very difficult, southeastern of 2, star to south", the "northwestern of 2" being NGC 1148.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.3 by 0.75 arcmin (from images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1152
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1152
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1152

NGC 1153 (= PGC 11230)
Discovered (Dec 13, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Cetus (RA 02 58 10.3, Dec +03 21 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1153 (= GC 626 = JH 276 = WH II 274, 1860 RA 02 50 53, NPD 87 11.1) is "faint, very small, irregularly a little extended, suddenly brighter middle, extremely mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.6 by 1.25 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1153
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1153
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1153

NGC 1154 (= PGC 11221)
Discovered (Dec 15, 1876) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABab? pec?) in Eridanus (RA 02 58 07.7, Dec -10 21 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1154 (= GC 5292, Stephan list VIII (#10), 1860 RA 02 51 22, NPD 100 57.6) is "extremely faint, small, a little brighter middle, southwestern of 2", the other being NGC 1155.
Physical Information: Vr 4650 km/sec. Apparent size of about 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin (from images below). Probably a physical companion of NGC 1155.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1154 and its probable companion, NGC 1155
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1154 and 1155
Below, a 2.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the pair
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1154 and its apparent companion, NGC 1155
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 1154
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1154

NGC 1155 (= PGC 11233)
Discovered (Dec 15, 1876) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec) in Eridanus (RA 02 58 13.1, Dec -10 21 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1155 (= GC 5293, Stephan list VIII (#11), 1860 RA 02 51 28, NPD 100 56.8) is "extremely faint, small, a little brighter middle, northeastern of 2", the other being NGC 1154.
Physical Information: Vr 4645 km/sec. Apparent size of about 1.2 by 1.1 arcmin (from the image below). A starburst galaxy. Probably a physical companion of NGC 1154.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1155
Above, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 1155; see NGC 1154 for wider-field images.

NGC 1156 (= PGC 11329)
Discovered (Nov 13, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type IB(s)m?) in Aries (RA 02 59 42.2, Dec +25 14 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1156 (= GC 627 = WH II 619, 1860 RA 02 51 31, NPD 65 19.4) is "pretty bright, considerably large, pretty much extended 0°, between 2 stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.6 by 1.7 arcmin? Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type IB(s)m.
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 1156
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1156
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of irregular galaxy NGC 1156
Below, a 2.5 arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
Partially processed 'raw' HST image of irregular galaxy NGC 1156

NGC 1157 (= PGC 11218)
Discovered (Dec 31, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec) in Eridanus (RA 02 58 06.6, Dec -15 07 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1157 (Leavenworth list I (#78), 1860 RA 02 51 35, NPD 105 41.3) is "extremely faint, pretty small, extended 0°, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.65 by 0.3 arcmin (from images below).
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1157, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1157
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1157

NGC 1158 (= PGC 11157)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Eridanus (RA 02 57 11.4, Dec -14 23 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1158 (Leavenworth list I (#79), 1860 RA 02 51 35, NPD 104 56.3) is "extremely faint, small, round, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.95 by 0.65 arcmin (from images below)
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1158, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1158
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1158

NGC 1159 (= PGC 11383)
Discovered (Dec 2, 1883) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(r)cd? pec) in Perseus (RA 03 00 46.5, Dec +43 09 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1159 (Stephan list XIII (#21), 1860 RA 02 51 35, NPD 47 23.9) is "very faint, small, round, very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.6 by 0.45 arcmin (from images below). Probably a starburst galaxy.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1159
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1159
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1159

NGC 1160 (= PGC 11403)
Discovered (Oct 7, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 2, 1856) by R. J. Mitchell
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc?) in Perseus (RA 03 01 13.2, Dec +44 57 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer NGC 1160 (= GC 629 = WH III 199, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 02 51 55, NPD 45 36.4) is "faint, extended".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.5 by 0.65 arcmin (from the images below)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1160, also showing NGC 1161
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1160, also showing NGC 1161
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1160

NGC 1161 (= PGC 11404)
Discovered (Oct 7, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Perseus (RA 03 01 14.2, Dec +44 53 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1161 (= GC 628 = GC 634 = JH 277 = WH II 239, 1860 RA 02 51 56, NPD 45 39.7) is "faint, pretty small, a little extended, suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8 by 2.0 arcmin? Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SA(r)0+.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1161, also showing NGC 1160
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1161, also showing NGC 1160
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1161
Below, a 1/3 arcmin wide view of the core of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of dusty rings surrounding the central core of lenticular galaxy NGC 1161

NGC 1162 (= PGC 11274)
Discovered (Nov 27, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Eridanus (RA 02 58 56.0, Dec -12 23 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1162 (= GC 630 = JH 2502 = WH III 469, 1860 RA 02 52 17, NPD 102 57.6) is "faint, round, gradually a little brighter middle, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.65 by 1.5 arcmin (from images below).
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1162
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1162
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1162

NGC 1163 (= PGC 11359)
Discovered (Oct 31, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Eridanus (RA 03 00 22.1, Dec -17 09 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1163 (Leavenworth list I (#80), 1860 RA 02 52 35, NPD 107 44.3) is "very faint, pretty small, much extended 75°". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 02 53 53. The corrected position precesses to RA 03 00 22.2, Dec -17 10 49, about an arcmin and a half south of the galaxy, and although the angle of extension is off a bit, the "much extended" so perfectly fits the galaxy that the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2285 km/sec, NGC 1163 is about 105 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 90 to 130 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.7 by 0.4 arcmin(?), the galaxy is about 85 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1163
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1163
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1163

NGC 1164 (= PGC 11441)
Discovered (Sep 18, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(s)ab?) in Perseus (RA 03 01 59.8, Dec +42 35 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1163 (= GC 632 = JH 278, 1860 RA 02 52 51, NPD 47 58.7) is "extremely faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.1 by 0.85 arcmin (from images below). A starburst galaxy.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1164
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1164
Below, a 1.3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1164

NGC 1165 (= PGC 11270)
Discovered (Oct 19, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(r)a?) in Fornax (RA 02 58 47.7, Dec -32 05 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1165 (= GC 633 = JH 2503, 1860 RA 02 52 57, NPD 122 39.4) is "very faint, pretty large, extended, very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 0.9 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1165
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1165
Below, a 2.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1165

NGC 1166 (= PGC 11372)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab? pec) in Aries (RA 03 00 35.0, Dec +11 50 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1166 (= GC 5294, Marth #85, 1860 RA 02 52 57, NPD 78 43) is "extremely faint, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.3 by 1.0 arcmin (from images below), including faint southeastern extension.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1166, also showing NGC 1168
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1166, also showing NGC 1168
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1166

NGC 1167
Discovered (Sep 13, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type (R)S0(r)a? pec) in Perseus (RA 03 01 42.3, Dec +35 12 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1167 (= GC 631 = WH III 178, 1860 RA 02 53 04, NPD 55 19.5) is "very faint, pretty large, round, suddenly pretty much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.3 by 2.7 arcmin (from the images below). The galaxy contains numerous concentric rings of material.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1167
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1167
Below, a 3.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1167

NGC 1168 (= PGC 11378)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b? pec) in Aries (RA 03 00 47.0, Dec +11 46 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1168 (= GC 5295, Marth #86, 1860 RA 02 53 09, NPD 78 47) is "extremely faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.05 by 0.6 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1168, also showing NGC 1166
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1168, also showing NGC 1166
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1168

NGC 1169 (= PGC 11521)
Discovered (Dec 11, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(r)b?) in Perseus (RA 03 03 34.8, Dec +46 23 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1169 (= GC 635 = JH 279 = WH II 620, 1860 RA 02 54 05, NPD 44 10.3) is "pretty faint, pretty small, irregular figure, suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.0 by 2.6 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1169
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1169
Below, a 4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1169

NGC 1170
Recorded (Dec 31, 1869) by
Charles Peirce
A lost or nonexistent object in Aries (RA 03 02 26.6, Dec +27 04 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1170 (C. S. Peirce (#47, HN #38), 1860 RA 02 54 10, NPD 63 29) is "extremely large, diffused". The position precesses to RA 03 02 26.6, Dec +27 04 19, as listed above, but there is nothing there, despite the fact that the then-director of the Harvard Observatory (Joseph Winlock) confirmed the observation. Rather oddly, no one seems to have taken any notice of the object's apparent nonexistence until recently, but once realized, no effort to find NGC 1170 has met with any success. Given the fact that Peirce found the diffuse region during an examination of Comet 1869 III (periodic comet 11P/Tempel), the general feeling (as expressed by Corwin) is that it was just part of the comet's tail, and therefore "nonexistent" as far as any catalog of permanent nebulae would be concerned.
DSS image of region centered on Dreyer's position for NGC 1170
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Dreyer's position for NGC 1170

NGC 1171 (= PGC 11552)
Discovered (Dec 4, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan
Also observed (date?) by Lewis Swift
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc?) in Perseus (RA 03 03 58.9, Dec +43 23 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1171 (Sephan list X (#15), Swift list II (#??), 1860 RA 02 54 46, NPD 47 09.2) is "very faint, pretty large, irregular figure".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.5 by 1.2 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1171
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1171
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1171

NGC 1172 (= PGC 11420)
Discovered (Dec 30, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Eridanus (RA 03 01 36.1, Dec -14 50 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1172 (= GC 636 = JH 280 = WH II 502, 1860 RA 02 55 00, NPD 105 23.1) is "pretty faint, pretty large, round, pretty suddenly bright middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.3 by 2.1 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1172
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1172
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1172

NGC 1173
Recorded (Dec 17, 1884) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A lost or nonexistent object in Perseus (RA 03 04 11.4, Dec +41 21 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1173 (Bigourdan (list I #12), 1860 RA 02 55 06, NPD 49 11.3) is "extremely faint, very small, stellar nucleus". The position precesses to RA 03 04 11.4, Dec +41 21 50, but there is nothing there. Per Corwin, this is one of four objects observed by Bigourdan on the same night, while observing the area near NGC 1175. He states that Bigourdan appears to have made a reduction error of 1 degree in their NPDs, as corrected positions for the other three objects fall on faint stars not far from NGC 1175 (as described in the entries for NGC 1176, 1178 and 1183). However, Corwin states that Bigourdan must have misidentified the field for NGC 1173, as even a one degree correction to its NPD proved useless in identifying the object (as shown by the second image below, which is centered on RA 03 04 15.6, Dec +42 21 49, the position derived by Corwin using a 'corrected' NPD.) So whatever Bigourdan observed is well and truly lost, and since he describes it as having a stellar nucleus and his other three 'discoveries' proved to be stars, odds are that even if not lost NGC 1173 would prove to be merely a faint star, as well.
DSS image of region near the NGC position for NGC 1173
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the NGC position for NGC 1173
Below, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Corwin's position for NGC 1173 (NGC 1175 is to the east)
DSS image of region near Corwin's position for NGC 1173

NGC 1174 (=
NGC 1186 = PGC 11617)
Discovered (Oct 27, 1786) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1186)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1186)
Looked for but not found by William Parsons, the 3rd Lord Rosse (while listed as NGC 1186)
Looked for but not found by Heinrich d'Arrest (while listed as NGC 1186)
Looked for and observed? (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan (while listed as NGC 1186)
Discovered (Aug 31, 1883) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 1174)
Also observed (date?) by Rudolf Spitaler (and equated with NGC 1174)
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(r)bc?) in Perseus (RA 03 05 30.9, Dec +42 50 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1174 (= Swift list IV (#11), 1860 RA 02 55 17, NPD 47 43.1) is "pretty faint, pretty small, a little extended, pretty bright star close to east". The first Index Catalog adds "Probably identical with h281 = IV.43 (Spitaler, A.N. 3030). The words 'pretty bright star close following' were inserted in accordance with a correction made by Mr. Swift in a letter. (His) fourth list has 'close preceding', which is correct." (h281 = IV.43 = NGC 1186, so Dreyer was stating per Spitaler's suggestion that NGC 1174 and 1186 are probably the same object.) Swift's position precesses to RA 03 04 28.7, Dec +42 50 00, almost exactly 1 minute of time to the west of NGC 1186, which is a fairly bright galaxy (by modern standards) with a comparatively bright star to its west, or 'preceding', as indicated in the IC correction. (Per Corwin, Swift actually specified a double star, so the 10th-magnitude double star to the northwest is the one in question, not the 10th-magnitude star directly to the west.) Since such an error in right ascension was not unusual for Swift, Spitaler's recognition of the probable equality of the two objects is not surprising. However, many references still treat NGC 1174 as lost, so it should be emphasized that its equality with NGC 1186 (which see for anything else) has been known for more than a century. In fact, based on the NGC notes for NGC 1186 and comments by Corwin, it appears that it may have been NGC 1186 that was "lost" at first, and it was only when Spitaler noted the equality of the two entries that it became clear what nebula the listing(s) referred to.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2740 km/sec, NGC 1174 is about 130 million light years away. Given that and its 3.2 by 1.2 arcmin apparent size, it is about 120 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1186
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1174 (= NGC 1186)
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1186

NGC 1175 (= PGC 11578)
Discovered (Oct 24, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SAB0(r?)a? pec) in Perseus (RA 03 04 32.3, Dec +42 20 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1175 (= GC 637 = WH II 607, 1860 RA 02 55 21, NPD 48 13.4) is "faint, considerably large, extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 0.7 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1175, also showing NGC 1177
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1175, also showing NGC 1177
(NGC 1176, 1178 and 1183 are also in the field, but are only stars: see NGC 1176)
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1175

NGC 1176
Recorded (Dec 17, 1884) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude star in Perseus (RA 03 04 34.9, Dec +42 23 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1176 (Bigourdan (list I #13), 1860 RA 02 55 25, NPD 49 09.7) is a "13th magnitude star in very faint nebulosity". The position precesses to RA 03 04 30.7, Dec +41 23 23, but there is nothing there. Per Corwin, this is one of four objects observed by Bigourdan on the same night, while supposedly observing the area near NGC 1175 (which is nowhere near the area shown in the image below). He states that Bigourdan appears to have made a reduction error of 1 degree in their NPDs, as corrected positions for three of the objects fall on faint stars not far from NGC 1175 (the others being NGC 1178 and 1183). Using a corrected 1860 NPD of 48 09.7, the position for NGC 1176 precesses to RA 03 04 34.9, Dec +42 23 23, only a quarter arcmin south of the faint star thereby identified as NGC 1176. (A comparison of the entries for NGC 1176, 1178 and 1183 shows that their corrected positions are all between 0.2 and 0.4 arcmin to the south or southeast of the stars now identified as those NGC objects. The consistency of the already small errors makes it even more certain that these are the objects observed by Bigourdan.) It should be noted that visual observations show stars, whose light is concentrated in a nearly pointlike image, as relatively easily visible objects, while nebulae, whose light is spread out over a considerable area, look very faint and diffuse, and unless they are very bright and the sky is very dark, may not be noticed at all. As a result, although Bigourdan easily observed the stars listed as NGC 1176, 1178 and 1183, he had trouble seeing NGC 1177, even though it appears much brighter in modern photographs than any of those stars.
DSS image of region near the NGC positions for NGC 1176, 1178 and 1183
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image showing the NGC positions for NGC 1176, 1178 and 1183
Below, a 6 arcmin wide SDSS image showing NGC 1175, 1176, 1177, 1178 and 1183
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1175, also showing NGC 1177, and the stars listed as NGC 1176, 1178 and 1183

NGC 1177 (=
IC 281 = PGC 11581)
Discovered (Nov 29, 1874) by Lawrence Parsons, 4th Earl of Rosse (and later listed as NGC 1177)
Discovered (Nov 1, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 281)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Perseus (RA 03 04 37.2, Dec +42 21 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1177 (= GC 5296, 4th Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 02 55 27, NPD 48 12.0) is "very faint, small, round, northeast of II 607" (II 607 = NGC 1175). The position precesses to RA 03 04 36.7, Dec +42 21 04, about 0.7 arcmin south of the galaxy, but its position northeast of NGC 1175 (and per Corwin, a comment in Lord Rosse's original notes about the star directly north of the galaxy) make its identification certain. This did not, however, prevent Swift from incorrectly claiming a separate discovery (see IC 281 for a discussion of the double listing.)
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.75 by 0.7 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1177
Above, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 1177; see NGC 1175 and 1176 for wider views

NGC 1178
Recorded (Dec 17, 1884) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A 13th-magnitude star in Perseus (RA 03 04 38.8, Dec +42 18 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1178 (Bigourdan (list I #14), 1860 RA 02 55 29, NPD 49 14.6) is a "13th-magnitude star in very faint nebulosity (?)", the ? presumably meaning that the existence of the nebulosity appears uncertain. The position precesses to RA 03 04 34.4, Dec +41 18 29, but there is nothing there. Per Corwin, this is one of four objects observed by Bigourdan on the same night, while supposedly observing the area near NGC 1175 (which is nowhere near the area shown in the image of NGC positions at the entry for NGC 1176). He states that Bigourdan appears to have made a reduction error of 1 degree in their NPDs, as corrected positions for three of the objects fall on faint stars not far from NGC 1175 (the others being NGC 1176 and 1183). Using a corrected 1860 NPD of 48 14.6, the position for NGC 1178 precesses to RA 03 04 38.6, Dec +42 18 28, less than 0.4 arcmin south of the faint star thereby identified as NGC 1178. (A comparison of the entries for NGC 1176, 1178 and 1183 shows that their corrected positions are all between 0.2 and 0.4 arcmin to the south or southeast of the stars now identified as those NGC objects. The consistency of the already small errors makes it even more certain that these are the objects observed by Bigourdan.) See NGC 1176 for a view of the NGC positions for NGC 1176, 1178 and 1183, and a view of the stars identified as those NGC objects as a result of the 1 degree correction in their NPDs.

NGC 1179 (= PGC 11480)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(r)cd?) in Eridanus (RA 03 02 38.5, Dec -18 53 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1179 (Ormond Stone list I (#81), 1860 RA 02 55 35, NPD 109 27.2) is "extremely faint, pretty small, gradually brighter middle, 12th magnitude star 1 arcmin to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.7 by 3.8 arcmin?
NOAO image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1179, superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a 12 arcmin wide NOAO/DSS composite image centered on NGC 1179
(Image Credit above and below Kris Sandburg and Peter Jacobs/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
Below, a 5 arcmin wide NOAO image of the galaxy
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 1179

NGC 1180 (= PGC 11435)
Discovered (Dec 31, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 01 51.0, Dec -15 01 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1180 (Leavenworth list I (#82), 1860 RA 02 55 35, NPD 105 34.2) is "extremely faint, very small, round, brighter middle and nucleus". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 02 50 30, and adds "Leavenworth has 55 min for the RA of 1180 and 1181; are they perhaps 1150 and 1151? Howe mentions the latter as being a nebula, but gives no places for 1150 and 1151". Dreyer is correct in wondering whether, if Howe's positions for NGC 1180 and 1181 are correct, they are actually NGC 1150 and 1151. The two pairs of galaxies happen to have nearly the same declination and the same relative position, and Howe's "corrected" positions for NGC 1180 and 1181 do point at the other pair. But as happened in the case of some of Howe's other corrections, he was simply looking at the wrong objects, and Leavenworth's positions for NGC 1180 and 1181 are only off by a few arcmin, not the more than a degree error that would be required to identify them as NGC 1150 and 1151. Ignoring Howe's "correction", Leavenworth's position for NGC 1180 precesses to RA 03 02 09.2, Dec -15 00 58. This is a few arcmin to the east of the galaxy now identified as NGC 1180, but in roughly the correct position relative to NGC 1181, so the identifications of NGC 1180 and 1181 are considered reasonably certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.65 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS/DSS composite image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1180
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image centered on NGC 1180, also showing NGC 1181
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1180

NGC 1181 (= PGC 11427)
Discovered (Dec 31, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Eridanus (RA 03 01 42.8, Dec -15 03 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1181 (Leavenworth list I (#83), 1860 RA 02 55 35, NPD 105 36.2) is "extremely faint, very small, round, brighter middle and nucleus". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 02 50 27, and adds "Leavenworth has 55 min for the RA of 1180 and 1181; are they perhaps 1150 and 1151? Howe mentions the latter as being a nebula, but gives no places for 1150 and 1151". As noted at the entry for NGC 1180, if Howe's positions were correct, Dreyer would have been correct in wondering whether NGC 1180 and 1181 were actually NGC 1150 and 1151, because those galaxies must be what Howe observed when he made the "corrections". However, Leavenworth's positions for NGC 1180 and 1181 are only off by a few arcmin, not the more than a degree error required to identify them as NGC 1150 and 1151. Ignoring Howe's "correction", Leavenworth's position for NGC 1181 precesses to RA 03 02 09.2, Dec -15 02 58. This is a few arcmin to the east of the galaxy now identified as NGC 1181, but in roughly the correct position relative to NGC 1180, so the identifications of NGC 1180 and 1181 are considered reasonably certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.85 by 0.2 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1181, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas; also shown is its apparent companion, NGC 1180
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image centered on NGC 1181, also showing NGC 1180
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1181, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in a small missing area at the bottom
Below, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image near NGC 1180 and 1181
Also shown are the NGC positions for them
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1181, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas; also shown is its apparent companion, lenticular galaxy NGC 1180, and Dreyer's positions for the two objects

NGC 1182 (=
NGC 1205 = PGC 11511)
Discovered (1886) by Ormond Stone (and later listed as NGC 1182)
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 1182)
Discovered (1886) by Ormond Stone (and later listed as NGC 1205)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Eridanus (RA 03 03 28.4, Dec -09 40 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1182 (Ormond Stone list I (#84), 1860 RA 02 55 35, NPD 100 13.2) is "extremely faint, pretty small, extended 120°, 10th magnitude star 2 1/2 arcmin southwest". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 02 56 42. Per Corwin, Howe suggested the equality with NGC 1205, with the observation for NGC 1182 being about a minute of time west of the actual position, and NGC 1205 about two minutes east of the actual position. The NGC descriptions are essentially identical, save for the slight difference in the stated brightness and position of the nearby star, and a difference in position angle for NGC 1205 probably caused by a typographical error (for which, see the discussion at that entry). The corrected position precesses to RA 03 03 29.0, Dec -09 40 08, right on the galaxy, so the identification as PGC 11511 (and the equality with NGC 1205) seems certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.8 by 0.35 arcmin (from images below). Corwin notes a very faint apparent companion (PGC 988166) at RA 03 03 26.1, Dec -09 39 31.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1182; also note the star to its southwest matching the NGC description
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1182
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1182

NGC 1183
Recorded (Dec 17, 1884) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude star in Perseus (RA 03 04 46.1, Dec +42 22 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1183 (Bigourdan (list I #15), 1860 RA 02 55 37, NPD 49 11.1) is a "13th magnitude star involved in nebulosity". The position precesses to RA 03 04 42.7, Dec +41 21 57, but there is nothing there. Per Corwin, this is one of four objects observed by Bigourdan on the same night, while supposedly observing the area near NGC 1175 (which is nowhere near the area shown in the image of NGC positions at the entry for NGC 1176). He states that Bigourdan appears to have made a reduction error of 1 degree in their NPDs, as corrected positions for three of the objects fall on faint stars not far from NGC 1175 (the others being NGC 1176 and 1178). Using a corrected 1860 NPD of 48 11.1, the position for NGC 1183 precesses to RA 03 04 46.9, Dec +42 21 57, less than 1/4 arcmin southeast of the faint star thereby identified as NGC 1183. (A comparison of the entries for NGC 1176, 1178 and 1183 shows that their corrected positions are all between 0.2 and 0.4 arcmin to the south or southeast of the stars now identified as those NGC objects. The consistency of the already small errors makes it even more certain that these are the objects observed by Bigourdan.) See NGC 1176 for a view of the NGC positions for NGC 1176, 1178 and 1183, and a view of the stars identified as those NGC objects as a result of the 1 degree correction in their NPDs.

NGC 1184 (= PGC 12174)
Discovered (Sep 16, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Cepheus (RA 03 16 45.2, Dec +80 47 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1184 (= GC 638 = WH II 704, 1860 RA 02 55 45, NPD 09 44.5) is "faint, pretty large, much extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.5 by 0.85 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1184, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image centered on NGC 1184
Below, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1184

NGC 1185 (= PGC 11488)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(r)b?) in Eridanus (RA 03 02 59.5, Dec -09 07 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1185 (Leavenworth list II (#353), 1860 RA 02 56 03, NPD 99 41.2) is "extremely faint, pretty small, extended 15°".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.15 by 0.35 arcmin (from images below)
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1185
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1185
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1185

NGC 1186 (=
NGC 1174 = PGC 11617)
Discovered (Oct 27, 1786) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1186)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1186)
Looked for but not found by William Parsons, the 3rd Lord Rosse (while listed as NGC 1186)
Looked for but not found by Heinrich d'Arrest (while listed as NGC 1186)
Looked for and observed? (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan (while listed as NGC 1186)
Discovered (Aug 31, 1883) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 1174)
Also observed (date?) by Rudolf Spitaler (and equated with NGC 1174)
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(r)bc?) in Perseus (RA 03 05 30.9, Dec +42 50 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1186 (= GC 639 = JH 281 = WH IV 43, 1860 RA 02 56 20, NPD 47 43.5) is a "faint star with nebulous appendages". End-notes added "Twice looked for by (the third) Lord Rosse, but not found; often searched for in vain by d'Arrest. H (William Herschel) calls it 'a pretty bright star with two faint branches'; h (John Herschel) has 'a 14th magnitude star with some kind of nebulous appendage'." The first Index Catalog adds "Suspected of variability by Bigourdan".The 1860 position precesses to RA 03 05 32.2, Dec +42 49 26, nearly 2 arcmin to the north of the galaxy, but close enough that the identity of the NGC object should have been reasonably certain right from the start; but given the statement in the end-notes about the difficulty of finding it and comments by Corwin about how faint the galaxy appears to visual observers, it appears that NGC 1186 may not have been connected with an actual nebula until (as noted in the entry for NGC 1174) Spitaler pointed out the equality of thetwo entries. And even though that equality has been known for more than a century, confusion still seems common, with some references calling the galaxy NGC 1174, others NGC 1186, some equating the two listings, and others completely ignoring one or the other; hence the decision to cover their history on this page in more than usual detail.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, standard practice is to discuss its properties at the earlier-numbered entry; so see NGC 1174 for anything else.

NGC 1187 (= PGC 11479)
Discovered (Dec 9, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(r)c?) in Eridanus (RA 03 02 37.6, Dec -22 52 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1187 (= GC 640 = JH 2504 = WH III 245, 1860 RA 02 56 25, NPD 113 25.1) is "pretty faint, considerably large, pretty much extended, gradually brighter middle equivalent to a 16th magnitude star, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.2 by 3.2 arcmin? Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SB(rs)c.
NOAO image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1187, superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, an NOAO image superimposed on a 12 arcmin wide DSS background centered on NGC 1187
Below, a 5 arcmin wide image of NGC 1187 (Image Credit above & below Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 1187
Below, a ? arcmin wide VLT image with North at left to allow for more detail (Image Credit ESO)
ESO image of spiral galaxy NGC 1187
*Note to self: Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image also available*

NGC 1188 (= PGC 11533)
Discovered (Dec 2, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 03 43.4, Dec -15 29 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1188 (Leavenworth list I (#89), 1860 RA 02 56 35, NPD 106 03.1) is "extremely faint, very small, round, preceding h286" (that is, to the west of NGC 1209). The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 02 57 11. The corrected position precesses to RA 03 03 43.8, Dec -15 30 05, only one arcmin south of the galaxy, and there is nothing else nearby so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.2 by 0.4 arcmin (from images below)
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1188
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1188
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1188

NGC 1189 (= PGC 11503 =
HCGC)
(A member of Hickson Compact Group 22)

Discovered (Dec 2, 1885) by Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)dm?) in Eridanus (RA 03 03 24.3, Dec -15 37 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1189 (Leavenworth list I (#90), 1860 RA 02 56 35, NPD 106 09.1) is "extremely faint, very small, round, preceding h286" (that is, to the west of NGC 1209). The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 02 56 52. The corrected position precesses to RA 03 03 24.6, Dec -15 36 03, a little over an arcmin north of the nearest candidate, but the relative positions of most of the galaxies in the region correspond reasonably well to their relative NGC positions, so the identification seems certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.1 by 1.6 arcmin (from images below). A member of Hickson Compact Group 22.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1189, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing regions; also shown are NGC 1190, NGC 1191, NGC 1192 and NGC 1199; together, the five galaxies comprise Hickson Compact Group 22
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image centered on NGC 1189, also showing
NGC 1190, 1191, 1192 and 1199; the five galaxies comprise Hickson Compact Group 22
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy (a small area at upper right filled by DSS background)
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1189, a member of Hickson Compact Group 22
Below, a 6 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image of Hickson Compact Group 22
SDSS image of Hickson Compact Group 22 (overlaid on a DSS image to fill in a small missing area), consisting of NGC 1189, NGC 1190, NGC 1191, NGC 1192 and NGC 1199

NGC 1190 (= PGC 11508 =
HCGB)
(A member of Hickson Compact Group 22)

Discovered (Dec 2, 1885) by Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0? pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 03 26.1, Dec -15 39 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1190 (Leavenworth list I (#91), 1860 RA 02 56 35, NPD 106 12.1) is "extremely faint, very small, round, preceding h286" (that is, to the west of NGC 1209). The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 02 56 54. The corrected position precesses to RA 03 03 26.5, Dec -15 39 03, only 0.7 arcmin north of the nearest candidate, and the relative positions of most of the galaxies in the region correspond reasonably well to their relative NGC positions, so the identification seems certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.0 by 0.3 arcmin (from images below). A member of Hickson Compact Group 22.
SDSS/DSS composite image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1190, one of the members of Hickson Compact Group 22, also showing the other members of the group, NGC 1189, NGC 1191, NGC 1192 and NGC 1192
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image centered on NGC 1190, also showing
NGC 1189, 1191, 1192 and 1199; the five galaxies comprise Hickson Compact Group 22
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1190, one of the members of Hickson Compact Group 22
Below, a 6 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image of Hickson Compact Group 22
SDSS image of Hickson Compact Group 22 (overlaid on a DSS image to fill in a small missing area), consisting of NGC 1189, NGC 1190, NGC 1191, NGC 1192 and NGC 1199

NGC 1191 (= PGC 11514 =
HCGD)
(A member of Hickson Compact Group 22)

Discovered (Dec 2, 1885) by Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 03 30.8, Dec -15 41 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1191 (Leavenworth list I (#92), 1860 RA 02 56 35, NPD 106 14.1) is "extremely faint, very small, round, preceding h286" (that is, to the west of NGC 1209). The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 02 56 58. The corrected position precesses to RA 03 03 30.4, Dec -15 41 03, right on the most likely candidate, so the identification seems certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.75 by 0.5 arcmin (from images below). A member of Hickson Compact Group 22.
SDSS/DSS composite image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1191, one of the members of Hickson Compact Group 22, also showing the other members of the group, NGC 1189, NGC 1190, NGC 1192 and NGC 1192
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image centered on NGC 1191, also showing
NGC 1189, 1190, 1192 and 1199; the five galaxies comprise Hickson Compact Group 22
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1191, one of the members of Hickson Compact Group 22
Below, a 6 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image of Hickson Compact Group 22
SDSS image of Hickson Compact Group 22 (overlaid on a DSS image to fill in a small missing area), consisting of NGC 1189, NGC 1190, NGC 1191, NGC 1192 and NGC 1199

NGC 1192 (= PGC 11519 =
HCGE)
(A member of Hickson Compact Group 22)

Discovered (Dec 2, 1885) by Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E6?) in Eridanus (RA 03 03 34.6, Dec -15 40 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1192 (Leavenworth list I (#93), 1860 RA 02 56 35, NPD 106 13.1) is "extremely faint, very small, round, preceding h286" (that is, to the west of NGC 1209). The position precesses to RA 03 03 07.5, Dec -15 40 00, well to the west of the group of "extremely faint" galaxies presumably observed by Leavenworth as his #90 to #93. Dreyer lists the same RA for all four entries, and only separates them by their declinations, but if their NGC numbers are in the correct order they should be gradually marching toward the east, and for the three whose positions were corrected by Howe (NGC 1189 to 1191), that is the case. So NGC 1192 ought to be a little to the east of NGC 1191, and there is a galaxy there, with exactly the right declination, so although some rationalization is required the identification with PGC 11519 seems reasonably certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.85 by 0.35 arcmin (from images below). A member of Hickson Compact Group 22.
SDSS/DSS composite image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1192, one of the members of Hickson Compact Group 22, also showing the other members of the group, NGC 1189, NGC 1190, NGC 1191 and NGC 1192
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image centered on NGC 1192, also showing
NGC 1189, 1190, 1191 and 1199; the five galaxies comprise Hickson Compact Group 22
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1192, one of the members of Hickson Compact Group 22
Below, a 6 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image of Hickson Compact Group 22
SDSS image of Hickson Compact Group 22 (overlaid on a DSS image to fill in a small missing area), consisting of NGC 1189, NGC 1190, NGC 1191, NGC 1192 and NGC 1199

NGC 1193 (= OCL 390)
Discovered (Oct 24, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude open cluster (type II3m) in Perseus (RA 03 05 55.8, Dec +44 22 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1193 (= GC 641 = WH II 608, 1860 RA 02 56 35, NPD 46 10.5) is "faint, considerably large, extremely mottled but not resolved". The position above is for the dense western portion of the cluster; the overall center lies a little to the east, but may not have been as noticeable to Herschel as the brighter western portion.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 arcmin?
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 1193
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the eastern portion of NGC 1193
Below, a 4.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the cluster
DSS image of open cluster NGC 1193

NGC 1194 (= PGC 11537)
Discovered (Nov 23, 1883) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec) in Cetus (RA 03 03 49.1, Dec -01 06 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1194 (Stephan list XIII (#22), 1860 RA 02 56 43, NPD 91 39.3) is "faint, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.6 by 0.95 arcmin (from images below). Probably interacting with the galaxy to its northwest, PGC 1127439.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1194
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1194, also showing PGC 1127439
Below, a 5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1194, also showing its probable companion, PGC 1127439
Below, a 3.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1194

PGC 1127439
Not an NGC object but listed here since probably interacting with
NGC 1194
A magnitude 15(?) spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)ab? pec) in Cetus (RA 03 03 41.2, Dec -01 04 25)
Physical Information: Apparent size of the central galaxy of about 0.6 by 0.35 arcmin (from the arcmin wide image below); with very faint east-west extensions (from the 5 arcmin wide image below) of about 1.8 by 0.5 arcmin. Probably interacting with NGC 1194.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 1127439, which is probably interacting with NGC 1194
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 1127439
Below, a 5 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 1194 shows faint east-west extensions on PGC 1127439
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1194, also showing its probable companion, PGC 1127439
For a 12 arcmin SDSS wide image of the region see NGC 1194

NGC 1195 (= PGC 11517)
Discovered (Jan 8, 1877) by
John Dreyer
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 03 32.8, Dec -12 02 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5297 (Dreyer, using Lord Rosse's 72-inch Leviathan, 1860 RA 02 56 52, NPD 102 36.0) is "extremely faint, extremely small, 12th magnitude star to southeast, h 2505 to southeast", (JH) 2505 being NGC 1196.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3910 km/sec, NGC 1195 is about 180 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.6 by 0.45 arcmin (from the image below), it is about 30 thousand light years across. Although an apparent companion of NGC 1196, the difference in their radial velocities is large enough that they are probably an optical double, and no one seems to have suggested any physical connection between them. No one seems to have suggested that NGC 1195 and NGC 1200 are physical companions either, although their radial velocities differ by only 140 km/sec, and they could be only a few tens or hundreds of thousands of light years apart; but in the absence of obvious physical interaction, it is just as possible that they are several million light years apart.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1195, also showing NGC 1196 and NGC 1200
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1195, also showing NGC 1196 and 1200
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1195

NGC 1196 (= PGC 11522)
Discovered (Nov 22, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 03 35.2, Dec -12 04 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1196 (= GC 642 = JH 2505, 1860 RA 02 56 55, NPD 102 38.3) is "very faint, southwestern of 2", the other being NGC 1200.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3385 km/sec, NGC 1196 is about 150 million light years away (based on H = 73 km/sec/Mpc). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.8 by 1.5 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 80 thousand light years across. (The high contrast between the fainter extended outer region and the brighter central region suggests that NGC 1196 may be a starburst galaxy; it certainly seems worthy of more study.) Although an apparent companion of NGC 1195, the difference in their radial velocities is large enough that they are probably an optical double, and no one seems to have suggested any physical connection between them.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1196, also showing NGC 1195 and NGC 1200
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1196, also showing NGC 1195 and 1200
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1196

NGC 1197
Recorded (Sep 12, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A lost or nonexistent object in Perseus (RA 03 06 13.9, Dec +44 03 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1197 (Swift list II (#27), 1860 RA 02 56 56, NPD 46 29.2) is "pretty faint, pretty small, considerably extended, several very faint stars near". The position precesses to RA 03 06 13.9, Dec +44 03 39, as shown above, but there is nothing there and no one has been able to identify any suitable candidate for what Swift might have seen; so although the description is sufficiently detailed to suggest that he did see something, what he saw is completely unknown.
DSS image centered on the NGC position of the lost or nonexistent NGC 1197
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the NGC position of NGC 1197

NGC 1198 (=
IC 282 = PGC 11648)
Discovered (Dec 6, 1880) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 1198)
Discovered (Oct 27, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 282)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Perseus (RA 03 06 13.2, Dec +41 50 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1198 (Stephan list IX (#??), 1860 RA 02 57 05, NPD 48 41.9) is a "nebulous 11th magnitude star". The position precesses to RA 03 06 13.5, Dec +41 50 56, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. (See IC 282 for a discussion of the double listing.)
Additional Note: Dreyer's numbering of Stephan's published lists combines some originally separate lists, based on the way they were republished in English. Based on their original (French) publication, Steinicke has a different numbering system for those after list 8. In this case, Dreyer's "Stephan's list IX" corresponds to Steinicke's "Stephan's list 11a", in which NGC 1198 is entry #7.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.4 by 1.0 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1198
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1198
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1198

NGC 1199 (= PGC 11527 =
HCGA)
(A member of Hickson Compact Group 22)

Discovered (Dec 30, 1785) by William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Eridanus (RA 03 03 38.4, Dec -15 36 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1199 (= GC 643 = JH 282 = WH II 503, 1860 RA 02 57 06, NPD 106 09.0) is "considerably bright, pretty small, irregularly round, suddenly much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 1.7 arcmin? A member of Hickson Compact Group 22. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type E3.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1199 overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas; also shown are NGC 1189, NGC 1190, NGC 1191, and NGC 1192. Together, the five galaxies comprise Hickson Compact Group 22.
Below, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image centered on NGC 1199
Also shown are NGC 1189, 1190, 1191 and 1192, which with it comprise Hickson Compact Group 22
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1199 slightly overlaid on a DSS background to fill in minor missing areas
Below, a 6 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image of Hickson Compact Group 22
SDSS image of Hickson Compact Group 22 (overlaid on a DSS image to fill in a small missing area), consisting of NGC 1189, NGC 1190, NGC 1191, NGC 1192 and NGC 1199
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1100 - 1149) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 1150 - 1199     → (NGC 1200 - 1249)