Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1200 - 1249) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 1250 - 1299     → (NGC 1300 - 1349)
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Page last updated Oct 26, 2012
WORKING: basic pix, tags

NGC 1250 (= PGC 12098)
Discovered (Oct 21, 1886) by
Lewis Swift (5-53)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Perseus (RA 03 15 21.0, Dec +41 21 20)
Apparent size 2.1 by 0.6 arcmin.

NGC 1251
Recorded (Jan 25, 1860) by
Sidney Coolidge
A 13th- and 14th-magnitude pair of stars in Cetus (RA 03 14 09.1, Dec +01 27 25)
Per Dreyer, NGC 1251 (GC 5060, S. Coolidge (#4, HN24), 1860 RA 03 06 55, NPD 89 04.5) is "faint". The position precesses to RA 03 14 08.1, Dec +01 27 02, but there is nothing there save for a faint pair of stars just to the northeast. There has never been any doubt that this is what Coolidge saw, as he has the unfortunate distinction of being the only NGC observer for whom every object reported was merely a star or pair of stars. However, this is perhaps not as much due to any particular lack of ability on his part as to the poor quality of the equipment he used, as all the Harvard Observatory observers had a relatively high percentage of such "discoveries".

NGC 1252
Discovered (Dec 4, 1834) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Horologium (RA 03 10 48.0, Dec -57 45 50)
Per Dreyer, NGC 1252 (GC 663 = JH 2515, 1860 RA 03 07 07, NPD 148 40.3) is a "cluster of 18 or 20 stars". The position precesses to RA 03 10 34.0, Dec -58 08 31, but there is nothing there. However, per Corwin, there is a relatively compelling identification with a group of stars 20 arcmin to the north, as Herschel's original description "star 8th magnitude, the chief of a cluster of 18 to 20 stars" fits the group well, with the position falling dead center on a 7th-magnitude star if it is assumed that there was a transcription error of exactly 20 arcmin in the NPD. (Although a reasonable identification, it cannot be considered certain, and several references therefore note the uncertainty of the identification.) Apparent size 10 by 8 arcmin.
DSS image of region centered on stellar group NGC 1252; Herschel's 'corrected' position falls on the bright star at the southern end of the group
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 1252 (the bright star is at Herschel's 'corrected' position)

NGC 1253 (= PGC 12041, and with
PGC 12053 = Arp 279)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1784) by William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)cd) in Eridanus (RA 03 14 09.2, Dec -02 49 23)
Apparent size 5.3 by 2.3 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1253, which with spiral galaxy PGC 12053 comprises Arp 279
Above, a 5 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1253
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing PGC 12053
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1253, also showing spiral galaxy PGC 12053, which is often called NGC 1253A; the pair comprise Arp 279

PGC 12053 (= "NGC 1253A", and with
NGC 1253 = Arp 279)
Not an NGC object but often called NGC 1253A due to its proximity to NGC 1253
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)m) in Eridanus (RA 03 14 23.6, Dec -02 48 04)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.8 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 12053, also known as NGC 1253A, and with spiral galaxy NGC 1253, as Arp 279
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 12053; for a wide-field view see NGC 1253

NGC 1254 (= PGC 12052)
Discovered (Sep 9, 1864) by
Albert Marth (89)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Cetus (RA 03 14 23.8, Dec +02 40 40)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin.

NGC 1255 (= PGC 12007)
Discovered (Aug 30, 1883) by
Edward Barnard (b)
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc) in Fornax (RA 03 13 32.0, Dec -25 43 28)
Apparent size 4.2 by 2.7 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1255
Above, a 4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1255
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1255

NGC 1256 (= PGC 12032)
Discovered (Nov 13, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0) in Eridanus (RA 03 13 58.1, Dec -21 59 11)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.4 arcmin.

NGC 1257
Recorded (Oct 19, 1884) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A 13th-magnitude pair of stars in Perseus (RA 03 16 59.5, Dec +41 31 46)
Per Dreyer, NGC 1257 (Bigourdan (list I #16), 1860 RA 03 07 51, NPD 48 59.4), is a "stellar nebula". The position precesses to RA 03 17 03.5, Dec +41 31 50, but there is nothing there; not that that is a surprise, as given its description Bigourdan's object was as likely to be some kind of stellar object as a nebula. Per Corwin that is almost certainly the case, with the double star an arcmin to the southwest of Bigourdan's position being the most likely candidate due to the stars flanking it (Bigourdan's original paper notes a pair of stars flanking his I-16), so the identification listed above seems reasonably certain. (Other efforts to identify NGC 1257 have centered on a galaxy (PGC 12157) about 2/3 of a minute of time to the west of Bigourdan's position, and although that identification is probably incorrect, it seems appropriate to discuss that object immediately below.)

PGC 12157 (not =
NGC 1257)
Not an NGC object but listed here because sometimes misidentified as NGC 1257
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Perseus (RA 03 16 26.2, Dec +41 31 49)
Based on a recessional velocity of 4745 km/sec, PGC 12157 is about 220 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size 1.6 by 0.25 arcmin, it is about 100 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 12157, sometimes misidentified as NGC 1257
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 12157
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 12157, sometimes misidentified as NGC 1257

NGC 1258 (= PGC 12034)
Discovered (Nov 19, 1886) by
Francis Leavenworth (II-364)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)cd?) in Eridanus (RA 03 14 05.4, Dec -21 46 28)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.9 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1258
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1258
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1258

NGC 1259 (= PGC 12208)
Discovered (Oct 21, 1884) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (I-17)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Perseus (RA 03 17 17.3, Dec +41 23 08)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin. (member of Perseus Cluster)

NGC 1260 (= PGC 12219)
Discovered (Oct 19, 1884) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (I-18)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Perseus (RA 03 17 27.2, Dec +41 24 19)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.5 arcmin. (member of Perseus Cluster)

NGC 1261 (= GCL 5)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1826) by
James Dunlop (337)
An 8th-magnitude globular cluster (type II) in Horologium (RA 03 12 15.3, Dec -55 12 59)
Apparent size 6.8 arcmin.

NGC 1262 (= PGC 12107)
Discovered (Nov 12, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)c?) in Eridanus (RA 03 15 33.6, Dec -15 52 48)
Per Dreyer, NGC 1262 (Leavenworth list I (#99), 1860 RA 03 08 35, NPD 106 24.8) is "extremely faint, pretty small, irregularly round, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 03 09 04. The corrected position precesses to RA 03 15 33.9, Dec -15 53 33, less than an arcmin south of the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Based on a recessional velocity of 24975 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 1262 is about 1165 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 1055 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 1100 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin, the galaxy is about 275 thousand light years across. (Note: A second radial velocity measurement in excess of 30000 km/sec would place the galaxy about 20% further away, and make it about 20% larger.)
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1262
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1262
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1262

NGC 1263 (= PGC 12114)
Discovered (Dec 31, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)0+ pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 15 39.5, Dec -15 05 54)
Per Dreyer, NGC 1263 (Leavenworth list I (#100), 1860 RA 03 08 35, NPD 105 37.8) is "very faint, small, a little extended, suddenly bright middle". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 03 09 08. The corrected position precesses to RA 03 15 40.0, Dec -15 06 34, only 2/3 of an arcmin south of the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1263
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1263
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1263 overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas

NGC 1264 (= PGC 12270)
Discovered (Oct 19, 1884) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab) in Perseus (RA 03 17 59.5, Dec +41 31 13)
Per Dreyer, NGC 1264 (Bigourdan (list I #19), 1860 RA 03 08 47, NPD 48 59.5) is "very faint, small, very little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 03 17 59.9, Dec +41 31 35, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Despite that, a careless error has led to PGC 12254, which is 5 arcmin south-southwest, being incorrectly identified as NGC 1264 in some places; so that galaxy is discussed immediately below. Apparent size 1.0 by 0.5 arcmin. (A member of the Perseus Cluster of galaxies.)
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1264
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1264
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing PGC 12254
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1264, also showing PGC 12254, which is sometimes mistakenly identified as NGC 1264

PGC 12254 (not =
NGC 1264)
Not an NGC object but listed here because sometimes misidentified as NGC 1264
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Perseus (RA 03 17 51.1, Dec +41 27 03)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin. (Probably part of the Perseus Cluster of galaxies.) (For now, see the wide-field image of NGC 1264.)

NGC 1265 (= PGC 12287)
Discovered (Nov 14, 1884) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (I-20)
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Perseus (RA 03 18 15.8, Dec +41 51 28)
Apparent size 1.8 by 1.6 arcmin. (A member of the Perseus Cluster of Galaxies.)

NGC 1266 (= PGC 12131)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Eridanus (RA 03 16 00.7, Dec -02 25 36)
Apparent size 1.6 by 1.0 arcmin.

NGC 1267 (= PGC 12331)
Discovered (Feb 14, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2) in Perseus (RA 03 18 44.8, Dec +41 28 03)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin. (A member of the Perseus Cluster of Galaxies.) (For now, see the wide-field image of NGC 1268.)

NGC 1268 (= PGC 12332)
Discovered (Feb 14, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)b?) in Perseus (RA 03 18 45.2, Dec +41 29 21)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin. (A member of the Perseus Cluster of Galaxies.)
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1268, also showing part of elliptical galaxy NGC 1267
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1268, also showing part of NGC 1267
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 1267 and 1270
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1268, overlaid on a DSS background to remove severe mosaic artifacts in the southeastern corner; also shown are elliptical galaxies NGC 1267 and 1270

NGC 1269 (probably =
NGC 1291 = PGC 12209)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1826) by James Dunlop (and later listed as NGC 1291)
Recorded (Nov 1, 1836) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1269)
(If NGC 1291) A 9th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SB0/a(s)) in Eridanus (RA 03 17 18.3, Dec -41 06 26)
Per Dreyer, NGC 1269 (GC 670 = JH 2518, 1860 RA 03 09 42, NPD 131 36.4) is "very bright, round, gradually much brighter middle". The second Index Catalog adds "Not found by Innes (1901, 7-inch refractor), but 1291 well seen. h (John Herschel) observed both the same night, once". The position precesses to RA 03 14 49.7, Dec -41 05 08, but there is nothing there, save for the aforementionedNGC 1291 (which see), which lies 2 1/2 minutes of time to the east, and as noted in IC2 was all that Innes could find in the region. Per Corwin, odds are that the missing NGC 1269 is a duplicate observation of NGC 1291, as Herschel's NPDs and descriptions for the two entries are identical, and Innes suggested that the two entries might be identical when he failed to find NGC 1269 (although Dreyer did not bother to report the supposition). So although it is possible that NGC 1269 is a lost or nonexistent object, it seems more likely that it is simply a duplicate of NGC 1291, as indicated above.

NGC 1270 (= PGC 12350)
Discovered (Feb 14, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2) in Perseus (RA 03 18 58.1, Dec +41 28 13)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin. (A member of the Perseus Cluster of Galaxies)

NGC 1271 (= PGC 12367)
Discovered (Nov 14, 1884) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (I-21)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Perseus (RA 03 19 11.2, Dec +41 21 13)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2 arcmin. (A member of the Perseus Cluster of Galaxies)

NGC 1272 (= PGC 12384)
Discovered (Feb 14, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Perseus (RA 03 19 21.3, Dec +41 29 26)
Per Dreyer, NGC 1272 (GC 672, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 03 10 09, NPD 49 01.6) is "faint, small, round". The position precesses to RA 03 19 22.4, Dec +41 29 17, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Apparent size 2.2 by 2.0 arcmin. (A member of the Perseus Cluster of Galaxies)

NGC 1273 (= PGC 12396)
Discovered (Feb 14, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Perseus (RA 03 19 26.8, Dec +41 32 24)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin. (A member of the Perseus Cluster of Galaxies)

NGC 1274 (= PGC 12413)
Discovered (Dec 4, 1875) by
Lawrence Parsons, 4th Earl of Rosse
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Perseus (RA 03 19 40.6, Dec +41 32 58)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.3 arcmin. (A member of the Perseus Cluster of Galaxies)

NGC 1275 (= PGC 12429), Perseus A
Discovered (Oct 17, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude peculiar galaxy (type cD + S0? pec) in Perseus (RA 03 19 48.1, Dec +41 30 41)
NGC 1275 is the central, dominant member of the Perseus Cluster of galaxies. A Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 1.5). It is actually two galaxies, a dusty spiral galaxy whose distorted arms are seen as dark filaments against the background of the massive elliptical galaxy with which it is colliding (and probably merging). Each galaxy is distorted by the gravity of the other one, and as clouds of gas in the galaxies collide or are compressed by the interaction, bursts of star formation occur. Among other things, the interaction produces intense radio radiation (probably from gas falling into a supermassive black hole near the center of the elliptical galaxy), hence the galaxies' designation as Perseus A (meaning the brightest radio source in Perseus). As emphasized by a false-color composite in the bottom image, the collision creates glowing filaments of gas which are kept from dissipating by strong magnetic fields extending from the core of the elliptical galaxy. Based on a recessional velocity of 5265 km/sec, NGC 1275 is about 245 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 210 to 270 million light years. Given that and an apparent size of 2.3 by 1.7 arcmin, the pair span 165 thousand light years.
SDSS image of the colliding pair of galaxies listed as NGC 1275, and also known as radio source Perseus A
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1275
Below, a HST image of almost the same region, showing far more detail
(Image Credits: ESA, and the Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration, NASA)
HST image of the colliding pair of galaxies listed as NGC 1275, and also known as radio source Perseus A
Below, a detail of the nuclear region (the following image shows its position and orientation)
(Image Credits: Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), M. Donahue (STScI) & J. Trauger (JPL), NASA)
HST image of a portion of the colliding pair of galaxies listed as NGC 1275, and also known as radio source Perseus A
Below, for reference, the HST detail is overlaid on the 3 arcmin wide SDSS image
Composite of HST and SDSS images of the colliding pair of galaxies listed as NGC 1275, and also known as radio source Perseus A
Below, an NOAO image uses an Hα filter to emphasize the gaseous filaments
(Image Credits: C. Conselice/Caltech and WIYN/AURA/NSF/NOAO)
NOAO H-alpha image of the colliding pair of galaxies listed as NGC 1275, and also known as radio source Perseus A
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown are NGC 1272, 1273, 1274, 1277, 1278 and 1279, PGC 12405 (often misidentified as IC 1907) and PGC 12441 (often misidentified as NGC 1279)
SDSS image of region near the colliding pair of galaxies listed as NGC 1275, and also known as Perseus A; also shown are elliptical galaxies NGC 1272, 1274, 1278, PGC 12405 (often misidentified as IC 1907) and PGC 12241 (often misidentified as NGC 1279), and lenticular galaxies NGC 1273, 1277 and 1279

NGC 1276
Recorded (Dec 12, 1876) by
John Dreyer
A pair of 15th-magnitude stars in Perseus (RA 03 19 51.1, Dec +41 38 33)
Per Dreyer, NGC 1276 (Dreyer, using Lord Rosse's 72-inch telescope, 1860 RA 03 10 37, NPD 48 52.5) is "very faint, very small". The position precesses to RA 03 19 51.3, Dec +41 38 18, less than a third of an arcmin south of the pair of stars noted above; and per Corwin, Dreyer's original measurements fall within a tenth of an arcmin or so from the pair, so the identification is certain. (For now, see the wide-field view of NGC 1278 for an image of NGC 1276.)

NGC 1277 (= PGC 12434)
Discovered (Dec 4, 1875) by
Lawrence Parsons, 4th Earl of Rosse
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Perseus (RA 03 19 51.4, Dec +41 34 27)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.3 arcmin. (A member of the Perseus Cluster of Galaxies) (See NGC 1278 for images.)

NGC 1278 (=
IC 1907 = PGC 12438)
Discovered (Feb 14, 1863) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 1278)
Discovered (Oct 22, 1884) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 1907)
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Perseus (RA 03 19 54.1, Dec +41 33 49)
Per Dreyer, NGC 1278 (GC 674 = JH 293 = WH II 603, 1860 03 10 40, NPD 48 57.4) is "pretty bright, pretty small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 03 19 54.0, Dec +41 33 24, within the outline of the galaxy, so the identification is certain. (See IC 1907 for a discussion of the equality of the two listings.) Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1 arcmin. (A member of the Perseus Cluster of Galaxies)
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1278, also showing lenticular galaxy NGC 1277
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1278, also showing NGC 1277
Below, a 12 arcmin region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 1272, 1273, 1274, 1275, 1276, 1277, 1279 and 1281, and PGC 12405 (which is not IC 1907) and 12441 (which is not NGC 1279)
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1278, also showing
elliptical galaxies NGC 1272, 1274 and 1281, PGC 12405 (often misidentified as IC 1907) and PGC 12241 (often misidentified as NGC 1279), lenticular galaxies NGC 1273, 1277 and 1279, the colliding pair of galaxies listed as NGC 1275 and the pair of stars listed as NGC 1276

NGC 1279 (= PGC 12448 = PGC 12449)
Discovered (Dec 12, 1876) by
John Dreyer
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Perseus (RA 03 19 59.1, Dec +41 28 47)
Per Dreyer, NGC 1279 (Dreyer, using Lord Rosse's 72-inch telescope, 1860 RA 03 10 47, NPD 49 02.3) is "very faint, very small". The position precesses to RA 03 20 00.7, Dec +41 28 29, just outside the southwestern outline of the galaxy, so the identification is certain. (Despite that, some references misidentify PGC 12441 as NGC 1279, so that object is discussed immediately below.) Apparent size 0.85 by 0.4 arcmin. (A member of the Perseus Cluster of Galaxies)
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1279
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1279 (also see the wide-field image of NGC 1275)

PGC 12441 (not =
NGC 1279)
Not an NGC object but listed here because often misidentified as NGC 1279
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Perseus (RA 03 19 55.5, Dec +41 31 22)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin. (A member of the Perseus Cluster of Galaxies)
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy PGC 12441, often misidentified as NGC 1279; also shown is part of the colliding pair of galaxies listed as NGC 1275
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 12441 and part of NGC 1275 (which see for a wider image)

NGC 1280 (= PGC 12262)
Discovered (Dec 19, 1881) by
Édouard Stephan (12-25)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)c?) in Cetus (RA 03 17 57.0, Dec -00 10 08)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1280
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1280
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1280

NGC 1281 (= PGC 12458)
Discovered (Dec 12, 1876) by
John Dreyer
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E5) in Perseus (RA 03 20 06.3, Dec +41 37 47)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4 arcmin. (A member of the Perseus Cluster of Galaxies) (For now, see the wide-field image of NGC 1278.)

NGC 1282
Discovered (Oct 23, 1884) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (I-22)
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4) in Perseus (RA 03 20 12.0, Dec +41 22 01)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.7 arcmin. (A member of the Perseus Cluster of Galaxies)

NGC 1283 (= PGC 12478)
Discovered (Oct 23, 1884) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (I-23)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Perseus (RA 03 20 15.5, Dec +41 23 55)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin. (A member of the Perseus Cluster of Galaxies)

NGC 1284 (= PGC 12247)
Discovered (Dec 10, 1798) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Eridanus (RA 03 17 45.4, Dec -10 17 19)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.9 arcmin.

NGC 1285 (= PGC 12259)
Discovered (Oct 28, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(r)b pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 17 53.4, Dec -07 17 51)
Apparent size 1.5 by 1.1 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1285
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1285
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1285

NGC 1286 (= PGC 12250)
Discovered (Nov 10, 1885) by
Lewis Swift (3-25)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Eridanus (RA 03 17 48.5, Dec -07 36 59)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin.

NGC 1287 (= PGC 12310)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 18 33.3, Dec -02 43 50)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1287
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1287
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1287

NGC 1288 (= PGC 12204)
Discovered (Nov 19, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)c) in Fornax (RA 03 17 13.2, Dec -32 34 35)
Per Dreyer, NGC 1288 (GC 683 = JH 2520, 1860 RA 03 11 34, NPD 123 05.7) is "very faint, large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle". The second Index Catalog adds "(per Swift) considerably extended north-south, (per Delisle Stewart) 2 branch spiral". The position precesses to RA 03 17 13.7, Dec -32 34 56, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Apparent size 2.3 by 1.9 arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SAB(rs)bc.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1288
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1288
Below, a far more detailed image (the star left of center is supernova SN 2006dr) (Image Credits: ESO)
ESO image of spiral galaxy NGC 1288 and supernova SN 2006dr, located within that galaxy
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy (Image Credits as above)
ESO image of spiral galaxy NGC 1288 and supernova SN 2006dr superimposed on a DSS image of region near the galaxy to fill in missing areas

NGC 1289 (=
IC 314 = PGC 12342)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 1289)
Discovered (Dec 14, 1887) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 314)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 18 49.8, Dec -01 58 23)
Per Dreyer, NGC 1289 (Swift list IV (#13), 1860 RA 03 11 34, NPD 92 29.0) is "very faint, small, round, 4 stars following (to the east)". The position precesses to RA 03 18 38.8, Dec -01 58 10, about 2 1/2 arcmin to the west of the presumed object, and there are several reasonably bright stars to its east, so the identification is considered certain. (See IC 314 for a discussion of the double listing.) Apparent size 1.8 by 1.1 arcmin.

NGC 1290 (= PGC 12395)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone (I-101)
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E?) in Eridanus (RA 03 19 25.1, Dec -13 59 21)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin.

NGC 1291 (= PGC 12209, and probably =
NGC 1269)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1826) by James Dunlop (487) (and later listed as NGC 1291)
Discovered (Nov 1, 1836) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1269)
A 9th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SB0/a(s)) in Eridanus (RA 03 17 18.3, Dec -41 06 26)
Per Dreyer, NGC 1291 (GC 685 = JH 2521 = Dunlop 487, 1860 RA 03 12 15, NPD 131 36.8) is a "globular cluster, very bright, pretty large, round, much brighter middle, easily resolvable". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 03 12 50. Usually Howe's corrected positions are an improvement over the original, but in this case the original position is dead on the galaxy (precessing to RA 03 17 21.5, Dec -41 05 55), while Howe's position is a little to its east (precessing to RA 03 17 56.2, Dec -41 06 01). However, the galaxy is so large and bright that the identification is absolutely certain no matter which coordinates are used. The only oddity is the description as an easily resolvable globular cluster, as although the galaxy's bright core could have easily been mistaken for a globular cluster, it is certainly not resolvable. Apparent size 11.0 by 9.5 arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type (R)SAB(l)0/a.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1291
Above, a 12 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1291
Below, a composite of visible and UV radiation by the galaxy (Image Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/CTIC)
Composite of a GALEX UV image and a Cerro Tololo visible-light image of spiral galaxy NGC 1291
Below, a 20 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1291

NGC 1292 (= PGC 12285)
Discovered (November 1885) by
Edward Barnard
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)c) in Fornax (RA 03 18 14.8, Dec -27 36 38)
Apparent size 3.0 by 1.4 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1292
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1292
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1292

NGC 1293 (= PGC 12597)
Discovered (Oct 17, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Perseus (RA 03 21 36.4, Dec +41 23 36)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9 arcmin. (A member of the Perseus Cluster of Galaxies)

NGC 1294 (= PGC 12600)
Discovered (Oct 17, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Perseus (RA 03 21 40.0, Dec +41 21 38)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin. (A member of the Perseus Cluster of Galaxies)

NGC 1295 (= PGC 12465)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone (I-102)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Eridanus (RA 03 20 03.2, Dec -13 59 52)
Per Dreyer, NGC 1295 (Ormond Stone list I (#102), 1860 RA 03 12 35, NPD 104 30.7) is "extremely faint, very small, gradually brighter middle and nucleus, 10th magnitude star 3' following (to the east)". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 03 13 29. The corrected position precesses to RA 03 20 03.3, Dec -14 00 08, on the southern edge of the galaxy, and there is a 10th magnitude star just to the east, so the identification is certain. Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin.

NGC 1296 (= PGC 12341)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth (II-365)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)ab pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 18 49.7, Dec -13 03 44)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1296
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1296
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1296

NGC 1297 (= PGC 12373)
Discovered (February 1885) by
Edward Barnard
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0) in Eridanus (RA 03 19 14.0, Dec -19 06 00)
Apparent size 2.3 by 1.9 arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SA0+ pec.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1297
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1297
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1297

NGC 1298 (= PGC 12473)
Discovered (Jan 4, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Eridanus (RA 03 20 13.0, Dec -02 06 49)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin.

NGC 1299 (= PGC 12466)
Discovered (Jan 27, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b?) in Eridanus (RA 03 20 09.6, Dec -06 15 43)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1299
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1299
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1299
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1200 - 1249) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 1250 - 1299     → (NGC 1300 - 1349)