Celestial Atlas
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Page last updated Sep 8, 2016
Added Dreyer NGC entries, checked Steinicke updated databases, Corwin positions, PGC IDs
Updated to current formatting standards, added/updated images/tags/captions/links

NGC 1350 (= PGC 13059 = FCC 88)
Discovered (Nov 24, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 10.3 spiral galaxy (NED type (R)SB(r)ab?) in Fornax (RA 03 31 08.1, Dec -33 37 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1350 (= GC 721 = JH 2545, Dunlop 591, 1860 (RA 03 24, NPD 124 12) is "bright, large, much extended, very much brighter middle and round nucleus". The second IC lists a corrected position (per DeLisle Stewart) of RA 03 25 44, NPD 124 06, and adds "annular; h's place was very rough".
Physical Information: Based on recessional velocity measurements of 1440 and 1905 km/sec (!), NGC 1350 is 65 to 90 million light years away, in good agreement with equally variable redshift-independent distance estimates of 55 to 85 million light years. Given that and an apparent size of about 6.2 by 3.2 arcmin (from the images below), it is between 115 and 145 thousand light years across. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type (R1')SAB(r)ab. (The designation FCC 88 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1350
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1350
Below, a 7 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 1350
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the galaxy (with North at upper right) (Image Credit ESO)
ESO image of spiral galaxy NGC 1350

NGC 1351 (= PGC 13028 = FCC 83)
Discovered (Oct 19, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.6 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Fornax (RA 03 30 35.0, Dec -34 51 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1351 (= GC 722 = JH 2544, 1860 RA 03 25 08, NPD 125 20.2) is "pretty bright, pretty small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.9 by 2.3 arcmin (from the images below). (The designation FCC 83 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1351
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1351
Below, a 4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1351

PGC 12952 (= "NGC 1351A" = FCC 67)
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 1351A
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc?) in
Fornax (RA 03 28 48.8, Dec -35 10 43)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.5 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below). (The designation FCC 67 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 12952, sometimes called NGC 1351A
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 12952
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 12952, sometimes called NGC 1351A

NGC 1352 (= PGC 13091 = PGC 857440)
Discovered (Dec 11, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 31 33.0, Dec -19 16 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1352 (= GC 723 = JH 2543, 1860 RA 03 25 17, NPD 109 45.6) is "extremely faint, pretty suddenly a little brighter middle, diffuse, 8th magnitude star to southeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.1 by 0.75 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1352
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1352
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1352

NGC 1353 (= PGC 13108)
Discovered (Dec 9, 1784) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 11.5 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b?) in Eridanus (RA 03 32 03.0, Dec -20 49 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1353 (= GC 724 = JH 2546 = WH III 246, 1860 RA 03 25 49, NPD 111 17.8) is "pretty bright, considerably large, irregularly extended, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 4.0 by 1.8 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1353
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1353
Below, a 4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 1353

NGC 1354 (= PGC 13130)
Discovered (Dec 30, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a? pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 32 29.4, Dec -15 13 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1354 (= GC 725 = JH 2547 = WH III 487, 1860 RA 03 26 02, NPD 105 41.5) is "very faint, small, a little extended, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.0 by 1.0 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1354
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1354
Below, a 3.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1354

NGC 1355 (= PGC 13169)
Discovered (Dec 27, 1861) by
Samuel Hunter
Discovered (Oct 8, 1864) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 33 23.5, Dec -04 59 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1355 (= GC 5314, d'Arrest, 1860 RA ) is "pretty faint, small".
Discovery Notes: Identification of Samuel Hunter, an assistant of the 3rd Lord Rosse, as the actual discoverer is due to Steinicke (more later).
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.4 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1355, also showing NGC 1358
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1355, also showing NGC 1358
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1355

NGC 1356 (= PGC 13035 = PGC 467855)
Discovered (Dec 23, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SAB(r)bc? pec) in Horologium (RA 03 30 40.8, Dec -50 18 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1356 (= GC 728 = JH 2549, 1860 RA 03 26 31, NPD 140 45.9) is "very faint, pretty large, irregularly round, gradually brighter middle, star near".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 11795 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 1356 is about 550 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 525 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it left it, about 535 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being caused by the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and the galaxy's apparent size of about 1.65 by 0.95 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 260 thousand light years across. As shown in the images below the galaxy is a spectacular object, so it is unfortunate that no better images seem to be currently available. (Corwin lists an apparent companion, PGC 95415, at RA 03 30 39.8, Dec -50 19 12, but that may be merely a brighter part of the main galaxy; I need to do some research to see what is most likely.)
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1356, also showing IC 1947
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1356, , also showing IC 1947
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy, also showing PGC 95415
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1356, also showing PGC 95415

NGC 1357 (= PGC 13166)
Discovered (Feb 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.5 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)ab?) in Eridanus (RA 03 33 17.1, Dec -13 39 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1357 (= GC 726 = JH 2548 = WH II 290, 1860 RA 03 26 44, NPD 104 08.4) is "pretty faint, pretty large, round, a little brighter middle, 9th magnitude star to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 4.0 by 2.9 arcmin (from the images below).
NOAO image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1357 overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a 12 arcmin wide NOAO/DSS composite image centered on NGC 1357
(Image Credit Adam Block/Steve Mandel/Jim Rada and Students/NOAO/AURA /NSF)
Below, a 4.2 by 4.0 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
(Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 1357

NGC 1358 (= PGC 13182)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.1 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(s)a?) in Eridanus (RA 03 33 39.7, Dec -05 05 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1358 (= GC 727 = JH 302 = WH III 446, 1860 RA 03 26 44, NPD 95 33.5) is "very faint, small, between 2 stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.4 arcmin? A Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2). Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type (R')SB(s)a.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1358, also showing NGC 1355
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1358, also showing NGC 1355
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1358
Below, a 1.9 by 1.6 'raw' HST image of part of the galaxy, overlaid on the southern part of the image above
(Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
'Raw' HST image of part of spiral galaxy NGC 1358 overlaid on a DSS image to show its location relative to the rest of the galaxy

NGC 1359 (= PGC 13190)
Discovered (Oct 12, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)m? pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 33 47.7, Dec -19 29 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1359 (= GC 729 = JH 2550, 1860 RA 03 27 29, NPD 109 58.6) is "faint, large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 1.5 arcmin?
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1359
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1359
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1359

NGC 1360 (= "PGC 3145958")
Discovered (1859) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (Oct 9, 1861) by Wilhelm Tempel
Also observed (January 1868) by August Winnecke
A magnitude 9.4 planetary nebula in Fornax (RA 03 33 14.6, Dec -25 52 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1360 (= GC 5315, Swift 1857, Winnecke, (Tempel), 1860 RA 03 27 36, NPD 116 18.5) is "an 8th magnitude star in bright, large nebula, extended north-south".
Discovery Notes: Tempel was not credited with an observation by Dreyer, as he did not publish his observation until much later; hence his name being placed in parentheses in the NGC entry shown here. Swift did not publish his observation until 1885, but Dreyer did take notice of it; however, he misrecorded the date of Swift's observation (stated by Swift in the Sidereal Messenger as 1859). LEDA lists NGC 1360 as PGC 3145958 (and states that it is a planetary nebula), but a search for that designation returns no result.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 8.6 by 6.2 arcmin (from the image below), not including the reddish extension at the northeastern end (there is also an extension at the southwestern end, but it is much fainter).
Observatorio Antilhue image of planetary nebula NGC 1360, overlaid on a DSS image of the region near the nebula to fill in missing areas
Above, a 12 arcmin wide Antilhue/DSS composite image centered on NGC 1360
(Image Credit & © Daniel Verschatse, Observatorio Antilhue, Chile; used by permission)

NGC 1361 (= PGC 13218)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
A magnitude 13.9 elliptical galaxy (type E3? pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 34 17.8, Dec -06 15 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1361 (Ormond Stone list II (#370), 1860 RA 03 27 38, NPD 96 43.1) is "extremely faint, extremely small, gradually brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.2 by 0.9 arcmin (from the images shown below).
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1361
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1361
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1361

NGC 1362 (= PGC 13196)
Discovered (Dec 17, 1799) by
William Herschel?
Discovered (Nov 13, 1835) by John Herschel?
A magnitude 12.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 33 53.1, Dec -20 16 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1362 (= GC 730 = JH 2551 = WH III 960, 1860 RA 03 27 39, NPD 110 46.1) is "very faint, small, round".
Discovery Query: Traditionally, GC 730 = JH 2551 has been equated with WH III 960; and if that is correct, NGC 1362 was discovered by William Herschel on Dec 17, 1799. But Steinicke's current database states that III 960 is not NGC 1362, but NGC 1370 = WH III 559; and if that is correct, John Herschel's observation of Nov 13, 1835 represented the first observation of NGC 1362.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.3 by 1.1 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1362
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1362
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1362

NGC 1363 (= PGC 13245)
Discovered (Dec 31, 1877) by
Sherburne Burnham
Also observed (Oct 21, 1886) by Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)bc? pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 34 49.6, Dec -09 50 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1363 (Burnham, 1860 RA 03 28 06, NPD 100 18.8) is "very faint, small, round, 7th magnitude star 3.5 arcmin southwest, southwestern of 2", the other being NGC 1364.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1363, also showing NGC 1364
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1363, also showing NGC 1364
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1363
NGC 1364 (= PGC 13253)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Eridanus (RA 03 34 59.0, Dec -09 50 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1364 (Muller list II (#371), 1860 RA 03 28 16, NPD 100 18.1) is "very faint, small, very little extended, northeastern of 2", the other being NGC 1363.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.5 by 0.45 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1364, also showing NGC 1363
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1364, also showing NGC 1361
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1364

NGC 1365 (= PGC 13179 = FCC 121)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Nov 28, 1837) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.6 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)b?) in Fornax (RA 03 33 36.4, Dec -36 08 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1365 (= GC 731 = JH 2552, (Dunlop 562), 1860 RA 03 28 18, NPD 126 36.5) is "a very remarkable object, very bright, very large, much extended, mottled but not resolved nucleus".
Discovery Notes: The recognition of Dunlop's #562 as this object and therefore its discovery prior to Herschel's observation is relatively recent, hence its inclusion in the NGC entry in parentheses.
Physical Information: NGC 1365 is a member of the Fornax Cluster (the designation FCC 121 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog), the second richest cluster of galaxies within 100 million light years, and a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 1.8). Based on a recessional velocity of 1635 km/sec, the galaxy is about 75 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 35 to 80 million light years, and the average estimated distance of the cluster (about 60 million light years). Given that and its apparent size of 11.2 by 6.2 arcmin(?), NGC 1365 is about 200 thousand light years across. A rotating density wave triggers the formation of new star clusters in the spiral arms, helps maintain the structure of the bar, and funnels material into the bar, feeding its growth and most likely that of a supermassive black hole hidden within the dusty clouds that partially obscure the bar. Because of the huge mass of the galaxy (more than a trillion solar masses), the bar rotates at well over a thousand miles a second, but even at such speeds the spiral arms take three or four hundred million years to move once around the galaxy's vast circumference. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SB(s)bc.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1365
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1365
Below, an NOAO image overlaid on an 11 arcmin wide version of the image above
(Image Credit SSRO/PROMPT and NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 1365 overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Below, a ? arcmin wide ESO "true-color" image of the galaxy
ESO image of spiral galaxy NGC 1365
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the core of the galaxy
(Image Credit NASA and John Trauger (Jet Propulsion Laboratory))
HST image of the core of spiral galaxy NGC 1365

NGC 1366 (= PGC 13197)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1790) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Fornax (RA 03 33 53.7, Dec -31 11 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1366 (= GC 732 = JH 2553 = WH III 857, 1860 RA 03 28 18, NPD 121 40.6) is "very faint, small, irregular figure, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.0 by 0.8 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1366
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1366
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1366

NGC 1367 (=
NGC 1371 = PGC 13255)
Discovered (Nov 17, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1371)
Discovered (1886) by Ormond Stone (and later listed as NGC 1367)
A magnitude 10.7 spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(rs)a?) in Fornax (RA 03 35 01.4, Dec -24 56 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1367 (Ormond Stone list I (#106), 1860 RA 03 28 40, NPD 115 24.1) is "very faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 8.2 by 5.6 arcmin (including the faint outer regions, as shown in the images below). Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type (R')SAB(rs)a.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1367, also known as NGC 1371
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1367 (also known as NGC 1371)
Below, a 6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1367, also known as NGC 1371
Below, a 6.8 arcmin wide image of the galaxy, digitally enhanced to show faint outer regions
(Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission (digital enhancement Courtney Seligman))
Digitally enhanced Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 1367, also known as NGC 1371

NGC 1368 (= PGC 13247 = PGC 908214)
Discovered (Nov 12, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a? pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 34 58.9, Dec -15 39 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1368 (Leavenworth list I (#107), 1860 RA 03 28 40, NPD 106 10.1) is "very faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.3 by 0.6 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1368
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1368
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1368

NGC 1369 (= PGC 13330 = FCC 176)
Discovered (Jan 19, 1865) by
Julius Schmidt
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)a?) in Eridanus (RA 03 36 45.2, Dec -36 15 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1369 (= GC 5316, J Schmidt (b), 1860 RA 03 28 41, NPD 126 44.6) is "faint". (Corwin gives the precessed NGC position, but there is nothing there; the object listed above is the most likely candidate.)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.6 by 1.5 arcmin (from the images below). Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SAB(s)a. (The designation FCC 176 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
ESO/DSS composite image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1369
Above, a 12 arcmin wide ESO/DSS composite image centered on NGC 1369
(Image Credit above and below ESO. Acknowledgement: Aniello Grado and Luca Limatola)
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide ESO image of the galaxy
ESO image of spiral galaxy NGC 1369

NGC 1370 (= PGC 13265)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Eridanus (RA 03 35 14.5, Dec -20 22 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1370 (= GC 733 = JH 2554 = WH III 559 (= III 960), 1860 RA 03 29 01, NPD 110 50.8) is "very faint, small, round, between two 14th magnitude stars".
Discovery Notes: Traditionally, WH III 960 has been associated with NGC 1362, in which case William Herschel would be the discoverer of that object; but recently, Steinicke has decided that III 960 is a duplicate of III 559, as shown by its parenthetical inclusion in Dreyer's NGC entry. The two entries will not be considered final until I see whether there is now general agreement with that reassignment of the 1799 observation of III 960.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.6 by 1.1 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1370
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1370
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1370

NGC 1371 (=
NGC 1367 = PGC 13255)
Discovered (Nov 17, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1371)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1371)
Discovered (1886) by Ormond Stone (and later listed as NGC 1367)
A magnitude 10.7 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)a?) in Fornax (RA 03 35 01.4, Dec -24 56 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1371 (= GC 734 = JH 2555 = WH II 262, 1860 RA 03 29 02, NPD 115 24.4) is "pretty bright, pretty large, very little extended, pretty sudennly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 1367 for anything else.

NGC 1372 (= PGC 13346)
Discovered (Nov 12, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 14.3 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 36 59.7, Dec -15 52 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1372 (Leavenworth list I (#108), 1860 RA 03 29 40, NPD 106 22.1) is "very faint, very small, round, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1372
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1372
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1372

NGC 1373 (= PGC 13252 = FCC 143)
Discovered (Nov 29, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 elliptical galaxy (type E3? pec) in Fornax (RA 03 34 59.2, Dec -35 10 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1373 (= GC 735 = JH 2556, 1860 RA 03 29 51, NPD 125 42.4) is "extremely faint, very small, western of 3", the others being NGC 1374 and 1375.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.2 by 1.0 (from the images below). The northern "extension", which in older images appears to be an ejection of material from the galaxy, is actually a background galaxy (since it is partially obscured by NGC 1373, as shown in the images below). (The designation FCC 143 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
ESO image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1373, also showing NGC 1374 and NGC 1375
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 1373, also showing NGC 1374 and 1375
(Image Credit above and below ESO. Acknowledgement: Aniello Grado and Luca Limatola)
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
ESO image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1373

NGC 1374 (= PGC 13267 = FCC 147)
Discovered (Nov 29, 1837) by
John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Julius Schmidt
A magnitude 11.1 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Fornax (RA 03 35 16.6, Dec -35 13 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1374 (= GC 736 = JH 2557, J Schmidt, 1860 RA 03 29 54, NPD 125 41.9) is "very bright, pretty large, a little extended, gradually much brighter middle, 2nd of 3", the others being NGC 1373 and 1375.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.2 by 2.8 arcmin (from the images below). Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type E+0. (The designation FCC 147 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
ESO image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1374, also showing NGC 1373 and NGC 1375
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 1374, also showing NGC 1373 and 1375
(Image Credit ESO. Acknowledgement: Aniello Grado and Luca Limatola)
Below, a 3.5 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1374
Below, a 3.8 arcmin wide HST image of NGC 1374 and NGC 1375
(Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, Judy Schmidt)
HST image of region between elliptical galaxy NGC 1374 and lenticular galaxy NGC 1375

NGC 1375 (= PGC 13266 = FCC 148)
Discovered (Nov 29, 1837) by
John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Julius Schmidt
A magnitude 12.4 lenticular galaxy (type SB0? pec) in Fornax (RA 03 35 16.8, Dec -35 15 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1375 (= GC 737 = JH 2558, J Schmidt, 1860 RA 03 29 54, NPD 125 44.4) is "bright, small, a little extended, pretty much brighter middle, 3rd of 3", the others being NGC 1373 and 1374.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.8 by 0.65 arcmin (from the image below). (The designation FCC 148 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
HST image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1375
Above, a 2 arcmin wide HST image of NGC 1375; for wider-field images see NGC 1374
(Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, Judy Schmidt)

NGC 1376 (= PGC 13352)
Discovered (Jan 28, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.1 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)cd?) in Eridanus (RA 03 37 05.9, Dec -05 02 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1376 (= GC 738 = JH 303 = WH II 288, 1860 RA 03 30 09, NPD 95 30.0) is "extremely faint, pretty large, irregularly round, brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.9 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1376
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1376
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1376
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy
(Image Credit NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA). Acknowledgment: R. Thompson (Univ. of Arizona))
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 1376

NGC 1377 (= PGC 13324)
Discovered (Dec 19, 1799) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 36 39.1, Dec -20 54 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1377 (= GC 740 = JH 2560 = WH III 961, 1860 RA 03 30 29, NPD 111 21.7) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.0 by 0.9 arcmin (from the images below). The site of a black hole that is ejecting gases at the poles of its accretion disk (an ESO ALMA image shows the gases, color-coded according to their velocity relative to us; for example, red if going away from us and blue if coming toward us).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1377
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1377
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1377

NGC 1378 (= "PGC 5067582")
Recorded (Jan 19, 1865) by
Julius Schmidt
A double star in Fornax (RA 03 35 58.2, Dec -35 12 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1378 (= GC 5317, J Schmidt (d), 1860 RA 03 30 31, NPD 125 40.5) is "faint". LEDA lists NGC 1378 as PGC 5067582 (and as a double star), but a search for that designation returns no result.
Physical Information: Although the northern star appears to be a small galaxy in the ESO/VST image, Dr. Corwin points out that there are a large number of similar objects in the field that look exactly the same; so apparently they are all stars of a certain magnitude (about magnitude 13, give or take a magnitude) for which diffraction effects or seeing happen to make their ESO/VST images look like small galaxies. In a sense, this is the same problem that visual observers in the 19th century faced when trying to tell faint stars from nebulae, and led to many stellar objects being misclassified as nebular (and therefore, NGC/IC) objects.
ESO/VST image of region near the double star listed as NGC 1378
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 1378 (NGC 1381 is out of frame to the southeast)
(Image Credit ESO. Acknowledgement: Aniello Grado and Luca Limatola)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image of the same region, showing that all the small "galaxies" are stars
DSS image of region near the double star listed as NGC 1378

NGC 1379 (= PGC 13299 = FCC 161)
Discovered (Dec 25, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 10.9 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Fornax (RA 03 36 04.0, Dec -35 26 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1379 (= GC 741 = JH 2561, 1860 RA 03 30 43, NPD 125 54.8) is "a globular cluster, brighter, pretty large, round, gradually pretty much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.2 by 3.1 arcmin (from the images below). Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type E0. (The designation FCC 161 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
ESO image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1379
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 1379
(Image Credit ESO. Acknowledgement: Aniello Grado and Luca Limatola)
Below, a 3.4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1379

NGC 1380 (= PGC 13318 = = PGC 654885 = FCC 167)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Julius Schmidt
A magnitude 9.9 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Fornax (RA 03 36 27.6, Dec -34 58 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1380 (= GC 739 = JH 2559, Dunlop 574, Schmidt, 1860 RA 03 31 04, NPD 125 26.8) is "very bright, large, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 4.8 by 3.5 arcmin (from the images below). (The designation FCC 167 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
ESO image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1380
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 1380
(Image Credit ESO. Acknowledgement: Aniello Grado and Luca Limatola)
Below, a 5.8 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1380

PGC 13335 (= "NGC 1380A" = FCC 177)
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 1380A
A magnitude 12.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in
Fornax (RA 03 36 47.5, Dec -34 44 22)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.4 by 0.7 arcmin (from the images below). (The designation FCC 177 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 13335, which is sometimes called NGC 1380A
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 13335
Below, a 2.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 13335, which is sometimes called NGC 1380A

PGC 13354 (= "NGC 1380B" =
NGC 1382 = FCC 190)
Actually NGC 1382, but listed here as a warning against the use of non-standard NGC designations
Discovered (Jan 19, 1865) by Julius Schmidt
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Fornax (RA 03 37 09.0, Dec -35 11 42)
Warning About Non-Standard NGC Designations: The use of letters attached to an NGC number should always be avoided, as it can lead to all sorts of confusion. It is not at all unusual for an NGC object to be referred to by its NGC number plus the letter A, and also using the letter B, and for non-NGC objects to be similarly confused. "NGC 1380B" is an extreme example of this poor practice, being a case in which a galaxy with a perfectly good NGC designation of its own is assigned a number and letter corresponding to a completely different object.
Historical Identification and Physical Information: Given the incorrect assignment of "NGC 1380B" to this object, see NGC 1382 for anything else.

NGC 1381 (= PGC 13321 = FCC 170)
Discovered (Jan 19, 1865) by
Julius Schmidt
A magnitude 11.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Fornax (RA 03 36 31.7, Dec -35 17 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1381 (= GC 5318, J Schmidt (3), 1860 RA 03 31 09, NPD 125 46.0) is "faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.2 by 1.0 arcmin (from the images below). (The designation FCC 170 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
ESO image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1381
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 1381
(Image Credit above and below ESO. Acknowledgement: Aniello Grado and Luca Limatola)
Below, a 3 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
ESO image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1381
Below, a 25 by 37 arcmin wide image of NGC 1381, 1382, 1387, 1396, 1399 and 1404
(Image Credit & © Daniel Verschatse, Observatorio Antilhue, Chile; used by permission)
Observatorio Antilhue image of part of the Fornax Cluster of galaxies, showing NGC 1381, NGC 1382, NGC 1387, NGC 1396, NGC 1399 and NGC 1404

NGC 1382 (= PGC 13354 = "NGC 1380B" = FCC 190)
Discovered (Jan 19, 1865) by
Julius Schmidt
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Fornax (RA 03 37 09.0, Dec -35 11 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1382 (= GC 5319, J Schmidt (f), 1860 RA 03 31 09, NPD 125 37.8) is "faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.9 by 1.4 arcmin (from the images below). (The designation FCC 190 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.) Sometimes stupidly called NGC 1380B.
ESO image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1382
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 1382
(Image Credit above and below ESO. Acknowledgement: Aniello Grado and Luca Limatola)
Below, a 2 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
ESO image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1382
Below, a 25 by 37 arcmin wide image of NGC 1381, 1382, 1387, 1396, 1399 and 1404
(Image Credit & © Daniel Verschatse, Observatorio Antilhue, Chile; used by permission)
Observatorio Antilhue image of part of the Fornax Cluster of galaxies, showing NGC 1381, NGC 1382, NGC 1387, NGC 1396, NGC 1399 and NGC 1404

NGC 1383 (= PGC 13377)
Discovered (Dec 11, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 lenticular galaxy (type SB0? pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 37 39.2, Dec -18 20 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1383 (= GC 742 = JH 2562, 1860 RA 03 31 20, NPD 108 48.3) is "pretty faint, small, round, pretty suddenly much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.6 by 0.8 arcmin (from the images below), counting the eastern and western extensions.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1383
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1383
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1383

NGC 1384 (= PGC 13448 = PGC 1494072)
Discovered (Oct 20, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Taurus (RA 03 39 13.6, Dec +15 49 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1384 (= GC 5320, Marth #90, 1860 RA 03 31 20, NPD 74 37) is a "nebulous 13th magnitude star".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1384
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1384 (the 9th-magnitude star is SAO 93537)
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1384

NGC 1385 (= PGC 13368)
Discovered (Nov 17, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.9 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)cd? pec) in Fornax (RA 03 37 28.3, Dec -24 30 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1385 (= GC 743 = JH 2563 = WH II 263, 1860 RA 03 31 27, NPD 114 58.1) is "pretty bright, pretty small, round, gradually pretty much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.5 by 1.5 arcmin for the central galaxy, but about 4.4 by 2.8 arcmin including the faint outer extensions (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1385
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1385
Below, a 4.6 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 1385
Below, a 1.6 by 2.45 arcmin wide partially processed HST image of the galaxy
(Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, Wikimedia Commons)
Partially processed HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 1385

NGC 1386 (= PGC 13333 = FCC 179)
Discovered (Jan 19, 1865) by
Julius Schmidt
A magnitude 11.2 spiral galaxy (type (R)S(rs)a?) in Eridanus (RA 03 36 46.2, Dec -35 59 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1386 (= GC 5321, J Schmidt (g), 1860 RA 03 31 29, NPD 126 28.2) is "faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.7 by 1.3 arcmin (from the images below). (The designation FCC 179 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
ESO image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1386
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 1386
(Image Credit above and below ESO. Acknowledgement: Aniello Grado and Luca Limatola)
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
ESO image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1386
Below, a different image of the same region shown above
(Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 1386

NGC 1387 (= PGC 13344 = FCC 184)
Discovered (Dec 25, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 10.7 lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Fornax (RA 03 36 57.0, Dec -35 30 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1387 (= GC 744 = JH 2564, 1860 RA 03 31 35, NPD 125 58.6) is "a globular cluster, very bright, pretty large, round, gradually much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 4.3 by 4.2 arcmin (from the images below). Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SB0-. (The designation FCC 184 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
ESO image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1387
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 1387
(Image Credit above and below ESO. Acknowledgement: Aniello Grado and Luca Limatola)
Below, a 5 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
ESO image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1387
Below, a 25 by 37 arcmin wide image of NGC 1381, 1382, 1387, 1396, 1399 and 1404
(Image Credit & © Daniel Verschatse, Observatorio Antilhue, Chile; used by permission)
Observatorio Antilhue image of part of the Fornax Cluster of galaxies, showing NGC 1381, NGC 1382, NGC 1387, NGC 1396, NGC 1399 and NGC 1404

NGC 1388 (= PGC 13402)
Discovered (Nov 12, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 13.8 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 38 12.0, Dec -15 53 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1388 (Leavenworth list I (#109), 1860 RA 03 31 40, NPD 106 23.0) is "very faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.9 by 0.85 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1388
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1388
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1388

NGC 1389 (= PGC 13360 = FCC 193)
Discovered (Jan 19, 1865) by
Julius Schmidt
A magnitude 11.5 lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 37 11.7, Dec -35 44 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1389 (= GC 5322, J Schmidt (h), 1860 RA 03 31 50, NPD 126 12.9) is "faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.9 by 1.6 arcmin (from the images below). (The designation FCC 193 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1389
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1389
(Image Credit ESO. Acknowledgement: Aniello Grado and Luca Limatola)
Below, a 3 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1389

NGC 1390 (= PGC 13386)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SBa? pec?) in Eridanus (RA 03 37 52.2, Dec -19 00 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1390 (Muller list II (#372), 1860 RA 03 31 50, NPD 109 30.0) is "very faint, pretty small, extended 260".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.5 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1390
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1390
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1390

NGC 1391 (= PGC 13436 = PGC 74824 = PGC 869183)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Ormond Stone
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 38 53.0, Dec -18 21 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1391 (Leavenworth list II (#373), 1860 RA 03 32 10, NPD 108 48.0) is "extremely faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle and nucleus". The first IC lists a corrected position (per Ormond Stone) of RA 03 32 34, 108 45.0. The second IC lists a corrected NPD (per Ormond Stone and Howe) of 108 48.8.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.3 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1391, also showing NGC 1393 and NGC 1394
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1391, also showing NGC 1393 and 1394
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1391

NGC 1392 (perhaps = PGC 13383?)
Recorded (Feb 13, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A lost or nonexistent object in Eridanus (RA 03 37 31.9, Dec -37 07 20)
or perhaps A magnitude 16(?) spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)bc?) in Eridanus (RA 03 37 47.0, Dec -36 08 50)
Historical Identification (or Misidentification?): Per Dreyer, NGC 1392 (Swift list VI (#15), 1860 RA 03 32 17, NPD 127 35.6) is "very faint, pretty small, round". The position precesses to RA 03 37 32.1, Dec -37 07 55, but there is nothing there (Swift's actual position was 1885 RA 03 33 13, Dec -37 30, which precesses to RA 03 37 31.9, Dec -37 07 20 (as shown above), but there is also nothing there). It is conceivable that what Swift observed was one of the stars in the first image below, but the in his declination means that if he observed something in that field, there is no way to determine what it was. Corwin suggests that Swift made a one degree error in the declination, yielding a rough position (given the in the declination) of about RA 03 37 35.3, Dec -36 07 20, or about 2.8 arcmin west northwest of the galaxy listed above. If the galaxy were brighter Corwin's identification might be considered reasonably certain; but whether Swift could have seen such a faint object is uncertain (and even if he could, wouldn't he have called it 'most extremely faint', instead of just 'very faint'?), so though a possible candidate for NGC 1392 (especially since there is nothing else anywhere in the region), it it is just as possible that it has nothing to do with Swift's observation. In other words, although PGC 13383 is generally assumed to be NGC 1392, there is a very good chance that is not correct, and it is merely the best candidate out of one or none.
Physical Information: If lost or nonexistent, there is nothing to say. Whether NGC 1392 is PGC 13383 or not, that galaxy's apparent size is about 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of the region near Swift's position for NGC 1392
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Swift's position for NGC 1392
Below, a 12 arcmin wide ESO image centered on PGC 13383, which may or may not be NGC 1392
(Image Credit ESO. Acknowledgement: Aniello Grado and Luca Limatola)
ESO image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 13383, which may be NGC 1392
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide ESO image of PGC 13383 (Image credit as above)
ESO image of spiral galaxy PGC 13383, which may be NGC 1392

NGC 1393 (= PGC 13425)
Discovered (Oct 6, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 38 38.6, Dec -18 25 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1393 (= GC 745 = JH 2565 = WH III 451, 1860 RA 03 32 19, NPD 108 53.6) is "faint, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.3 by 1.5 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1393, also showing NGC 1391
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1393, also showing NGC 1391
Below, a 2.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1393

NGC 1394 (= PGC 13444)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Ormond Stone
A magnitude 12.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 39 06.9, Dec -18 17 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1394 (Leavenworth list II (#374), 1860 RA 03 32 20, NPD 108 44.0) is "very faint, very small, extended 170, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus". The first IC lists a corrected position (per Ormond Stone) of RA 03 32 48, NPD 108 45.0.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.5 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1394
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1394, also showing NGC 1391
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1394

NGC 1395 (= PGC 13419)
Discovered (Nov 17, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.6 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Eridanus (RA 03 38 29.7, Dec -23 01 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1395 (= GC 746 = JH 2566 = WH I 58, 1860 RA 03 32 25, NPD 113 29.3) is "bright, pretty small, extended, pretty suddenly much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 8.0 by 5.5 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1395
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1395
Below, a 7.4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1395

NGC 1396 (= PGC 13398 = FCC 202)
Discovered (Jan 19, 1865) by
Julius Schmidt
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Fornax (RA 03 38 06.6, Dec -35 26 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1396 (= GC 5323, J Schmidt (i), 1860 RA 03 32 40, NPD 126 07.9) is "faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.85 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below). (The designation FCC 202 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
Observatorio Antilhue image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1396, also showing elliptical galaxy NGC 1399
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 1396, also showing NGC 1399
(Image Credit and © Daniel Verschatse, Observatorio Antilhue, Chile; used by permission)
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
(Image Credit ESO. Acknowledgement: Aniello Grado and Luca Limatola)
ESO image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1396
Below, a 25 by 37 arcmin wide image of NGC 1381, 1382, 1387, 1396, 1399 and 1404
(Image Credit & © Daniel Verschatse, Observatorio Antilhue, Chile; used by permission)
Observatorio Antilhue image of part of the Fornax Cluster of galaxies, showing NGC 1381, NGC 1382, NGC 1387, NGC 1396, NGC 1399 and NGC 1404

NGC 1397 (= PGC 13485)
Discovered (Sep 30, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0(r)a?) in Eridanus (RA 03 39 47.2, Dec -04 40 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1397 (= GC 756 = JH 305 = WH III 569, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 03 32 49, NPD 95 07.3) is "very faint, very small, a little extended". The first IC adds "is not h305, which was observed by Swift and Burnham in h's place (RA 03 34 34, NPD 95 07.0)".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.7 by 0.55 arcmin for the central galaxy, and of about 1.9 by 1.6 arcmin for the outer ring (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1397
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1397
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1397

NGC 1398 (= PGC 13434)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1861) by
Wilhelm Tempel
Also observed (Dec 17, 1868) by August Winnecke
Also observed (Oct 18, 1879) by Eugen Block
A magnitude 9.7 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(r)ab?) in Fornax (RA 03 38 52.1, Dec -26 20 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1398 (Winnecke, Block, (Tempel V), 1860 RA 03 32 58, NPD 116 47.7) is "considerably bright, considerably large, round, very much brighter middle".
Discovery Notes: Although Tempel discovered this object in 1861 he did not publish his observation until 1882 (as a result of being made aware of Winnecke and Block's papers), and as a result Dreyer didn't give him credit in his NGC entry.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 7.9 by 5.3 arcmin (from the images below). Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type (R')SB(rs)ab.
NOAO image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1398 superimposed on a DSS image to fill in missing areas
Above, a 12 arcmin wide NOAO/DSS composite image centered on NGC 1398
(Image Credits above and below: Sean & Renee Stecker/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
Below, an 8 arcmin wide NOAO image of the galaxy
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 1398 superimposed on a DSS image to fill in very minor missing areas
Below, a 7.0 by 6.6 arcmin image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 1398
Below, a 9 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit Warren A. Keller; used by permission)
SSRO image of spiral galaxy NGC 1398

NGC 1399 (= PGC 13418 = FCC 213)
Discovered (May 1, 1826) by
James Dunlop?
Discovered (Oct 22, 1835) by John Herschel?
A magnitude 9.6 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Fornax (RA 03 38 29.0, Dec -35 27 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1399 (= GC 748 = JH 2569, (Dunlop 332), 1860 RA 03 33 07, NPD 125 54.9) is "a globular cluster, very bright, pretty large, pretty suddenly much brighter middle, partially resolved (some stars seen)".
Discovery Notes: Whether Dunlop's #332 was actually NGC 1399 appears to be a matter of some debate. Some databases list it as such (hence its inclusion in parentheses in Dreyer's entry, despite not being in the original entry), but Steinicke's current historical database does not include that attribution. So the discovery credit shown with question marks here is subject to revision until this page is finalized.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 8.3 by 7.9 arcmin (from the images below). Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type E0. (The designation FCC 213 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
ESO image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1399, also showing NGC 1396
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 1399, also showing NGC 1396
(Image Credit above and below ESO. Acknowledgement: Aniello Grado and Luca Limatola)
Below, a 10 arcmin wide image of the galaxy and its smaller apparent companion
ESO image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1399
Below, a 25 by 37 arcmin wide image of NGC 1381, 1382, 1387, 1396, 1399 and 1404
(Image Credit & © Daniel Verschatse, Observatorio Antilhue, Chile; used by permission)
Observatorio Antilhue image of part of the Fornax Cluster of galaxies, showing NGC 1381, NGC 1382, NGC 1387, NGC 1396, NGC 1399 and NGC 1404
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1300 - 1349) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 1350 - 1399     → (NGC 1400 - 1449)