Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1400 - 1449) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 1450 - 1499 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 1500 - 1549)
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Page last updated Oct 20, 2016
Next: Finish Historical Identifications

NGC 1450 (= PGC 13775)
Discovered (Oct 22, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (Dec 31, 1886) by Ormond Stone
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 14.1 galaxy (type E/S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 45 36.6, Dec -09 14 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1450 (Swift list V (#56), Ormond Stone list I (#??), 1860 RA 03 39 08, NPD 99 40.4) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round (perhaps double? distance 0.4 arcmin)". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 03 38 52.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 11065 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 1450 is about 515 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 495 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it left the galaxy, about 505 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers is due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and the galaxy's apparent size of about 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below), NGC 1450 is about 70 to 75 thousand light years across. Note: It appears that the bump on the northwest corner of NGC 1450 (at RA 03 45 36.1, Dec -09 13 58) is a magnitude 15.0 galaxy (type S0?) of 0.2 by 0.2(?) arcmin apparent size, as it is listed as a UV source (GALEXASC J034536.06-091358.2) in the NED; but nothing else appears to be known about it, so for the moment that is all that can be said about it.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1450
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1450
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1450

NGC 1451 (= PGC 13801)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 46 07.2, Dec -04 04 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1451 (= GC 5329, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 03 39 10, NPD 94 30.6) is "very faint, very small, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.75 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below). (Note to self: LEDA lists 1446 as a duplicate of NGC 1451; so need to address that when do Historical Identification.)
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1451, also showing NGC 1441, NGC 1449 and NGC 1453, and the stars listed as NGC 1443 and NGC 1446
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1451, also showing NGC 1441, 1449 and 1453
(Also shown are the stars listed as NGC 1443 and 1446)
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1451

NGC 1452 (=
NGC 1455 = PGC 13765)
Discovered (Oct 6, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1452)
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 1452)
Also observed (date?) by DeLisle Stewart (while listed as NGC 1452)
Discovered (1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 1455)
A magnitude 11.8 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(r)a) in Eridanus (RA 03 45 22.3, Dec -18 38 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1452 (= GC 777 = WH II 459, 1860 RA 03 39 12, NPD 109 00.4) is "faint, round, a little brighter middle". The second IC lists a corrected position (per Howe and DeLisle Stewart) of RA 03 39 05, NPD 109 04.4 and adds "the latter calls it a hazy star".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.1 by 1.7 arcmin (from the images below). Used by de Vaucouleurs as an example of galaxy type (R')SB(r)a.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1452
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1452
Below, a 3.2 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 1452

NGC 1453 (= PGC 13814)
Discovered (Sep 30, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.5 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Eridanus (RA 03 46 27.2, Dec -03 58 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1453 (= GC 778 = JH 309 = WH I 155, 1860 RA 03 39 29, NPD 94 24.6) is "pretty bright, small, round, 17th magnitude star in middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.3 by 2.6 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1453, also showing part of NGC 1451
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1453, also showing NGC 1451
Below, a 3.5 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1453

NGC 1454 (= "PGC 5067586")
Recorded (1886) by
Frank Muller
A magnitude 15 star in Eridanus (RA 03 45 59.4, Dec -20 39 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1454 (Muller list II (#385), 1860 RA 03 39 40, NPD 111 07.8) is "very faint, extremely small, round, (perhaps a star?), magnitude 9.5 star 3 arcmin to southwest".
Physical Information: LEDA lists NGC 1454 as PGC 5067586 (and as a star), but a search for that designation returns no result.
DSS image centered on the star listed as NGC 1454
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the star listed as NGC 1454

NGC 1455 (=
NGC 1452 = PGC 13765)
Discovered (Oct 6, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1452)
Discovered (1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 1455)
A magnitude 11.8 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB(r)a) in Eridanus (RA 03 45 22.3, Dec -18 38 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1455 (Leavenworth list II (#386), 1860 RA 03 39 47, NPD 109 04.8) is "very faint, small, a little extended 30░, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 1452 for anything else.

NGC 1456 (= "PGC 5067587")
Recorded (1886) by
Gerhard Lohse
A magnitude 11.0 pair of stars in Taurus (RA 03 48 08.3, Dec +22 33 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1456 (J. G. Lohse, 1860 RA 03 39 54, NPD 67 52.5) is a "double star of magnitudes 10 to 12, companion nebulous (130░ position angle, 9 arcsec separation)".
Physical Information: LEDA lists NGC 1456 as PGC 5067587 (and as a double star), but a search for that designation returns no result.
DSS image centered on the double star listed as NGC 1456
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the double star listed as NGC 1456

NGC 1457 (=
NGC 1448 = PGC 13727)
Discovered (Oct 24, 1835) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1457)
Discovered (Dec 14, 1835) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1448)
A magnitude 10.7 spiral galaxy (type SAcd? pec) in Horologium (RA 03 44 31.9, Dec -44 38 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1457 (= GC 779 = JH 2586, 1860 RA 03 39 57, NPD 135 05.4) is "pretty faint, pretty large, extremely extended 42░, very gradually pretty much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 1448 for anything else.

NGC 1458 (probably =
NGC 1440 = NGC 1442= PGC 13752)
Discovered (Oct 6, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1440)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1786) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1442)
Discovered (1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 1458)
Looked for but not observed by Sherburne Burnham (while listed as NGC 1458)
A magnitude 11.6 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0(rs)a?) in Eridanus (RA 03 45 02.9, Dec -18 15 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1458 (Leavenworth list II (#387), 1860 RA 03 40 40, NPD 108 40.7) is "very faint, very small, round, planetary nebula? nebulous?". The first IC notes "Not found by Burnham". (LEDA does not recognize NGC 1458 in any way, though it does acknowledge NED's identification.)
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entries, see NGC 1440 for anything else.

NGC 1459 (= PGC 13832)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)bc?) in Fornax (RA 03 46 57.9, Dec -25 31 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1459 (Ormond Stone list I (#115), 1860 RA 03 40 45, NPD 115 57.7) is "extremely faint, pretty small, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.0 by 1.3 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1459
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1459
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1459

NGC 1460 (= PGC 13805 = FCC 310)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 46 13.7, Dec -36 41 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1460 (= GC 780 = JH 2587, 1860 RA 03 41 00, NPD 127 07.9) is "faint, small, round, star attached".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.3 by 1.25 arcmin (from the images below). (The designation FCC 310 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1460
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1460
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1460
Below, a 2 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, Wikimedia Commons)
HST image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1460

NGC 1461 (= PGC 13881)
Discovered (Oct 6, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Eduard Sch÷nfeld
A magnitude 11.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 48 27.1, Dec -16 23 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1461 (= GC 781 = JH 2588 = WH II 460, Sch÷nfeld, 1860 RA 03 42 03, NPD 106 49.4) is "pretty bright, small, a little extended, much brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.5 by 1.1 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1461
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1461
Below, a 2.8 by 3.6 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
(Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1461

NGC 1462 (= PGC 13945)
Discovered (Sep 13, 1864) by
Albert Marth (92)
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Taurus (RA 03 50 23.4, Dec +06 58 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1462 (= GC 5330, Marth #92, 1860 RA 03 42 54, NPD 83 28) is "very faint, small, very little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.85 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below). Corwin lists an apparent companion on the northeast rim of the galaxy at RA 03 50 24.3, Dec +06 58 37, but based on the images below (though admittedly not the best quality) I feel almost certain that it is only a foreground star.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1462
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1462
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1462
*Note to self: the 16th-magnitude galaxy to the northeast is PGC 3091820*

NGC 1463 (= PGC 13807)
Discovered (Oct 6, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type (R)SA(rs)a pec?) in Reticulum (RA 03 46 15.4, Dec -59 48 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1463 (= GC 782 = JH 2589, 1860 RA 03 43 33, NPD 150 14.5) is "considerably faint, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle, among 7 bright stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.4 by 2.0 arcmin (from the images below) for the outermost ring.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1463
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1463
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1463

NGC 1464 (=
NGC 1471 = PGC 13976)
Discovered (prior to Oct 12, 1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 1471)
Discovered (Nov 1, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 1464)
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type S? pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 51 24.5, Dec -15 24 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1464 (Swift list V (#57), 1860 RA 03 44 51, NPD 105 48.6) is "pretty faint, small, round, 2 stars near".
Discovery Information: The paper containing Leavenworth's observation was sent to the Astronomical Journal on October 12, 1886, so all the observations listed there must have been completed before that date; but since the paper wasn't actually in print at the time of Swift's observation, he did make an independent discovery of the object.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.75 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1464
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1464
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1464

NGC 1465 (= PGC 14039)
Discovered (Sep 25, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 1magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Perseus (RA 03 53 31.9, Dec +32 29 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1465 (Swift list V (#58), 1860 RA 03 44 51, NPD 57 55.0) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round, pretty bright star near to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.1 by 0.45 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1465
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1465
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1465

NGC 1466 (= PGC 2802621), in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Discovered (Nov 26, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.4 globular cluster in Hydrus (RA 03 44 33.0, Dec -71 40 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1466 (= GC 783 = JH 2590, 1860 RA 03 45 15, NPD 162 06.6) is "pretty faint, pretty small, irregularly round, gradually a little brighter middle, 7th magnitude star to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.5 arcmin (from the images below). LEDA lists NGC 1466 as PGC 2802621 (and as a cluster).
DSS image of region near the Large Magellanic Cloud globular cluster, NGC 1466
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1466
Below, a 4.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the globular cluster
DSS image of the Large Magellanic Cloud globular cluster, NGC 1466
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide HST/DSS composite image of the cluster (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of part of the Large Magellanic Cloud globular cluster, NGC 1466, overlaid on a DSS background

NGC 1467 (= PGC 13991)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 51 52.8, Dec -08 50 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1467 (Muller list II (#388), 1860 RA 03 45 15, NPD 99 16.5) is "extremely faint, very small, round, 9th magnitude star 4 arcmin to south".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.5 by 0.85 arcmin (from the images below) for the main galaxy, and about 0.8 arcmin further for the faint northeastern extension.
DSS image of region near peculiar lenticular galaxy NGC 1467
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1467
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy and its northeastern extension
DSS image of peculiar lenticular galaxy NGC 1467 and its northeastern extension

NGC 1468 (= PGC 14004)
Discovered (Dec 19, 1881) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 52 12.6, Dec -06 20 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1468 (Stephan list XII (#28), 1860 RA 03 45 20, NPD 96 46.2) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.1 by 0.75 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1468
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1468
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1468

NGC 1469 (= PGC 14261)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.7 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Camelopardalis (RA 04 00 27.8, Dec +68 34 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1469 (Swift list III (#27), 1860 RA 03 45 33, NPD 21 47.5) is "very faint, very small, round, bright star near".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.4 by 1.2 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1469
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1469
Below, a 2.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1469

NGC 1470 (= PGC 14002)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Eridanus (RA 03 52 09.8, Dec -08 59 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1470 (Muller list II (#389), 1860 RA 03 46 27, NPD 99 25.5) is "extremely faint, small, extended 0░".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.5 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1470
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1470
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1470

NGC 1471 (=
NGC 1464 = PGC 13976)
Discovered (prior to Oct 12, 1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 1471)
Discovered (Nov 1, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 1464)
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type S? pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 51 24.5, Dec -15 24 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1471 (Leavenworth list I (#116), 1860 RA 03 46 35, NPD 105 49.5) is "very faint, very small, extended 45░".
Discovery Information: The paper containing Leavenworth's observation was sent to the Astronomical Journal on October 12, 1886, so all the observations listed there must have been completed before that date; but since the paper wasn't actually in print at the time of Swift's observation, he did make an independent discovery of the object.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 1464 for anything else.

NGC 1472 (= PGC 14050)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 53 47.3, Dec -08 34 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1472 (Ormond Stone list I (#117), 1860 RA 03 46 35, NPD 98 59.5) is "very faint, extremely small, stellar nucleus, 1st of 3", the others being NGC 1477 and 1478.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.85 by 0.8 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1472, also showing NGC 1477 and NGC 1478
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1472, also showing NGC 1477 and 1478
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1472

NGC 1473 (= PGC 13853)
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 irregular galaxy (type IB(s)m?) in Hydrus (RA 03 47 26.2, Dec -68 13 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1473 (= GC 784 = JH 2592, 1860 RA 03 46 49, NPD 158 38.4) is "considerably faint, pretty large, round, gradually a very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.55 by 0.8 arcmin (from the images below), including its northern extension.
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 1473
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1473
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of irregular galaxy NGC 1473

NGC 1474 (=
IC 2002 = PGC 14065 = PGC 14080)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 1474)
Discovered (Dec 21, 1903) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 2002)
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Taurus (RA 03 54 30.3, Dec +10 42 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1474 (= GC 5331, Marth #93, 1860 RA 03 46 58, NPD 79 51) is "very faint, small, round". Usually correctly called NGC 1474, but due to the duplicate entry sometimes incorrectly called IC 2002 (perhaps because the duplicate entry is not absolutely certain? To be reviewed in the next iteration of this page).
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.15 by 0.95 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1474
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1474
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1474

NGC 1475 (= PGC 1007783)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 15.4 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 53 49.6, Dec -08 08 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1475 (Leavenworth list II (#390), 1860 RA 03 47 21, NPD 98 32.5) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round, 14th magnitude star 4 arcmin to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1475
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1475
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1475

NGC 1476 (= PGC 14001)
Discovered (Dec 14, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec) in Horologium (RA 03 52 08.9, Dec -44 31 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1476 (= GC 785 = JH 2591, 1860 RA 03 47 35, NPD 134 56.8) is "considerably faint, small, extended 90░, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.2 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1476
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1476
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1476

NGC 1477 (= PGC 14060)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
A magnitude 14.2 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Eridanus (RA 03 54 02.9, Dec -08 34 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1477 (Ormond Stone list I (#118), 1860 RA 03 47 35, NPD 98 59.5) is "extremely faint, very small, 2nd of 3", the others being NGC 1472 and 1478.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.75 by 0.7 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1477, also showing NGC 1472 and NGC 1478
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1477, also showing NGC 1472 and 1478
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1477

NGC 1478 (= PGC 14062)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
A magnitude 14.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 54 07.3, Dec -08 33 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1478 (Ormond Stone list I (#119), 1860 RA 03 47 35, NPD 98 57.5) is "extremely faint, very small. 3rd of 3", the others being NGC 1472 and 1477.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.6 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1478, also showing NGC 1472 and NGC 1477
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1478, also showing NGC 1472 and 1477
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1478

NGC 1479 (= "PGC 5067588")
Recorded (1886) by
Frank Muller
A lost or nonexistent object in Eridanus (RA 03 54 21.3, Dec -10 12 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1479 (Muller list II (#391), 1860 RA 03 47 40, NPD 100 37.5) is "extremely faint, small, extended, western of 2", the other being NGC 1480. (Muller's published position was 1890 RA 03 49.1, Dec -10 32 (which precesses to RA 03 54 21.3, Dec -10 12 29, as shown above), with a magnitude of 16.0, size of 0.6 by 0.1 arcmin, and listed as a double star with a position angle of 170 degrees.) LEDA lists NGC 1479 as PGC 5067588 (and as an unknown object), but a search of the database for that designation returns no result.
Discovery Notes: Based on Muller's original notes there would seem to be a good chance that NGC 1479 and 1480 are stars near the center of the field shown below, as there is a 10th magnitude star about 30 seconds of time to the east of the region which would match the description of NGC 1480; but per Corwin there is no combination of observable objects in the region that fits the positions and descriptions.
DSS image of region near Muller's position for NGC 1479
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Muller's position for NGC 1479

NGC 1480 (= "PGC 5067589")
Recorded (1886) by
Frank Muller
A lost or nonexistent object in Eridanus (RA 03 54 33.2, Dec -10 15 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1480 (Muller list II (#392), 1860 RA 03 47 52, NPD 100 40.5) is "extremely faint, small, irregularly round, eastern of 2 (the other being NGC 1479), 10th magnitude star 30 seconds of time to east". (Muller's published position was 1890 RA 03 49.3, Dec -10 35 (which precesses to RA 03 54 33.2, Dec -10 15 31, as shown above), with a magnitude of 15.5, size of 0.4 arcmin, and a note that there is a 10th magnitude star about 30 seconds of time to the east.) LEDA lists NGC 1480 as PGC 5067589 (and as an unknown object), but a search of the database for that designation returns no result.
Discovery Notes: Based on Muller's original notes there would seem to be a good chance that NGC 1479 and 1480 are stars near the center of the field shown in the image for NGC 1479, as there is a 10th magnitude star about 30 seconds of time to the east of the region which would match the description of NGC 1480; but per Corwin there is no combination of observable objects in the region that fits the positions and descriptions.
*Given the Discovery Note, see NGC 1479 for anything else*

NGC 1481 (= PGC 14079)
Discovered (Nov 13, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 54 29.0, Dec -20 25 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1481 (= GC 786 = JH 2593, 1860 RA 03 48 19, NPD 110 52.5) is "extremely faint, small, round, 2 bright stars to east, western of 2", the other being NGC 1482.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.05 by 0.75 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1481, also showing NGC 1482
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1481, also showing NGC 1482
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1481

NGC 1482 (= PGC 14084)
Discovered (Dec 19, 1799) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0(r)a? pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 54 38.9, Dec -20 30 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1482 (= GC 787 = JH 2594 = WH III 962, 1860 RA 03 48 28, NPD 110 55.0) is "faint, small, very little extended, 2 stars of 10th magnitude near, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 1481.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 4.5 by 1.8 arcmin (from the images below), including its northwestern and southeastern extensions.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1482, also showing NGC 1481
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1482, also showing NGC 1481
Below, a 4.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1482

NGC 1483 (= PGC 14022)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)bc?) in Horologium (RA 03 52 47.7, Dec -47 28 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1483 (= GC 788 = JH 2595, Dunlop 427?, Dunlop 428?, 1860 RA 03 48 31, NPD 137 53.9) is "considerably faint, pretty large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.4 by 0.95 arcmin (from the images below).
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 1483 superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a HST image superimposed on a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1483
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide view of the galaxy (Image Credit above and below ESA/Hubble/NASA)
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 1483
Below, a 1.2 by 1.65 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit as above; rotated counter-clockwise 30 degrees)
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 1483 rotated with North on upper left to allow for greater detail

NGC 1484 (= PGC 14071)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)b?) in Eridanus (RA 03 54 17.6, Dec -36 58 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1484 (= GC 789 = JH 2596, 1860 RA 03 49 09, NPD 127 24.3) is "very faint, large, extended, very gradually a very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.4 by 0.6 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1484
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1484
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1484

NGC 1485 (= PGC 14432)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Camelopardalis (RA 04 05 03.9, Dec +70 59 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1485 (Swift list III (#28), 1860 RA 03 49 58, NPD 19 21.5) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 0.7 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1485
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1485
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1485

NGC 1486 (= PGC 14132)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type Sbc? pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 56 18.7, Dec -21 49 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1486 (Leavenworth list II (#393), 1860 RA 03 50 48, NPD 112 13.3) is "extremely faint, very small, round". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 03 50 13.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.85 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1486
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1486
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1486

NGC 1487 (PGC 3166843 (= PGC 14117 + PGC 14118 + PGC 14121))
Discovered (Oct 29, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.6 spiral galaxy (type Sm? pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 55 45.5, Dec -42 22 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1487 (= GC 790 = JH 2597, Dunlop 480, 1860 RA 03 51 04, NPD 132 46.7) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, gradually brighter middle, 2 stars in a triangle (with the object)".
Physical Information: Apparent size of the brighter regions is about 2.6 by 1.5 arcmin (from the images below), while with its extensions the galaxy spans about 6.5 arcmin. Listed in NED as PGC 14117 = PGC 14118, but in LEDA as three separate objects (PGC 14117, PGC 14118 and PGC 14121) with the combination of the three listed as PGC 3166843; which given the complex structure of the galaxy is not unreasonable.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1487
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1487
Below, a 6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy, showing its extensions
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1487 and its extended tail
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the core of the galaxy
DSS image of central portion of spiral galaxy NGC 1487
Below, a HST image of the same region (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, Wikimedia Commons)
HST image of central portion of spiral galaxy NGC 1487

NGC 1488 (= PGC 3325909)
Recorded (Nov 24, 1854) by
Edward Cooper
Also observed? (date?) by Arthur von Auwers
A magnitude 13.0 pair of stars in Taurus (RA 04 00 04.3, Dec +18 34 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1488 (= GC 791, Markree Catalogue, 1860 RA 03 52 01, NPD 71 50.1) is "a 12th magnitude star involved in nebulosity (Auwers 19)". Listed in LEDA as PGC 3325909 (and as an object of questionable nature).
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near the double star listed as NGC 1488
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the double star listed as NGC 1488

NGC 1489 (= PGC 14165)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)b?) in Eridanus (RA 03 57 38.1, Dec -19 13 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1489 (Muller list II (#394), 1860 RA 03 52 04, NPD 109 37.3) is "extremely faint, pretty small, extended 190. The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 03 51 24.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.7 by 0.6 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1489
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1489
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1489

NGC 1490 (= PGC 14040)
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Reticulum (RA 03 53 34.3, Dec -66 01 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1490 (= GC 792 = JH 2599, 1860 RA 03 52 23, NPD 156 25.7) is "pretty bright, small, very little extended, pretty much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.4 by 1.25 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1490
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1490
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1490

NGC 1491 (= LBN 704 = "PGC 3517585", in Sharpless 2-206)
Discovered (Dec 28, 1790) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Basilius Engelhardt
An emission nebula in Perseus (RA 04 03 13.7, Dec +51 19 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1491 (= GC 793 = WH I 258, Engelhardt, 1860 RA 03 52 51, NPD 39 04.9) is "very bright, small, irregular figure, brighter middle, mottled but not resolved, star involved". Listed in LEDA as PGC 3517585 (and as a nebula), but a search for that designation returns no result.
Physical Information: Apparent size of the bright central portion (which is what Herschel would have seen) is about 5 by 4 arcmin, while the entire nebula spans about 25 by 21 arcmin.
DSS image of region near emission nebula NGC 1491
Above, a 30 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1491
Below, a 22 by 25 arcmin wide image of the nebula
(Image Credit T.A. Rector (University of Alaska Anchorage), H. Schweiker & S. Pakzad (NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO image of emission nebula NGC 1491
Below, a 9 arcmin wide image of the central nebula
(Image Credit Adam Block/Mount Lemmon SkyCenter/University of Arizona)
Mount Lemmon SkyCenter image of central portion of emission nebula NGC 1491

NGC 1492 (= PGC 14186)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Eridanus (RA 03 58 13.1, Dec -35 26 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1492 (= GC 794 = JH 2598, 1860 RA 03 53 00, NPD 125 51.8) is "very faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.8 by 0.65 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1492
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1492
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1492

NGC 1493 (= PGC 14163)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.3 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)cd?) in Horologium (RA 03 57 27.4, Dec -46 12 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1493 (= GC 795 = JH 2600, Dunlop 438, 1860 RA 03 53 06, NPD 136 36.9) is "faint, considerably large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 5.2 by 4.5 arcmin (from the images below). Used by de Vaucouleurs as an example of galaxy type SB(rs)cd.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1493
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1493
Below, a 4.75 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 1493
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of part of the galaxy (Hubble Legacy Archive, Wikimedia Commons)
HST detail of part of spiral galaxy NGC 1493

NGC 1494 (= PGC 14169 = PGC 482465)
Discovered (Dec 28, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.7 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)d?) in Horologium (RA 03 57 42.2, Dec -48 54 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1494 (= GC 796 = JH 2601, 1860 RA 03 53 36, NPD 139 18.7) is "faint, large, round, very gradually a very little brighter middle, 3 stars to north".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.9 by 2.5 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1494
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1494
Below, a 3.8 by 4.3 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
(Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 1494
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the nucleus of the galaxy (Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of the nucleus of spiral galaxy NGC 1494

NGC 1495 (= PGC 14190 = PGC 537051 = PGC 3670393)
Discovered (Oct 24, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Horologium (RA 03 58 21.9, Dec -44 27 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1495 (= GC 797 = JH 2602, 1860 RA 03 53 47, NPD 134 53.0) is "extremely faint, small, a little extended 90░, very gradually a very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.4 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1495
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1495
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1495

NGC 1496 (= OCL 396 = "PGC 3517887")
Discovered (Nov 8, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 9.6 open cluster (type II1p) in Perseus (RA 04 04 30.0, Dec +52 39 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1496 (= GC 798 = JH 310, 1860 RA 03 53 47, NPD 37 45.8) is "a cluster, segment of a ring".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 arcmin? LEDA lists NGC 1496 as PGC 3517887 (an object of unknown type), but a search for that designation returns no result.
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 1496
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1496

NGC 1497 (= PGC 14331)
Discovered (Dec 11, 1876) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 13.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0? pec) in Taurus (RA 04 02 06.8, Dec +23 07 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1497 (= GC 5332, Stephan list VIII (#13), 1860 RA 03 53 49, NPD 67 15.8) is "extremely faint, very small, irregularly round, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.6 by 0.75 arcmin (from the images below). (There appear to be some faint fragments of the galaxy on its northern side, but given the low quality of the wide-field images, I can't be sure whether they are real or not, so the size listed here is only for the main part of the galaxy.) The galaxy has a dusty apparently polar ring wrapped around its nucleus.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1497
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1497
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1497
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the nucleus of the galaxy
(Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, Wikimedia Commons)
HST image of the dusty polar ring in the nucleus of lenticular galaxy NGC 1497
*Note to self: There are two ring galaxies (PGC 14314 and PGC 14315) on the western edge of the wide-field image;
add them to the PGC catalog when doing the final iteration of this entry
*

NGC 1498 (= "PGC 5067590")
Recorded (Feb 8, 1784) by
William Herschel
Three stars in Eridanus (RA 04 00 19.4, Dec -12 01 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1498 (= GC 799 = WH VII 3, 1860 RA 03 53 52, NPD 102 25.5) is "a cluster, small, compressed". LEDA lists NGC 1498 as PGC 5067590 (and as a triple star), but a search for that designation returns no result.
Physical Information: The individual stars appear to be between magnitude 13.6 and 14.0, making the overall brightness roughly magnitude 12.6.
DSS image of region near the three stars listed as NGC 1498
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1498

NGC 1499 (= LBN 756 = "PGC 3517586"), the California Nebula
Discovered (Nov 3, 1885) by
Edward Barnard
Also observed (date?) by Julius Scheiner
Also observed (Oct 27, 1891) by Friedrich Archenhold
A magnitude 5(?) emission nebula in Perseus (RA 04 03 13.0, Dec +36 22 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1499 (Barnard, 1860 RA 03 54 19, NPD 53 58.5) is "very faint, very large, extended north-south, diffuse". The first IC notes (per Scheiner) "is about half a degree in length". LEDA lists NGC 1499 as PGC 3517586 (and as a nebula), but a search for that designation returns no result.
Physical Information: Apparent size 120 by 60 arcmin? (Corwin lists the position of the brightest part of the nebula as shown above, but the geometric center to the northwest of that, at RA 04 00 39, Dec +36 30 00.)
DSS image of region near emission nebula NGC 1499, the California Nebula
Above, a 4 degree wide DSS image centered on NGC 1499
Below, a 2 by 4.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the nebula (with North at upper left)
DSS image of emission nebula NGC 1499, the California Nebula, rotated to show more detail
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1400 - 1449) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 1450 - 1499     → (NGC 1500 - 1549)