Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1550 - 1599) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 1600 - 1649 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 1650 - 1699)
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1600, 1601, 1602, 1603, 1604, 1605, 1606, 1607, 1608, 1609, 1610, 1611, 1612, 1613, 1614, 1615, 1616,
1617, 1618, 1619, 1620, 1621, 1622, 1623, 1624, 1625, 1626, 1627, 1628, 1629, 1630, 1631, 1632, 1633,
1634, 1635, 1636, 1637, 1638, 1639, 1640, 1641, 1642, 1643, 1644, 1645, 1646, 1647, 1648, 1649

Page last updated Nov 21, 2016
Checked for mis-spelling of DeLisle Stewart
WORKING: Check IDs, add/check pix, use to verify position, type, size

NGC 1600 (= PGC 15406)
Discovered (Nov 26, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Dec 28, 1826) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.9 elliptical galaxy (type E3??) in Eridanus (RA 04 31 39.9, Dec -05 05 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1600 (= GC 866 = JH 319 = WH I 158, 1860 RA 04 24 45, NPD 95 23.4) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, gradually much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 1.7? arcmin.

NGC 1601 (= PGC 15413)
Discovered (Jan 14, 1849) by
George Stoney
Also discovered by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Eridanus (RA 04 31 41.7, Dec -05 03 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1601 (= GC 867 = GC 5343, 3rd Lord Rosse, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 04 24 46, NPD 95 21.9) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 1602 (= PGC 15168)
Discovered (Dec 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 irregular galaxy (type IBm?? pec) in Dorado (RA 04 27 54.4, Dec -55 03 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1602 (= GC 870 = JH 2649, 1860 RA 04 24 48, NPD 145 22.0) is "extremely faint, pretty large, a little extended, the following (eastern) of 2", the other being NGC 1596.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.1? arcmin.
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 1602, also showing NGC 1596
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1602, also showing NGC 1596
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of irregular galaxy NGC 1602

NGC 1603 (= PGC 15424)
Discovered (Jan 14, 1849) by
George Stoney
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Eridanus (RA 04 31 49.9, Dec -05 05 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1603 (= GC 868, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 04 24 55, NPD 95 24.0) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 1604 (= PGC 15433)
Discovered (Dec 22, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Eridanus (RA 04 31 58.5, Dec -05 22 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1604 (Swift list VI (#16), 1860 RA 04 24 56, NPD 95 39.9) is "extremely faint, small, round, between a star and a double star".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 1605 (= OCL 406)
Discovered (Dec 11, 1786) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 10.7 open cluster (type III1m) in Perseus (RA 04 34 52.2, Dec +45 16 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1605 (= GC 871 = WH VI 26, 1860 RA 04 24 59, NPD 45 03.8) is a "cluster, very faint, pretty small, compressed, stars extremely small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.0? arcmin.

NGC 1606 (= PGC 15443)
Discovered (Jan 14, 1849) by
George Stoney
A magnitude 14.9 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a??) in Eridanus (RA 04 32 03.3, Dec -05 01 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1606 (= GC 869, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 04 25 05, NPD 95 21.0) is "extremely faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 1607 (= PGC 15442)
Discovered (Dec 14, 1881) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 13.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a??) in Eridanus (RA 04 32 03.1, Dec -04 27 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1607 (Stephan list XII (#30), 1860 RA 04 25 07, NPD 94 45.8) is "faint, small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 1608 (=
NGC 1593 = IC 2077 = PGC 15447)
Discovered (Nov 7, 1863) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 1593)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1876) by Lawrence Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse (and later listed as NGC 1608)
Discovered (Jan 15, 1898) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 2077)
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Taurus (RA 04 32 06.1, Dec +00 34 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1608 (= GC 5344, 4th Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 04 25 15, NPD 89 35.5) is "pretty faint, considerably small, 12th magnitude star 2 arcmin to north".
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 1593 for anything else.

NGC 1609 (= PGC 15480)
Discovered (Nov 26, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a??) in Eridanus (RA 04 32 45.0, Dec -04 22 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1609 (= GC 872 = WH III 585, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 04 25 47, NPD 94 39.6) is "very faint, extremely small, 17th magnitude star 45 arcsec to north".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 1610 (? =
NGC 1599 = PGC 15403 ?)
Recorded (1886) by Francis Leavenworth
Probably a lost or nonexistent object in Eridanus (RA 04 32 44.7, Dec -04 34 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1610 (Leavenworth list II (#396), 1860 RA 04 25 49, NPD 94 53.0) is "extremely faint, very small, round, brighter middle and nucleus".
As noted with question marks, this may be a duplicate of NGC 1599, but the general consensus seems to be that it is a lost or nonexistent object. Which is more likely to be true will be dealt with in the next iteration of this page, but whatever the result this entry appears destined to contain only historical information.

NGC 1611 (= PGC 15501)
Discovered (Nov 26, 1786) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a??) in Eridanus (RA 04 33 05.8, Dec -04 17 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1611 (= GC 873 = WH III 586, 1860 RA 04 26 10, NPD 94 35.8) is "extremely faint, small, extended 90°±".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 0.6? arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1611, also showing NGC 1609 and 1613
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1611, also showing NGC 1609 and NGC 1613
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1611

NGC 1612 (= PGC 15507)
Discovered (Dec 21, 1881) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a(r)?) in Eridanus (RA 04 33 13.1, Dec -04 10 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1612 (Stephan list XII (#31), 1860 RA 04 26 16, NPD 94 28.3) is "very faint, very small, round, gradually much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.3? arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1612, also showing NGC 1613
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1612, also showing NGC 1613
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1612

NGC 1613 (= PGC 15518)
Discovered (Dec 21, 1881) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a??) in Eridanus (RA 04 33 25.3, Dec -04 15 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1613 (Stephan list XII (#32), 1860 RA 04 26 29, NPD 94 33.8) is "faint, very small, round, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 1614 (= PGC 15538 =
Arp 186)
Discovered (Dec 29, 1885) by Lewis Swift
Also observed by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type SBc?? pec) in Eridanus (RA 04 33 59.8, Dec -08 34 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1614 (Swift list III (#30), 1860 RA 04 27 38, NPD 98 53.2) is "pretty faint, small, round, a little brighter middle". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 04 27 16.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.9? arcmin.
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 1614, also known as Arp 186, superimposed on an SDSS/DSS composite of the region near the galaxy
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS/SDSS/HST composite image centered on NGC 1614
(HST Image Credits above and below: NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration
and A. Evans (University of Virginia, Charlottesville/NRAO/Stony Brook University))

Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide HST image of NGC 1614
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 1614, also known as Arp 186
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy (Image Credits as above)
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 1614, also known as Arp 186
Below, an 0.9 arcmin wide HST image of part of the galaxy (Image credits as above)
HST closeup of spiral galaxy NGC 1614, also known as Arp 186

NGC 1615 (= PGC 15608)
Discovered (Jan 5, 1878) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type SA0?? pec) in Taurus (RA 04 36 01.9, Dec +19 57 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1615 (Stephan list IX (#3), 1860 RA 04 27 49, NPD 70 20.5) is "very faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle, very small star involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8? arcmin, not counting the galaxy's southeastern extension.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1615
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1615 (the stars at right are 6th and 7th magnitude)
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1615

NGC 1616 (= PGC 15479)
Discovered (Oct 24, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Caelum (RA 04 32 41.9, Dec -43 42 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1616 (= GC 874 = JH 2650, 1860 RA 04 28 20, NPD 134 00.5) is "faint, small, extended, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 1617 (= PGC 15405)
Discovered (Nov 5, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Dec 5, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.4 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)a?) in Dorado (RA 04 31 39.3, Dec -54 36 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1617 (= GC 875 = JH 2651, Dunlop 339??, 1860 RA 04 28 34, NPD 144 54.2) is "bright, large, much extended 106°, very gradually then very suddenly much brighter middle and nucleus 5 arcsec (across)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.3 by 2.1? arcmin. (Position based on central core in HST photo.)
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1617
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1617
Below, a 4.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1617
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy's core (Image Credit Wikimedia Commons, Hubble Legacy Archive))
HST closeup of the core of spiral galaxy NGC 1617

NGC 1618 (= PGC 15611)
Discovered (Feb 1, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Nov 24, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type SBb??) in Eridanus (RA 04 36 06.6, Dec -03 08 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1618 (= GC 876 = JH 320 = WH II 524, 1860 RA 04 29 07, NPD 93 26.6) is "faint, small, irregular figure, little brighter middle, 2 stars to southeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 0.8? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1618
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1618
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1618

NGC 1619
Recorded (Dec 22, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
Not found by Herbert Howe
A lost or nonexistent object in Eridanus (RA 04 36 11.4, Dec -04 49 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1619 (Swift list VI (#17), 1860 RA 04 29 16, NPD 95 07.3) is "most extremely faint, small, round". The second IC adds "Not found by Howe", and apparently no one else has been able to find it, either.

NGC 1620 (= PGC 15638)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Nov 23, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Eridanus (RA 04 36 37.2, Dec -00 08 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1620 (= GC 877 = JH 321 = WH II 514, 1860 RA 04 29 28, NPD 90 25.8) is "very faint, pretty large, much extended 140°, bright double star to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.6 by 1.0? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1620
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1620
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1620

NGC 1621 (=
NGC 1626 = PGC 15626)
Discovered (Dec 22, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 1621)
Discovered (1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 1626)
A magnitude 13.6 elliptical galaxy (type E4??) in Eridanus (RA 04 36 25.0, Dec -04 59 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1621 (Swift list VI (#18), 1860 RA 04 29 31, NPD 95 16.0) is "extremely faint, small, round, little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 1622 (= PGC 15635)
Discovered (Jan 16, 1850) by
George Stoney
Also observed by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type SBab??) in Eridanus (RA 04 36 36.6, Dec -03 11 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1622 (= GC 878 = GC 881, 3rd Lord Rosse, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 04 29 35, NPD 93 28.6) is "very faint, small, 20th magnitude star 5 seconds of time to west, (WH) II 524 to west", the latter object being NGC 1618.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.6 by 0.7? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1622
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1622 (glare is from 4th magnitude ν Eri)
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1622

NGC 1623 (= PGC 15591)
Discovered (Dec 31, 1885) by
Ormond Stone
A magnitude 15.6 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a??) in Eridanus (RA 04 35 32.2, Dec -13 33 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1623 (Ormond Stone list I (#135), 1860 RA 04 29 40, NPD 103 49.8) is "extremely faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 1624 (= OCL 403 + LBN 722)
Discovered (Dec 28, 1790) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 11.8 open cluster (type I2pn) & emission nebula in Perseus (RA 04 40 36.4, Dec +50 27 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1624 (= GC 879 = WH V 49, 1860 RA 04 29 48, NPD 39 50.2) is "faint, considerably large, irregular figure, 6 or 7 stars plus nebula".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0? arcmin.

NGC 1625 (= PGC 15654)
Discovered (Nov 24, 1827) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type SBb??) in Eridanus (RA 04 37 06.3, Dec -03 18 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1624 (= GC 880 = JH 322, 1860 RA 04 30 07, NPD 93 35.8) is "very faint, extended 141°, suddenly brighter middle, faint star attached on northwest, 6th magnitude star 48 seconds of time to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 1626 (=
NGC 1621 = PGC 15626)
Discovered (Dec 22, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 1621)
Discovered (1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 1626)
A magnitude 13.6 elliptical galaxy (type E4??) in Eridanus (RA 04 36 25.0, Dec -04 59 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1626 (Leavenworth list II (#397), 1860 RA 04 30 19, NPD 95 16.8) is "extremely faint, very small, round, 8th magnitude star to northwest".
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 1621 for anything else.

NGC 1627 (= PGC 15675)
Discovered (Dec 22, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Eridanus (RA 04 37 37.9, Dec -04 53 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1627 (Swift list VI (#19), 1860 RA 04 30 38, NPD 95 09.5) is "extremely faint, pretty large, round, 2 stars to southeast, southern of 2", the other being NGC 1628.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.5? arcmin.

NGC 1628 (= PGC 15674)
Discovered (Dec 22, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Eridanus (RA 04 37 36.1, Dec -04 42 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1628 (Swift list VI (#20), 1860 RA 04 30 41, NPD 94 59.5) is "very faint, pretty small, much extended north south, northern of 2", the other being NGC 1627.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 1629 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Dec 24, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.7 open cluster in Hydrus (RA 04 29 37.0, Dec -71 50 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1629 (= GC 882 = JH 2653, 1860 RA 04 31 14, NPD 162 08.1) is "very faint, pretty large, round, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1630 (= PGC 15659)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?? pec) in Eridanus (RA 04 37 15.4, Dec -18 54 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1630 (Leavenworth list II (#398), 1860 RA 04 31 47, NPD 109 11.8) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5? arcmin. Apparently accompanied by PGC 862277, but that galaxy is probably a more distant background object rather than an actual companion. Recessional velocity 9210 km/sec, z 0.030718.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1630
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1630
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 1630 and PGC 862277
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1630 and its apparent companion, PGC 862277

PGC 862277
Not an NGC object but listed here because an apparent companion of
NGC 1630
A magnitude 16.7 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Eridanus (RA 04 37 14.2, Dec -18 54 22)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.2 by 0.1? arcmin. Apparently a close companion of NGC 1630, but more likely to be an optical double rather than an actual companion. (NED lists as 2MASX J04371431-1854220.)

NGC 1631 (= PGC 15705)
Discovered (Dec 11, 1835) by
John Herschel
Also observed by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a??) in Eridanus (RA 04 38 24.1, Dec -20 39 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1631 (= GC 883 = JH 2652, 1860 RA 04 32 20, NPD 110 55.6) is a "nebula; no description". The second IC adds (per Howe) "The description should be very faint, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 1632 (probably =
IC 386 = PGC 15769)
Discovered (1886) by Frank Muller (and later listed as NGC 1632)
Discovered (Feb 6, 1893) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 386)
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type SAB(rs)0/a?) in Eridanus (RA 04 39 58.5, Dec -09 27 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1632 ( Muller list II (#399), 1860 RA 04 32 28, NPD 99 43.7) is "extremely faint, very small, round". The position precesses to RA 04 39 08.7, Dec -09 26 54, but there is nothing there. There are two "nearby" galaxies at about the right declination, 13th-magnitude IC 382 about 75s to the west of the NGC position, and 14th-magnitude IC 386 about 50s to the east. Some references have chosen the brighter western galaxy as NGC 1632, but aside from being closer to the eastern galaxy, NGC 1632's description better matches that of IC 386 (which is described as "very faint and very small", while IC 382 is "pretty bright and pretty large"), so general opinion is that NGC 1632 is identical to IC 386.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.65 by 0.35? arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 386, which is probably NGC 1632
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 386, which is probably NGC 1632
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 386, which is probably NGC 1632

NGC 1633 (= PGC 15774)
Discovered (Dec 9, 1798) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 8, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SBab??) in Taurus (RA 04 40 09.1, Dec +07 20 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1633 (= GC 884 = JH 323 = WH III 952, 1860 RA 04 32 36, NPD 82 56.3) is "extremely faint, small, round, 8th magnitude star to southwest, preceding (western) of double nebula", the other being NGC 1634.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9? arcmin. Recessional velocity 4990 km/sec. A possible companion of NGC 1634.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1633 and its possible companion, NGC 1634
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1633 and its possible companion, NGC 1634
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the pair
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1633 and its possible companion, NGC 1634

NGC 1634 (= PGC 15775)
Discovered (Dec 9, 1798) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 13, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Taurus (RA 04 40 09.8, Dec +07 20 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1634 (= GC 885 = JH 324 = WH III 953, 1860 RA 04 32 37, NPD 82 57.0) is "extremely faint, very small, following (eastern) of double nebula", the other being NGC 1633.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3? arcmin. Recessional velocity 4410 km/sec. A possible companion of NGC 1633, which see for images.

NGC 1635 (= PGC 15773)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Nov 23, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a??) in Eridanus (RA 04 40 07.9, Dec -00 32 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1635 (= GC 886 = JH 325 = WH II 515, 1860 RA 04 33 01, NPD 90 49.6) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle, 11th magnitude star 12.5 seconds of time to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.3? arcmin.

NGC 1636 (= PGC 15800)
Discovered (Jan 30, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 6, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type Sab??) in Eridanus (RA 04 40 40.2, Dec -08 36 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1636 (= GC 887 = JH 326 = JH 2654 = WH II 522, 1860 RA 04 33 57, NPD 98 52.8) is "very faint, pretty small, round, very gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved, star 1 arcmin to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 1637 (= PGC 15821)
Discovered (Feb 1, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Nov 24, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.8 spiral galaxy (type SBc??) in Eridanus (RA 04 41 28.2, Dec -02 51 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1637 (= GC 888 = JH 327 = WH I 122, 1860 RA 04 34 26, NPD 93 07.8) is "considerably bright, large, round, very gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.3 by 2.7? arcmin.
NOAO image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1637 superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS/NOAO image centered on NGC 1637
(NOAO Image Credit above and below Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide NOAO image of the galaxy
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 1637
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy's core (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, Wikimedia Commons)
HST closeup of central portion of spiral galaxy NGC 1637

NGC 1638 (= PGC 15824)
Discovered (Feb 1, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 12.0 lenticular galaxy (type SB0??) in Eridanus (RA 04 41 36.4, Dec -01 48 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1638 (= GC 890 = WH II 525, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 04 34 33, NPD 92 04.7) is "faint, pretty large, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.2? arcmin.

NGC 1639
Recorded (Dec 10, 1835) by
John Herschel
Also observed by Herbert Howe
Three stars in Eridanus (RA 04 40 52.3, Dec -16 59 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1639 (= GC 889 = JH 2655, 1860 RA 04 34 37, NPD 107 16.1) is "extremely faint, very small, round, between 2 stars". The second IC adds "Only 3 stars 12.5 magnitude forming an equilateral triangle found by Howe".

NGC 1640 (= PGC 15850)
Discovered (Dec 11, 1885) by
Ormond Stone
A magnitude 11.7 spiral galaxy (type SBab??) in Eridanus (RA 04 42 14.5, Dec -20 26 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1638 (Ormond Stone list I (#136), 1860 RA 04 34 40, NPD 110 41.6) is "very faint, pretty small, extended 40°, gradually brighter middle". The first IC lists a corrected RA (also per Ormond Stone) of 04 36 10.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.7 by 2.3? arcmin.

NGC 1641 (not in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Dec 2, 1834) by
John Herschel
Also observed by Herbert Howe
An open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 35 38.0, Dec -65 46 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1641 (= GC 891 = JH 2656, 1860 RA 04 35 30, NPD 156 04.8) is a "cluster, pretty large, pretty rich, pretty much compressed, stars from 11th to 16th magnitude". The second IC adds (per Howe) "The description should be very faint, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 9.0 by 6.0? arcmin. Formerly thought to be in the Large Magellanic Cloud (and still listed as such in several references, so it was also listed as such in this entry until recently), but WEBDA distance studies show that it is only about 3900 light years away, so it is in our galaxy, not the LMC. Its Hertzsprung-Diagram indicates that it is about 1.6 million years old.

NGC 1642 (= PGC 15867)
Discovered (Dec 29, 1861) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Taurus (RA 04 42 54.9, Dec +00 37 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1641 (= GC 892, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 04 35 45, NPD 89 39.7) is "faint, round, cometary, making a triangle with two 18th magnitude stars to the east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.2? arcmin.

NGC 1643 (= PGC 15891)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 10, 1830) by John Herschel
Also observed by Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (1877) by John Dreyer
Also observed (1903) by Isaac Roberts
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Eridanus (RA 04 43 43.9, Dec -05 19 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1643 (= GC 893 = JH 328 = WH III 588, 1860 RA 04 36 51, NPD 95 35.0) is "extremely faint, very small, irregularly round, brighter middle". The second IC adds "Is not extremely faint. Roberts in 1903 found it bright, pretty large; d'Arrest has faint or pretty faint. I found it faint in 1877."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 1644 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (1826) by
James Dunlop (226)
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 37 39.6, Dec -66 11 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1644 (= GC 894 = JH 2657, 1860 RA 04 37 07, NPD 156 27.9) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6? arcmin.

NGC 1645 (= PGC 15903)
Discovered (Oct 31, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?? pec) in Eridanus (RA 04 44 06.3, Dec -05 27 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1645 (= GC 5345, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 04 37 10, NPD 95 43.7) is "very faint, pretty small, round (h 328 to northwest)", (JH) 328 being NGC 1643.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 1646 (= PGC 15914)
Discovered (Jan 30, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 8, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Eridanus (RA 04 44 23.5, Dec -08 31 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1646 (= GC 895 = JH 329 = WH II 523, 1860 RA 04 37 41, NPD 98 47.2) is "faint, very small, irregularly round, brighter middle, 7th magnitude star to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.3? arcmin. Listed as apparently associated with two faint galaxies, but one (NGC 1646 NED02) may not even exist, and the other (PGC 3084954) is probably only an optical double.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1646, also showing NGC 1648
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1646, also showing NGC 1648
The 6th magnitude star to the west is 56 Eridani
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy and its apparent companion(s)
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1646

"NGC 1646 NED02"
Not an NGC object, but listed here since supposedly associated with
NGC 1646
A nonexistent or magnitude 15.0 compact galaxy (type C??) in Eridanus (RA 04 44 23.8, Dec -08 32 05)
Physical Information: Apparent size is listed as 0.3 by 0.3? arcmin, but the image of NGC 1646 (which see) shows nothing of note at its supposed position.

PGC 3084954
Not an NGC object, but listed here since supposedly associated with
NGC 1646
A magnitude 15.8 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Eridanus (RA 04 44 26.2, Dec -08 32 07)
Physical Information: Given their apparent proximity, the relative lack of distortion of either galaxy suggests that PGC 3084954 is almost certainly not a companion of NGC 1646 (which see for images), but merely a much more distant background galaxy. Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2 arcmin.

NGC 1647 (= OCL 457)
Discovered (Feb 15, 1784) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 6.4 open cluster (type II2m) in Taurus (RA 04 45 42.2, Dec +19 07 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1647 (= GC 896 = WH VIII 8, 1860 RA 04 37 55, NPD 71 11.4) is a "cluster, very large, large stars, scattered".
Physical Information: Apparent size 40? arcmin.

NGC 1648 (= PGC 15886 = PGC 15920)
Discovered (Dec 29, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Eridanus (RA 04 44 34.7, Dec -08 28 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1648 (Swift list III (#31), 1860 RA 04 38 10, NPD 98 44.3) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, very difficult, (WH) II 523 to southwest", II 523 being NGC 1646.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5? arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1648, also showing NGC 1646
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1648, also showing NGC 1646
The glare at right is from 6th magnitude 56 Eridani
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1648

NGC 1649 (=
NGC 1652, an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1652)
Discovered (Dec 24, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1649)
A magnitude 13.1 open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 38 22.5, Dec -68 40 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1649 (= GC 897 = JH 2660, 1860 RA 04 38 37, NPD 159 05.1) is "faint, pretty small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 1649, in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1649
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the cluster
DSS image of open cluster NGC 1649, in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1550 - 1599) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 1600 - 1649     → (NGC 1650 - 1699)