Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1650 - 1699) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 1700 - 1749 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 1750 - 1799)
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Page last updated Aug 28, 2014
Checked for mis-spelling of DeLisle Stewart
WORKING 1741: Check for better images, HCG 31 IDs and entries
WORKING 1716: Add images, check positions, types, sizes

NGC 1700 (= PGC 16386)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 11, 1830) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.2 elliptical galaxy (type E4? pec) in Eridanus (RA 04 56 56.3, Dec -04 51 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1700 (= GC 932 = JH 336 = WH IV 32, 1860 RA 04 50 02, NPD 95 05.3) is "considerably bright, small, much brighter starlike middle".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3890 km/sec, NGC 1700 is about 180 million light years away, in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 100 to 160 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 4.1 by 2.4 arcmin, it is about 215 thousand light years across. X-ray images show that the nucleus of the galaxy is surrounded by a nearly 100 thousand light year wide flattened disk of multi-million degree gas rotating in a way that suggests it was formed by the merger of two prior galaxies about 3 billion years ago.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1700
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1700
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1700
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide X-ray image of the galaxy (Image Credit NASA/Ohio U./T.Statler et al)
Chandra X-ray image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1700

NGC 1701 (= PGC 16352)
Discovered (Nov 6, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type (R)SA(r)ab?) in Caelum (RA 04 55 51.2, Dec -29 53 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1701 (= GC 933 = JH 2676, 1860 RA 04 50 25, NPD 120 06.2) is "faint, small, very little extended, gradually a little brighter middle, 10th magnitude star 75 arcsec to southeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.25 by 0.95 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1701
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1701
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1701

NGC 1702 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Possibly observed (Aug 3, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 12, 1836) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 open cluster in Mensa (RA 04 49 27.4, Dec -69 51 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1702 (= GC 934 = JH 2680, Dunlop 73?, 1860 RA 04 50 27, NPD 160 05.5) is a "cluster, very faint, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.08 by 0.075 arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 1702, in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1702
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the cluster
DSS image of open cluster NGC 1702, in the Large Magellanic Cloud

NGC 1703 (= PGC 16234)
Discovered (Dec 4, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.3 spiral galaxy (type SABbc?) in Dorado (RA 04 52 51.9, Dec -59 44 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1703 (= GC 935 = JH 2678, 1860 RA 04 50 49,, NPD 149 58.0) is "faint, large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle, double star attached".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.2 by 3.2 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1703
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1703
Below, a 3.8 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 1703

NGC 1704 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Dec 24, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.5 open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 49 55.4, Dec -69 45 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1704 (= GC 936 = JH 2683, (Dunlop 110), 1860 RA 04 50 54, NPD 159 59.2) is "faint, pretty small, a little extended, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.5 arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 1704, in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1704
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the cluster
DSS image of open cluster NGC 1704, in the Large Magellanic Cloud

NGC 1705 (= PGC 16282)
Discovered (Dec 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 irregular galaxy (type Im?) in Pictor (RA 04 54 13.4, Dec -53 21 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1705 (= GC 937 = JH 2679, 1860 RA 04 51 09, NPD 143 35.2) is "pretty faint, small, round, pretty much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 1.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 1705
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1705
Below, a 2.3 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of irregular galaxy NGC 1705
Below, a 0.5 by 0.6 arcmin wide image of the galaxy's core (NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)))
HST image of core of irregular galaxy NGC 1705

NGC 1706 (= PGC 16220)
Discovered (Dec 25, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)ab?) in Dorado (RA 04 52 31.1, Dec -62 59 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1706 (= GC 938 = JH 2682, 1860 RA 04 51 15, NPD 153 13.5) is "faint, pretty small, round, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.75 by 1.0 arcmin. Perhaps accompanied by a smaller galaxy to its north.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1706
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1706
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1706

NGC 1707 (=
IC 2107)
Discovered (Jan 8, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1707)
Discovered (Dec 25, 1899) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 2107)
A group of stars in Orion (RA 04 58 21.0, Dec +08 14 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1707 (= GC 939 = JH 338, 1860 RA 04 51 16, NPD 81 58.7) is "small, round, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars".
DSS image of region near the group of stars listed as NGC 1707
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1707

NGC 1708
Discovered (Feb 16, 1831) by
John Herschel
An open cluster in Camelopardalis (RA 05 03 21.0, Dec +52 49 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1708 (= GC 940 = JH 337, 1860 RA 04 51 32, NPD 37 19.9) is a "cluster, very large, pretty rich, a little compressed, large and small stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 20 by 12 arcmin; elongated north south.
DSS image of the group of region near open cluster NGC 1708
Above, a 24 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1708

NGC 1709 (=
NGC 1717 = PGC 16462)
Discovered (Jan 15, 1849) by George Stoney (and later listed as NGC 1717)
Discovered (Dec 8, 1854) by R. J. Mitchell (and later listed as NGC 1709)
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Orion (RA 04 58 44.1, Dec -00 28 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1709 (= GC 944, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 04 51 36, NPD 90 41.1) is "very faint, very small, northwest of (WH) II 516", WH II 516 being NGC 1713.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.95 by 0.7 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1709, also showing NGC 1713
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1709, also showing NGC 1713
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1709

NGC 1710 (=
IC 2108 = PGC 16396)
Discovered (Nov 14, 1885) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 1710)
Also observed by Ormond Stone (after listing as NGC 1710)
Discovered (Dec 9, 1896) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 2108)
A magnitude 12.7 lenticular galaxy (type E/SA0?) in Lepus (RA 04 57 16.8, Dec -15 17 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1710 (Leavenworth list I (#140), 1860 RA 04 51 40, NPD 105 30.9) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle and nucleus, 13th magnitude star involved". The first IC lists a corrected RA (per Ormond Stone) of 04 50 56.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.25 by 0.8 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1710
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1710
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1710

NGC 1711 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1826) by
James Dunlop (73, 76)
Also observed (Nov 11, 1836) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.1 open cluster in Mensa (RA 04 50 37.8, Dec -69 59 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1711 (= GC 941 = JH 2684, Dunlop 76?, 1860 RA 04 51 45, NPD 160 13.0) is a "globular cluster, bright, small, irregularly round, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars of magnitude 14".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 2.2 by 2.2 arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 1711
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1711
Below, a 3.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of open cluster NGC 1711
Below, a 1.1 arcmin wide image of part of the cluster (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, Wikimedia Commons)
HST image of part of open cluster NGC 1711

NGC 1712 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Dec 24, 1834) by John Herschel
An open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 50 58.0, Dec -69 24 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1712 (= GC 942 = JH 2685, (Dunlop 112), 1860 RA 04 51 46, NPD 159 39.8) is a "cluster, pretty bright, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 4.0 by 3.5 arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 1712
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1712

NGC 1713 (= PGC 16471)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Nov 23, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.7 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Orion (RA 04 58 54.6, Dec -00 29 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1713 (= GC 943 = JH 339 = WH II 516, 1860 RA 04 51 47, NPD 90 41.7) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.7 by 1.8 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1713, also showing NGC 1709
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1713, also showing NGC 1709
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1713

NGC 1714 (= an EN in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.6 emission nebula in Dorado (RA 04 52 08.1, Dec -66 55 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1714 (= GC 945 = JH 2686, 1860 RA 04 52 00, NPD 157 08.9) is "very bright, small, extended or bi-nuclear, brighter middle, southwestern of 2", the other being NGC 1715.
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.6 by 1.0 arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.
DSS image of region near emission nebulae NGC 1714 and NGC 1715
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1714, also showing NGC 1715
Below, another image of the same region (Image Credit C. Smith, S. Points, the MCELS Team & NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO image of region near emission nebulae NGC 1714 and NGC 1715
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 1714 and 1715
DSS image of emission nebulae NGC 1714 and NGC 1715

NGC 1715 (= an EN in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by
John Herschel
An emission nebula in Dorado (RA 04 52 11.1, Dec -66 54 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1715 (= GC 946 = JH 2687, 1860 RA 04 52 03, NPD 157 07.8) is "very faint, small, round, suddenly brighter middle, 2 stars near, northeastern of 2", the other being NGC 1714, which see for images.
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.1 by 0.85 arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

WORKING HERE

NGC 1716 (= PGC 16434)
Discovered (Dec 11, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Lepus (RA 04 58 13.2, Dec -20 21 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1716 (= GC 947 = JH 2681, 1860 RA 04 52 16, NPD 110 34.7) is "pretty faint, pretty large, round, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.2? arcmin.

NGC 1717 (=
NGC 1709 = PGC 16462)
Discovered (Jan 15, 1849) by George Stoney (and later listed as NGC 1717)
Discovered (Dec 8, 1854) by R. J. Mitchell (and later listed as NGC 1709)
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Orion (RA 04 58 44.0, Dec -00 28 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1717 (= GC 949, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 04 52±, NPD 90 28) is "northwest of h 340 (perhaps a faint star?)", (JH) 340 being NGC 1719.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 1709 for anything else.

NGC 1718 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 52 25.4, Dec -67 03 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1718 (= GC 950 = JH 2688, 1860 RA 04 52 20, NPD 157 16.7) is "faint, pretty small, round, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.
*HLA images available*
WORKING HERE: Look for non-DSS/SDSS images

NGC 1719 (= PGC 16501)
Discovered (Nov 23, 1827) by
John Herschel
Also observed by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Sa??) in Orion (RA 04 59 34.5, Dec -00 15 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1719 (= GC 948 = JH 340, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 04 52 26, NPD 90 27.9) is "pretty faint, small, irregularly round, pretty suddenly a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 1720 (= PGC 16485)
Discovered (Dec 30, 1861) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type SBab??) in Eridanus (RA 04 59 20.5, Dec -07 51 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1720 (= GC 951, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 04 52 37, NPD 98 04.0) is "pretty faint, pretty large, a little brighter middle, h 341 near", (JH) 341 being NGC 1726.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.2? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1720, also showing part of NGC 1726 at top left
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1720, also showing part of NGC 1726
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1720

NGC 1721 (= PGC 16484)
Discovered (Nov 10, 1885) by
Edward Barnard
Discovered (Dec 2, 1885) by Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.8 lenticular galaxy (type (R')SAB0^0(s)? pec) in Eridanus (RA 04 59 17.4, Dec -11 07 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1721 (Barnard, Swift list III (#32), 1860 RA 04 52 40, NPD 101 20.6) is "very faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4500 km/sec, NGC 1721 is about 210 million light years away. However, it is the namesake of the NGC 1721 group of galaxies, all the other members of which have Hubble distances close to 180 million light years; so it is probably closer to that distance, and simply moving away from the other group members at several hundred km/sec (such peculiar velocities are not that unusual, even in small groups). Given that and its apparent size of 2.1 by 1.5 arcmin, it is about 110 thousand light years across (this includes the large ringlike structure surrounding the core of the galaxy, presumably caused by gravitational or collisional interaction with its companions). The NGC 1721 Group consists of NGC 1721, 1723, 1725 and 1728.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1721, also NGC 1725 and NGC 1728
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1721, also showing NGC 1725 and 1728
Below, a 5 arcmin wide DSS/NOAO image of NGC 1721, 1725 and 1728
(Image Credits: Richard and Leslie Maynard/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1721 overlaid on a DSS image to fill in missing areas, also showing NGC 1725 and NGC 1728
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS/NOAO image of NGC 1721 and part of NGC 1725 (Image Credit as above)
Composite of NOAO and DSS images of lenticular galaxy NGC 1721, showing the surrounding ringlike structure, and at lower left, part of NGC 1725
Below, a 10 by 15 arcmin NOAO/DSS image of the NGC 1721 group (Image Credits as above)
NOAO image of the NGC 1721 group, ahowing galaxies NGC 1721, NGC 1723, NGC 1725 and NGC 1728, overlaid on a DSS image to fill in missing areas

NGC 1722 (= an OCL and EN in the LMC)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Nov 3, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 04 51 50.7, Dec -69 23 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1722 (= GC 952 = JH 2689, (Dunlop 112), 1860 RA 04 52 42, NPD 159 37.2) is a "cluster, pretty faint, small, round, 2nd of 3".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1723 (= PGC 16493)
Discovered (Jan 12, 1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel
Also observed (Nov 10, 1885) by Edward Barnard
A magnitude 11.7 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)a? pec) in Eridanus (RA 04 59 25.9, Dec -10 58 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1723 (Tempel list V (#3), Barnard, 1860 RA 04 52 50, NPD 101 11.5) is "faint, between two 9th magnitude stars, 10th magnitude stars north and south, 3rd star to east".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3740 km/sec, NGC 1723 is about 175 million light years away, in poor agreement with a single redshift-independent distance estimate of 105 million light years. Presuming the larger distance is more accurate, its apparent size of 3.6 by 2.5 arcmin suggests that it is about 180 thousand light years across. NGC 1723 is believed to be a member of the NGC 1721 Group (most of whose members have recessional velocities and Hubble expansion distances comparable to those of NGC 1723), consisting of NGC 1721, 1723, 1725 and 1728.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1723
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1723; for a wider view of the region see NGC 1721
Below, a 3.75 by 3.6 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
(Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 1723

NGC 1724 (= OCL 405)
Discovered (Apr 30, 1864) by
George Rümker
A group of stars in Auriga (RA 05 03 33.0, Dec +49 29 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1724 (= GC 5347, George Rümker, 1860 RA 04 52 53, NPD 40 42.4) is a "cluster, very small, stars plus nebula?".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 1725 (= PGC 16488)
Discovered (Nov 10, 1885) by
Edward Barnard
Discovered (Dec 2, 1885) by Lewis Swift
Also observed by Sherburne Burnham
A magnitude 12.8 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Eridanus (RA 04 59 22.9, Dec -11 07 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1725 (= Barnard, Swift list III (#33), 1860 RA 04 52 55, NPD 101 20.9) is "extremely faint, very small, round". The first IC adds (per Burnham) that the seconds of RA should be 46.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3885 km/sec, NGC 1725 is about 180 million light years away. Given that and its 1.2 by 1.0? arcmin apparent size, it is about 65 thousand light years across. It is part of the NGC 1721 Group, consisting of NGC 1721, 1723, 1725 and 1728.
NOAO image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1725, also showing part of lenticular galaxy NGC 1721 and spiral galaxy NGC 1728, superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing areas at bottom right
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide NOAO/DSS image of NGC 1725, and parts of NGC 1721 and 1728
(Image Credit Richard & Leslie Maynard/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
See NGC 1721 for wider-field views

NGC 1726 (= PGC 16508)
Discovered (Jan 8, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Eridanus (RA 04 59 41.9, Dec -07 45 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1726 (= GC 953 = JH 341, 1860 RA 04 52 59, NPD 97 58.0) is "faint, round, 13th magnitude star to south".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.4? arcmin.

NGC 1727 (= an OCL and EN in the LMC)
Discovered (1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 3, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.1 open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 04 52 20.0, Dec -69 20 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1727 (= GC 954 = JH 2690, (Dunlop 113), 1860 RA 04 53 01, NPD 159 34.1) is a "cluster, pretty bright, pretty small, pretty much extended, stars of 12th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1728 (= PGC 16495)
Discovered (Nov 10, 1885) by
Edward Barnard
Discovered (Dec 2, 1885) by Lewis Swift
Also observed by Sherburne Burnham
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec) in Eridanus (RA 04 59 27.8, Dec -11 07 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1728 (Barnard, Swift list III (#34), 1860 RA 04 53 05, NPD 101 20.6) is "very faint, very small, round". The first IC lists a corrected RA (per Burnham) of 04 52 51.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3765 km/sec, NGC 1728 is about 175 million light years away. Given that and its 2.0 by 0.7? arcmin apparent size, it is about 100 thousand light years across. NGC 1728 is part of the NGC 1721 Group, consisting of NGC 1721, 1723, 1725 and 1728.
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 1728, also showing part of NGC 1725
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1728, also showing part of NGC 1725
(Image Credit Richard & Leslie Maynard/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
See NGC 1721 for wider-field views

NGC 1729 (= PGC 16529)
Discovered (Feb 1, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed by Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (Nov 20, 1886) by Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)c?) in Orion (RA 05 00 15.6, Dec -03 21 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1729 (= GC 955 = WH III 503, d'Arrest, (Swift list ?? #??), 1860 RA 04 53 13, NPD 93 35.1) is "very faint, pretty large, 2 bright stars very near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.4? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1729
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1729
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1729

NGC 1730 (=
IC 2113 = PGC 16499)
Discovered (Nov 14, 1885) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 1730)
Also observed (Oct 9, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 1730)
Discovered (1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 2113)
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)a>) in Lepus (RA 04 59 31.7, Dec -15 49 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1730 (Swift list V (#??), Ormond Stone list I, 1860 RA 04 53 13, NPD 106 02.1) is "faint, pretty small, a little extended, between 2 faint stars (per Ormond Stone, a double nebula of 10 arcsec separation)" (Stone's paper lists the supposed double nebula as #141 and #142, and gives a position angle of 110° between them).
Discovery Notes: Stone published the list referred to by Dreyer, but in it he gives credit for the actual observation to Leavenworth.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 1.0? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1730
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1730
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1730

NGC 1731
Discovered (Dec 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 9.9 open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 04 53 32.1, Dec -66 55 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1731 (= GC 956 = JH 2691, 1860 RA 04 53 23, NPD 157 08.6) is a "cluster, pretty large, a little rich, a little compressed, stars from 10th to 15th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 8.0? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud? or a foreground object?

NGC 1732 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 53 10.6, Dec -68 39 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1732 (= GC 957 = JH 2694, 1860 RA 04 53 43, NPD 158 52.4) is "small, round, close double star in middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1733 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Jan 3, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 54 04.8, Dec -66 40 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1733 (= GC 958 = JH 2693, 1860 RA 04 53 49, NPD 156 53.7) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1734 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.1 open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 53 33.6, Dec -68 46 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1734 (= GC 959 = JH 2695, 1860 RA 04 54 08, NPD 158 59.3) is "pretty bright, large, round, gradually much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1735 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 10.8 open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 54 19.7, Dec -67 05 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1735 (= GC 960 = JH 2696, 1860 RA 04 54 19, NPD 157 18.9) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round, 2 stars attached".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1736 (= an EN in the LMC)
Discovered (Dec 30, 1836) by
John Herschel
An emission nebula in Dorado (RA 04 53 01.6, Dec -68 03 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1736 (= GC 961 = JH 2697, 1860 RA 04 54 19, NPD 158 17.3) is "bright, round, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1737 (= an EN in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 11, 1836) by
John Herschel
An emission nebula in Dorado (RA 04 53 57.8, Dec -69 10 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1737 (= GC 962 = JH 2698, 1860 RA 04 54 32, NPD 159 24.2) is "very faint, small, 1st of 4", the 2nd being NGC 1743.
Physical Information: In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1738 (= PGC 16585)
Discovered (Dec 11, 1885) by
Ormond Stone
Also observed by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)bc? pec) in Lepus (RA 05 01 46.5, Dec -18 09 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1738 (Ormond Stone list I (#143), 1860 RA 04 54 40, NPD 108 21.8) is "very faint, small, extended 45°". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 04 55 36.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.7? arcmin. Part of a physical pair with NGC 1739.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 1738 and NGC 1739
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1738 and 1739
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the pair
DSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 1738 and NGC 1739
Below, the image above with an HST overlay (Credits: HST/NASA/ESA; Source: Cosmic Astronomy)
(The HST image is of poor quality and unknown orientation; so the superposition may be slightly "off")

Raw HST image (a 'preview' of unknown origin and orientation) superimposed on a DSS closeup of spiral galaxies NGC 1738 and NGC 1739

NGC 1739 (= PGC 16586)
Discovered (Dec 11, 1885) by
Ormond Stone
Also observed by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)bc? pec) in Lepus (RA 05 01 47.3, Dec -18 10 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1739 (Ormond Stone list I (#144), 1860 RA 04 54 40, NPD 108 21.8) is "extremely faint, very small, a little extended, in field with last", the last being NGC 1738. The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 04 55 37.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.8? arcmin. Part of a physical pair with NGC 1738 (which see for images).

NGC 1740 (= PGC 16589)
Discovered (Feb 11, 1830) by
John Herschel
Also observed by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Orion (RA 05 01 54.7, Dec -03 17 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1740 (= GC 965 = JH 342, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 04 54 41, NPD 93 30.8) is "extremely faint, very small, 12th magnitude star to southwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.2? arcmin.

WORKING HERE: Check Hickson Group IDs, update that page, check for better images

NGC 1741 (= PGC 16570 + PGC 16574), also known as
Arp 259
and as part (HCG 31A and 31B) of Hickson Compact Group 31

Discovered (Jan 6, 1878) by Édouard Stephan
A pair of spiral galaxies in Eridanus
PGC 16570 = A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)m? pec) at RA 05 01 35.4, Dec -04 15 48
PGC 16574 = A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type Sdm? pec) at RA 05 01 38.7, Dec -04 15 32
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1741 (Stephan list IX (#5), 1860 RA 04 54 43, NPD 94 27.9) is "very faint, very small, very small excentric part involved", the last comment suggesting that Stephan was able to sense the complex nature of the object.
Physical Information: Apparent size of PGC 16570 is 0.55 by 0.15 arcmin; of PGC 16574 is 0.95 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near the pair of interacting galaxies listed as NGC 1741, also known as Arp 259, and as part of Hickson Compact Group 31; also shown is IC 399, which is also part of Hickson Compact Group 31
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1741, also showing IC 399
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide HST image of NGC 1741 (Image Credit as below)
HST image of PGC 16570 and PGC 16574, the pair of interacting galaxies listed as NGC 1741, also known as Arp 259, and as part of Hickson Compact Group 31
(Image Credits above and below: Hubble Legacy Archive, Acknowledgment Stephen Byrne)
Below, a detail of the pair (rotated with North down and to right to allow for more detail)
HST detail of the pair of interacting galaxies listed as NGC 1741, also known as Arp 259, and as part of Hickson Compact Group 31
Below, a 2.7 arcmin wide view of the region between NGC 1741 and IC 399 (Image Credits as above)
HST image of region between irregular galaxy IC 399, which is part of Hickson Compact Group 31, and peculiar galaxy group NGC 1741, which is also known as Arp 259 and is also part of Hickson Compact Group 31
**BETTER LINK AVAILABLE HERE??**

NGC 1742
Recorded (Dec 29, 1866) by
Robert Ball
A magnitude 13(?) star in Orion (RA 05 02 00.5, Dec -03 17 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1742 (= GC 5348, Ball (using Lord Rosse's Leviathan), 1860 RA 04 54 45, NPD 93 30.4) is "very faint, very small, 3.6 seconds of time to the east of h 342", (JH) 342 being NGC 1740.

NGC 1743 (= an EN in the LMC)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Nov 3, 1834) by John Herschel
An emission nebula in Dorado (RA 04 54 03.2, Dec -69 11 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1743 (= GC 963 = JH 2699, Dunlop 114, 1860 RA 04 54 49, NPD 159 25.3) is "bright, pretty large, round, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved, 2nd of 4", the 1st and 3rd being NGC 1737 and 1745.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 2.0? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1744 (= PGC 16517)
Discovered (Nov 20, 1835) by
John Herschel
Also observed by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 11.1 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)cd?) in Lepus (RA 04 59 57.6, Dec -26 01 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1744 (= GC 964 = JH 2692, 1860 RA 04 54 51, NPD 116 14.6) is "faint, very large, very much extended, very gradually very little brighter middle". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 04 54 14.
Physical Information: Apparent size 8.1 by 4.4 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1744
Above, a 15 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1744
Below, a 9 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1744

NGC 1745 (= an EN and OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 11, 1836) by
John Herschel
An open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 04 54 20.7, Dec -69 09 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1745 (= GC 966 = JH 2702, 1860 RA 04 55 08, NPD 159 23.2) is "faint, small, 3rd of 4", the 2nd and 4th being NGC 1743 and 1748.
Physical Information: In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1746 (= OCL 452 (and ? =
NGC 1750 ?))
Perhaps observed (Dec 26, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1750)
Discovered (Nov 9, 1863) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 1746)
A magnitude 6.1 group of stars in Taurus (RA 05 03 50, Dec +23 46 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1746 (= GC 5349, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 04 55 09, NPD 66 24.2) is a "cluster, poor".
Physical Information: Apparent size 40? arcmin. NGC 1746 is closely associated with NGC 1750, and may be the same object under a different name (although Steinicke states that NGC 1750 is not a cluster). As a result, see NGC 1750 for a discussion of their relationship and images of the region containing the objects (the next iteration of these pages will reassess the historical evidence and may slightly alter the discussion).

NGC 1747 (= an OCL and EN in the LMC?)
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 9.4 open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 04 55 11.0, Dec -67 10 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1747 (= GC 967 = JH 2701, 1860 RA 04 55 13, NPD 157 23.5) is a "cluster, pretty small, a little rich, stars very small".
Physical Information: In the Large Magellanic Cloud? or a foreground object?

NGC 1748 (=
IC 2114, an EN in the LMC)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1826) by James Dunlop (and later listed as NGC 1748)
Discovered (Nov 11, 1836) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1748)
Discovered (1901) by Williamina Fleming (and later listed as IC 2114)
An emission nebula in Dorado (RA 04 54 23.7, Dec -69 11 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1748 (= GC 968 = JH 2704, (Dunlop 114), 1860 RA 04 55 14, NPD 159 25.1) is "pretty bright, very small, round, 4th of 4", the 3rd being NGC 1745.
Physical Information: In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1749 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Dec 30, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.6 open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 54 56.1, Dec -68 11 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1749 (= GC 969 = JH 2703, 1860 RA 04 55 17, NPD 158 24.4) is "very faint, round, preceding (western) of 2", the other being NGC 1755.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.
DSS image of open cluster NGC 1749, also showing NGC 1755, both of which lie in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 6 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1749, also showing NGC 1755
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1650 - 1699) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 1700 - 1749     → (NGC 1750 - 1799)