Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1700 - 1749) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 1750 - 1799 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 1800 - 1849)
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1750, 1751, 1752, 1753, 1754, 1755, 1756, 1757, 1758, 1759, 1760, 1761, 1762, 1763, 1764, 1765, 1766,
1767, 1768, 1769, 1770, 1771, 1772, 1773, 1774, 1775, 1776, 1777, 1778, 1779, 1780, 1781, 1782, 1783,
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Page last updated Sep 2, 2014
Checked for mis-spelling of DeLisle Stewart
WORKING 1750+ for pix, query re N11/NGC 1760

NGC 1750 (? =
NGC 1746, or just part of that object ?)
Discovered (Dec 26, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1750)
Recorded (Nov 9, 1863) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 1746)
An open cluster in Taurus (RA 05 03 54.0, Dec +23 39 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1750 (= GC 970 = WH VIII 43, 1860 RA 04 55 19, NPD 66 33.3) is a "cluster, large stars, very considerably scarce".
Discovery Notes: Herschel discovered NGC 1750 in 1785. 78 years later d'Arrest observed a nearby cluster that was catalogued as NGC 1746. It is likely that both observed the same cluster and simply recorded different positions, but there are differing interpretations: (1) that NGC 1750 is only the southeastern portion of NGC 1746, or (2) that the two are the same cluster, and should therefore have the same designation.
Physical Information: There is another cluster (NGC 1758) northeast of NGC 1746/1750, but it is physically unrelated to them (being about 500 light years more distant), and just happens to be in nearly the same direction. (Presuming that NGC 1750 is only part of NGC 1746, its apparent size is about 25 by 12 arcmin.)
DSS image of region containing open clusters NGC 1746, 1750, and 1758
Above, a 1 degree wide DSS image showing NGC 1750, NGC 1746 and NGC 1758
Below, a "mapped" view of the image, showing the approximate position of each cluster
Map based on DSS image of region near open clusters NGC 1746, 1750, and 1758
(Note to self: The supposed sizes of the clusters do not correspond to the map; need to reconcile.)

NGC 1751 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 12, 1836) by John Herschel
A magnitude 14.5 open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 54 12.1, Dec -69 48 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1751 (= GC 971 = JH 2705, (Dunlop 78), 1860 RA 04 55 19, NPD 160 02.0) is "extremely faint, pretty large, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.
*HLA image available on Wikimedia Commons*

NGC 1752 (= PGC 16600)
Discovered (Dec 30, 1861) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)c?) in Eridanus (RA 05 02 09.6, Dec -08 14 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1752 (= GC 972, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 04 55 26, NPD 98 26.8) is "faint, pretty large, pretty much extended, two or three 11th magnitude stars to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.6 by 0.8? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1752
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1752
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1752

NGC 1753 (= PGC 16610)
Discovered (Oct 31, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sa??) in Orion (RA 05 02 32.2, Dec -03 20 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1753 (Swift list V (#67), 1860 RA 04 55 30, NPD 93 33.2) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, southeast of h 342", (JH) 342 being NGC 1740.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.6? arcmin.
*SDSS image*

NGC 1754 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 12, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 open cluster in Mensa (RA 04 54 17.9, Dec -70 26 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1754 (= GC 973 = JH 2708, 1860 RA 04 55 37, NPD 160 39.8) is "faint, small, round, 13th magnitude star attached at 135".
Physical Information: In the Large Magellanic Cloud.
*HLA image available on Wikimedia Commons*

NGC 1755 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Oct 3, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Dec 30, 1836) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.9 open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 55 14.9, Dec -68 12 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1755 (= GC 976 = JH 2706, Dunlop 167, 1860 RA 04 55 37, NPD 158 25.7) is "very bright, pretty large, round, gradually brighter middle", following (eastern) of 2", the other being NGC 1749
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.6? arcmin. Given that and the approximately 160 thousand light years' distance of the Large Magellanic Cloud, NGC 1755 is about 120 light years across, an exceptionally large size for an open cluster. That and its densely packed spherical shape suggests that it may be a globular cluster, instead of an open cluster.
DSS image of region near open (or perhaps globular) cluster NGC 1755, also showing NGC 1749
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1755, also showing NGC 1749
Below, a 6 arcmin wide DSS image of the clusters
DSS image of open (or perhaps globular) cluster NGC 1755, also showing NGC 1749
*HLA image available on Wikimedia Commons*

NGC 1756 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 11, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.2 open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 54 49.9, Dec -69 14 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1756 (= GC 974 = JH 2707, 1860 RA 04 55 38, NPD 159 27.4) is "very faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud
*HLA image available on Wikimedia Commons*

NGC 1757
Recorded (Feb 20, 1830) by
John Herschel
Not seen by Rudolf Spitaler (while listed as NGC 1757)
A lost or nonexistent object in Eridanus (RA 05 02 39.3, Dec -04 43 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1757 (= GC 975 = JH 343, 1860 RA 04 55 45, NPD 94 55.6) is a "very large diffuse nebula in zigzags??". The first IC adds "Not seen by Spitaler".

NGC 1758 (= OCL 453)
Discovered (Dec 26, 1785) by
William Herschel
An open cluster (type IV1p) in Taurus (RA 05 04 36.0, Dec +23 47 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1758 (= GC 977 = WH VII 21, 1860 RA 04 55 6, NPD 66 25.4) is a "cluster, pretty compressed, stars large and small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 40? arcmin. NGC 1758 is closely aligned with NGC 1746 and 1750 in the sky, but is not physically connected with them, being about 500 light years more distant. See NGC 1750 for a view of the region containing the clusters, and a "map" of their relative positions.

NGC 1759 (= PGC 16547)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Caelum (RA 05 00 49.0, Dec -38 40 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1759 (= GC 978 = JH 2700, 1860 RA 04 56 06, NPD 128 55.0) is "very faint, pretty large, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.2? arcmin.

WORKING HERE: Some references equate this to NGC 1760, others treat that as only part of N11

"N11" (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Not an NGC/IC object, but listed here since several structures inside it are listed as such
A large region of emission nebulae and star clusters in
Dorado
Several of the NGC objects on this page are part of a large region of emission nebulae and star clusters known as "N11"; so once completed, this entry will provide a reference and finding chart for those objects (for now, all I'm offering is a wide-field image without any labels)
NOAO image of the star-forming region known as N11, in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Above, a half degree wide image of N11 (Image Credit C. Aguilera, C. Smith & S. Points/NOAO/AURA/NSF)

NGC 1760 (= an EN in the LMC)
Probably discovered (Aug 3, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Dec 13, 1835) by John Herschel
An emission nebula in Dorado (RA 04 56 36.0, Dec -66 31 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1760 (= GC 979 = JH 2709, (Dunlop 231), 1860 RA 04 56 16, NPD 156 43.9) is "very faint, small, 3 very small stars involved".
Physical Information: In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1761 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Possibly observed (Aug 3, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Dec 13, 1835) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.9 open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 56 42.0, Dec -66 28 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1761 (= GC 980 = JH 2710, (Dunlop 231?), 1860 RA 04 56 19, NPD 156 41.1) is a "cluster, large, much compressed, double star of 9th magnitude".
Discovery Notes: Dunlop's#231 is listed as NGC 1760, but is also listed as possibly being an observation of NGC 1761. This is due to his reductions (the mathematical conversion of observations to reliable positions in the sky) being poor at best, and exactly what object one of his observations represents often being a mystery. When (John) Herschel was able to find and verify the existence of an object in Dunlop's list, Dunlop is generally credited with the discovery. When Herschel could not find Dunlop's object or was uncertain about whether he had, Herschel is generally credited with the discovery. In this case, Herschel (or Dreyer) decided that the emission nebula (NGC 1760) was the more likely object listed as Dunlop's #231; but since the nearby open cluster covers some distance, it is possible that Dunlop's observation referred to either or both objects, hence the confusing attribution.
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.5 by 4.5 arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Also in the region known as "N11".
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 1761
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1761

NGC 1762 (= PGC 16654)
Discovered (Oct 8, 1785) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Orion (RA 05 03 37.0, Dec +01 34 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1762 (= GC 981 = WH III 453, 1860 RA 04 56 25, NPD 88 34.5) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 1763 (= an EN in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 6, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by John Herschel
An emission nebula in Dorado (RA 04 56 45.0, Dec -66 25 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1763 (= GC 982 = JH 2711, (Dunlop 230), 1860 RA 04 56 32, NPD 156 37.2) is "very bright, very large, very irregularly much extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.0 by 3.0? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1764 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Jan 2, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 56 27.8, Dec -67 41 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1764 (= GC 983 = JH 2713, 1860 RA 04 56 42, NPD 157 54.6) is "very faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud

NGC 1765 (= PGC 16444)
Discovered (Dec 26, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type SB0??) in Dorado (RA 04 58 24.3, Dec -62 01 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1765 (= GC 984 = JH 2712, 1860 RA 04 56 52, NPD 152 14.2) is "considerably faint, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 1766 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Dec 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.2 open cluster in Mensa (RA 04 55 57.7, Dec -70 13 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1766 (= GC 985 = JH 2717, 1860 RA 04 57 15, NPD 160 26.3) is "considerably faint, small, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7? arcmin.in the Large Magellanic Cloud

NGC 1767 (= an OCL + EN in the LMC)
Discovered (probably in Nov 1834 or Dec 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 10.6 open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 04 56 27.4, Dec -69 24 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1767 (= GC 5062 = JH (123), 1860 RA 04 57 18, NPD 159 36.5) has "no description (in Nubecula major)", "JH (123)" referring to the object's inclusion in a supplementary catalog of objects observed by Herschel in the Large Magellanic Cloud.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1768 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Oct 3, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Dec 30, 1836) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 57 00.2, Dec -68 14 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1768 (= GC 986 = JH 2718, (Dunlop 168), 1860 RA 04 57 22, NPD 158 28.1) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1769 (in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 6, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by John Herschel
An open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 57 44.7, Dec -66 27 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1769 (= GC 987 = JH 2716, (Dunlop 232), 1860 RA 04 57 30, NPD 156 39.9) is "bright, large, irregularly round, very suddenly much brighter middle like a double star of 10th magnitude".
Physical Information: Steinicke states an emission nebula, not an open cluster. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1770 (= an OCL + EN in the LMC)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 23, 1834) by John Herschel
An open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 04 57 18.0, Dec -68 24 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1770 (= GC 988 = JH 2715, Dunlop 169, 1860 RA 04 57 40, NPD 158 37.7) is a "cluster plus nebula, pretty large, pretty rich, stars from 11th to 18th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1771 (= PGC 16472)
Discovered (Dec 25, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SAB(r)c?) in Dorado (RA 04 58 55.6, Dec -63 17 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1771 (= GC 989 = JH 2720, 1860 RA 04 57 48, NPD 153 20.7) is "very faint, much extended, gradually a little brighter middle, 7.8 magnitude star to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 0.5? arcmin.
Monochrome DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1771
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1771
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
Monochrome DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1771

NGC 1772 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Dec 24, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.0 open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 56 52.9, Dec -69 33 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1772 (= GC 990 = JH 2722, (Dunlop 81), 1860 RA 04 57 49, NPD 159 46.0) is "pretty bright, pretty small, irregularly round, partially resolved, some stars seen".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1773 (= an EN in the LMC)
Discovered (Jan 3, 1837) by
John Herschel
An emission nebula in Dorado (RA 04 58 12.0, Dec -66 21 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1773 (= GC 991 = JH 2721, 1860 RA 04 57 50, NPD 156 34.0) is "pretty faint, pretty large, irregularly round, 2 or 3 bright stars near".
Physical Information: In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1774 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 10.8 open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 58 06.9, Dec -67 14 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1774 (= GC 992 = JH 2723, 1860 RA 04 58 11, NPD 157 27.1) is "bright, small, round, suddenly much brighter middle, double star plus nebula".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1775 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 12, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 open cluster in Mensa (RA 04 56 53.4, Dec -70 25 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1775 (= GC 993 = JH 2725, 1860 RA 04 58 19, NPD 160 38.4) is "extremely faint, pretty large, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7? arcmin. In the Lage Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1776 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Jan 3, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 58 39.8, Dec -66 25 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1776 (= GC 994 = JH 2724, 1860 RA 04 58 23, NPD 156 38.0) is "very faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1777 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 26, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 open cluster in Mensa (RA 04 55 47.8, Dec -74 17 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1777 (= GC 995 = JH 2728, 1860 04 58 28, NPD 164 29.7) is "extremely faint, extended, 9th magnitude double star attached on the east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1778 (= OCL 429)
Discovered (Jan 17, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 3, 1832) by John Herschel
A magnitude 7.7 open cluster (type III2p) in Auriga (RA 05 08 05.0, Dec +37 01 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1778 (= GC 996 = JH 344 = WH VIII 61, 1860 RA 04 58 36, NPD 53 08.3) is a "cluster, pretty compressed, a little rich, irregular figure, stars large".
Physical Information: Apparent size 8.0? arcmin.

NGC 1779 (= PGC 16713)
Discovered (Jan 30, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 6, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.1 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a??) in Eridanus (RA 05 05 18.0, Dec -09 08 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1779 (= GC 997 = JH 345 = JH 2714 = WH III 500, 1860 RA 04 58 38, NPD 99 20.5) is "pretty bright, small, round, gradually pretty much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 1.4? arcmin.

NGC 1780 (= PGC 16743)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
Also observed by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 1780)
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type SB0??) in Lepus (RA 05 06 20.7, Dec -19 28 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1780 (Ormond Stone list I (#145), 1860 RA 04 58 40, NPD 109 38.6) is "extremely faint, extremely small, gradually brighter middle". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 05 00 16.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 1781 (=
NGC 1794 = PGC 16788)
Discovered (Feb 6, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1781)
Not found by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 1781)
Discovered (Dec 11, 1885) by Ormond Stone (and later listed as NGC 1794)
A magnitude 12.6 lenticular galaxy (type SB0??) in Lepus (RA 05 07 55.1, Dec -18 11 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1781 (= GC 998 = WH III 268, 1860 RA 04 58 43, NPD 108 22.9) is "extremely faint, very small, stellar". The second IC states "Not found by Howe, is = 1794; see note in NGC", so the identity of the two listings has been known for over a century.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 1782 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Dec 16, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 10.5 open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 57 51.2, Dec -69 23 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1782 (= GC 999 = JH 2727, 1860 RA 04 58 44, NPD 159 36.3) is a "globular cluster, pretty bright, small, round, pretty much brighter middle, partially resolved, some stars seen".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1783 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Dec 13, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 10.9 globular cluster in Dorado (RA 04 59 08.8, Dec -65 59 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1783 (= GC 1000 = JH 2726, 1860 RA 04 58 44, NPD 156 11.6) is "considerably bright, large, round, very gradually pretty much brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 4 by 3? arcmin. NGC 1783 is an intermediate age cluster (approximately 1400 million years ) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. It is one of the most massive clusters in the LMC, save for ancient globulars formed well over ten thousand million years ago, and as a result most references list it as a globular, but because of its lower age and mass (compared to the more ancient clusters), it is often referred to as an open cluster instead.
DSS image of region near globular cluster NGC 1783, in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1783
Below, a 5 arcmin wide DSS image of the cluster
DSS image of globular cluster NGC 1783, in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide image of the core of the cluster (Hubble Legacy Archive, Wikisky cutout)
HST image of central portion of globular cluster NGC 1783, in the Large Magellanic Cloud

NGC 1784 (= PGC 16716)
Discovered (Dec 11, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.7 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)c?) in Lepus (RA 05 05 27.1, Dec -11 52 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1784 (= GC 1001 = JH 2719, 1860 RA 04 58 57, NPD 102 04.1) is "pretty bright, pretty large, very little extended, very gradually brighter middle, among stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.8 by 2.6? arcmin.
NOAO image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1784, superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a 12 arcmin wide NOAO/DSS image centered on NGC 1784
Below, a 5 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit above and below Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 1784

NGC 1785
Discovered (probably in Nov 1834 or Dec 1835) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Dorado (RA 04 58 35.3, Dec -68 50 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1785 (= GC 1002 = JH (147), 1860 RA 04 59 12, NPD 159 03.6) has "no description, in Nubecula major", "JH (147)" referring to the object's inclusion in a supplementary catalog of objects observed by Herschel in the Large Magellanic Cloud.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0? arcmin; merely a chain of 5 to 10 stars.

NGC 1786 (= a GCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Dec 20, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 10.9 globular cluster (type II) in Dorado (RA 04 59 07.9, Dec -67 44 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1786 (= GC 1003 = JH 2729, 1860 04 59 21, NPD 157 57.0) is "very bright, pretty small, a little extended, very suddenly very much brighter middle equivalent to 9th magnitude star".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud

NGC 1787
Discovered (Dec 25, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 10.9 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 00 02.0, Dec -65 47 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1787 (= GC 1004 = JH 2731, 1860 RA 04 59 52, NPD 156 02.7) is a "cluster, very large, pretty rich".
Physical Information: Apparent size 23? arcmin. In the direction of the Large Magellanic Cloud, but a foreground object in our own galaxy.

NGC 1788
Discovered (Feb 1, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 11, 1830) by John Herschel
Also observed (Nov 24, 1887) by Lewis Swift (list ?? # ??)
A reflection nebula in Orion (RA 05 06 53.2, Dec -03 20 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1788 (= GC 1005 = JH 347 = WH V 32, 1860 RA 04 59 57, NPD 93 32.7) is "bright, considerably large, round, brighter middle like a 15th magnitude triple star, 10th magnitude star involved in the nebulosity at a distance of 1 1/2 arcmin, and position angle 318".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.0 by 3.0? arcmin.

NGC 1789 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Dec 15, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.1 open cluster in Mensa (RA 04 57 51.2, Dec -71 54 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1789 (= GC 1006 = JH 2733, 1860 RA 04 59 58, NPD 162 05.6) is "very faint, pretty small, round, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1790
Discovered (Feb 16, 1831) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Auriga (RA 05 11 07.2, Dec +52 03 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1790 (= GC 1007 = JH 346, 1860 RA 05 00 13, NPD 38 07.1) is a "cluster, group of eight or nine 10th magnitude stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 15? arcmin.

NGC 1791 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Dec 16, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13,1 open cluster in Mensa (RA 04 59 06.6, Dec -70 10 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1791 (= GC 1008 = JH 2734, 1860 RA 05 00 20, NPD 160 21.8) is "extremely faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1792 (= PGC 16709)
Discovered (May 10, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Dec 24, 1835) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.2 spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)bc?) in Columba (RA 05 05 13.8, Dec -37 58 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1792 (= GC 1009 = JH 2730, Dunlop 531?, 1860 RA 05 00 24, NPD 128 11.6) is "very bright, very large, much extended 314, gradually a little bright middle, partially resolved, some stars seen".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.2 by 2.6? arcmin.
ESO image of spiral galaxy NGC 1792, superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a 12 arcmin wide ESO/DSS image centered on NGC 1792
Below, a 6 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit above and below: ESO/T. Barthel)
ESO image of spiral galaxy NGC 1792

NGC 1793 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 24, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 59 38.3, Dec -69 33 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1793 (= GC 1010 = JH 2736, 1860 RA 05 00 36, NPD 159 45.4) is "faint, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1794 (=
NGC 1781 = PGC 16788)
Discovered (Feb 6, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1781)
Not found by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 1781)
Discovered (Dec 11, 1885) by Ormond Stone (and later listed as NGC 1794)
A magnitude 12.6 lenticular galaxy (type SB0??) in Lepus (RA 05 07 55.1, Dec -18 11 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1794 (Ormond Stone list I (#146), 1860 RA 05 00 40, NPD 108 21.6) is "very faint, extremely small, gradually brighter middle (= (WH) III 268?)", WH III 268 being NGC 1781. The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 05 01 45. Dreyer's 1912 discussion of Herschel's catalog adds "1794 is = III 268, (1860) RA 05 01 45", thereby confirming his earlier suspicion about the identity with NGC 1781.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 1781 for anything else.

NGC 1795 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 12, 1836) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 open cluster in Dorado (RA 04 59 47.0, Dec -69 48 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1795 (= GC 1011 = JH 2738, Dunlop 81, 1860 RA 05 00 59, NPD 159 59.6) is "faint, pretty large, a little extended". (Steinicke states = Dunlop 82.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1796 (= PGC 16617)
Discovered (Dec 26, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)c? pec) in Dorado (RA 05 02 42.8, Dec -61 08 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1796 (= GC 1012 = JH 2735, 1860 RA 05 01 01, NPD 151 19.5) is "pretty faint, pretty small, pretty much extended, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.0? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1796
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1796
Below, a 2.4 arcmin DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1796

PGC 16698 (= "NGC 1796A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 1796A since in general area of
NGC 1796
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type Sab??) in Dorado (RA 05 05 03.3, Dec -61 29 02)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.5? arcmin.

PGC 16787 (= "NGC 1796B")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 1796B since in general area of
NGC 1796
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Dorado (RA 05 07 53.7, Dec -61 11 26)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.3? arcmin. Recessional velocity 5555 km/sec.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 16787, sometimes called NGC 1796B, and spiral galaxy PGC 16789
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 16787, also showing PGC 16789
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the apparent pair
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 16787, sometimes called NGC 1796B, and spiral galaxy PGC 16789

PGC 16789
Not an NGC object but sometimes called part of NGC 1796B due to apparent proximity to
PGC 16787
A magnitude 15.7 spiral galaxy (type S?? pec) in Dorado (RA 05 07 55.8, Dec -61 11 37)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.2? arcmin. Apparent companion of PGC 16787 (which see for images), but whether they are physical companions or merely an optical double is unknown; though based on currently available images, an optical double seems more likely.

NGC 1797 (= PGC 16781)
Discovered (Feb 13, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(rs)a? pec) in Eridanus (RA 05 07 44.9, Dec -08 01 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1797 (Swift list VI (#23), 1860 RA 05 01 03, NPD 98 12.5) is "most extremely faint, small, round, very faint star to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.0? arcmin. A starburst galaxy.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1797, also showing NGC 1799
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1797, also showing NGC 1799
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1797

NGC 1798 (= OCL 410)
Discovered (November 1885) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 10.0 open cluster (type II2m) in Auriga (RA 05 11 39.3, Dec +47 41 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1798 (Barnard, 1860 RA 05 01 07, NPD 42 31.2) is "small, a cluster or a cluster plus nebulosity".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.0? arcmin.

NGC 1799 (= PGC 16783)
Discovered (Feb 13, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type SB0^0? pec) in Eridanus (RA 05 07 44.5, Dec -07 58 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1799 (Swift list VI (#24), 1860 RA 05 01 08, NPD 98 09.5) is "very faint, very small, very little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6? arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1799, also showing NGC 1797
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1799, also showing NGC 1797
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1799
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1700 - 1749) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 1750 - 1799     → (NGC 1800 - 1849)