Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1750 - 1799) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 1800 - 1849 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 1850 - 1899)
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1800, 1801, 1802, 1803, 1804, 1805, 1806, 1807, 1808, 1809, 1810, 1811, 1812, 1813, 1814, 1815, 1816,
1817, 1818, 1819, 1820, 1821, 1822, 1823, 1824, 1825, 1826, 1827, 1828, 1829, 1830, 1831, 1832, 1833,
1834, 1835, 1836, 1837, 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842, 1843, 1844, 1845, 1846, 1847, 1848, 1849

Page last updated Jul 20, 2015
Checked for mis-spelling of DeLisle Stewart
WORKING: Add basic pix, tags

NGC 1800 (= PGC 16745)
Discovered (Nov 19, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 irregular galaxy (type IB(s)m?) in Columba (RA 05 06 25.4, Dec -31 57 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1800 (= GC 1013 = JH 2732, 1860 RA 05 11 11, NPD 122 08.7) is "pretty bright, pretty much extended, gradually pretty much brighter middle, 13th magnitude star to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.1? arcmin.
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 1800
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1800
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of irregular galaxy NGC 1800

NGC 1801 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 24, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.2 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 00 34.6, Dec -69 36 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1801 (= GC 1014 = JH 2739, (Dunlop 115), 1860 RA 05 01 34, NPD 159 48.5) is "faint, pretty large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle, preceding (western) of 2", the other presumably being NGC 1809.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1802
Discovered (Dec 7, 1785) by
William Herschel
An open cluster or group of stars in Taurus (RA 05 10 14.0, Dec +24 07 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1802 (= GC 1015 = WH VIII 41, 1860 RA 05 01 44, NPD 66 04.8) is a "cluster, stars considerably scattered".
Physical Information: Apparent size 20? arcmin.

NGC 1803 (= PGC 16715)
Discovered (Dec 28, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)bc?) in Pictor (RA 05 05 26.7, Dec -49 34 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1803 (= GC 1016 = JH 2737, 1860 RA 05 01 52, NPD 139 45.8) is "faint, small, round, very gradually a little brighter middle, 11th magnitude star to the southeast, perhaps nebulous".
Discovery Notes: As it happens, the "11th magnitude star to the southeast" was indeed nebulous and is PGC 16720, which is therefore discussed immediately following.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.25 by 0.7 arcmin (directly measured from image below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1803, also showing PGC 16720
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1803, also showing PGC 16720
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy (glare is from 5th magnitude ηβ Pictoris)
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1803

PGC 16720
Not an NGC object but listed here since in Corwin's
ngcnot notes
Discovered (Dec 28, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type SAB0(r)a?) in Pictor (RA 05 05 34.0, Dec -49 35 47)
Historical Identification: As noted in Dreyer's entry for NGC 1803, Herschel suspected that the 11th magnitude star to the southeast was also nebulous. As noticed by Steve Gottlieb, the only 11th magnitude object to the southeast of NGC 1803 is PGC 16720, so Herschel was correct in thinking it might be nebulous, and the identification of that "star" with PGC 16720 is certain. Since Herschel wrote "perhaps nebulous", Dreyer did not give it an NGC entry of its own, so it is listed in Corwin's "notngc" notes. (If it had been in the NGC it might have been a little further down on this page, but since it is byproduct of the identification of NGC 1803, it seems best to place its entry here.)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4390 km/sec, PGC 16720 is about 205 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.65 by 0.45 arcmin, it is 35 to 40 thousand light years across.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 16720
Above, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of PGC 16720; see NGC 1803 for a wide-field view

NGC 1804 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.9 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 01 03.3, Dec -69 04 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1804 (= GC 1017 = JH 2742, 1860 RA 05 01 52, NPD 159 16.9) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1805 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.6 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 02 21.4, Dec -66 06 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1805 (= GC 1018 = JH 2741, Dunlop 233?, 1860 RA 05 02 02, NPD 156 18.1) is "bright, very small, very suddenly much brighter middle, stars plus nebulosity".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1806 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Dec 30, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11(?) open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 02 11.4, Dec -67 59 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1806 (= GC 1019 = JH 2745, 1860 RA 05 02 32, NPD 158 11.3) is "pretty bright, large, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1807 (= OCL 462)
Discovered (Jan 25, 1832) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 7.0 group of stars or open cluster (type II2p) in Taurus (RA 05 10 46.0, Dec +16 30 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1807 (= GC 1020 = JH 348, 1860 RA 05 02 38, NPD 73 39.6) is a "cluster, pretty rich, large and small stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 12? arcmin.

NGC 1808 (= PGC 16779)
Discovered (May 10, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Dec 24, 1835) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.9 spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(s)a?) in Columba (RA 05 07 42.5, Dec -37 30 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1808 (= GC 1021 = JH 2740, Dunlop 549, 1860 RA 05 02 50, NPD 127 41.8) is "bright, large, extended, pretty suddenly bright middle". (Steinicke also lists this as Dunlop 532)
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.5 by 3.9? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1808
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1808
Below, a 9 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy and its surrounding ring
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1808
Below, a 4 arcmin wide HST/DSS image of the central galaxy
(Image Credits: Jim Flood (Amateur Astronomers Inc., Sperry Observatory), Max Mutchler (STScI), Hubblesite)
HST image of part of spiral galaxy NGC 1808 overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the core of the galaxy (Image credits as above, but different Hubblesite image)
HST image of core of spiral galaxy NGC 1808

NGC 1809 (= PGC 16599)
Discovered (Dec 24, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.1 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Dorado (RA 05 02 05.3, Dec -69 34 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1809 (= GC 1022 = JH 2747, 1860 RA 05 03 05, NPD 159 49.2) is "pretty faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle, 2nd of 2", the other presumably being NGC 1801.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.2 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 1810 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 23, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.9 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 03 23.3, Dec -66 22 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1810 (= GC 1023 = JH 2746, Dunlop 235, 1860 RA 05 03 09, NPD 156 34.3) is "considerably faint, small, round, a little brighter middle, globular cluster following (to the east)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1811 (= PGC 16811)
Discovered (Nov 6, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Sa??) in Columba (RA 05 08 42.5, Dec -29 16 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1811 (= GC 1024 = JH 2743, 1860 RA 05 03 17, NPD 119 27.9) is "considerably faint, small, a little extended, preceding (western) of 2", theother being NGC 1812.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 1812 (= PGC 16819)
Discovered (Nov 6, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type Sa??) in Columba (RA 05 08 52.8, Dec -29 15 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1812 (= GC 1025 = JH 2744, 1860 RA 05 03 27, NPD 119 26.1) is "faint, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle, following (eastern) of 2", the other being NGC 1811.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 1813 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Dec 16, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 open cluster in Mensa (RA 05 02 40.4, Dec -70 19 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1813 (= GC 1026 = JH 2752, 1860 RA 05 03 55, NPD 160 30.7) is "very faint, small, round, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1814 (= an OCL and EN in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 9.0 open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 03 46.5, Dec -67 18 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1814 (= GC 1027 = JH 2748, 1860 RA 05 03 55, NPD 157 29.7) is "very faint, round, smaller of 2 in cluster", the other being NGC 1816, and the cluster that contains both of them being NGC 1820.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Part of NGC 1820.

NGC 1815 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 24, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 open cluster in Mensa (RA 05 02 27.3, Dec -70 37 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1815 (= GC 1028 = JH 2753, 1860 RA 05 03 56, NPD 160 48.6) is "faint, very small, round, very little brighter middle, among stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1816 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Jan 2, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 9.0 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 03 50.8, Dec -67 15 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1816 (= GC 1029 = JH 2750, 1860 RA 05 03 59, NPD 157 27.0) is "very faint, round, 2nd nebula in cluster", the other being NGC 1814, and the cluster that contains both of them being NGC 1820.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Part of NGC 1820.

NGC 1817 (= OCL 463)
Discovered (Feb 19, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 25, 1832) by John Herschel
A magnitude 7.7 open cluster (type III1m) in Taurus (RA 05 12 27.0, Dec +16 41 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1817 (= GC 1030 = JH 349 = WH VII 4, 1860 RA 05 03 59, NPD 73 28.7) is a "cluster, large, rich, a little compressed, stars from 11th to 14th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 20? arcmin.

NGC 1818 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Nov 2, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.7 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 04 14.8, Dec -66 26 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1818 (= GC 1031 = JH 2749, Dunlop 236, 1860 RA 05 04 02, NPD 156 37.1) is a "globular cluster, very bright, pretty large, round, very much compressed, partially resolved, some stars seen". (Steinicke also lists this as Dunlop 234.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.4? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1819 (= PGC 16899)
Discovered (Dec 26, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed by Guillaume Bigourdan (while listed as NGC 1819)
A magnitude 12.5 lenticular galaxy (type SB0??) in Orion (RA 05 11 46.0, Dec +05 12 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1819 (Swift list III (#36), 1860 RA 05 04 10, NPD 84 58.2) is "very faint, small, round". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 05 04 21.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 1820 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Jan 2, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 9.0 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 04 04.0, Dec -67 16 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1820 (= GC 1032 = JH 2754, 1860 RA 05 04 22, NPD 157 26.8) is a "cluster, pretty large, rich, compressed, irregular figure".
Physical Information: In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1821 (= PGC 16898)
Discovered (Dec 26, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 1821)
A magnitude 13.3 irregular galaxy (type IBm??) in Lepus (RA 05 11 46.0, Dec -15 08 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1821 (Leavenworth list I (#147), 1860 RA 05 04 40, NPD 105 17.4) is "very faint, very small, a little extended". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 05 05 25. Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 1822 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Dec 20, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 05 09.2, Dec -66 12 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1822 (= GC 1033 = JH 2756, 1860 RA 05 04 48, NPD 156 23.8) is "very faint, small, preceding (western) of 2", the other being NGC 1826.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1823 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 12, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.1 open cluster in Mensa (RA 05 03 25.0, Dec -70 20 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1823 (= GC 1034 = JH 2758, 1860 RA 05 04 52, NPD 160 31.9) is a "cluster, pretty faint, large, irregular figure, stars from 12th to 15th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1824 (= PGC 16761)
Discovered (Dec 26, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type SBm??) in Dorado (RA 05 06 56.0, Dec -59 43 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1824 (= GC 1035 = JH 2755, 1860 RA 05 04 53, NPD 149 54.2) is "very faint, pretty large, very much extended 162°".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.2 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 1825 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (probably in Nov 1834 or Dec 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 04 19.0, Dec -68 55 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1825 (= GC 1036 = JH (199), 1860 RA 05 05 02, NPD 159 07.9) has "no description, in Nubecula major", "JH (199)" referring to the object's inclusion in a supplementary catalog of objects observed by Herschel in the Large Magellanic Cloud.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1826 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Dec 20, 1835) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 05 34.0, Dec -66 13 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1826 (= GC 1037 = JH 2757, (Dunlop 235), 1860 RA 05 05 11, NPD 156 25.0) is "very faint, small, following (eastern) of 2", the other being NGC 1822.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1827 (= PGC 16849)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type SBc??) in Columba (RA 05 10 04.4, Dec -36 57 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1827 (= GC 1038 = JH 2751, 1860 RA 05 05 13, NPD 127 09.3) is "very faint, very much extended, long ray, 11th magnitude star involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 1828 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Dec 24, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 04 20.9, Dec -69 23 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1828 (= GC 1039 = JH 2761, 1860 RA 05 05 17, NPD 159 34.6) is "faint, small, round, 1st of 3", the others being NGC 1830 and 1835.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1829 (= an OCL and EN in the LMC)
Discovered (Dec 13, 1835) by
John Herschel
An open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 04 57.4, Dec -68 03 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1829 (= GC 1040 = JH 2760, 1860 RA 05 05 23, NPD 158 14.2) is "faint, pretty large, round, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1830 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Dec 24, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 04 38.3, Dec -69 20 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1830 (= GC 1041 = JH 2762, 1860 RA 05 05 34, NPD 159 31.8) is "faint, pretty small, round, 2nd of 3", the others being NGC 1828 and 1835.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1831 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Dec 3, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.2 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 06 16.2, Dec -64 55 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1831 (= GC 1042 = JH 2759, Dunlop 246, 1860 RA 05 05 36, NPD 155 06.7) is "bright, large, round, gradually a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.9? arcmin.

NGC 1832 (= PGC 16906)
Discovered (Feb 4, 1785) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 11.3 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Lepus (RA 05 12 03.0, Dec -15 41 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1832 (= GC 1043 = WH II 292, 1860 RA 05 05 53, NPD 105 53.2) is "pretty bright, irregularly round, much brighter middle, considerable star 1 arcmin to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.6 by 1.7? arcmin.

NGC 1833 (= an OCL and EN in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 12, 1836) by
John Herschel
An open cluster and emission nebula in Mensa (RA 05 04 21.8, Dec -70 43 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1833 (= GC 1044 = JH 2765, 1860 RA 05 05 56, NPD 160 55.1) is "very faint, pretty large, 1st of several".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1834 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 11, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11(?) open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 05 11.4, Dec -69 12 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1834 (= GC 1045 = JH 2764, 1860 RA 05 06 03, NPD 159 23.9) is a "planetary?, bright, extremely small, a little extended".
Physical Information: In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1835 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Dec 24, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.6 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 05 05.7, Dec -69 24 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1835 (= GC 1046 = JH 2763, (Dunlop 116), 1860 RA 05 06 04, NPD 159 35.2) is "considerably bright, small, round, gradually much brighter middle, 3rd of 3", the others being NGC 1828 and 1830.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1836 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 23, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.2 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 05 34.5, Dec -68 37 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1836 (= GC 1047 = JH 2766, (Dunlop 170), 1860 RA 05 06 13, NPD 158 48.7) is a "star plus nebula, 1st of several".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1837 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 10.6 open cluster in Mensa (RA 05 04 55.9, Dec -70 42 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1837 (= GC 1048 = JH 2769, 1860 RA 05 06 28, NPD 160 53.9) is a "cluster, large, rich, scattered stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1838 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Probably observed (between 1822 and 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Dec 30, 1836) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 06 47.0, Dec -68 25 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1838 (= GC 1049 = JH 2767, Brisbane 895, 1860 RA 05 06 33, NPD 158 37.5) is a "cluster, large, very little compressed".
Discovery Notes: Brisbane 895 is HD 33617, an 8th magnitude star on the western side of the cluster, and one of 7385 primarily southern stars observed by Thomas Brisbane and his assistants from 1822 to 1826; however, Brisbane states that to ensure consistency in the resulting catalog, almost all the observations were done by a single observer (Dunlop), so he is presumably the first observer of the star, and thanks to Herschel's reference to Brisbane 895, was given some credit for discovering the cluster, whether he realized its nature or not.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1839 (= an OCL and EN in the LMC)
Possibly observed (Sep 5, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 23, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.8 open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 06 02.4, Dec -68 37 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1839 (= GC 1050 = JH 2768, Dunlop 170?, 1860 RA 05 06 38, NPD 158 48.6) is "stars plus nebula, pretty bright, irregular figure, 2nd of several", the first being NGC 1836.
Physical Information: In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1840 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1834) by
John Herschel
An open cluster in Mensa (RA 05 05 19.2, Dec -71 45 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1840 (= GC 1051 = JH 2771, 1860 RA 05 06 46, NPD 161 56.1) is "faint, round, brighter middle, mottled but not resolved (min of RA questionable?)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1841 (= GCL 8 (= a companion of the Large Magellanic Cloud?))
Discovered (Jan 19, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 14.1 globular cluster in Mensa (RA 04 45 23.1, Dec -83 59 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1841 (= GC 1052 = JH 2788, 1860 RA 05 07 02, NPD 174 12.6) is "pretty faint, large, irregularly round, very suddenly brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4? arcmin. Although 15 degrees away from the Large Magellanic Cloud, NGC 1841 is at about the same 160 thousand light year distance from us, and is about four times closer to the LMC than to the Milky Way, so it may be a distant member of that galaxy, rather than our own.

NGC 1842 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Dec 20, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 14.0 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 07 18.2, Dec -67 16 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1842 (= GC 1053 = JH 2772, 1860 RA 05 07 21, NPD 157 27.3) is "very very faint, round, preceding (western) of 2", the other being NGC 1844.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1843 (= PGC 16949)
Discovered (Jan 17, 1877) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Orion (RA 05 14 06.1, Dec -10 37 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1843 (= GC 5350, Stephan list VIII (#17), 1860 RA 05 07 30, NPD 100 47.5) is "faint, small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.7? arcmin.

NGC 1844 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.1 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 07 30.7, Dec -67 19 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1844 (= GC 1054 = JH 2773, 1860 RA 05 07 37, NPD 157 29.9) is "pretty faint, pretty large, round, gradually brighter middle, following (eastern) of 2", the other being NGC 1842.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1845 (= an OCL in the direction of the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 24, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 10.2 open cluster in Mensa (RA 05 05 45.0, Dec -70 34 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1845 (= GC 1055 = JH 2770, 1860 RA 05 07 38, NPD 160 44.7) is a "cluster, very little compressed middle, stars of 9th and 11th through 16th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 20? arcmin. (Note to self: Check to see if this could be a foreground object in our galaxy.)

NGC 1846 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 6, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.3 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 07 34.7, Dec -67 27 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1846 (= GC 1056 = JH 2774, (Dunlop 209), 1860 RA 05 07 45, NPD 157 38.0) is "pretty bright, considerably large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1847 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Dec 15, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.1 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 07 08.2, Dec -68 58 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1847 (= GC 1057 = JH 2775, 1860 RA 05 07 56, NPD 159 08.9) is "bright, small, a little extended, double star in middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1848 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 26, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 9.7 open cluster in Mensa (RA 05 07 27.2, Dec -71 11 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1848 (= GC 1058 = JH 2776, 1860 RA 05 08 06, NPD 161 21.9) is a "cluster, very little compressed, stars from 9th magnitude".
Physical Information: In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1849 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Jan 3, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 09 34.9, Dec -66 18 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1849 (= GC 1059 = JH 2778, 1860 RA 05 09 21, NPD 156 28.7) is "very faint, small, a little extended, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 1849, in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1849
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the cluster
DSS image of open cluster NGC 1849, in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1750 - 1799) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 1800 - 1849     → (NGC 1850 - 1899)