Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1800 - 1849) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 1850 - 1899 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 1900 - 1949)
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1867, 1868, 1869, 1870, 1871, 1872, 1873, 1874, 1875, 1876, 1877, 1878, 1879, 1880, 1881, 1882, 1883,
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Page last updated Sep 3, 2014
Checked for mis-spelling of DeLisle Stewart
WORKING: Check Dreyer IC/IC2/1912 notes/corrections
WORKING: Check historical IDs
WORKING: Add more images, use to check size, type, position, etc

NGC 1850 (= OCL PGC 2802627, in the LMC)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.0 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 08 45.5, Dec -68 45 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1850 (= GC 1060 = JH 2780, Dunlop 170?, 1860 RA 05 09 25, NPD 158 55.8) is a "remarkable object, a globular cluster, very bright, large, a little extended, very much compressed middle, partially resolved, some stars seen". (Steinicke states = Dunlop 172.)
Discovery Notes: Dunlop 170? in Dreyer's entry means that Herschel thought Dunlop 170 might be his (JH) 2780 and listed it as such (with a question mark) in the GC, and as a result so did Dreyer in the NGC. (Steinicke states = Dunlop 172.) means it is now thought that NGC 1850 is actually Dunlop 172.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.4? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.
DSS image of open cluster NGC 1850, in the Large Magellanic Cloud, also showing the LMC globular cluster listed as NGC 1854 and 1855
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1850, also showing NGC 1854 / 1855
Below, a 7.5 arcmin wide image of the cluster and nearby nebulosity (Image Credits ESO; reprocessing Sergey Stepanenko)
ESO image of open cluster NGC 1850, in the Large Magellanic Cloud, as reprocessed by Sergey Stepanenko
Below, a 1.75 arcmin wide image of the core of the cluster (Image Credit NASA/ESA/Martino Romaniello (ESO, Germany) )
HST image of core of open cluster NGC 1850, in the Large Magellanic Cloud

NGC 1851 (= GCL 9 = PGC 2802628)
Discovered (May 10, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Oct 23, 1835) by John Herschel
A magnitude 7.1 globular cluster (type II) in Columba (RA 05 14 06.3, Dec -40 02 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1851 (= GC 1061 = JH 2777, Dunlop 508, 1860 RA 05 09 30, NPD 130 12.3) is a "remarkable object, a globular cluster, very bright, very large, round, very suddenly very very much brighter middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars".
Discovery Notes: Dunlop 508 in Dreyer's entry means that Herschel felt certain that his (JH) 2777 was the same as Dunlop 508, listed it as such in the GC, and as a result so did Dreyer in the NGC. The lack of any other comment means that this is still the accepted identification of Dunlop 508.
Physical Information: Apparent size 12? arcmin.
DSS image of globular cluster NGC 1851
Above, a 15 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 1851 (raw HST images also exist)

NGC 1852 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 6, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Dec 23, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 09 24.0, Dec -67 46 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1852 (= GC 1062 = JH 2781, (Dunlop 171), 1860 RA 05 09 42, NPD 157 57.0) is "faint, pretty large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Discovery Notes: (Dunlop 171) indicates that Herschel was unable to identify Dunlop's object, did not include it in the GC, and as a result, neither did Dreyer in the NGC; but it is now thought that NGC 1852 is probably the object recorded as Dunlop 171.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1853 (= PGC 16911)
Discovered (Dec 4, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SBcd??) in Dorado (RA 05 12 16.0, Dec -57 23 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1853 (= GC 1063 = JH 2779, 1860 RA 05 09 52, NPD 147 33.7) is "faint, small, much extended 45, very gradually very little brighter middle, 11th magnitude star to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 1854 (= part of GCL
NGC 1855, in the LMC)
Discovered (Aug 2, 1826) by James Dunlop (and later listed as NGC 1854)
Discovered? (Aug 2, 1826) by James Dunlop (and later listed as NGC 1855)
Discovered (Nov 23, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.4 globular cluster core in Dorado (RA 05 09 20.0, Dec -68 50 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1854 (= GC 1064 = JH 2782, (Dunlop 119), 1860 RA 05 10 02, NPD 159 01.2) is a "globular cluster, considerably bright, small, round, gradually brighter middle, 2nd of 3".
Discovery Notes: (Dunlop 119) indicates that Herschel was unable to identify Dunlop's object, did not include it in the GC, and as a result, neither did Dreyer in the NGC; but it is now thought that NGC 1854/1855 is probably the object recorded as Dunlop 119.
Discovery Notes 2: The double listing is not due to Dunlop, but to John Herschel, who reobserved all of Dunlop's objects (that is, the ones he could find). NGC 1854 refers to the brighter core of the stellar association, which was presumably observed by Dunlop (and by Herschel, in five separate observations of the region). NGC 1855 refers to a fainter outer "halo", which Herschel noticed on only one occasion. Since the two NGC numbers refer to different portions of the same object, they are in a sense identical, and are usually listed that way; but since NGC 1855 is probably a fainter outer region only noticed by Herschel, Herschel should probably receive credit for its discovery, even if it is still part of the same object.
Physical Information: In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1855 (= a GCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Aug 2, 1826) by
James Dunlop (and later listed as NGC 1854)
Discovered? (Aug 2, 1826) by James Dunlop (and later listed as NGC 1855)
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by John Herschel
The magnitude 10.4 core and halo of a globular cluster in Dorado (RA 05 09 20.0, Dec -68 50 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1855 (= GC 1065 = JH 2783, (Dunlop 119) 1860 RA 05 10 08, NPD 159 00.6) is a "cluster, very bright, large, round, stars of 12th magnitude".
Discovery Notes: (Dunlop 119) indicates that Herschel was unable to identify Dunlop's object, did not include it in the GC, and as a result, neither did Dreyer in the NGC; but it is now thought that NGC 1854/1855 is probably the object recorded as Dunlop 119.
Discovery Notes 2: The double listing is not due to Dunlop, but to John Herschel, who reobserved all of Dunlop's objects (that is, the ones he could find). NGC 1854 refers to the brighter core of the stellar association, which was presumably observed by Dunlop (and by Herschel, in five separate observations of the region). NGC 1855 refers to a fainter outer "halo", which Herschel noticed on only one occasion. Since the two NGC numbers refer to different portions of the same object, they are in a sense identical, and are usually listed that way; but since NGC 1855 is probably a fainter outer region only noticed by Herschel, Herschel should probably receive credit for its discovery, even if it is still part of the same object.
Physical Information: In the Large Magellanic Cloud.
DSS image of the globular cluster listed as NGC 1854 and 1855, in the Large Magellanic Cloud, also showing open cluster NGC 1850
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 1854 / 1855, also showing NGC 1850

NGC 1856 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 3, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.1 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 09 29.4, Dec -69 07 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1856 (= GC 1066 = JH 2784, (Dunlop 118), 1860 RA 05 10 20, NPD 159 18.0) is "bright, pretty large, round, gradually brighter middle, 12 seconds of time diameter in RA".
Discovery Notes: (Dunlop 118) indicates that Herschel was unable to identify Dunlop's object, did not include it in the GC, and as a result, neither did Dreyer in the NGC; but it is now thought that NGC 1856 is probably the object recorded as Dunlop 118.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1857 (= OCL 428)
Discovered (Sep 30, 1780) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 3, 1832) by John Herschel
A magnitude 7.0 open cluster (type II2m) in Auriga (RA 05 20 05.0, Dec +39 20 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1857 (= GC 1067 = JH 350 = WH VII 33, 1860 RA 05 10 26, NPD 50 48.5) is a "cluster, pretty rich, pretty compressed, stars from 7th magnitude downward."
Physical Information: Apparent size 10? arcmin.

NGC 1858 (= an OCL and EN in the LMC)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.9 open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 09 55.0, Dec -68 53 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1858 (= GC 1068 = JH 2785, (Dunlop 120), 1860 RA 05 10 37, NPD 159 03.7) is "bright, large, irregularly extended, binuclear, a cluster plus nebulosity".
Discovery Notes: (Dunlop 120) indicates that Herschel was unable to identify Dunlop's object, did not include it in the GC, and as a result, neither did Dreyer in the NGC; but it is now thought that NGC 1858 is probably the object recorded as Dunlop 120.
Physical Information: In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1859 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Dec 3, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 11 31.8, Dec -65 14 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1859 (= GC 1069 = JH 2786, 1860 RA 05 10 59, NPD 155 24.8) is "faint, small, round, very gradually brighter middle, 7th magnitude star 6 arcmin to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1860 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Probably not observed (Aug 3, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Dec 30, 1836) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.0 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 10 39.6, Dec -68 45 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1860 (= GC 1070 = JH 2787, Dunlop 172?, 1860 RA 05 11 22, NPD 158 55.6) is "faint, pretty large, round, very gradually brighter middle".
Discovery Notes: Dunlop 172? in Dreyer's entry means that Herschel thought Dunlop 172 might be his (JH) 2787 and listed it as such (with a question mark) in the GC, and as a result so did Dreyer in the NGC. However, it is now thought that Dunlop 172 is NGC 1850, and its questionable assignment to NGC 1860 is probably wrong.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1861 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 12, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 open cluster in Mensa (RA 05 10 22.2, Dec -70 46 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1861 (= GC 1071 = JH 2790, 1860 RA 05 12 02, NPD 160 56.9) is "extremely faint, pretty large, round, gradually a very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1862 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Jan 31, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 12 34.6, Dec -66 09 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1862 (= GC 1072 = JH 2789, 1860 RA 05 12 06, NPD 156 18.8) is "pretty faint, large, irregularly round, very gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1863 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Possibly observed (Sep 5, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 3, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.0 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 11 39.6, Dec -68 43 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1863 (= GC 1073 = JH 2791, Dunlop 173?, 1860 RA 05 12 19, NPD 158 53.4) is "very bright, very small, round, mottled but not resolved or stellar". (Steinicke states = Dunlop 173.)
Discovery Notes: Dunlop 173? in Dreyer's entry means that Herschel thought Dunlop 173 might be his (JH) 2791 and listed it as such (with a question mark) in the GC, and as a result so did Dreyer in the NGC. (Steinicke states = Dunlop 173.) means it is now thought certain that Dunlop 173 is NGC 1863.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1864 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Dec 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 12 40.7, Dec -67 37 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1864 (= GC 1074 = JH 2792, 1860 RA 05 12 56, NPD 157 47.3) is "faint, pretty small, irregularly round, brighter middle, mottled but not resolved or stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1865 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Almost certainly not observed (Sep 25, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Dec 24, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 12 25.1, Dec -68 46 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1865 (= GC 1075 = JH 2794, Dunlop 173??, 1860 RA 05 13 06, NPD 158 55.6) is "very faint, pretty large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle". (Steinicke now assigns Dunlop 173 to NGC 1863.)
Discovery Notes: Dunlop 173?? in Dreyer's entry means that Herschel thought there was a remote possibility that Dunlop 173 might be his (JH) 2794 and listed it as such (with a double question mark) in the GC, and as a result so did Dreyer in the NGC. (Steinicke now assigns Dunlop 173 to NGC 1863.) means it is now thought certain that Dunlop 173 is not NGC 1865.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1866 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 23, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.7 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 13 39.1, Dec -65 27 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1866 (= GC 1076 = JH 2793, Dunlop 247? 248?, 1860 RA 05 13 11, NPD 155 37.6) is "very bright, large, round, very gradually much brighter middle, mottled but not resolved". (Steinicke has a similar identification with Dunlop 247 and/or 248, but without the question marks.)
Discovery Notes: Dunlop 247? 248? in Dreyer's entry means that Herschel thought Dunlop 247 and/or 248 might be his (JH) 2793 and listed it as such (with question marks) in the GC, and as a result so did Dreyer in the NGC. (Steinicke has a similar identification with Dunlop 247 and/or 248, but without the question marks.) means it is now thought certain that Dunlop 247 and/or 248 is/are NGC 1866.
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.5? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1867 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Jan 3, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.4 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 13 42.5, Dec -66 17 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1867 (= GC 1077 = JH 2795, 1860 RA 05 13 27, NPD 156 27.1) is "extremely faint, pretty large, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1868 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.6 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 14 36.5, Dec -63 57 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1868 (= GC 1078 = JH 2796, 1860 RA 05 13 42, NPD 154 06.6) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.9? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1869 (= an OCL and EN in the LMC)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Dec 20, 1835) by John Herschel
An open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 13 52.0, Dec -67 22 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1869 (= GC 1079 = JH 2798, Dunlop 210, 1860 RA 05 13 58, NPD 157 32.1) is a "cluster, large, pretty rich, scattered stars".
Discovery Notes: Dunlop 210 in Dreyer's entry means that Herschel thought Dunlop 210 was his (JH) 2798 and listed it as such in the GC, and as a result so did Dreyer in the NGC. The lack of any other comment means that the identification is still thought to be correct. However, as indicated by the entries at NGC 1871 and 1873, it is now thought that Dunlop 210 referred to all three NGC objects.
Physical Information: Apparent size 14? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Part of a triple "association" with NGC 1871 and 1873.

NGC 1870 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 24, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.3 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 13 10.0, Dec -69 07 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1870 (= GC 1080 = JH 2799, (Dunlop 123), 1860 RA 05 13 59, NPD 159 16.5) is "bright, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle".
Discovery Notes: (Dunlop 123) indicates that Herschel was unable to identify Dunlop's object, did not include it in the GC, and as a result, neither did Dreyer in the NGC; but it is now thought that NGC 1870 is probably the object recorded as Dunlop 123.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1871 (= an OCL and EN in the LMC)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.1 open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 13 51.8, Dec -67 27 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1871 (= GC 1081 = JH 2800, (Dunlop 210), 1860 RA 05 14 06, NPD 157 36.8) is a "cluster, a little rich, 2nd of several", the others being NGC 1869 and 1873.
Discovery Notes: (Dunlop 210) indicates that Herschel was unable to tell whether any of Dunlop's objects corresponded to (JH) 2800, did not include any reference to any of them in the entry for GC 1081, and as a result, neither did Dreyer in the entry for NGC 1871; but it is now thought that Dunlop 210 referred to the triple listed as NGC NGC 1869, 1871 and 1873.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Part of a triple "association" with NGC 1869 and 1873.

NGC 1872 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 3, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.0 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 13 10.8, Dec -69 19 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1872 (= GC 1082 = JH 2802, (Dunlop 121), 1860 RA 05 14 08, NPD 159 28.2) is "pretty bright, round, gradually brighter middle, 1st of group", the others being NGC 1876, 1877 and 1880.
Discovery Notes: (Dunlop 121) indicates that Herschel was unable to identify Dunlop's object, did not include it in the GC, and as a result, neither did Dreyer in the NGC; but it is now thought that NGC 1872 is probably the object recorded as Dunlop 121.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1873 (= an OCL and EN in the LMC)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Jan 2, 1837) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.4 open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 13 55.7, Dec -67 20 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1873 (= GC 1083 = JH 2801, (Dunlop 210), 1860 RA 05 14 09, NPD 157 29.4) is a "cluster, 3rd of several", the others being NGC 1869 and 1871.
Discovery Notes: (Dunlop 210) indicates that Herschel was unable to tell whether any of Dunlop's objects corresponded to (JH) 2801, did not include any reference to any of them in the entry for GC 1083, and as a result, neither did Dreyer in the entry for NGC 1873; but it is now thought that Dunlop 210 referred to the triple listed as NGC NGC 1869, 1871 and 1873.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.5? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Part of a triple "association" with NGC 1869 and 1871.

NGC 1874 (= an OCL and EN in the LMC)
Discovered (1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Dec 16, 1835) by John Herschel
A magnitude (9?) open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 13 11.7, Dec -69 22 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1874 (= GC 1084 = JH 2803, (Dunlop 122), 1860 RA 05 14 10, NPD 159 31.9) is a "nebula and cluster, binuclear".
Discovery Notes: (Dunlop 122) indicates that Herschel was unable to identify Dunlop's object, did not include it in the GC, and as a result, neither did Dreyer in the NGC; but it is now thought that Dunlop 122 corresponds to NGC 1874, 1876, 1877 and 1880.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1875 (= PGC 17171, and with its faint companions =
Arp 327)
Discovered (Nov 18, 1863) by Albert Marth
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Orion (RA 05 21 45.7, Dec +06 41 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1875 (= GC 5351, Marth 98, 1860 RA 05 14 13, NPD 83 28) is "extremely faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7? arcmin. The brightest member of a string of galaxies known as Arp 327 (whether they are actually related to each other to be determined in the next iteration of this page).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1875, also known with its apparent companions as Arp 327
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1875
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1875, also known with its apparent companions as Arp 327

NGC 1876 (= an OCL and EN in the LMC)
Discovered (1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 3, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.7 open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 13 18.5, Dec -69 21 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1876 (= GC 1085 = JH 2804, (Dunlop 122), 1860 RA 05 14 16, NPD 159 31.0) is "pretty bright, irregularly round, binuclear, 2nd in group", the others being NGC 1872, 1877 and 1880.
Discovery Notes: (Dunlop 122) indicates that Herschel was unable to identify Dunlop's object, did not include it in the GC, and as a result, neither did Dreyer in the NGC; but it is now thought that Dunlop 122 corresponds to NGC 1874, 1876, 1877 and 1880.
Physical Information: In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1877 (= and OCL and EN in the LMC)
Discovered (1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Jan 17, 1838) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12(?) open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 13 39.0, Dec -69 23 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1877 (= GC 1086 = JH 2805, (Dunlop 122), 1860 RA 05 14 19, NPD 159 31.8) is "very faint, 3rd of group in cluster", the others being NGC 1872, 1876 and 1880.
Discovery Notes: (Dunlop 122) indicates that Herschel was unable to identify Dunlop's object, did not include it in the GC, and as a result, neither did Dreyer in the NGC; but it is now thought that Dunlop 122 corresponds to NGC 1874, 1876, 1877 and 1880.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1878 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 12, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 open cluster in Mensa (RA 05 12 51.0, Dec -70 28 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1878 (= GC 1087 = JH 2807, 1860 RA 05 14 26, NPD 160 37.9) is "very faint, a little extended, gradually a very little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1879 (= PGC 17113)
Discovered (Nov 18, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)m?) in Columba (RA 05 19 48.1, Dec -32 08 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1879 (= GC 1088 = JH 2797, 1860 RA 05 14 37, NPD 122 17.8) is "very faint, large, round, very gradually very little brighter middle, 12th magnitude star to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 1.7? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1879
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1879
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1879

NGC 1880 (= an EN in the LMC)
Discovered (1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Jan 17, 1838) by John Herschel
An emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 13 39.2, Dec -69 22 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1880 (= GC 1089 = JH 2808, (Dunlop 122), 1860 RA 05 14 38, NPD 159 31.8) is "4th of group in cluster", the others being NGC 1872, 1876 and 1877.
Discovery Notes: (Dunlop 122) indicates that Herschel was unable to identify Dunlop's object, did not include it in the GC, and as a result, neither did Dreyer in the NGC; but it is now thought that Dunlop 122 corresponds to NGC 1874, 1876, 1877 and 1880.
Physical Information: In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1881 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Jan 17, 1838) by
John Herschel
An open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 13 36.0, Dec -69 17 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1881 (= GC 1090 = JH 2810, 1860 RA 05 15 03, NPD 159 27.0) is "very faint, double star to west".
Physical Information: In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1882 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Jan 3, 1837) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude 12.3 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 15 33.4, Dec -66 07 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1883 (= GC 1091 = JH 2809, 1860 RA 05 15 16, NPD 156 16.6) is "pretty faint, round, very gradually very little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1883 (= OCL 417)
Discovered (Dec 11, 1786) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 open cluster (type II3p) in Auriga (RA 05 25 54.1, Dec +46 29 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1883 (= GC 1092 = WH VII 34, 1860 RA 05 15 29, NPD 43 35.9) is a "cluster, very faint, pretty rich, pretty compressed, irregular figure".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.0? arcmin.

NGC 1884 (in the region of the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Recorded (Jan 3, 1837) by
John Herschel
A lost or nonexistent object in Dorado (RA 05 15 58.0, Dec -66 09 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1884 (= GC 1093 = JH 2812, 1860 RA 05 15 45, NPD 156 18.8) is "extremely faint, pretty large".
Physical Information: If real, probably something in the LMC; but since an unknown object, we should only say "observed" in that direction.

NGC 1885 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Jan 31, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 15 05.9, Dec -68 58 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1885 (= GC 1094 = JH 2814, 1860 RA 05 15 47, NPD 159 07.4) is "pretty bright, very small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1886 (= PGC 17174)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
Also observed by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 1886)
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Lepus (RA 05 21 48.2, Dec -23 48 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1886 (Muller list II (#400), 1860 RA 05 15 51, NPD 113 57.9) is "very faint, pretty large, extended 240, 8th magnitude star 40 arcsec to southwest". The second IC adds (per Howe) "For '8th-magnitude star 40 arcsec southwest', read '9th-magnitude star 11 seconds west, 0.9 arcmin south, and 8.5 magnitude star about 6 arcmin south".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.1 by 0.4? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1886
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1886
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1886

NGC 1887 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.7 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 16 06.0, Dec -66 19 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1887 (= GC 1095 = JH 2813, 1860 RA 05 15 54, NPD 156 28.3) is "very faint, very small, round, star 25 arcsec to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1888 (= PGC 17195, and with
NGC 1889 = Arp 123)
Discovered (Jan 31, 1785) by William Herschel
Also observed (Dec 26, 1836) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.9 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)c? pec) in Lepus (RA 05 22 34.4, Dec -11 30 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1888 (= GC 1096 = JH 352 = JH 2806 = WH II 289, 1860 RA 05 16 03, NPD 101 37.7) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, mottled but not resolved". (Per Dreyer's entry for NGC 1889, the two make a close double nebula.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.2 by 0.8? arcmin. Recessional velocity 2430 km/sec. A physical pair with NGC 1889.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1888 and elliptical galaxy NGC 1889, which are also known as Arp 123
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1888 and 1889
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the pair
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1888 and elliptical galaxy NGC 1889, which are also known as Arp 123

NGC 1889 (= PGC 17196, and with
NGC 1888 = Arp 123)
Discovered (Oct 29, 1851) by Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 13.1 elliptical galaxy (type E3??) in Lepus (RA 05 22 35.3, Dec -11 29 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1889 (= GC 1097, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 05 16, NPD 101 38) "makes a close double nebula with h 352", (JH) 352 being NGC 1888.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4? arcmin. Recessional velocity 2480 km/sec. A physical pair with NGC 1888 (which see for images).

NGC 1890 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 26, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 open cluster in Mensa (RA 05 13 45.9, Dec -72 04 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1890 (= GC 1098 = JH 2816, 1860 RA 05 16 06, NPD 162 13.9) is "very faint, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1891
Discovered (Dec 26, 1835) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Columba (RA 05 21 44.0, Dec -35 47 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1891 (= GC 1099 = JH 2811, 1860 RA 05 16 21, NPD 125 51.6) is a "cluster, large, scattered, double star taken", the last comment meaning that the position of the cluster is taken as that of the double star.
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.0? arcmin.

NGC 1892 (= PGC 17042)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Dorado (RA 05 17 09.5, Dec -64 57 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1892 (= GC 1100 = JH 2815, 1860 RA 05 16 32, NPD 155 06.7) is "considerably faint, pretty large, extended 90, very gradually little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.9 by 0.8? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1892
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1892
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1892
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST/DSS image of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
Raw HST image of part of spiral galaxy NGC 1892
Below, a 3 arcmin wide superposition of the images shown above (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive/DSS)
Superposition of a HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 1892 on a DSS background to fill in missing areas

NGC 1893 (= OCL 439, in
IC 410)
Discovered (Jan 22, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 7.5 open cluster in Auriga (RA 05 22 45.6, Dec +33 24 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1893 (= GC 1101 = JH 351, 1860 RA 05 16 32, NPD 56 44.6) is a "cluster, large, rich, a little compressed".
Physical Information: Apparent size 10? arcmin. In emission nebula IC 410.

NGC 1894 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 24, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.2 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 15 51.3, Dec -69 28 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1894 (= GC 1102 = JH 2818, (Dunlop 125, 127) 1860 RA 05 16 57, NPD 159 36.7) is "faint, pretty large, rich, suddenly brighter middle, mottled but not resolved, star involved".
Discovery Notes: (Dunlop 125, 127) indicates that Herschel was unable to identify Dunlop's objects, did not include them in the GC, and as a result, neither did Dreyer in the NGC; but it is now thought that Dunlop 125 and/or 127 corresponds to 1894 (although as indicated in the entry for NGC 1903, Dunlop 127 may better correspond to that object instead.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1895 (= an EN in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by
John Herschel
An emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 16 52.4, Dec -67 19 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1895 (= GC 1103 = JH 2817, 1860 RA 05 17 03, NPD 157 28.6) is "pretty faint, pretty large, rich, gradually very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1896
Discovered (Jan 17, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Dec 24, 1827) by John Herschel
A group of stars in Auriga (RA 05 25 41.9, Dec +29 19 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1896 (= GC 1104 = JH 353 = WH VIII 4, 1860 RA 05 17 08, NPD 69 58.2) is a "cluster, very large, rich, very little compressed, stars from 9th to 12th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 20? arcmin.

NGC 1897 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Jan 31, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.5 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 17 32.4, Dec -67 26 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1897 (= GC 1105 = JH 2820, 1860 RA 05 17 44, NPD 157 35.3) is "extremely faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1898 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 24, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.9 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 16 42.4, Dec -69 39 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1898 (= GC 1106 = JH 2822, (Dunlop 88), 1860 RA 05 17 51, NPD 159 47.7) is "faint, pretty small, round".
Discovery Notes: (Dunlop 88) indicates that Herschel was unable to identify Dunlop's object, did not include it in the GC, and as a result, neither did Dreyer in the NGC; but it is now thought that Dunlop 88 probably corresponds to NGC 1898.
Physical Information: In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1899 (= an EN in the LMC)
Discovered (Dec 30, 1836) by
John Herschel
A faint emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 17 46.0, Dec -67 54 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1899 (= GC 1107 = JH 2821, 1860 RA 05 17 58, NPD 158 01.1) is "faint, pretty small, round, very gradually a little brighter middle, three 10th magnitude stars to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.85 by 0.8? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.
DSS image of region near emission nebula NGC 1899, in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1899
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the nebula
DSS image of emission nebula NGC 1899, in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1800 - 1849) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 1850 - 1899     → (NGC 1900 - 1949)