Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1850 - 1899) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 1900 - 1949 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 1950 - 1999)
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1900, 1901, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1911, 1912, 1913, 1914, 1915, 1916,
1917, 1918, 1919, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933,
1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949

Page last updated Mar 19, 2017
Checked for mis-spelling of DeLisle Stewart
WORKING (1907): Check/update Steinicke discovery/physical data
WORKING: Check Dreyer IC/IC2/1912 notes/corrections
WORKING: Check historical IDs
WORKING: Add more images, use to check size, type, position, etc

NGC 1900 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.6 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 19 09.4, Dec -63 01 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1900 (= GC 1108 = JH 2819, 1860 RA 05 18 01, NPD 153 10.2) is "faint, pretty large, a little extended, very gradually very little brighter middle, 7th magnitude star to northwest".
Note: A Wikisky search for NGC 1900 shows the correct object, but labels it as NGC 7076; equally unfortunately, a Wikisky search for NGC 7076 also shows NGC 1900.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 1900, in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1900
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the cluster
DSS image of open cluster NGC 1900, in the Large Magellanic Cloud

NGC 1901 (=OCL 791)
Discovered (Dec 30, 1836) by
John Herschel
An open cluster (type III3m) in Dorado (RA 05 17 48.0, Dec -68 26 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1901 (= GC 1109 = JH 2824, 1860 RA 05 18 08, NPD 158 44.1) is a "cluster, bright middle, a little rich, stars from 7th magnitude downwards".
Physical Information: Apparent size 40? arcmin. In the direction of the Large Magellanic Cloud, but a foreground object in our own galaxy. (ESO lists an LMC cluster a couple of arcmin from Herschel's position as NGC 1901; but the description makes it clear that it is the much larger scattering of stars in our galaxy that was the object of his attention.)

NGC 1902 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Nov 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.8 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 18 19.2, Dec -66 37 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1902 (= GC 1110 = JH 2823, 1860 RA 05 18 14, NPD 156 46.0) is a "globular cluster, pretty bright, pretty large, round, pretty much brighter middle, partially resolved, some stars seen".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1903 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 3, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.9 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 17 22.4, Dec -69 20 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1903 (= GC 1111 = JH 2825, (Dunlop 127), 1860 RA 05 18 22, NPD 159 28.7) is "very bright, small, round, gradually much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1904 (= GCL 10 =
M79)
Discovered (Oct 26, 1780) by Pierre Méchain
Recorded (date?) by Charles Messier as M79
Also observed (Mar 4, 1783) by William Herschel
A magnitude 7.7 globular cluster (type V) in Lepus (RA 05 24 10.6, Dec -24 31 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1904 (= GC 1112, Méchain, M79, 1860 RA 05 18 25, NPD 114 39.3) is a "globular cluster, pretty large, extremely rich, extremely compressed, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 9.6? arcmin.
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 1904, also known as M79
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1904
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the cluster (Image Credit AURA, NSF, NOAO)
NOAO image of globular cluster NGC 1904, also known as M79

NGC 1905 (= an OCL in the LMC)
Discovered (Jan 2, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 18 23.6, Dec -67 16 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1905 (= GC 1113 = JH 4016, (hon), 1860 RA 05 18 36, NPD 157 25.4) is "faint, small, round, mottled but not resolved".
Discovery Notes: "hon" refers to one of several nebulae accidentally omitted from their proper location in Herschel's Cape Catalog, but rescued from oblivion by an erratum at the end of the catalog, thereby allowing Dreyer to list its proper designation (in this case, JH 4016).
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0? arcmin. In the Large Magellanic Cloud.

NGC 1906 (= PGC 17243)
Discovered (Nov 12, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 1906)
Also observed by Guillaume Bigourdan (while listed as NGC 1906)
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Scd??) in Lepus (RA 05 24 47.1, Dec -15 56 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1906 (Leavenworth list I (#148), 1860 RA 05 18 40, NPD 106 05.8) is "extremely faint, pretty small, extended 0°, gradually a little brighter middle". The second IC adds a corrected RA (per Howe and Bigourdan) of 05 18 29.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1906
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1906
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1906

NGC 1907 (= OCL 434)
Presumably discovered (possibly before 1759) by
Guillaume Le Gentil
Discovered (Jan 17, 1787) by William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 5, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 8.2 open cluster (type II1m) in Auriga (RA 05 28 05.5, Dec +35 19 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1907 (= GC 1114 = JH 354 = WH VII 39, Legentil, 1860 RA 05 18 43, NPD 54 48.5) is a "cluster, pretty rich, pretty compressed, round, stars from 9th to 12th magnitude". The position precesses to RA 05 28 03.8, Dec +35 18 56, well within the outline of the cluster listed above, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Notes: As pointed out by a correspondent, there is no obvious evidence that Le Gentil discovered NGC 1907, but Dreyer's note lists him as an observer of the object, and since essentially all his astronomical observations were carried out between 1745 and 1770, if he observed the object he would have been the first to do so. Unfortunately Dreyer does not list the reference that led him to conclude that Le Gentil observed the open cluster, so whether he or William Herschel was the actual discoverer is not obvious. (The most likely reference would be in a submission of July 26, 1758 to the French Royal Academy (Le Gentil, 1759. Remarques sur les Étoiles Nebuleuses. Mémoires de l'Académie Royale des Sciences. Année M.DCCLIX. [Remarks on the Nebulous Stars. Memoirs of the Royal Academy of Sciences. For the year 1759.] P. 453-471 + Pl. 21. Paris, 1765), which is in French; and although my French is not bad, it is not good enough to quickly scan the article; so I will revisit this question in the next iteration of this page.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 5? arcmin.
DSS image of region near open cluser NGC 1907
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1907

NGC 1908
Recorded (Feb 1, 1786) by
William Herschel
Not observed by John Herschel
A lost or nonexistent object in Orion (RA 05 25 53.7, Dec -02 31 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1908 (= GC 1115 = WH V 33, 1860 RA 05 18 52, NPD 92 39.4) is "very diffused nebula suspected". (William Herschel wrote "Diffused extremely faint nebulosity. The means of verifying this phenomenon are difficult." John Herschel listed it as "suspected" in the GC, and Dreyer did the same in the NGC. So although an entry was provided in both catalogs, NGC 1908's existence has always been in doubt.)

NGC 1909 (probably =
IC 2118, the Witch Head Nebula)
Probably discovered (Dec 20, 1786) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1909)
Discovered (Jan 16, 1891) by Max Wolf (and later listed as IC 2118)
A reflection nebula in Eridanus (RA 05 04 54.0, Dec -07 15 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1909 (= GC 1116 = WH V 38, 1860 RA 05 19 10, NPD 98 15.3) is "extremely large, strongly suspected (2° in PD)", the note in parentheses meaning that it extends about 2 degrees to the north and south (Herschel's original observation stated that it extended at least 2° 11' north and south, and 26s of time east and west). The position precesses to RA 05 25 53.7, Dec -08 07 41, but there is nothing in the area that matches the description, so for a long time NGC 1909 was considered a lost or nonexistent object. The object now identified as NGC 1909, the Witch Head Nebula, matches Herschel's description, as it extends about 3 degrees north and south and a degree east and west; but it is 22 minutes of time (over 5 degrees) to the west of his position. The argument in favor of NGC 1909 being the same as IC 2118, which is the Witch Head Nebula, is based on Herschel's method of stating its position. Namely, he placed it a little over 11 minutes of time east of Rigel; but it is actually a little over 11 minutes of time west of Rigel, so he could have observed the Nebula but accidentally reversed its east-west position relative to the star. Since such errors are not uncommon, there is fairly general agreement that the Witch Head Nebula is probably what Herschel observed. However, since that is a relatively recent conclusion, the Witch Head was long identified with IC 2118 and not NGC 1909; so although this entry contains the historical information required to provide a possible identity for NGC 1909, readers should refer to IC 2118 for anything else.
Physical Information:
DSS image centered on Dreyer's position for NGC 1909
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Dreyer's position for NGC 1909
Below, a 7.5 degree wide DSS image showing Dreyer's position for NGC 1909, Rigel, and IC 2118
DSS image showing Dreyer's position for NGC 1909, Rigel, and IC 2118, also known as the Witch Head Nebula

NGC 1910 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 18 33.4, Dec -69 13 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1910 (= GC 1117 = JH 2827, Dunlop 129, 1860 RA 05 19 10, NPD 159 21.5) is a "cluster, large, pretty rich, irregularly round, stars from 11th to 16th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 8.5? arcmin.

NGC 1911 (=
NGC 1920, in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1920)
Discovered (Dec 23, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1911)
An open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 20 33.0, Dec -66 46 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1911 (= GC 1118 = JH 2826, 1860 RA 05 19 13, NPD 156 54.1) is "faint, round, gradually brighter middle, among stars".
Discovery Notes: Herschel observed this region eight times. In seven of the sweeps he observed what became NGC 1920, and did not observe what became NGC 1911. In the remaining sweep he observed what became NGC 1911 and did not observe NGC 1920. The declinations are nearly identical, and although the right ascensions differ by an odd amount (1m 20s, which is harder to explain than 1m exactly, which could be presumed to be a simple recording error), it appears almost certain that NGC 1911 was an erroneous recording of NGC 1920. Therefore, this entry will contain only historical information; for anything else, see NGC 1920.

NGC 1912 (=
M38 = OCL 433)
Discovered (before 1654) by Giovanni Hodierna
Rediscovered (1749) by Guillaume Le Gentil
Rediscovered (Sep 25, 1764) by Charles Messier
A 6th-magnitude open cluster (type II2r) in Auriga (RA 05 28 43.0, Dec +35 51 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1912 (= GC 1119, M38, 1860 RA 05 19 17, NPD 54 17.6) is a "cluster, bright, very large, very rich, irregular figure, large and small stars". (Note: See the discussion of Hodierna for an explanation of why he was not credited with the discovery of this object.) Why Dreyer sometimes credited Le Gentil's discoveries and just as often failed to do so appears a mystery. His note that NGC 1912 is Messier 38 is understandable, as Messier's catalog was famous a century beforehand; and Messier probably discovered the cluster independently, for although Le Gentil presented his observations of various nebulae to the French Academy in 1758 they weren't published until 1765, and Messier's listing makes no mention of Le Gentil's prior discovery.
Physical Information: Apparent size 15? arcmin. M38 is a moderately dense open cluster, about 25 light years in diameter, and 4000 light years from the Sun. Based on the "turnoff" point of the bright blue stars still on the Main Sequence, the cluster must be about 200 million years old. Over long periods of time, open clusters are disrupted by stars passing through the cluster, so moderately dense clusters are rarely more than a few hundred million years old.
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 1912, also known as M38
Above, a half degree wide DSS image centered on NGC 1912
Below, a 20 arcmin wide DSS image of the cluster
DSS image of open cluster NGC 1912, also known as M38

NGC 1913 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (probably in Nov 1834 or Dec 1835) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 18 19.4, Dec -69 32 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1913 (= GC 1120 = JH (356), 1860 RA 05 19 34, NPD 159 41.5) has "no description, in Nubecula major". "JH (356)" means that this object was identified in a supplementary catalog of objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and not assigned a "standard" entry in Herschel's Cape Catalog.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6? arcmin.

NGC 1914 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster and emission nebula in Mensa (RA 05 17 39.8, Dec -71 15 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1914 (= GC 1121 = JH 2830, 1860 RA 05 19 36, NPD 161 23.7) is "faint, large, irregularly extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2? arcmin.

NGC 1915 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud?)
Recorded (Jan 2, 1837) by
John Herschel
A lost or misrecorded object in Dorado (RA 05 19 42.3, Dec -66 49 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1915 (= GC 1122 = JH 2828, 1860 RA 05 19 37, NPD 156 56.4) is "extremely faint, pretty large".
Corwin suggests a couple of possibilities for this object, but whether either is at all convincing remains to be seen, so for now the "lost or nonexistent" stands; but I will revisit this in a later iteration of this page. (Whatever Herschel saw was probably in the LMC.)

NGC 1916 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 10th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 18 36.5, Dec -69 24 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1916 (= GC 1123 = JH 2829, 1860 RA 05 19 39, NPD 159 32.8) is "bright, small, round, very gradually very much brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information:

NGC 1917 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Sep 25, 1826) by
James Dunlop (130)
Discovered by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude globular cluster in Dorado (RA 05 19 01.2, Dec -68 59 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1917 (= GC 1124 = JH 2831, 1860 RA 05 19 53, NPD 159 08.3) is "very faint, large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information:

NGC 1918 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1826) by
James Dunlop (88)
Discovered (probably in Nov 1834 or Dec 1835) by John Herschel
A supernova remnant in Dorado (RA 05 19 07.1, Dec -69 39 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1918 (= GC 1125 = JH (369), 1860 RA 05 20 10, NPD 159 46.6) has "no description, in Nubecula major". "JH (369)" means that this object was identified in a supplementary catalog of objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and not assigned a "standard" entry in Herschel's Cape Catalog.
Physical Information:

NGC 1919 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Jan 3, 1837) by
John Herschel
An open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 20 18.0, Dec -66 53 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1919 (= GC 1126 = JH 2832, 1860 RA 05 20 15, NPD 157 01.0) is a "cluster, extremely faint, large, irregularly round, much compressed, partially resolved, some stars seen".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7? arcmin.

NGC 1920 (=
NGC 1911, in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1920)
Discovered (Dec 23, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1911)
An open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 20 33.0, Dec -66 46 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1920 (= GC 1127 = JH 2833, 1860 RA 05 20 33, NPD 156 54.7) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, very gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information:

NGC 1921 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1826) by
James Dunlop (128)
Discovered by John Herschel
An emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 19 22.8, Dec -69 47 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1921 (= GC 1128 = JH 2834, 1860 RA 05 20 34, NPD 159 55.1) is "very faint, pretty small, a little extended, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information:

NGC 1922 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (probably in Nov 1834 or Dec 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 19 50.0, Dec -69 30 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1922 (= GC 5063 = JH (374), 1860 RA 05 20 53, NPD 159 36.6) has "no description, in Nubecula major". "JH (374)" means that this object was identified in a supplementary catalog of objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and not assigned a "standard" entry in Herschel's Cape Catalog.

Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 1923 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 21 34.1, Dec -65 29 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1923 (= GC 1129 = JH 2835, 1860 RA 05 21 07, NPD 155 37.0) is "very faint, pretty small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 1924 (= PGC 17319)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Orion (RA 05 28 01.9, Dec -05 18 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1924 (= GC 1130 = WH III 447, 1860 RA 05 21 07, NPD 95 26.7) is "very faint, pretty large, irregularly round, stars near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.2? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1924
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1924
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1924

NGC 1925 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
An open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 21 30.0, Dec -65 48 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1925 (= GC 1131 = JH 2837, 1860 RA 05 21 22, NPD 156 00.3) is a "cluster, very little rich, a little compressed, stars of 10th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 11? arcmin.

NGC 1926 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1826) by
James Dunlop (131)
Discovered by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 20 34.2, Dec -69 31 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1926 (= GC 1132 = JH 2838, 1860 RA 05 21 41, NPD 159 39.9) is "pretty bright, pretty large, irregularly round, mottled but not resolved, in diffuse nebula".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 1927
Recorded (Jan 8, 1831) by
John Herschel
Not found by John Dreyer
A lost or nonexistent object in Orion (RA 05 28 43.8, Dec -08 22 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1927 (= GC 1133 = JH 356, 1860 RA 05 22 01, NPD 98 29.7) is a "diffused nebulosity". A note adds "h 356 (= GC 1133). Looked for three times at Birr Castle; twice the sky was fancied to have a milky appearance." Herschel observed the area only once, saying there was a diffused nebulosity all around the place (hence the NGC description). The position precesses to that given above, but there is nothing there.

NGC 1928 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 20 56.6, Dec -69 28 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1928 (= GC 1134 = JH 2839, Dunlop 131, 1860 RA 05 22 02, NPD 159 36.9) is "pretty faint, pretty large, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 1929 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1826) by
James Dunlop (175)
Discovered by John Herschel
An emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 21 37.0, Dec -67 54 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1929 (= GC 1135 = JH 2840, 1860 RA 05 22 02, NPD 158 03.6) is "faint, preceding of group", the latter comment presumably meaning it is the western member of a group of objects.
Physical Information:

NGC 1930 (= PGC 17276)
Discovered (Dec 29, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0) in Pictor (RA 05 25 56.6, Dec -46 43 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1930 (= GC 1136 = JH 2836, 1860 RA 05 22 03, NPD 136 51.1) is "pretty faint, small, round, brighter middle, 4 bright stars to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.2? arcmin.

NGC 1931 (= OCL 441)
Discovered (Feb 4, 1793) by
William Herschel
Also observed by John Herschel
An open cluster and emission nebula in Auriga (RA 05 31 25.7, Dec +34 14 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1931 (= GC 1137 = JH 355 = WH I 261, 1860 RA 05 22 09, NPD 55 52.0) is "very bright, large, round, bright triple star in middle".
Physical Information:

NGC 1932
Recorded (Nov 2, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude star in Dorado (RA 05 22 17.3, Dec -66 09 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1932 (= GC 1138 = JH 2841, 1860 RA 05 22 15, NPD 156 16.5) is "pretty bright, small, round, suddenly much brighter middle, part of a double nebula separated by 80 arcsec, at a position angle of 26° (relative to each other)", the other nebula being NGC 1933, the 26° corrected by an erratum in the original NGC to read 260°. Since the GC and NGC are in order of right ascension, Herschel's earlier number in the GC (GC 1138) must be the western member of the pair, so it automatically becomes the western member in the NGC (namely NGC 1932) as well.
Physical Information:

NGC 1933 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by
John Herschel
An open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 22 27.3, Dec -66 09 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1933 (= GC 1139 = JH 2841, 1860 RA 05 22 15, NPD 156 16.5) is "extremely faint, round, stellar, part of a double nebula separated by 80 arcsec, at a position angle of 26° (relative to each other)", the other nebula being NGC 1933, the 26° corrected by an erratum in the original NGC to read 260°. Since the GC and NGC are in order of right ascension, Herschel's later number in the GC (GC 1139) must be the eastern member of the pair, so it automatically becomes the eastern member in the NGC (namely NGC 1933) as well.
Physical Information:

NGC 1934 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Nov 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
An emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 21 54.0, Dec -67 54 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1934 (= GC 1140 = JH 2842, 1860 RA 05 22 21, NPD 158 02.9) is the "2nd nebula of group", the 1st nebula presumably being NGC 1929.
Physical Information:

NGC 1935 (=
IC 2126, in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Nov 23, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1935)
Discovered (1901) by Williamina Fleming (and later listed as IC 2126)
An emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 21 58.8, Dec -67 57 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1935 (= GC 1141 = JH 2843, 1860 RA 05 22 25, NPD 158 05.3) is "pretty faint, small, round, 3rd of group", the 2nd presumably being NGC 1934.
Physical Information:

NGC 1936 (=
IC 2127, in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1826) by James Dunlop (and later listed as NGC 1936)
Discovered by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1936
Discovered (1901) by Williamina Fleming (and later listed as IC 2127)
An emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 22 14.6, Dec -67 58 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1936 (= GC 1142 = JH 2844, Dunlop 175, 1860 RA 05 22 42, NPD 158 06.4) is "a remarkable object, pretty bright, small, round, 4th of group", the 3rd presumably being NGC 1935.
Physical Information:

NGC 1937 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1826) by
James Dunlop (175)
Discovered by John Herschel
An open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 22 24.0, Dec -67 54 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1937 (= GC 1143 = JH 2845, 1860 RA 05 22 44, NPD 158 01.8) is "very faint, pretty large, follows a group", the group presumably consisting of NGC 1929, 1934, 1935 and 1936.
Physical Information:

NGC 1938 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1826) by
James Dunlop (89)
Discovered by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Mensa (RA 05 21 24.8, Dec -69 56 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1938 (= GC 1144 = JH 2848, Dunlop 89?, 1860 RA 05 22 46, NPD 160 04.7) is "pretty bright, pretty small, round, gradually a little brighter middle, part of a double nebula separated by 50 arcsec, with a position angle of 339°". Since the GC and NGC are in order of right ascension, Herschel's earlier number in the GC (GC 1144) must be the western member of the pair, so it automatically becomes the western member in the NGC (namely NGC 1938) as well.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6? arcmin.

NGC 1939 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1826) by
James Dunlop (89)
Discovered by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude globular cluster in Mensa (RA 05 21 26.7, Dec -69 56 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1939 (= GC 1145 = JH 2848, Dunlop 89?, 1860 RA 05 22 46, NPD 160 04.7) is "faint, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle, part of a double nebula separated by 50 arcsec, with a position angle of 339°". Since the GC and NGC are in order of right ascension, Herschel's later number in the GC (GC 1145) must be the eastern member of the pair, so it automatically becomes the eastern member in the NGC (namely NGC 1939) as well.

Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 1940 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Nov 6, 1826) by
James Dunlop (212)
Discovered by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 22 43.8, Dec -67 11 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1940 (= GC 1146 = JH 2847, 1860 RA 05 22 55, NPD 157 18.8) is "pretty bright, very small, round, brighter middle, 2 stars of 9th and 10th magnitude to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 1941 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Dec 20, 1835) by
John Herschel
An emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 23 07.8, Dec -66 22 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1941 (= GC 1147 = JH 2846, 1860 RA 05 22 55, NPD 156 30.6) is "very small, nebula plus stars".
Physical Information:

NGC 1942 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 24 44.6, Dec -63 56 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1942 (= GC 1148 = JH 2849, 1860 RA 05 23 51, NPD 154 04.4) is "extremely faint, stellar, 14th magnitude star plus nebula".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 1943 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude open cluster and emission nebula in Mensa (RA 05 22 28.8, Dec -70 09 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1943 (= GC 1149 = JH 2850, Dunlop 90, 1860 RA 05 23 53, NPD 160 16.8) is "pretty faint, pretty small, irregularly round, very gradually a little brighter middle, 15th magnitude star 60 arcsec distant at position angle 190°.6". (Steinicke lists as Dunlop 91.)
Physical Information:

NGC 1944 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Feb 8, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Mensa (RA 05 21 57.4, Dec -72 29 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1944 (= GC 1150 = JH 2852, 1860 RA 05 24 27, NPD 162 36.3) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.3? arcmin.

NGC 1945 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Nov 6, 1826) by
James Dunlop (237)
Discovered by John Herschel
An emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 24 54.0, Dec -66 27 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1945 (= GC 1151 = JH 2851, 1860 RA 05 24 48, NPD 156 34.7) is "most excessively extremely faint, very very large, irregularly diffuse".
Physical Information:

NGC 1946 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Possibly observed (Nov 6, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Jan 3, 1837) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 25 16.4, Dec -66 23 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1946 (= GC 1152 = JH 2854, Dunlop 237?, 1860 RA 05 25 09, NPD 156 30.5) is "pretty faint, round, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 1947 (= PGC 17296)
Discovered (Nov 5, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Dorado (RA 05 26 47.3, Dec -63 45 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1947 (= GC 1153 = JH 2855, 1860 RA 05 25 38, NPD 154 52.7) is "pretty bright, large, round, gradually a little brighter middle, 9th magnitude star to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 2.6? arcmin.

NGC 1948 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Nov 6, 1826) by
James Dunlop (237)
Discovered by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 25 46.3, Dec -66 16 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1948 (= GC 1154 = JH 2856, 1860 RA 05 25 40, NPD 156 23.1) is a "cluster, considerably large, rich, stars of 13th magnitude".
Physical Information:

NGC 1949 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Dec 30, 1836) by
John Herschel
An emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 25 05.0, Dec -68 28 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1949 (= GC 1155 = JH 2857, 1860 RA 05 25 47, NPD 158 35.5) is "pretty bright, small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of the brighter nebulosity 0.6? arcmin.
DSS image of region near emission nebula NGC 1949, in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1949
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the emission nebula
DSS image of emission nebula NGC 1949, in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1850 - 1899) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 1900 - 1949     → (NGC 1950 - 1999)