Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1900 - 1949) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 1950 - 1999 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 2000 - 2049)
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1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966,
1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983,
1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999

Page last updated Oct 20, 2016
Checked for mis-spelling of DeLisle Stewart
WORKING: Add basic pix, tags

NGC 1950 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Dec 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 24 33.1, Dec -69 54 09)
Apparent size 1.0 arcmin.

NGC 1951 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Dec 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 26 06.9, Dec -66 35 50)
Apparent size 1.9 arcmin.

NGC 1952 (=
M1 = PGC 2817554 = PGC 2819678), The Crab Nebula
Discovered (1731) by John Bevis
Rediscovered (Aug 28, 1758) by Charles Messier and listed as M1 on Sep 12, 1758
Also observed (Feb 24, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 8.4 supernova remnant in Taurus (RA 05 34 31.9, Dec +22 00 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1952 (= GC 1157 = JH 357, Bevis 1731, M1, 1860 RA 05 26 06, NPD 68 05.0) is "very bright, very large, extended 135°±, very gradually a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 05 34 31.1, Dec +22 01 03, right on the nebula listed above and the description fits, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Notes: Discovered by Messier while searching for the "comet of 1758" (Halley's Comet). Previously found by Bevis about 1731, whose prior discovery was acknowledged by Messier after receiving a letter from Bevis (on Jun 10, 1771) pointing out its resulting presence in the English Celestial Atlas. Messier's decision to create a list of nebulae that could be confused with comets began with this object, and proved a particularly good idea in this case, as it was also confused with Halley's Comet on its following return (in 1835).
Physical Information: Apparent size 6 by 4 arcmin. The Crab Nebula is the remnant of the daylight supernova of 1054 AD. In the millennium since its formation the nebula has expanded to a diameter of 10 light-years, with an average velocity of expansion of 1/2 % of the speed of light (about a thousand miles per second). The radiation of the nebula is caused by synchrotron radiation emitted by the millisecond pulsar at its center -- a neutron star rotating 30 times per second. (More images and discussion to follow in the next iteration of this page)
Misti Mountain Observatory image of region near supernova remnant NGC 1952, also known as M1, the Crab Nebula, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 1952
(Image Credit & © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Below, a HST false-color image of the supernova remnant
(Image Credit NASA, ESA, J. Hester, A. Loll (ASU); Acknowledgement: Davide De Martin (Skyfactory))
HST false-color image of supernova remnant NGC 1952, also known as M1, the Crab Nebula
Below, a different choice of wavelengths and color assignments gives a different impression of the nebula
(Image Credit NASA, ESA, CXC, JPL-Caltech, J. Hester and A. Loll (Arizona State Univ.), R. Gehrz (Univ. Minn.), and STScI)
HST false-color image of supernova remnant NGC 1952, also known as M1, the Crab Nebula
Below, a 5 by 3 arcmin wide HST image of the nebula; the lower right star near the center is the pulsar
(Image Credit NASA and ESA; Acknowledgment M. Weisskopf (NASA Marshall Space Flight Center))
HST false-color image of supernova remnant NGC 1952, also known as M1, the Crab Nebula

NGC 1953 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Jan 31, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 25 27.9, Dec -68 50 18)

NGC 1954 (= PGC 17422)
Discovered (Dec 14, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)bc pec) in Lepus (RA 05 32 48.3, Dec -14 03 44)
Apparent size 4.2 by 2.0 arcmin. A physical pair with NGC 1957.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1954
Above, a 4.8 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1954
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 1957
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1954, also showing its companion, lenticular galaxy NGC 1957

NGC 1955 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1826) by
James Dunlop (211)
A 9th-magnitude open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 26 10.0, Dec -67 29 51)
Apparent size 1.8 arcmin.

NGC 1956 (= PGC 17102)
Discovered (Jan 22, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Mensa (RA 05 19 35.6, Dec -77 43 47)
Apparent size 1.9 by 0.8 arcmin. The second IC adds (per DeLisle Stewart) "very faint, hazy star involved in nebula".
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1956
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1956
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1956

NGC 1957 (= PGC 17427)
Discovered (Dec 11, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth (I-149)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Lepus (RA 05 32 55.1, Dec -14 07 57)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin.

NGC 1958 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Apr 31, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude globular cluster in Dorado (RA 05 25 30.6, Dec -69 50 13)

NGC 1959 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Dec 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Mensa (RA 05 25 36.7, Dec -69 55 37)
Apparent size 0.5 arcmin.

NGC 1960 (=
M36 = OCL 445)
Discovered (before 1654) by Giovanni Hodierna
Discovered (1749) by Guillaume Le Gentil
Rediscovered (Sep 2, 1764) by Charles Messier
A 6th-magnitude open cluster (type II3m) in Auriga (RA 05 36 17.7, Dec 34 08 27)
(Note: See the discussion of Hodierna for an explanation of why he was not credited with the discovery of this object.) Apparent size 10 arcmin.
DSS image of open cluster NGC 1960, also known as M36
Above, a 15 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1960
Below, a 20 arcmin wide region centered on the cluster (Image Credit: AURA, NSF, NOAO)
NOAO image of open cluster NGC 1960, also known as M36

NGC 1961 (=
IC 2133 = PGC 17625 = Arp 184)
Discovered (Dec 3, 1788) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1961)
Discovered (Dec 22, 1891) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 2133)
A magnitude 11.0 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)c? pec) in Camelopardalis (RA 05 42 03.9, Dec +69 22 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1961 (= GC 1167 = WH III 747, 1860 RA 05 27 11, NPD 20 36.0) is "considerably faint, pretty large, irregular figure, much brighter middle, extremely mottled but not resolved, star involved (questionable Polar Distance)".
Discovery Notes: Herschel's catalog lists the discovery date as Dec 3, 1787, but a comparison with the previous catalog page shows that the heading for the page in question is incorrect; so the actual date was Dec 3, 1788.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3935 km/sec, NGC 1961 is about 185 million light years away. Given that and the brighter central galaxy's apparent size of 4.1 by 2.2 arcmin, it spans about 220 thousand light years; while the 4.9 by 4.2 arcmin wide region that includes the very faint northern arms spans about 260 thousand light years.
Mount Lemmon Skycenter image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1961, also known as Arp 184
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 1961
(Image Credit & © above and below Adam Block/Mount Lemmon SkyCenter/University of Arizona; used by permission)
Mount Lemmon Skycenter image of spiral galaxy NGC 1961, also known as Arp 184
Below, a 4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit Jyri Näränen, Kalle Torstensson, Nordic Optical Telescope)
Nordic Observatory image of spiral galaxy NGC 1961, also known as Arp 184, superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing areas

NGC 1962 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Jan 31, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 26 17.8, Dec -68 50 16)
Apparent size 0.5 arcmin.

NGC 1963
Discovered (Dec 24, 1835) by
John Herschel
An open cluster in Columba (RA 05 32 10.8, Dec -36 22 50)
Apparent size 14 arcmin.

NGC 1964 (= PGC 17436)
Discovered (Nov 20, 1784) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Lepus (RA 05 33 21.8, Dec -21 56 43)
The second IC notes (per Howe) "not very small, but large". Apparent size 5.6 by 1.8 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1964
Above, a 6 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1964
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1964

NGC 1965 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Jan 31, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 7th-magnitude open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 26 29.1, Dec -68 48 23)

NGC 1966 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Possibly observed (Sep 27, 1826) by
James Dunlop (136)
Discovered (Jan 31, 1835) by John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 26 45.0, Dec -68 48 54)
Apparent size 13 by 13 arcmin.

NGC 1967 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (1830's) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 26 43.4, Dec -69 06 06)
Apparent size 0.4 arcmin.

NGC 1968 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Jan 2, 1837) by
John Herschel
A 9th-magnitude open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 27 24.0, Dec -67 27 48)
Apparent size 1.1 arcmin.

NGC 1969 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1826) by
James Dunlop (93)
A 13th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 26 32.4, Dec -69 50 29)
Apparent size 0.8 arcmin. (Note to self: the NGC note is for 1970, not 1969; so ignore when adding historical info)

NGC 1970 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Jan 31, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 7th-magnitude open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 26 52.7, Dec -68 50 12)
(Note to self: check out NGC note for 1970 when adding historical info)

NGC 1971 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Dec 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 26 45.3, Dec -69 51 06)
Apparent size 0.8 arcmin.

NGC 1972 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1826) by
James Dunlop (93)
A 13th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 26 47.4, Dec -69 50 18)
Apparent size 0.9 arcmin.

NGC 1973 (= part of
NGC 1977)
Discovered (Dec 16, 1862) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 6th-magnitude emission nebula in Orion (RA 05 35 04.8, Dec -04 43 55)
Apparent size 5.0 by 5.0 arcmin.

NGC 1974 (=
NGC 1991, in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Nov 6, 1826) by James Dunlop (213) (and later listed as NGC 1974)
Discovered (Jan 2, 1837) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1991)
A 9th-magnitude open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 28 00.4, Dec -67 25 23)
Apparent size 1.7 arcmin.

NGC 1975 (= part of
NGC 1977)
Discovered (Oct 3, 1864) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 6th-magnitude emission nebula in Orion (RA 05 35 18.0, Dec -04 41 00)
Apparent size 10 by 5.0 arcmin.

NGC 1976 (=
M42), the Orion Nebula
Discovered (Nov 24, 1610) by Nicolas Peiresc
Recorded (Mar 4, 1769) by Charles Messier as M42
A 4th-magnitude emission nebula (and star cluster) in Orion (RA 05 35 17.1, Dec -05 23 25)
Apparent size 40 by 35 arcmin.
HST image of NGC 1976, also known as M42, the Orion Nebula
Above, an image of the Orion Nebula (Credit: NASA, ESA, M. Robberto (STScI/ESA) & HST Orion Treasury Project Team)

NGC 1977 (= OCL 525.1)
Discovered (Jan 18, 1786) by
William Herschel
An open cluster and reflection nebula in Orion (RA 05 35 18.0, Dec -04 49 15)
Apparent size 20 arcmin.

NGC 1978 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Nov 6, 1826) by
James Dunlop (238)
An 11th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 28 45.2, Dec -66 14 14)
Apparent size 3.9 arcmin.

NGC 1979 (= PGC 17452)
Discovered (Nov 20, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Lepus (RA 05 34 01.1, Dec -23 18 37)
The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 05 28 10. Apparent size 1.8 by 1.8 arcmin.

NGC 1980 (= OCL 529), the
ί Orionis Nebula
Discovered (Jan 31, 1786) by William Herschel
An open cluster and emission nebula in Orion (RA 05 35 25.0, Dec -05 54 54)
Apparent size 14 by 14 arcmin, clustered around ί Ori.

NGC 1981 (= OCL 525)
First observed (Oct 23, 1780) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 4, 1827) by John Herschel
A 4th-magnitude open cluster (type III2p) in Orion (RA 05 35 12.0, Dec -04 26 00)
Discovery Notes: Until October of 2016 it was thought that John Herschel was the first to observe this object; but per Steinicke, William Herschel had already observed the cluster (but not recorded it as such) during his early studies of double stars, whence the date of discovery shown above.
Apparent size 28 arcmin.

NGC 1982 (=
M43)
Noted (1731) by Jean-Jacques Mairan
Recorded (Mar 4, 1769) by Charles Messier as M43
A 7th-magnitude emission nebula in Orion (RA 05 35 31.3, Dec -05 16 03)
Apparent size 20 by 15 arcmin. A portion of the Orion nebula (NGC 1976) separated from the main portion by a dark lane.
HST image of NGC 1982, also known as M43, a part of the Orion Nebula
Above, an image of NGC 1982 (Credit: NASA, ESA, M. Robberto (STScI/ESA) & HST Orion Treasury Project Team)

NGC 1983 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Possibly observed (Sep 25, 1826) by
James Dunlop (177?)
Discovered (Nov 11, 1836) by John Herschel
A 9th-magnitude open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 27 44.3, Dec -68 59 10)

NGC 1984 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Dec 16, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 9th-magnitude open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 27 41.0, Dec -69 08 04)

NGC 1985
Discovered (Nov 13, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude reflection nebula in Auriga (RA 05 37 47.8, Dec +31 59 20)
Apparent size 0.68 arcmin.

NGC 1986 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1826) by
James Dunlop (94)
An 11th-magnitude open cluster in Mensa (RA 05 27 39.0, Dec -69 58 22)
Apparent size 0.7 arcmin.

NGC 1987 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1834) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude open cluster in Mensa (RA 05 27 17.2, Dec -70 44 15)
Apparent size 1.7 arcmin.

NGC 1988
Recorded (Oct 19, 1855) by
Jean Chacornac
A 10th-magnitude star in Taurus (RA 05 37 26.5, Dec +21 13 07)

NGC 1989 (= PGC 17464)
Discovered (Jan 28, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Columba (RA 05 34 23.4, Dec -30 48 02)
Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1 arcmin.

NGC 1990, the
ε Orionis Nebula
Discovered (Feb 1, 1786) by William Herschel
A reflection nebula in Orion (RA 05 36 12.8, Dec -01 12 05)
Apparent size 50 by 10 arcmin.

NGC 1991 (=
NGC 1974, in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Nov 6, 1826) by James Dunlop (and later listed as NGC 1974)
Discovered (Jan 2, 1837) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1991)
A 9th-magnitude open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 28 00.4, Dec -67 25 23)
(this entry will only contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 1974)

NGC 1992 (= PGC 17466)
Discovered (Nov 19, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Columba (RA 05 34 31.8, Dec -30 53 49)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin.

NGC 1993 (= PGC 17487)
Discovered (Feb 6, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Lepus (RA 05 35 25.4, Dec -17 48 54)
Apparent size 1.5 by 1.4 arcmin.

NGC 1994 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Dec 16, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 10th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 28 21.8, Dec -69 08 31)
Apparent size 0.6 arcmin.

NGC 1995
Recorded (Dec 28, 1834) by
John Herschel
A pair of stars in Pictor (RA 05 33 03.3, Dec -48 40 28)

NGC 1996
Discovered (Dec 7, 1785) by
William Herschel
A group of stars in Taurus (RA 05 38 10.2, Dec +25 49 04)
Apparent size 22 arcmin.

NGC 1997 (in the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 30 34.4, Dec -63 12 15)
Apparent size 1.3 arcmin.

NGC 1998 (= PGC 17434)
Discovered (Dec 28, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Pictor (RA 05 33 15.7, Dec -48 41 43)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin.

NGC 1999
Discovered (Oct 5, 1785) by
William Herschel
An emission and reflection nebula in Orion (RA 05 36 25.4, Dec -06 42 57)
Apparent size 2.0 by 2.0 arcmin.
Misti Mountain Observatory image of NGC 1999, an emission and reflection nebula in Orion
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1999
(Image credits and © above and below: Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the nebula
Misti Mountain Observatory image of region near NGC 1999, an emission and reflection nebula in Orion
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1900 - 1949) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 1950 - 1999     → (NGC 2000 - 2049)