Celestial Atlas
(NGC 100 - 149) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 150 - 199     → (NGC 200 - 249)
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150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166,
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Page last updated Sep 7, 2013
WORKING: Checking positions/identifications (Corwin+), physical data

NGC 150 (= PGC 2052)
Discovered (Nov 20, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 11.4 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b) in Sculptor (RA 00 34 15.7, Dec -27 48 18)
Per Dreyer, NGC 150 (= Swift list VI (#3), 1860 RA 00 26 50, NPD 118 35.1) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe and Delisle Stewart) of 00 27 19. Using the corrected RA and original NPD, the position precesses to RA 00 34 15.8, Dec -27 48 44, about 0.4 arcmin south of the center of the galaxy, but well within its outline, so the identification is certain. Based on the recessional velocity of 1585 km/sec, the galaxy is about 70 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 55 to 85 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 3.9 by 1.9 arcmin, it is about 55 thousand light years across. NGC 150 is listed as a member of the NGC 134 group of galaxies, which includes NGC 115, 131 and 148, PGC 2000 (erroneously identified as IC 1554) and IC 1555, and PGC 2044. Several of these are also listed as members of a group of galaxies in or near Sculptor with recessional velocities of about 1500 to 1800 km/sec (this is not "the" Sculptor Group, a close neighbor to our Local Group, with an average recessional velocity of less than 300 km/sec); so all NGC 134 group members are presumably members of the larger group.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 150
Above, a 4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 150
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 150

NGC 151 (=
NGC 153 = PGC 2035)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 151)
Discovered (Aug 9, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 153)
A magnitude 11.6 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)bc) in Cetus (RA 00 34 02.8, Dec -09 42 18)
Per Dreyer, NGC 151 (= John Herschel's GC 74, 1860 RA 00 26 57, NPD 100 28.5) is "pretty faint, pretty large, slightly extended 90°, very gradually slightly brighter middle". (The identity with NGC 153 (which see for a discussion of the double listing) was published by Spitaler in time to be included in the first Index Catalog corrections.) Herschel's position precesses to RA 00 34 02.9, Dec -09 42 08, within 0.2 arcmin of the center of the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Based on the recessional velocity of 3745 km/sec, the galaxy is about 165 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 125 to 190 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.6 by 1.1 arcmin, it is about 125 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 151
Above, a 3.6 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 151
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 151

NGC 152 (in the Small Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11 open cluster in Tucana (RA 00 32 56.9, Dec -73 06 58)
Per Dreyer, NGC 152 (= John Herschel's GC 75, 1860 RA 00 27 04, NPD 163 53.2) is "very faint, large, round, very gradually slightly brighter middle". Apparent size 1.7 arcmin?
DSS image of open cluster NGC 152 in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 6 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 152
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the cluster
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 152 in the Small Magellanic Cloud

NGC 153 (=
NGC 151 = PGC 2035)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 151
Discovered (Aug 9, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 153)
A magnitude 11.6 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Cetus (RA 00 34 02.8, Dec -09 42 18)
Per Dreyer, NGC 153 (= Swift's list IV (#1), 1860 RA 00 27 14, NPD 100 28.4) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round, star near to northeast". (The identity with NGC 151 was published by Spitaler in time to be included in the first Index Catalog corrections.) This entry will be primarily concerned with historical information (Corwin has a lengthy note about the identity); for anything else see NGC 151.

NGC 154 (= PGC 2058)
Discovered (Nov 27, 1785) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Cetus (RA 00 34 19.4, Dec -12 39 21)
Per Dreyer, NGC 154 (= John Herschel's GC 76, 1860 RA 00 27 14, NPD 103 26.0) is "extremely faint, very small, round". Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin?
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 154
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 154
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 154

NGC 155 (= PGC 2076)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Cetus (RA 00 34 40.0, Dec -10 45 58)
Per Dreyer, NGC 155 (= Swift's list IV (#2), 1860 RA 00 27 24, NPD 101 31.7) is "pretty faint, small, round". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 00 27 35. Apparent size 1.7 by 1.3 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 155
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 155
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 155

NGC 156
Recorded (1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A magnitude 14.4 and 16.0 pair of stars in Cetus (RA 00 34 35.8, Dec -08 20 22)
Per Dreyer, NGC 156 (= Tempel's list V, 1860 RA 00 27 28, NPD 99 07) is "very small, northwest of (WH) II 3". II 3 means object #3 in William Herschel's list II, which is NGC 157 (which see for an image). (Corwin has short note about NGC 156)

NGC 157 (= PGC 2081)
Discovered (Dec 13, 1783) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 10.4 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc) in Cetus (RA 00 34 46.4, Dec -08 23 46)
Per Dreyer, NGC 157 (= John Herschel's GC 78, 1860 RA 00 27 40, NPD 99 10.2) is "pretty bright, large, extended, between 2 considerably bright stars". (Corwin has brief note, but may not be relevant) Based on recessional velocity of 1650 km/sec, about 75 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 40 to 95 million light years. Given that and apparent size of 4.2 by 2.7 arcmins, about 90 thousand light years in diameter.
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 157
Above, a closeup of NGC 157 (Credit: Erica and Dan Simpson/Adam Block/AURA/NSF/NOAO)
Below, a 4 arcmin wide infrared view of the galaxy (Image Credits: ESO)
'Natural'-color ESO infrared image of spiral galaxy NGC 157
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 156
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 157, also showing the pair of stars listed as NGC 156 and the pair of stars listed as NGC 158

NGC 158
Recorded (1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A magnitude 15.3 and 17.3 pair of stars in Cetus (RA 00 35 05.5, Dec -08 20 42)
Per Dreyer, NGC 158 (= Tempel's list V, 1860 RA 00 27 51, NPD 99 05) is "very small, northeast of II 3". II 3 means object #3 in William Herschel's list II, which is NGC 157 (which see for an image). (Corwin has note about object)

NGC 159 (= PGC 2073)
Discovered (Oct 28, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0/a(r)?) in Phoenix (RA 00 34 35.4, Dec -55 47 23)
Per Dreyer, NGC 159 (= John Herschel's GC 77, 1860 RA 00 28 03, NPD 146 33.4) is "very faint, pretty small, round, gradually slightly brighter middle, 3 stars to east". Apparent size 1.4 by 0.4 arcmin?
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 159
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 159
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 159

NGC 160 (= PGC 2154)
Discovered (Dec 5, 1785) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.7 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SA0/a? pec) in Andromeda (RA 00 36 04.1, Dec +23 57 29)
Per Dreyer, NGC 160 (= John Herschel's GC 79, 1860 RA 00 28 42, NPD 66 48.8) is "very faint, very small, stellar, 8th magnitude star 4 arcmin away 17° east of north". (The star is 7th magnitude HD 3293.) Apparent size 2.3 by 1.2 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 160, also showing the star listed as NGC 162
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 160; also shown is NGC 162
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 160, also showing 162 and PGC 2148
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 160, also showing the star listed as NGC 162, and PGC 2148, which is often misidentified as NGC 162

NGC 161 (= PGC 2131)
Discovered (Nov 21, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Cetus (RA 00 35 33.9, Dec -02 50 54)
Per Dreyer, NGC 161 (= Swift's list VI (#4), 1860 RA 00 28 44, NPD 93 36.2) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round, nearly between 2 stars". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 00 28 26. Apparent size 1.3 by 0.8 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 161
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 161
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 160
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 161

NGC 162
Recorded (Aug 22, 1862) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 14.8 star in Andromeda (RA 00 36 09.2, Dec +23 57 44)
Per Dreyer, NGC 162 (= Schultz, 1860 RA 00 28 48, NPD 66 48.4) is "extremely faint, stellar, h39 to southwest". The reference to h39 (= NGC 192) appears to be a typographical error, as that galaxy is in a different part of the sky. As it happens, Dreyer's notes for NGC 160 confirm the error, stating that Schultz was the first to see a nebula 78° east of north, 1.2 arcmin from h32 (= NGC 160), which means that galaxy must be the one near NGC 162. The position precesses to RA 00 36 09.8, Dec +23 57 55, within 0.3 arcmin of the star, and NGC 160 is in the correct relative position; so the identification with the star is certain. The attribution to d'Arrest involves a complicated story, not otherwise discussed online: Corwin and Steinicke's web pages attribute the discovery to Schultz, and although Steinicke's downloadable database lists d'Arrest as the discoverer, there is no explanation of the listing. However, Steinicke's book contains a two-page discussion of the problems Dreyer faced when dealing with identifications of nebulae by various observers in the region near NGC 160 and 169, which led Dreyer to (often incorrectly) assume that observations of one object were actually observations of another. The lengthy process of sorting out who saw what and when they saw it leads to the conclusion that Schultz was actually the third person to observe the star listed as NGC 162, and d'Arrest was the first. As an ironic end to this tale of mistakes and misinterpretations, it should be noted that as in all too many cases a Wikisky search for NGC 162 shows the wrong object, namely PGC 2148. For correctly labeled images see NGC 160.

PGC 2148 (= PGC 2156, and not =
NGC 162)
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes misidentified as NGC 162
A magnitude 16 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Andromeda (RA 00 35 57.9, Dec +24 02 14)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.2 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 2148, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 162
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 2148; see NGC 160 for a wide-field view
(The glare at left is from 7th magnitude HD 3293)

NGC 163 (= PGC 2149)
Discovered (Dec 10, 1798) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.7 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Cetus (RA 00 35 59.7, Dec -10 07 17)
Per Dreyer, NGC 163 (= John Herschel's GC 81, 1860 RA 00 28 55, NPD 100 53.5) is "very faint, very small". Apparent size 1.5 by 1.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 163
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 163
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 163

NGC 164 (= PGC 2181)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 15.8 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Pisces (RA 00 36 32.9, Dec +02 45 00)
Per Dreyer, NGC 164 (= Marth 12, 1860 RA 00 29 23, NPD 88 02) is "extremely faint". The second Index Catalog adds "Not found by Bigourdan; perhaps = Bigourdan 361 with an error of 1m". (Bigourdan 361 is IC 1560, currently listed as lost or nonexistent) Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 164
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 164
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 164

NGC 165 (= PGC 2182)
Discovered (1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc) in Cetus (RA 00 36 28.9, Dec -10 06 23)
Per Dreyer, NGC 165 (= Tempel's list V, 1860 RA 00 29 24, NPD 100 53.5) is "faint, large, star in centre, eastern of 2" (the other presumably being NGC 163). Apparent size 1.6 by 1.3 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 165
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 165
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 165

NGC 166 (= PGC 2143)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Cetus (RA 00 35 48.8, Dec -13 36 38)
Per Dreyer, NGC 166 (= Leavenworth's list II (#285), 1860 RA 00 29 30, NPD 104 23.0) is "extremely faint, small, slightly extended, 11th magnitude star to northwest". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 00 28 46. Apparent size 0.9 by 0.3 arcmin?
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 166
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 166
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 166

NGC 167 (= PGC 2122)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth (his list II, #286)
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)c?) in Cetus (RA 00 35 22.9, Dec -23 22 29)
Per Dreyer, NGC 167 (= Muller's list II, 1860 RA 00 29 30, NPD 114 09.0) is "very faint, pretty small, irregularly round". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe and Delisle Stewart) of 00 28 24. (Note: Dreyer's reference to "Muller's list II" is to a paper by Ormond Stone in which observations by Stone, Leavenworth and Frank Muller are presented. According to Steinicke, in this particular case Dreyer accidentally credited Muller with one of Leavenworth's discoveries.) Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin?
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 167
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 167
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 167

NGC 168 (= PGC 2192)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Cetus (RA 00 36 38.6, Dec -22 35 37)
Per Dreyer, NGC 168 (= Muller's list II (#287), 1860 RA 00 29 30, NPD 113 23.0) is "extremely faint, small, extended 30° east of north, 10th magnitude star 3 arcmin northeast". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 00 29 40. Apparent size 1.2 by 0.3 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 168
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 168
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 168
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 168

NGC 169 (= PGC 2202, and with
IC 1559 = Arp 282)
Discovered (Sep 18, 1857) by R. J. Mitchell
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)ab?) in Andromeda (RA 00 36 51.7, Dec +23 59 29)
Per Dreyer, NGC 169 (= d'Arrest and the 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 00 29 30, NPD 66 47.1) is "faint, pretty large, double or binary nucleus, 6th magnitude star 4 arcmin northeast". (Dreyer credits the report of the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, with the note that most of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by his assistants, George Stoney, Bindon Stoney, and R. J. Mitchell.) Apparent size 2.6 by 0.6 arcmin? Used (with IC 1559) by the Arp Atlas as an example of galaxies with infall and attraction.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 169 and lenticular galaxy IC 1559, which comprise Arp 282
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 169 and IC 1559
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 169 and lenticular galaxy IC 1559, which comprise Arp 282

NGC 170 (= PGC 2195)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Cetus (RA 00 36 45.9, Dec +01 53 11)
Per Dreyer, NGC 170 (= Marth 13, 1860 RA 00 29 35, NPD 88 52) is "faint, small, round". Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 170
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 170
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 170, also showing part of NGC 173
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 170, also showing part of NGC 173

NGC 171 (=
NGC 175 = PGC 2232)
Discovered (Oct 20, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 171)
Discovered (Nov 11, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 175)
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)ab) in Cetus (RA 00 37 21.5, Dec -19 56 04)
Per Dreyer, NGC 171 (= John Herschel's GC 83, 1860 RA 00 29 41, NPD 109 44.1) is "very faint, pretty large, slightly extended, 2 pretty bright stars to southeast". There is also a note questioning whether the object is the same as William Herschel's list III object 223, and a similar note for NGC 175, which suggests that Dreyer was aware of the possibility that NGC 171 and 175 were actually the same object (as turned out to be the case). Note: A Wikisky search for NGC 171 shows the correct object, but is labeled NGC 175, presumably because of the double listing. Apparent size 2.1 by 1.9 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 171
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 171
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 171
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 171

NGC 172 (= PGC 2228)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)bc?) in Cetus (RA 00 37 13.6, Dec -22 35 12)
Per Dreyer, NGC 172 (= Muller list II (#288), 1860 RA 00 30 00, NPD 113 23.0) is "extremely faint, small, extended". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 00 30 15, and adds "13th magnitude star close southwest". Apparent size 2.0 by 0.3 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 172
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 172
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 172, also showing NGC 177
SDSS image of region near NGC 172 spiral galaxy, also showing NGC 177

NGC 173 (= PGC 2223)
Discovered (Dec 28, 1790) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)c) in Cetus (RA 00 37 12.4, Dec +01 56 32)
Per Dreyer, NGC 173 (= John Herschel's GC 84, 1860 RA 00 30 02, NPD 88 49.8) is "very faint, small, round, very gradually brighter middle, 11th magnitude star 80 arcsec southwest". Apparent size 3.2 by 2.6 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 173
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 173
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 173

NGC 174 (= PGC 2206)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type SB0/a?(rs)) in Sculptor (RA 00 36 58.8, Dec -29 28 40)
Per Dreyer, NGC 174 (= John Herschel's GC 85, 1860 RA 00 30 02, NPD 120 14.5) is "extremely faint, small, very slightly extended, among bright stars". Apparent size 1.4 by 0.6 arcmin?
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 174
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 174
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 174

NGC 175 (=
NGC 171 = PGC 2232)
Discovered (Oct 20, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 171)
Discovered (Nov 11, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 175)
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)ab) in Cetus (RA 00 37 21.5, Dec -19 56 04)
Per Dreyer, NGC 175 (= John Herschel's GC 86, 1860 RA 00 30 21, NPD 110 42.2) is "pretty bright, pretty large, extended, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved." There is also a note questioning whether the object is the same as William Herschel's list III object 223, and a similar note for NGC 171, which suggests that Dreyer was aware of the possibility that NGC 171 and 175 were actually the same object (as turned out to be the case). (This entry will only deal with historical information; see NGC 171 for anything else.)

NGC 176 (in the Small Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Aug 12, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.7 open cluster in Tucana (RA 00 35 58.8, Dec -73 09 58)
Per Dreyer, NGC 176 (= John Herschel's GC 87, 1860 RA 00 30 22, NPD 163 56.5) is "extremely faint, small, very slightly extended, mottled but not resolved, 8th magnitude star near". Apparent size 1.0 arcmin?
DSS image of NGC 176, an open cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 176
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the cluster
DSS image of region near NGC 176, an open cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud

NGC 177 (= PGC 2241)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type SA(r)ab) in Cetus (RA 00 37 34.3, Dec -22 32 57)
Per Dreyer, NGC 177 (= Muller's list II (#289), 1860 RA 00 30 30, NPD 113 12.0) is "extremely faint, small, extended 175°, perhaps a star?". The second Index Catalog says "Delete the (original) query; it seems to be a nebula (per Howe)". Apparent size 2.2 by 0.5 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 177
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 177
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 177, also showing NGC 172
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 177, also showing NGC 172

NGC 178 (=
IC 39 = PGC 2349 = PGC 928022)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1885) by Ormond Stone (and later listed as NGC 178)
Discovered (Aug 26, 1892) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 39)
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type Sb(s)m) in Cetus (RA 00 39 08.4, Dec -14 10 20)
Per Dreyer, NGC 178 (= Ormond Stone's list I (#7), 1860 RA 00 30 30, NPD 104 57.0) is "faint, small, much extended 0°, brighter middle". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 00 32 06. (See IC 39 for a discussion of the double identification.) Based on recessional velocity of 1445 km/sec, about 65 million light years away, in good agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 60 million light years. Given that and apparent size of 2.2 by 1.0 arcmins, about 40 thousand light years across.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 178
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 178
Below, a HST image of part of the galaxy (Image Credits: Hubble Legacy Archive, Wikimedia Commons)
'Raw' HST image of part of spiral galaxy NGC 178
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 178

NGC 179 (= PGC 2253)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type E/SAB0?) in Cetus (RA 00 37 46.3, Dec -17 51 00)
Per Dreyer, NGC 179 (= Leavenworth's list II (#290), 1860 RA 00 30 36, NPD 108 37.0) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round, bright star to northwest". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 00 30 46. Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin?
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 179
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 179
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 179

NGC 180 (= PGC 2268)
Discovered (Dec 29, 1790) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc) in Pisces (RA 00 37 57.7, Dec +08 38 05)
Per Dreyer, NGC 180 (= John Herschel's GC 88, 1860 RA 00 30 47, NPD 82 06.1) is "very faint, pretty large, irregularly round, star involved to northwest". Apparent size 1.9 by 1.3 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 180
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 180
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 180
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 180

NGC 181 (= PGC 2287)
Discovered (Oct 6, 1883) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 14.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Andromeda (RA 00 38 23.3, Dec +29 28 24)
Per Dreyer, NGC 181 (= Stephan's list XIII (#6), 1860 RA 00 30 57, NPD 61 17.9) is "extremely faint, extremely small, irregular, very faint star attached". Apparent size 0.7 by 0.2 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 181
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 181
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 183 and 184
The considerable glare at bottom is from 4th magnitude ε Andromedae
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 181, also showing NGC 183 and NGC 184

NGC 182 (= PGC 2279)
Discovered (Dec 25, 1790) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type (R')SAB(rs)a pec?) in Pisces (RA 00 38 12.4, Dec +02 43 43)
Per Dreyer, NGC 182 (= John Herschel's GC 89, 1860 RA 00 31 01, NPD 88 02.0) is "very faint, small, irregularly round, very gradually brighter middle." Apparent size 1.9 by 1.6 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 182
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 182
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 182

NGC 183 (= PGC 2298)
Discovered (Nov 5, 1866) by
Truman Safford (Safford 65)
A magnitude 12.7 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Andromeda (RA 00 38 29.3, Dec +29 30 42)
Per Dreyer, NGC 183 (= Stephan's list XIII, 1860 RA 00 31 03, NPD 61 15.6) is "pretty faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle". (Note: Dreyer was not aware of Safford's observations at the time he compiled the NGC, as they were published as an appendix to an obscure paper; but he did list a number of Safford's observations in an appendix to the NGC. Unfortunately, he only listed those objects not already in the NGC, so in those cases where Safford was the discoverer of an object already credited to someone else, his prior discovery went unmentioned. Steinicke's book has a complete listing of the objects for which Safford deserves priority, hence his listing as the discoverer of this object.) Stephan's position precesses to RA 00 38 29.0, Dec +29 30 38, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Apparent size 1.7 by 1.1 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 183
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 183
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 181 and 184
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 183, also showing NGC 181 and NGC 184

NGC 184 (= PGC 2309)
Discovered (Oct 6, 1883) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 14.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Andromeda (RA 00 38 35.8, Dec +29 26 51)
Per Dreyer, NGC 184 (= Stephan's list XIII (#8), 1860 RA 00 31 09, NPD 61 19.4) is "extremely faint, extremely small". Apparent size 0.7 by 0.2 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 184
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 184
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 181 and 183
The considerable glare at bottom is from 4th magnitude ε Andromedae
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 184, also showing NGC 181 and NGC 183

NGC 185 (= PGC 2329)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1787) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 9.2 elliptical galaxy (type E3 pec?) in Cassiopeia (RA 00 38 57.6, Dec +48 20 14)
Per Dreyer, NGC 185 (= John Herschel's GC 90, 1860 RA 00 31 14, NPD 42 26.0) is "pretty bright, very large, irregularly round, very gradually much bright middle, mottled but nor resolved". Apparent size 8.0 by 7.0 arcmin? Considerable dustiness near its center, unfortunately not well shown in the image below.
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 185
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 185; see NGC 147 for a wider view

NGC 186 (= PGC 2291)
Discovered (Dec 6, 1850) by
Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a? pec) in Pisces (RA 00 38 25.2, Dec +03 09 58)
Per Dreyer, NGC 186 (= d'Arrest, 1860 RA 00 31 15, NPD 87 36.1) is "faint, small, round, slightly brighter middle". Apparent size 1.4 by 0.8 arcmin? (WORKING: Resolve apparent error in attribution; probably discussed in Steinicke's book)
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 186
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 186
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 186

NGC 187 (= PGC 2380)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1885) by
Ormond Stone
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)cd) in Cetus (RA 00 39 30.2, Dec -14 39 23)
Per Dreyer, NGC 187 (= Ormond Stone's list I (#8), 1860 RA 00 31 30, NPD 105 25.9) is "faint, small, much extended 150°, brighter middle". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 00 32 28. Apparent size 1.3 by 0.5 arcmin?
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 187
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 187
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 187

NGC 188 (= OCL 309)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 8.1 open cluster (type II2r) in Cepheus (RA 00 47 30.0, Dec +85 15 30)
Per Dreyer, NGC 188 (= John Herschel's GC 92, 1860 RA 00 31 40, NPD 05 26.5) is "cluster, very large, round, 150-200 stars from 10th to 18th magnitude". Apparent size 15 arcmin?
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 188
Above, a 24 arcmin wide region centered on open cluster NGC 188

NGC 189 (= OCL 301)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1783) by
Caroline Herschel
A magnitude 8.8 open cluster (type III2p) in Cassiopeia (RA 00 39 35.6, Dec +61 05 42)
Per Dreyer, NGC 189 (= John Herschel's GC 93, 1860 RA 00 31 40, NPD 29 42.5) is "cluster, pretty large, round, stars from 11th to 15th magnitude". (Also observed Oct 27, 1829 by John Herschel, and since it was part of his GC and otherwise unpublished, Dreyer failed to note Caroline's prior discovery.) Apparent size 5.0 arcmin?
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 189
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on open cluster NGC 189

NGC 190 (= PGC 2324 = HCG 5A)
(Hickson Compact Group 5 = NGC 190 +
PGC 2325 + PGC 2322 + PGC 2326)
Discovered (Oct 22, 1886) by Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Pisces (RA 00 38 54.7, Dec +07 03 45)
Per Dreyer, NGC 190 (= Swift's list V (#8), 1860 RA 00 31 48, NPD 83 42.6) is "very faint, small, slightly extended, several stars near to southwest". Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 190, elliptical galaxy PGC 2325, lenticular galaxy PGC 2322 and spiral galaxy PGC 2326, the four members of Hickson Compact Group 5
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 190 and Hickson Compact Group 5
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the group
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 190, elliptical galaxy PGC 2325, lenticular galaxy PGC 2322 and spiral galaxy PGC 2326, the four members of Hickson Compact Group 5

PGC 2325 (= "NGC 190A" = HCG 5B)
(Hickson Compact Group 5 =
NGC 190 + PGC 2325 + PGC 2322 + PGC 2326)
Not an NGC object but often called NGC 190A due to its proximity to NGC 190
A magnitude 14.8 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Pisces (RA 00 38 54.7, Dec +07 03 23)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin? (See NGC 190 for images.)

PGC 2322 (= HCG 5C)
(Hickson Compact Group 5 =
NGC 190 + PGC 2325 + PGC 2322 + PGC 2326)
Not an NGC object but listed here due to its proximity to NGC 190, another member of HCG 5
A magnitude 15.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pisces (RA 00 38 52.8, Dec +07 04 22)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.55 arcmin? (See NGC 190 for images.)

PGC 2326 (= HCG 5D)
(Hickson Compact Group 5 =
NGC 190 + PGC 2325 + PGC 2322 + PGC 2326)
Not an NGC object but listed here due to its proximity to NGC 190, another member of HCG 5
A magnitude 15.8 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pisces (RA 00 38 54.9, Dec +07 02 49)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.15 arcmin? (See NGC 190 for images.) Actually a foreground object, and not a physical companion to the other three members of HCG 5.

NGC 191 (= PGC 2331, and with
IC 1563 = Arp 127)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1785) by William Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)c? pec) in Cetus (RA 00 38 59.2, Dec -09 00 10)
Per Dreyer, NGC 191 (= John Herschel's GC 95, 1860 RA 00 31 53, NPD 99 46.4) is "pretty bright, pretty large, irregularly extended 0°". The reference to a north-south extension is probably due to NGC 191 being nearly in contact with IC 1563, with which it comprises Arp 127. Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of an elliptical galaxy (IC 1563) close to and perturbing a spiral galaxy. Apparent size 1.4 by 1.2 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 191 and lenticular galaxy IC 1563, which comprise Arp 127
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 191 and IC 1563
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 191 and lenticular galaxy IC 1563, which comprise Arp 127

IC 1563 (= PGC 2332 = "NGC 191A", and with NGC 191 = Arp 127)
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 191A due to its proximity to NGC 191
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0? pec) in Cetus (RA 00 39 00.1, Dec -09 00 54)
(See NGC 191 for images, and IC 1563 for anything else.)

NGC 192 (= PGC 2352 = HCG 7A)
(Hickson Compact Group 7 = NGC 192 +
NGC 196 + NGC 201 + NGC 197)
Discovered (Dec 28, 1790) by William Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(r)a) in Cetus (RA 00 39 13.5, Dec +00 51 51)
Per Dreyer, NGC 192 (= John Herschel's GC 96, 1860 RA 00 32 03, NPD 89 54.6) is "faint, pretty small, pretty much extended, brighter middle". Apparent size 1.9 by 0.9 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 192, a member of Hickson Compact Group 7
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 192; for a wide-field view, see NGC 197

NGC 193 (= PGC 2359)
Discovered (Dec 21, 1786) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 lenticular galaxy (type E/SAB0(s)?) in Pisces (RA 00 39 18.5, Dec +03 19 52)
Per Dreyer, NGC 193 (= John Herschel's GC 94, 1860 RA 00 32 07, NPD 87 26.4) is "faint, large, preceding of 2, 15th magnitude star close to southwest" (the "following of 2" being NGC 204). Apparent size 1.4 by 1.2 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 193
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 193
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 193, also showing the western outline of NGC 204
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 193, also showing the western outline of NGC 204

NGC 194 (= PGC 2362)
Discovered (Dec 25, 1790) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.2 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Pisces (RA 00 39 18.3, Dec +03 02 15)
Per Dreyer, NGC 194 (= John Herschel's GC 98, 1860 RA 00 32 07, NPD 87 43.9) is "pretty bright, small, round, very gradually brighter middle". Apparent size 1.6 by 1.4 arcmin?
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 194
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 194
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 194, also showing part of NGC 199
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 194, also showing part of NGC 199

NGC 195 (= PGC 2391)
Discovered (1876) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(r)a?) in Cetus (RA 00 39 35.7, Dec -09 11 39)
Per Dreyer, NGC 195 (= Tempel's list I (#2), 1860 RA 00 32 08, NPD 99 53.3) is "faint." The second Index Catalog lists a corrected position (per Bigourdan) of RA 00 32 33, NPD 99 58. Apparent size 1.2 by 0.9 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 195
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 195
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 195
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 195

NGC 196 (= PGC 2357 = HCG 7B)
(Hickson Compact Group 7 =
NGC 192 + NGC 196 + NGC 201 + NGC 197)
Discovered (Dec 28, 1790) by William Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type SB0? pec) in Cetus (RA 00 39 17.8, Dec +00 54 47)
Per Dreyer, NGC 196 (= John Herschel's GC 100, 1860 RA 00 32 08, NPD 89 51.4) is "faint, pretty small, round, pretty suddenly much brighter middle". Apparent size 1.3 by 0.8 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 196, also showing part of NGC 197; both galaxies are members of Hickson Compact Group 7
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 196 and part of NGC 197 (which see for wide-field view)

NGC 197 (= PGC 2365 = HCG 7D)
(Hickson Compact Group 7 =
NGC 192 + NGC 196 + NGC 201 + NGC 197)
Discovered (Oct 16, 1863) by Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type SB0? pec) in Cetus (RA 00 39 18.7, Dec +00 53 33)
Per Dreyer, NGC 197 (= Marth 14, RA 1860 RA 00 32 09, NPD 89 53) is "extremely faint, south of h41" (h41 being NGC 196). Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 197, also showing part of NGC 192 and NGC 196; the three galaxies are members of Hickson Compact Group 7
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 197, also showing parts of NGC 196 and 192
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 197, also showing NGC 192, 196 and 201
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 197, also showing NGC 192, NGC 196 and NGC 201; the four galaxies comprise Hickson Compact Group 7

NGC 198 (= PGC 2371)
Discovered (Dec 25, 1790) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SA(r)c) in Pisces (RA 00 39 22.9, Dec +02 47 54)
Per Dreyer, NGC 198 (= John Herschel's GC 97, 1860 RA 00 32 12, NPD 87 58.2) is "faint, small, very gradually bright middle". Apparent size 1.2 by 1.2 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 198
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 198
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 198, also showing NGC 200
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 198, also showing NGC 200

NGC 199 (= PGC 2382)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1862) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type SA0? pec) in Pisces (RA 00 39 33.1, Dec +03 08 17)
Per Dreyer, NGC 199 (1860 RA 00 32 21, NPD 87 37.9) is "faint, very small, 8th magnitude star 27s west and 45 arcsec south". Apparent size 1.2 by 0.7 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 199
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 199
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 199, also showing part of NGC 194
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 199, also showing part of NGC 194
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 100 - 149) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 150 - 199     → (NGC 200 - 249)