Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2050 - 2099) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 2100 - 2149 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 2150 - 2199)
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Page last updated Oct 20, 2016
Checked for mis-spelling of DeLisle Stewart
WORKING 2100: Add basic pix, tags, captions

NGC 2100 (= OCL in LMC)
Discovered (Sep 25, 1826) by
James Dunlop (154)
A 10th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 42 09.1, Dec -69 12 43)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 2.8 arcmin.
DSS image of open cluster NGC 2100
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2100
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the cluster
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 2100
Below, a 1 degree wide view showing the position of NGC 2100 in the Large Magellanic Cloud
DSS image showing position of open cluster NGC 2100 relative to the Large Magellanic Cloud
Below, a 4 degree wide view showing the position of NGC 2100 in the Large Magellanic Cloud
DSS image showing position of open cluster NGC 2100 relative to the Large Magellanic Cloud

NGC 2101 (= PGC 17793)
Discovered (Jan 9, 1837) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type IBm pec) in Pictor (RA 05 46 22.4, Dec -52 05 24)
Apparent size 2.0 by 1.3 arcmin
DSS image of irregular galaxy NGC 2101
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2101
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 2101

NGC 2102 (= OCL in LMC)
Discovered (1830's) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 42 20.6, Dec -69 29 14)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 1.0 arcmin.

NGC 2103
Discovered (Dec 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
An emission nebula in Mensa (RA 05 41 40.0, Dec -71 19 54)

NGC 2104 (= PGC 17822)
Discovered (Dec 27, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBm) in Pictor (RA 05 47 04.2, Dec -51 33 11)
Apparent size 2.0 by 0.9 arcmin.

NGC 2105 (= OCL in LMC)
Discovered (Jan 2, 1837) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 44 19.2, Dec -66 55 04)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 1.7 arcmin.

NGC 2106 (= PGC 17975)
Discovered (Nov 21, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0) in Lepus (RA 05 50 46.3, Dec -21 34 01)
Apparent size 2.7 by 1.4 arcmin.

NGC 2107
Discovered (Feb 9, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Mensa (RA 05 43 13.0, Dec -70 38 24)
Apparent size 2.1 arcmin.

NGC 2108 (= OCL in LMC)
Possibly observed (1826) by
James Dunlop (153?)
Discovered (Dec 16, 1835) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 43 55.3, Dec -69 10 51)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 2.0 arcmin.

NGC 2109 (= OCL in LMC)
Discovered (Nov 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 44 23.0, Dec -68 32 52)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 2.0 arcmin.

NGC 2110 (= PGC 18030)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Orion (RA 05 52 11.2, Dec -07 27 23)
Apparent size 1.7 by 1.2 arcmin.

NGC 2111
Discovered (Feb 9, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude open cluster in Mensa (RA 05 44 33.1, Dec -70 59 36)
Apparent size 1.6 arcmin.

NGC 2112 (= OCL 509)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 9th-magnitude open cluster (type II3m) in Orion (RA 05 53 45.2, Dec +00 24 39)
Apparent size 18 arcmin.

NGC 2113
Discovered (Nov 3, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster and emission nebula in Dorado (RA 05 45 24.6, Dec -69 46 27)
Apparent size 1.8 arcmin.

NGC 2114 (= OCL in LMC)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1826) by
James Dunlop (186)
A 13th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 46 12.2, Dec -68 02 54)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 1.0 arcmin.

NGC 2115 (= PGC 18001)
Discovered (Jan 4, 1837) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Pictor (RA 05 51 19.8, Dec -50 35 00)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin. Recessional velocity 6960 km/sec.

PGC 18002 (= "NGC 2115A")
Not an NGC object, but often referred to as NGC 2115A because paired with
NGC 2115
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Pictor (RA 05 51 21.3, Dec -50 35 32)
As (will be) noted at NGC 2115's entry, Dreyer listed that object as "most extremely faint", meaning that even the brighter member of the pair was barely observable. Given the two magnitude difference in brightness between the two galaxies, the existence of PGC 18002 cannot have had any effect on Herschel's observation. Therefore the NGC listing properly belongs only to the brighter galaxy, as listed above. However, the two galaxies have nearly identical recessional velocities, and their shapes seem to indicate a mutual gravitational interaction, so they are almost certainly a physical pair. Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin. Recessional velocity 6990 km/sec.

NGC 2116
Discovered (Sep 27, 1826) by
James Dunlop (188)
A 13th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 47 15.2, Dec -68 30 29)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 1.0 arcmin.

NGC 2117
Discovered (Nov 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 47 46.0, Dec -67 27 01)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 1.3 arcmin.

NGC 2118
Discovered (Sep 25, 1826) by
James Dunlop (157)
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 47 39.6, Dec -69 07 55)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 1.3 arcmin.

NGC 2119 (= PGC 18136)
Discovered (Jan 9, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan (10-19)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2) in Orion (RA 05 57 26.9, Dec +11 56 56)
Apparent size 1.2 by 1.0 arcmin.

NGC 2120
Discovered (Nov 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 50 34.8, Dec -63 40 30)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 2 arcmin.

NGC 2121
Discovered (Feb 9, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Mensa (RA 05 48 12.4, Dec -71 28 52)
Apparent size 2.7 arcmin.

NGC 2122
Discovered (Aug 3, 1826) by
James Dunlop (106)
A 10th-magnitude open cluster and emission nebula in Mensa (RA 05 48 52.6, Dec -70 04 12)
Apparent size 4.5 arcmin.

NGC 2123
Discovered (Nov 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 51 43.4, Dec -65 19 18)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 1.2 arcmin.

NGC 2124 (= PGC 18147)
Discovered (Oct 20, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Lepus (RA 05 57 52.3, Dec -20 05 06)
The second IC notes (per Howe) "faint, small; not most extremely faint". Apparent size 2.7 by 0.9 arcmin.

NGC 2125
Discovered (Dec 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
An open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 50 54.3, Dec -69 28 45)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 1 arcmin.
DSS image of open cluster NGC 2125
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2125
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the cluster
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 2125
Below, a 4 degree wide view showing the position of NGC 2125 in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Wikisky image of region near open cluster NGC 2125

NGC 2126 (= OCL 418)
Discovered (Nov 12, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 10th-magnitude open cluster (type II1p) in Auriga (RA 06 02 32.9, Dec +49 51 57)
Apparent size 6 arcmin.

NGC 2127
Discovered (Dec 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 51 22.4, Dec -69 21 41)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 1.2 arcmin.

NGC 2128 (= PGC 18374)
Discovered (Dec 27, 1886) by
Edward Swift (6-25)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Camelopardalis (RA 06 04 34.0, Dec +57 37 39)
Apparent size 1.5 by 1.1 arcmin.

NGC 2129 (= OCL 467)
Discovered (Feb 6, 1782) by
William Herschel
A 7th-magnitude open cluster (type III3p) in Gemini (RA 06 01 06.5, Dec +23 19 04)
Historical Identification:
Discovery Notes: William Herschel's VIII 26 was observed by him on Nov 16, 1784; but per Steinicke, Herschel had already observed the cluster (but not recorded it as such) during his earlier studies of double stars, whence the date of discovery shown above.
Physical Information: Apparent size 6 arcmin.

NGC 2130
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 52 23.8, Dec -67 20 03)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 1.2 arcmin.

NGC 2131 (= PGC 18172)
Discovered (Jan 20, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type IBm) in Lepus (RA 05 58 47.2, Dec -26 39 11)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.5 arcmin.

NGC 2132
Discovered (Jan 11, 1836) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Pictor (RA 05 55 09.1, Dec -59 54 37)
Scattered around 8th-magnitude SAO 234207, apparent size 45 arcmin.

NGC 2133
Discovered (Nov 24, 1834) by
John Herschel
An open cluster in Mensa (RA 05 51 28.8, Dec -71 10 30)
Apparent size 1.7 arcmin.

NGC 2134
Discovered (Nov 24, 1834) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude open cluster in Mensa (RA 05 51 56.7, Dec -71 05 50)
Apparent size 2.5 arcmin.

NGC 2135
Discovered (Nov 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 53 35.0, Dec -67 25 38)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 1 arcmin.

NGC 2136
Discovered (Sep 24, 1826) by
James Dunlop (160)
An 11th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 52 58.5, Dec -69 29 33)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 1.9 arcmin.

NGC 2137
Discovered (Dec 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 53 13.2, Dec -69 28 55)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 0.8 arcmin.

NGC 2138
Discovered (Nov 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 54 48.8, Dec -65 50 07)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 1 arcmin.

NGC 2139 (=
IC 2154 = PGC 18258)
Discovered (Nov 17, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2139)
Discovered (Dec 1, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 2154)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)cd) in Lepus (RA 06 01 08.0, Dec -23 40 22)
The second IC adds "Not found twice by Howe. Probably = IC 2154, 23 seconds east and 9 arcmin north of Herschel's place"; so the double identity has been suspected for more than a century. Based on a recessional velocity of 1835 km/sec, NGC 2139 is about 85 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 75 to 120 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.4 by 1.9 arcmin, it is about 60 thousand light years across, although this does not include a faint extension to the southeast. Its bright center is home to one of the smallest nuclear star clusters currently known. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SB(s)d.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2139
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2139 and its southeastern filament
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2139

NGC 2140
Discovered (Dec 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 54 16.3, Dec -68 36 00)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 1.7 arcmin.

NGC 2141 (= OCL 487)
Discovered (January, 1883) by
Edward Barnard
A 9th-magnitude open cluster (type II3r) in Orion (RA 06 02 55.0, Dec +10 26 47)
Apparent size 10 arcmin.

NGC 2142 (= 3 Monocerotis)
Recorded (Jan 6, 1831) by
John Herschel
A 5th-magnitude star in Monoceros (RA 06 01 50.3, Dec -10 35 51)
Mistakenly thought to be involved with some nebulosity.

NGC 2143
Discovered (Feb 2, 1831) by
John Herschel
An open cluster in Orion (RA 06 03 07.4, Dec +05 43 42)
Apparent size 11 arcmin.

NGC 2144 (= PGC 17592)
Discovered (Jan 17, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Mensa (RA 05 40 56.3, Dec -82 07 08)
Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1 arcmin.

NGC 2145
Discovered (Nov 12, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Mensa (RA 05 54 22.8, Dec -70 54 07)
Apparent size 1.7 arcmin.

NGC 2146 (= PGC 18797)
Discovered (1876) by
August Winnecke
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)ab pec) in Camelopardalis (RA 06 18 38.3, Dec +78 21 21)
Based on a recessional velocity of 895 km/sec, NGC 2146 is about 40 million light years away, in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 55 to 90 million light years (peculiar (non-Hubble-expansion) velocities could have a significant effect on the recessional distance, so the difference is not unexpected). Given that and its apparent size of about 5.4 by 2.9 arcmin, the galaxy is about 75 thousand light years across. Its distorted form is presumably due to gravitational interaction with PGC 18960, which is 19 arcmin to the northeast, or to a relatively recent collision with another galaxy which has merged with the larger galaxy, and is therefore no longer visible as a separate object.
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 2146
Above, a 5.5 arcmin wide image of NGC 2146 (Image Credits: Peter Lipscomb/Flynn Haase/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
Below, a closeup of its nucleus (Image Credits: ESA/HST/NASA)
HST image of nucleus of spiral galaxy NGC 2146
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy (Image Credits: Jeff Hapeman, NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2146, superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing areas

PGC 18960 (= "NGC 2146A")
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in
Camelopardalis (RA 06 23 54.6, Dec +78 31 48)
Based on a recessional velocity of 1495 km/sec, PGC 18960 is about 70 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 60 to 85 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 3.0 by 1.2 arcmin, it is about 60 thousand light years across. Although the recessional distance of PGC 18960 is much further than that for NGC 2146, their redshift-independent distance estimates are in the same range, so it has been suggested that the two galaxies may be interacting. However, the range of distance estimates for each galaxy is so large that they could be tens of millions of light years apart, and it is just as likely that they are merely an "optical double".
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 18960, also known as NGC 2146A
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 18960
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 18960, also known as NGC 2146A
Below, a 24 arcmin wide region centered between NGC 2146 and PGC 18960
DSS image of region between spiral galaxy NGC 2164 and spiral galaxy PGC 18960, also known as NGC 2146A

NGC 2147
Discovered (Sep 27, 1826) by
James Dunlop (191)
A 13th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 05 55 45.7, Dec -68 12 06)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 1.1 arcmin.

NGC 2148 (= PGC 18171)
Discovered (Dec 4, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Pictor (RA 05 58 45.6, Dec -59 07 35)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin.

NGC 2149
Discovered (Jan 17, 1877) by
Édouard Stephan (8-18)
A reflection nebula in Monoceros (RA 06 03 30.7, Dec -09 43 50)
Apparent size 3.0 by 2.0 arcmin.
DSS image of reflection nebula NGC 2149
Above, a 6 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2149 (the bright region embedded within obscuring clouds)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the reflection nebula
DSS image of region near reflection nebula NGC 2149
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2050 - 2099) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 2100 - 2149     → (NGC 2150 - 2199)