Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2150 - 2199) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 2200 - 2249 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 2250 - 2299)
Click here for Introductory Material
QuickLinks:
2200, 2201, 2202, 2203, 2204, 2205, 2206, 2207, 2208, 2209, 2210, 2211, 2212, 2213, 2214, 2215, 2216,
2217, 2218, 2219, 2220, 2221, 2222, 2223, 2224, 2225, 2226, 2227, 2228, 2229, 2230, 2231, 2232, 2233,
2234, 2235, 2236, 2237, 2238, 2239, 2240, 2241, 2242, 2243, 2244, 2245, 2246, 2247, 2248, 2249

Page last updated Oct 20, 2016
WORKING 2237, 2238, 2239, 2244, 2246: Sort out various parts of Rosette Nebula
WORKING 2202: Adding basic pix, tags

NGC 2200 (= PGC 18652)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)c) in Puppis (RA 06 13 17.4, Dec -43 39 47)
Based on a recessional velocity of 4890 km/sec, NGC 2200 is about 225 million light years away. It is thought to be physically paired with NGC 2201. If so, the two galaxies are probably close to their average distance of 215 to 220 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.0 by 0.9 arcmins, it is about 65 thousand light years across.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2200
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2200
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown is NGC 2201
DSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 2200 and 2201

NGC 2201 (= PGC 18658)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(r)bc) in Puppis (RA 06 13 31.4, Dec -43 42 18)
Based on a recessional velocity of 4660 km/sec, NGC 2201 is about 210 million light years away. It is thought to be physically paired with NGC 2200, which may be responsible for its distorted outer disk. If so, the two galaxies are probably close to their average distance of 215 to 220 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 3 by 2 arcmins, it is about 180 thousand light years across.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2201
Above, a 3.6 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2201
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown is NGC 2200
DSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 2200 and 2201

NGC 2202
Discovered (1825) by
Wilhelm Struve (885)
An open cluster in Orion (RA 06 16 50.7, Dec +05 59 48)
Apparent size 7 arcmin.

NGC 2203
Discovered (Jan 23, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Mensa (RA 06 04 42.7, Dec -75 26 18)
The second IC adds (per Delisle Stewart) "faint cluster, not a nebula". Apparent size 3.3 arcmin.

NGC 2204 (= OCL 572)
Discovered (Feb 6, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 9th-magnitude open cluster (type III3m) in Canis Major (RA 06 15 33.0, Dec -18 39 54)
Apparent size 10 arcmin.

NGC 2205 (= PGC 18551)
Discovered (Dec 9, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0) in Pictor (RA 06 10 32.8, Dec -62 32 19)
Apparent size 1.4 by 0.9 arcmin.

NGC 2206 (= PGC 18736)
Discovered (Jan 20, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Canis Major (RA 06 15 59.7, Dec -26 45 55)
Apparent size 2.4 by 1.3 arcmin.

NGC 2207 (= PGC 18749)
Discovered (Jan 24, 1835) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc pec) in Canis Major (RA 06 16 21.8, Dec -21 22 22)
The second IC adds (per Howe and Stewart) "bi-nuclear, surrounded by faint trace of ring". Paired and strongly gravitationally interacting with IC 2163, which see for a more detailed discussion of that galaxy. Based on a 2740 km/sec recessional velocity, NGC 2207 is about 125 million light years away (and of necessity at the same distance as its companion), in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 55 to 110 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 4.3 by 2.8 arcmin, it is about 150 thousand light years across. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SAB(rs)bc.
NOAO image of the region near interacting spiral galaxies NGC 2207 and IC 2163, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing regions
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 2207 and its companion, IC 2163
(Image Credits: Stuart Meyer/Flynn Haase/AURA/NSF/NOAO)
Below, a HST image of the pair, rotated to fit a larger image on the page (North is on the right)
Credits: Debra Meloy Elmegreen (Vassar College) et al., & the Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/ STScI/ NASA)
HST image of interacting spiral galaxies NGC 2207 and IC 2163

NGC 2208 (= PGC 18911)
Discovered (Nov 24, 1886) by
Lewis Swift (6-26)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Auriga (RA 06 22 34.6, Dec +51 54 36)
Apparent size 1.6 by 1.1 arcmin.

NGC 2209
Discovered (Feb 8, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude open cluster in Mensa (RA 06 08 33.5, Dec -73 50 16)
Apparent size 2.8 arcmin.

NGC 2210 (= OCL in LMC)
Discovered (Jan 31, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 10th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 06 11 31.9, Dec -69 07 15)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 2.1 arcmin.

NGC 2211 (= PGC 18794)
Discovered (Dec 11, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth (I-150)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0) in Canis Major (RA 06 18 30.2, Dec -18 32 16)
The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Ormond Stone, Bigourdan and Howe) of 06 12 23. Apparent size 1.4 by 0.7 arcmin.

NGC 2212 (= PGC 18796)
Discovered (Dec 11, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth (I-151)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a) in Canis Major (RA 06 18 35.7, Dec -18 31 12)
Apparent size 1.5 by 0.8 arcmin.

NGC 2213
Discovered (Feb 9, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Mensa (RA 06 10 42.0, Dec -71 31 42)
Apparent size 2.1 arcmin.

NGC 2214 (= OCL in LMC)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1826) by
James Dunlop (201)
An 11th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 06 12 57.5, Dec -68 15 33)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 3.6 arcmin.

NGC 2215 (= OCL 550)
Discovered (Nov 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster (type II2p) in Monoceros (RA 06 20 49.2, Dec -07 17 02)
Apparent size 8 arcmin.

NGC 2216 (= PGC 18877)
Discovered (Jan 23, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab) in Canis Major (RA 06 21 30.7, Dec -22 05 14)
Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1 arcmin.

NGC 2217 (= PGC 18883)
Discovered (Jan 20, 1835) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB(rs)0/a) in Canis Major (RA 06 21 39.8, Dec -27 14 03)
Based on a recessional velocity of 1620 km/sec, NGC 2217 is about 75 million light years away, in reasonably good agreement with a single redshift-independent distance estimate of 65 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 4.8 by 4.3 arcmin, it is about 100 thousand light years across. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type (R)SB(rs)0/a. (Note: NGC 2217 is referred to as a barred spiral galaxy in places, because the outer ring contains clusters of young hot stars similar to those in spirals; but the central structure does not display spiral arms, hence its classification as a lenticular or transitional galaxy.)
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2217
Above, a 6 arcmin wide view of NGC 2217
Below, a 4.5 arcmin wide closeup of the galaxy (Image Credits: ESO)
ESO image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2217
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2217

NGC 2218
Recorded (Jan 13, 1853) by
Edward Cooper
Looked for but not found (prior to 1862) by Arthur von Auwers
A group of five stars in Gemini (RA 06 24 41.5, Dec +19 20 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2218 (= GC 1402, Markree Catalog, 1860 RA 06 16 25, NPD 70 35.5) is a "faint cluster (Auwers No. 22)". The position precesses to RA 06 24 40.8, Dec +19 20 19, on the southwestern rim of the group of stars listed above, and though not a particularly impressive group it does fit the description, so the identification is considered reasonably certain. However, some catalogs list the object as lost or nonexistent, including the original reference for this catalog, so it was also listed as lost or nonexistent here until early 2015.
Physical Information: The asterism consists of five 14th to 15th magnitude stars arranged in a north-south oval, and a few much fainter stars that Cooper could not have seen; so the NGC object is basically just the five brighter stars. Apparent size 0.85 by 0.35 arcmin.
DSS image of region near the asterism listed as NGC 2218
Above, a 9 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2218

NGC 2219
Discovered (Feb 19, 1830) by
John Herschel
An open cluster in Monoceros (RA 06 23 44.3, Dec -04 40 36)
Apparent size 10 arcmin.

NGC 2220
Discovered (Dec 29, 1834) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Puppis (RA 06 21 12.0, Dec -44 45 28)
Apparent size 5 arcmin, scattered around 8th magnitude star SAO 217873.

NGC 2221 (= PGC 18833)
Discovered (Dec 4, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Pictor (RA 06 20 15.8, Dec -57 34 43)
Apparent size 2.0 by 0.5 arcmin.

NGC 2222 (= PGC 18835)
Discovered (Dec 4, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa) in Pictor (RA 06 20 16.8, Dec -57 32 00)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.3 arcmin.

NGC 2223 (= PGC 18978)
Discovered (Jan 23, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Canis Major (RA 06 24 35.8, Dec -22 50 19)
Apparent size 3.0 by 2.6 arcmin.

NGC 2224
Discovered (Dec 24, 1786) by
William Herschel
A group of stars in Gemini (RA 06 27 32.0, Dec +12 39 20)
Apparent size 20 arcmin.

NGC 2225
Discovered (Jan 30, 1786) by
William Herschel
An open cluster in Monoceros (RA 06 26 37.0, Dec -09 38 30)
Apparent size 40 arcmin.

NGC 2226 (= core of
NGC 2225)
Discovered (probably 1882 - 1887) by Edward Barnard
Part of an open cluster in Monoceros (RA 06 26 37.5, Dec -09 38 32)
The core of NGC 2225; apparent size 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 2227 (= PGC 19030)
Discovered (Jan 27, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)c) in Canis Major (RA 06 25 57.9, Dec -22 00 17)
Based on a recessional velocity of 2260 km/sec, NGC 2227 is about 105 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 90 to 105 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.1 by 1.2 arcmin, it is about 65 thousand light years across. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SB(rs)cd.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2227
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2227
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2227

NGC 2228 (= PGC 18862)
Discovered (Jan 31, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0) in Dorado (RA 06 21 15.9, Dec -64 27 33)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin.

NGC 2229 (= PGC 18867)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a) in Dorado (RA 06 21 23.8, Dec -64 57 24)
Apparent size 1.5 by 0.4 arcmin.

NGC 2230 (= PGC 18873)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Dorado (RA 06 21 27.9, Dec -64 59 34)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.9 arcmin.

NGC 2231 (= OCL in LMC)
Discovered (Dec 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 06 20 43.0, Dec -67 31 07)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 2.0 arcmin.

NGC 2232 (= OCL 545)
Discovered (Dec 5, 1779) by
William Herschel
A 4th-magnitude open cluster (type IV3p) in Monoceros (RA 06 27 15.0, Dec -04 45 30)
Historical Identification:
Discovery Notes: William Herschel's VIII 25 was observed by him on Oct 16, 1784; but per Steinicke, Herschel had already observed the cluster (but not recorded it as such) during his earlier studies of double stars, whence the date of discovery shown above. Also per Steinicke, this was the very first cluster or nebula observed by Herschel.
Physical Information: Apparent size 45 arcmin.

NGC 2233 (= PGC 18882)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Dorado (RA 06 21 40.1, Dec -65 02 00)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.2 arcmin.

NGC 2234
Discovered (Feb 19, 1784) by
William Herschel
A group of stars in Gemini (RA 06 29 29.2, Dec +16 43 08)
Apparent size 35 arcmin.

NGC 2235 (= PGC 18906)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2) in Dorado (RA 06 22 22.2, Dec -64 56 05)
Apparent size 1.4 by 1.0 arcmin.

NGC 2236 (= OCL 501)
Discovered (Feb 23, 1784) by
William Herschel
An 9th-magnitude open cluster (type III2p) in Monoceros (RA 06 29 39.6, Dec +06 49 51)
Apparent size 8 arcmin.

WORKING 2237, 2238, 2239, 2244, 2246: Sorting out various designations for the Rosette Nebula

NGC 2237, the western part of the Rosette Nebula
Discovered (1865) by
Lewis Swift (2-31)
An emission nebula in Monoceros (RA 06 30 54.6, Dec +05 02 52)
The Rosette Nebula is a relatively near and therefore apparently large (and spectacular) stellar birthplace. It is not unusual in such cases for several NGC entries to apply to different parts of the object, and not infrequently to be misapplied. Sorting out the resulting mess can require considerable research, so the entries on this page will be primarily confined to a historical discussion, which will be amended as new information becomes available. For a physical discussion of the nebula (and a spectacular image), see The Rosette Nebula.
     The Rosette is usually listed as NGC 2239, but that is incorrect. Regardless of what John Herschel saw when he observed the cluster of stars listed as NGC 2239, Dreyer's NGC entries and the IC correction shown here make it clear that Dreyer considered the cluster of stars in the center of the Rosette to be Herschel's cluster, and the Nebula itself was primarily comprised of NGC 2237 and 2238. A future iteration of this page will discuss such matters in more detail, and include images of the Nebula which show a final interpretation of the historical evidence.
     (Note to self, to be used in the above: The first IC adds "2237 and 2238 are parts of an extremely large nebulous ring surrounding the cluster h392. See a sketch by Barnard (A.N. 2918)". This implies that the Rosette is the extremely large ring in question, consisting of (among other entries) NGC 2237 and 2238; and h392 (= NGC 2239) is the cluster at the center of the Rosette, not the one off to the side, centered on 12 Monocerotis. Also, per Steinicke, the apparent size of NGC 2237 is about 80 by 50 arcmin.)
CFHT image of the emission nebulae and star clusters collectively referred to as the Rosette Nebula
Above, an image of the Rosette Nebula
(Image credit and ©: Jean-Charles Cuillandre (CFHT) & Giovanni Anselmi (Coelum), MegaPrime Camera; used by permission)

NGC 2238, a knot in the Rosette Nebula
Discovered (Feb 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth (99)
An emission nebula in Monoceros (RA 06 30 40.3, Dec +05 00 47)
The Rosette Nebula is a relatively near and therefore apparently large (and spectacular) stellar birthplace. It is not unusual in such cases for several NGC entries to apply to different parts of the object, and not infrequently to be misapplied. Sorting out the resulting mess can require considerable research, so the entries on this page will be primarily confined to a historical discussion, which will be amended as new information becomes available. For a physical discussion of the nebula (and a spectacular image), see The Rosette Nebula.
     The Rosette is usually listed as NGC 2239, but that is incorrect. Regardless of what John Herschel saw when he observed the cluster of stars listed as NGC 2239, Dreyer's NGC entries and the IC correction shown here make it clear that Dreyer considered the cluster of stars in the center of the Rosette to be Herschel's cluster, and the Nebula itself was primarily comprised of NGC 2237 and 2238. A future iteration of this page will discuss such matters in more detail, and include images of the Nebula which show a final interpretation of the historical evidence.
     (Note to self, to be used in the above: The first IC adds "2237 and 2238 are parts of an extremely large nebulous ring surrounding the cluster h392. See a sketch by Barnard (A.N. 2918)". This implies that the Rosette is the extremely large ring in question, consisting of (among other entries) NGC 2237 and 2238; and h392 (= NGC 2239) is the cluster at the center of the Rosette, not the one off to the side, centered on 12 Monocerotis. Also, per Steinicke, NGC 2238 = a knot in the Rosette Nebula, about 80 by 60 arcmin apparent size.)

NGC 2239 (=
NGC 2244 = OCL 515 (in the Rosette Nebula); not = 12 Monocerotis)
Discovered (Feb 17, 1690) by John Flamsteed (and later listed as NGC 2244)
Discovered (March 1830) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2239)
A 5th-magnitude open cluster (type II3p) in Monoceros (RA 06 32 19.0, Dec +04 51 24)
The Rosette Nebula is a relatively near and therefore apparently large (and spectacular) stellar birthplace. It is not unusual in such cases for several NGC entries to apply to different parts of the object, and not infrequently to be misapplied. Sorting out the resulting mess can require considerable research, so the entries on this page will be primarily confined to a historical discussion, which will be amended as new information becomes available. For a physical discussion of the nebula (and a spectacular image), see The Rosette Nebula.
     The Rosette is usually listed as NGC 2239, but that is incorrect. Regardless of what John Herschel saw when he observed the cluster of stars listed as NGC 2239, Dreyer's NGC entries and the IC correction shown here make it clear that Dreyer considered the cluster of stars in the center of the Rosette to be Herschel's cluster, and the Nebula itself was primarily comprised of NGC 2237 and 2238. A future iteration of this page will discuss such matters in more detail, and include images of the Nebula which show a final interpretation of the historical evidence. (Note: The 2000.0 RA and Dec for shown for NGC 2239 correspond to the usual identification with 12 Monocerotis; when they have been changed to the correct position, this note will be deleted.)
     (The following is the historical evidence for the statements above) Per Dreyer, NGC 2239 (= John Herschel's GC 1420 = h392, 1860 RA 06 23 29, NPD 84 57.5) is an "8th-magnitude star in a large, poor, bright cluster". The first IC adds "2237 and 2238 are parts of an extremely large nebulous ring surrounding the cluster h392. See a sketch by Barnard (A.N. 2918)". This implies that the Rosette is the extremely large ring in question, consisting of (among other entries) NGC 2237 and 2238; and h392 (= NGC 2239) is the cluster at the center of the Rosette, not the one off to the side, centered on 12 Monocerotis. Per Steinicke, the apparent size of NGC 2239 is 24 arcmin.

NGC 2240
Discovered (Jan 3, 1786) by
William Herschel
An open cluster in Auriga (RA 06 33 10.5, Dec +35 15 02)

NGC 2241 (= OCL in LMC)
Discovered (Jan 31, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 06 22 53.3, Dec -68 55 29)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 1.3 arcmin.

NGC 2242
Discovered (Nov 24, 1886) by
Lewis Swift (6-27)
A 15th-magnitude planetary nebula in Auriga (RA 06 34 07.4, Dec +44 46 40)
Apparent size 0.37 arcmin.

NGC 2243 (= OCL 644)
Discovered (May 24, 1826) by
James Dunlop (616)
A 9th-magnitude open cluster (type I2r) in Canis Major (RA 06 29 34.4, Dec -31 16 53)
The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 06 24 28 and adds (per Delisle Stewart) "faint, open cluster, stars from 9th to 11th magnitude". Apparent size 8.3 arcmin.

NGC 2244 (=
NGC 2239 = OCL 515 (in the Rosette Nebula); not = 12 Monocerotis)
Discovered (Feb 17, 1690) by John Flamsteed (and later listed as NGC 2244)
Discovered (March 1830) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2239)
A 5th-magnitude open cluster (type II3p) in Monoceros (RA 06 32 19.0, Dec +04 51 24)
See the discussion of NGC 2237, 2238 and 2239 for a hint of the complications involved in unraveling the historical assignment of NGC numbers in the region near the Rosette Nebula. Apparent size 24 arcmin.

NGC 2245
Discovered (Jan 16, 1784) by
William Herschel
A reflection nebula in Monoceros (RA 06 32 41.2, Dec +10 09 24)
Apparent size 5 by 4 arcmin.

NGC 2246, part of the Rosette Nebula
Discovered (Feb 27, 1886) by
Lewis Swift (3-36)
An emission nebula in Monoceros (RA 06 32 33.7, Dec +05 07 42)
See the discussion of NGC 2237, 2238 and 2239 for a hint of the complications involved in unraveling the historical assignment of NGC numbers in the region near the Rosette Nebula.

NGC 2247
Discovered (Feb 14, 1857) by
R. J. Mitchell
A reflection nebula in Monoceros (RA 06 33 05.1, Dec +10 19 18)
Apparent size 6 by 6 arcmin.

NGC 2248
Discovered (Dec 23, 1853) by
Edward Cooper
A group of stars in Gemini (RA 06 34 35.3, Dec +26 18 21)

NGC 2249 (= GCL in LMC)
Discovered (Dec 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude globular cluster in Dorado (RA 06 25 49.6, Dec -68 55 11)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 1.7 arcmin. (Says open cluster in Steinicke, but images and other references suggest a globular, so probably a typo.)
DSS image of globular cluster NGC 2249
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2249
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the cluster
DSS image of region near globular cluster NGC 2249
Below, a 1 degree wide region centered on the cluster to show its position relative to nearby stars
DSS image of 1 degree wide region near globular cluster NGC 2249 to show its position relative to nearby stars
Below, a 4 degree region centered on the cluster to show its position relative to stars in Dorado
DSS image of 4 degree wide region near globular cluster NGC 2249 to show its position relative to stars in Dorado
Below, an 8 degree region centered on the cluster to show its position relative to the LMC
DSS image of 8 degree wide region near globular cluster NGC 2249 to show its position relative to the Large Magellanic Cloud
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2150 - 2199) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 2200 - 2249     → (NGC 2250 - 2299)