Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2200 - 2249) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 2250 - 2299 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 2300 - 2349)
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2267, 2268, 2269, 2270, 2271, 2272, 2273, 2274, 2275, 2276, 2277, 2278, 2279, 2280, 2281, 2282, 2283,
2284, 2285, 2286, 2287, 2288, 2289, 2290, 2291, 2292, 2293, 2294, 2295, 2296, 2297, 2298, 2299

Page last updated Mar 30, 2017
WORKING: Add basic pix, tags

NGC 2250 (= OCL 547)
Discovered (Feb 20, 1830) by
John Herschel
A 9th-magnitude open cluster (type IV2p) in Monoceros (RA 06 33 49.8, Dec -05 05 04)
Apparent size 10 arcmin
DSS image of region centered on open cluster NGC 2250
Above, a 20 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 2250

NGC 2251 (= OCL 499)
Discovered (Dec 26, 1783) by
William Herschel
A 7th-magnitude open cluster (type III2p) in Monoceros (RA 06 34 38.4, Dec +08 21 59)
Apparent size 10 arcmin
DSS image of region centered on open cluster NGC 2251
Above, a 20 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 2251

NGC 2252 (= OCL 514)
Discovered (Jan 27, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 7th-magnitude open cluster (type IV2p) in Monoceros (RA 06 34 19.8, Dec +05 19 22)
Apparent size 18 arcmin, on the northeastern side of the Rosette Nebula
DSS image of region centered on open cluster NGC 2252
Above, a 24 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 2252

NGC 2253
Recorded (Nov 1, 1788) by
William Herschel
A lost or nonexistent object in Camelopardalis (RA 06 43 42.0, Dec +65 12 22)

NGC 2254 (= OCL 500)
Discovered (Dec 28, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 9th-magnitude open cluster (type I2p) in Monoceros (RA 06 35 46.6, Dec +07 40 15)
Apparent size 6 arcmin

NGC 2255 (= PGC 19260)
Discovered (Feb 2, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Columba (RA 06 33 58.6, Dec -34 48 42)
Apparent size 1.5 by 0.7 arcmin

NGC 2256 (= PGC 19602)
Discovered (Aug 1, 1883) by
Wilhelm Tempel (IX-3)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0) in Camelopardalis (RA 06 47 14.2, Dec +74 14 13)
Apparent size 2.3 by 2.0 arcmin

NGC 2257 (= OCL in LMC)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude open cluster in Dorado (RA 06 30 13.0, Dec -64 19 29)
In the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent size 2.2 arcmin.

NGC 2258 (= PGC 19622)
Discovered (Aug 1, 1883) by
Wilhelm Tempel (IX-4)
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Camelopardalis (RA 06 47 46.5, Dec +74 28 53)
The second IC added (per Bigourdan) "Minutes of RA are 29". Apparent size 2.3 by 1.5 arcmin.

NGC 2259 (= OCL 492)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1787) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude open cluster (type II2p) in Monoceros (RA 06 38 33.3, Dec +10 52 57)
Apparent size 3.5 arcmin

NGC 2260
Discovered (Jan 1, 1786) by
William Herschel
An open cluster in Monoceros (RA 06 38 03.0, Dec -01 28 20)
Apparent size 20 arcmin

NGC 2261, Hubble's Variable Nebula
Discovered (Dec 26, 1783) by
William Herschel
An emission and reflection nebula in Monoceros (RA 06 39 09.5, Dec +08 44 40)
Apparent size 3.0 by 1.0 arcmin

NGC 2262 (= OCL 531)
Discovered (Dec 27, 1786) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude open cluster (type I2p) in Monoceros (RA 06 39 38.7, Dec +01 08 30)
Apparent size 4 arcmin

NGC 2263 (= PGC 19355)
Discovered (Jan 20, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab) in Canis Major (RA 06 38 28.8, Dec -24 50 55)
Apparent size 2.6 by 2.0 arcmin

NGC 2264 (= OCL 495), the Christmas Tree Cluster = the Snowflake Cluster
(plus nebulosity including the Cone Nebula and Foxfur Nebula)

Discovered (Jan 18, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 4th-magnitude open cluster (type IV3pn) in Monoceros (RA 06 40 58.2, Dec +09 53 44)
The second IC added "Delete 'remarkable!' An extremely large nebula, 3 ± degrees in diameter, the densest part 12 arcmin southwest of the star 15 Monocerotis (per Barnard and Roberts)". (Per Steinicke, the cluster itself is about 40 arcmin across.) NGC 2264 is part of a complex region in Monoceros consisting of dark absorption nebulae, emission nebulae, reflection nebulae, and the stars that illuminate or outline their structures. At one end, the Cone Nebula is a dense cloud of gas and dust sculpted by stellar winds from an extremely hot, bright star which is completely hidden in visible light by the gas and dust in front of it. Scattered across the nebula are a number of bright stars which look like lights strung on a Christmas tree, with the Cone Nebula at the apex of the tree, and the bright star S Monocerotis and the Fox Fur Nebula near the base. (The Fox Fur nebula is not generally considered a part of NGC 2264, but is certainly an extension of the gas and dust filling the region, as all the stars and clouds of gas and dust lie at about the same 2600 light year distance from us.)
     The field of view below, extending from the Cone nebula at the top to S Monocerotis and the Fox Fur nebula at the bottom, covers about 30 light years. (Image Credits: ESO)
ESO image of the nebulosity near open cluster NGC 2264, including the Cone Nebula and the Fox Fur Nebula
Below, another view more clearly shows the Cone at the top, and the Fox Fur nebula, to the left of the bright star S Monocerotis, at the bottom (T.A. Rector (NRAO/AUI/NSF and NOAO/AURA/NSF) and B.A. Wolpa (NOAO/AURA/NSF))
NOAO image of the nebulosity near open cluster NGC 2264, including the Cone Nebula and the Fox Fur Nebula
The Cone Nebula and Its Stellar Sculptor
Below, a HST closeup of the Cone Nebula shows the dense clouds of gas and dust in a region only a couple of light years across (the overall size of the Cone is about 7 light years). The stars near the tip of the Cone are not responsible for its shape. That is sculpted by stellar winds from an extremely bright star, NGC 2264 IRS, first seen in a 1997 Hubble image, and dramatically shown in a more recent Spitzer image, further below. (ACS Science & Engineering Team, NASA)
HST image of the region near the Cone Nebula
Below, a Spitzer Space Telescope infrared image showing open cluster NGC 2264. The brilliant star near the Cone nebula is NGC 2264 IRS, the source of the stellar winds sculpting the Cone. Despite its brilliance, this star is completely hidden by the gas and dust in front of it. Only infrared images can penetrate the dust and reveal the star; but when they do, its brilliance dwarfs that of the other stars in the region. (JPL-Caltech, P. S. Teixeira (CfA), NASA)
Spitzer infrared image of open cluster NGC 2264 and the Cone Nebula
The Fox Fur Nebula
At the opposite end of NGC 2264 from the Cone nebula, the Fox Fur Nebula, though not technically a part of NGC 2264, reveals a complex structure of clouds of gas and dust. The bluish glow of the gas to its right is caused by light scattered from the nearby star S Monocerotis, which is outside the field of view, but visible in the full-field images at the top of this section. (Jean-Charles Cuillandre (CFHT) & Giovanni Anselmi (Coelum Astronomia), (copyright Hawaiian Starlight, used by permission)
CFHT image of the Fox Fur Nebula

NGC 2265
Discovered (Jan 23, 1832) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Gemini (RA 06 41 41.6, Dec +11 54 19)
Apparent size 10 arcmin

NGC 2266 (= OCL 471)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 10th-magnitude open cluster (type II2m) in Gemini (RA 06 43 19.2, Dec +26 58 10)
Apparent size 5 arcmin

NGC 2267 (= PGC 19417)
Discovered (Feb 16, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0) in Canis Major (RA 06 40 51.7, Dec -32 28 56)
The second IC adds (per Delisle Stewart) "Two nebulae close together". Apparent size 1.7 by 1.3 arcmin.

NGC 2268 (= PGC 20458)
Discovered (1871) by
Alphonse Borrelly (1)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Camelopardalis (RA 07 14 17.5, Dec +84 22 56)
Apparent size 3.4 by 1.8 arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SAB(rs)bc.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2268
Above, a 3.6 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2268
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2268

NGC 2269 (= OCL 524)
Discovered (Jan 24, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 10th-magnitude open cluster (type II2p) in Monoceros (RA 06 43 17.0, Dec +04 37 28)
Apparent size 3.0 arcmin.

NGC 2270
Discovered (Dec 26, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 9th-magnitude open cluster in Monoceros (RA 06 43 57.7, Dec +03 28 45)
Apparent size 10 arcmin.
DSS image of open cluster NGC 2270
Above, a 15 arcmin wide region centered on the position listed above for NGC 2270

NGC 2271 (= PGC 19476)
Discovered (Jan 23, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0) in Canis Major (RA 06 42 52.9, Dec -23 28 33)
Apparent size 2.1 by 1.4 arcmin

NGC 2272 (= PGC 19466)
Discovered (Jan 20, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0) in Canis Major (RA 06 42 41.2, Dec -27 27 35)
Apparent size 2.4 by 1.6 arcmin

NGC 2273 (= PGC 19688)
Discovered (Sep 15, 1867) by
Nils Dunér
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(r)a) in Lynx (RA 06 50 08.4, Dec +60 50 45)
Apparent size 3.6 by 2.0 arcmin. A Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 1 / Sy 2). Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type (RR)SAB(rs)a. (Note: Hubble Legacy Archive image of core available)
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2273
Above, a 3.6 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2273
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2273

PGC 19397 (= "NGC 2273A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 2273A since in general area of
NGC 2273
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Lynx (RA 06 40 07.0, Dec +60 04 50)
Apparent size 2.7 by 2.2 arcmin

PGC 19579 (= "NGC 2273B")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 2273B since in general area of
NGC 2273
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBd) in Lynx (RA 06 46 31.5, Dec +60 20 25)
Apparent size 2.7 by 1.2 arcmin

NGC 2274 (= PGC 19603)
Discovered (Oct 26, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Gemini (RA 06 47 17.4, Dec +33 34 03)
Apparent size 1.2 by 1.1 arcmin

NGC 2275 (= PGC 19605)
Discovered (Oct 26, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab) in Gemini (RA 06 47 17.9, Dec +33 35 57)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.9 arcmin

NGC 2276 (=
Arp 25 = PGC 21039)
Discovered (Jun 26, 1876) by August Winnecke
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)c) in Cepheus (RA 07 27 14, Dec +85 45 18)
Based on a recessional velocity of 2415 km/sec, NGC 2276 is about 110 million light years away, in good agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 120 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.8 by 2.7 arcmin, it is about 90 thousand light years across.
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 2276, also known as Arp 25
Above, a 3 arcmin wide image of NGC 2276 (Image Credits: Carlos & Crystal Acosta/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide view showing a Hubble Legacy Archive image overlaid on the NOAO view
Composite of HST and NOAO images of spiral galaxy NGC 2276, also known as Arp 25
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown is NGC 2300
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2276, also known as Arp 25, also showing lenticular galaxy NGC 2300
Below, a 12 arcmin wide composite centered between the two galaxies
NOAO image of area between spiral galaxy NGC 2276, also known as Arp 25, and lenticular galaxy NGC 2300, superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing regions

NGC 2277
Recorded (Apr 20, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (Dec 25, 1884) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A small group of stars in Gemini (RA 06 47 47.0, Dec +33 27 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2277 (= GC 5365, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 06 38 36, NPD 56 24.5) is a "cluster, very small, a little rich". The position precesses to RA 06 47 48.0, Dec +33 26 44, less than 0.4 arcmin southeast of the center of the asterism listed above and the description is consistent with those for other asterisms found by d'Arrest, so the identification is reasonably certain.
Discovery Notes: This object is variously listed as only the 13th magnitude star at the northern end of the group, or as the triplet of stars including that star, or as the larger grouping including the double star to the south of the triplet. Bigourdan's observations indicate that he presumed d'Arrest's observation was of only the triplet, and if Dreyer had mentioned Bigourdan in his entry for NGC 2277 I would have chosen to describe this object as only that group, and used its position. But since Bigourdan's observations were not noted by Dreyer and d'Arrest's position is east southeast of the double at the southern end of the group, I have included the double in the listing, and used a position between it and the triplet at the northern end of the group.
Physical Information: A triplet of two brighter stars and a much fainter one a little to the north of a close double consisting of a brighter star and a much fainter companion. There is also a much fainter star just east of the center of the asterism, but it probably contributed little if anything to d'Arrest's impression of the group. The "brighter" stars range from 13th to 14th magnitude, and the entire asterism is fainter than magnitude 12. Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin.
DSS image of region near the asterism listed as NGC 2277
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2277

NGC 2278
Recorded (Jan 1, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (Dec 25, 1884) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A pair of stars in Gemini (RA 06 48 16.3, Dec +33 23 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2278 (= GC 5366, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 06 39 03, NPD 56 26.8) is "very faint, very small".

NGC 2279
Recorded (Jan 8, 1885) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
Three stars in Gemini (RA 06 48 24.7, Dec +33 24 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2279 (Bigourdan (list I #24), 1860 RA 06 39 13, NPD 56 27.1) is "very faint, very small, stellar nucleus".

NGC 2280 (= PGC 19531)
Discovered (Feb 1, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 10.3 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Canis Major (RA 06 44 48.9, Dec -27 38 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2280 (= GC 1450 = JH 3062, 1860 RA 06 39 17, NPD 117 30.1) is "pretty faint, pretty large, a little extended, gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 06 44 51.2, Dec -27 38 38, on the eastern outline of the galaxy listed above and the description fits, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.3 by 3.0? arcmin

NGC 2281 (= OCL 446)
Discovered (Nov 6, 1782) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 5.4 open cluster (type I3p) in Auriga (RA 06 48 17.8, Dec +41 04 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2281 (= GC 1451 = WH VIII 71, 1860 RA 06 39 31, NPD 48 47.3) is a "cluster, pretty rich, very little compressed, stars pretty large". The position precesses to RA 06 49 21.6, Dec +41 03 41, about a minute of time east of the cluster listed above, but the description fits and there is nothing similar nearby, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Notes: William Herschel's VIII 71 was observed by him on Mar 4, 1788; but per Steinicke, Herschel had already observed the cluster (but not recorded it as such) during his earlier studies of double stars, whence the date of discovery shown above.
Physical Information: Apparent size 18 arcmin.
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 2281
Above, a 24 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2281 (artifact to be removed later)

NGC 2282 (=
IC 2172 = OCL 535.1)
Discovered (Mar 3, 1886) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as NGC 2282)
Reobserved (considerably later) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 2172)
A reflection nebula in Monoceros (RA 06 46 51.2, Dec +01 18 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2282 (Barnard, 1860 RA 06 39 37, NPD 88 32.0) is a "10th magnitude star in faint, round nebulosity". The position precesses to RA 06 46 51.7, Dec +01 19 14, just north of 10th magnitude HD 289120 and near the center of the nebula listed above, so the identification is certain.
Additional Note: One of the primary sources for this catalog incorrectly lists OCL 535 as the cluster lighting up NGC 2282, but that cluster lies about half a degree away from the NGC object, so for a long time this entry stated that the identification must be wrong, and although I have now added its correct identification as OCL 535.1, it seems appropriate to note the possibility of running into such misidentifications, and to retain the entry following this one, which shows the actual OCL 535.
Physical Information: NGC 2282 is a 3.0 by 3.0 arcmin reflection nebula lit up by the cluster of stars (OCL 535.1) located within its dusty environs. However, as shown in the images below the reflection nebula is part of a substantially larger region (almost 6 arcmin across) that contains additional reflection nebulae and clouds of obscuring dust. The cluster and associated nebula are about 5500 light years away, which makes the central 3 arcmin wide region about 5 light years across, and the larger 6 arcmin wide region about twice that size. The age of the cluster is estimated at 5 to 10 million years.
SDSS image of region near reflection nebula NGC 2282, the cluster of stars energizing the nebula, and the lager region of gas and dust that comprises an outer extension of the central region
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2282
Below, a 10 arcmin wide image of the region
(Image Credit & © Adam Block/Mount Lemmon SkyCenter/University of Arizona; used by permission)
Mount Lemmon SkyCenter image of reflection nebula NGC 2282, the cluster of stars energizing the nebula, and the lager region of gas and dust that comprises an outer extension of the central region
Below, a 6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the nebula and its central cluster (OCL 535.1)
SDSS image of reflection nebula NGC 2282, the cluster of stars energizing the nebula, and the lager region of gas and dust that comprises an outer extension of the central region
Below, the same region as shown in the Mount Lemmon SkyCenter image
Mount Lemmon SkyCenter image of reflection nebula NGC 2282, the cluster of stars energizing the nebula, and the lager region of gas and dust that comprises an outer extension of the central region

OCL 535
Not an NGC object, but listed here because of its supposed association with
NGC 2282
A 9th magnitude open cluster (type IV2m) in Monoceros (RA 06 46.5, Dec +01 46)
Explanatory Note: In some places the cluster in NGC 228 is incorrectly listed as OCL 535 (it is actually OCL 535.1, as noted in the entry for the NGC object), and it therefore seems appropriate to also show the actual OCL 535, and its position relative to NGC 2282 and OCL 535.1.
Physical Information: About 50 to 100 stars scattered across a region about 7 arcmin across.
DSS image of region near open cluster OCL 535
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on OCL 535
Below, a 40 arcmin wide DSS image centered between OCL 535 and NGC 2282
DSS image of region between open cluster OCL 535 and reflection nebula NGC 2282

WORKING HERE

NGC 2283 (= PGC 19562)
Discovered (Feb 6, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Canis Major (RA 06 45 52.6, Dec -18 12 37)
Apparent size 3.6 by 2.7 arcmin

NGC 2284
Discovered (Apr 20, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Four stars in Gemini (RA 06 49 09.5, Dec +33 11 40)

NGC 2285
Discovered (Apr 20, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A pair of stars in Gemini (RA 06 49 36.0, Dec +33 21 54)

NGC 2286 (= OCL 548)
Discovered (Jan 6, 1785) by
William Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster (type IV3m) in Monoceros (RA 06 47 40.1, Dec -03 08 52)
Apparent size 15 arcmin

NGC 2287 (=
M41 = OCL 597)
Recorded (325 B.C.E.) by Aristoteles
Recorded (1765) by Charles Messier as M41
A 5th-magnitude open cluster (type II3m) in Canis Major (RA 06 46 00, Dec -20 45 24)
Per Dreyer, NGC 2287 (= Flamsteed, Legentil, M14, 1860 RA 06 41 00, NPD 110 36.0) is a "cluster, very large, bright, a little compressed, stars from 8th magnitude". The reference to M14 is wrong, and was corrected in the first IC, which stated "For M14 read M41". Apparent size 39 arcmin.
NOAO image of open cluster NGC 2287, also known as M41
Above, an image of NGC 2287 (Image Credits: AURA, NSF, NOAO)

NGC 2288 (= PGC 19714)
Discovered (Feb 22, 1849) by
George Stoney
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E5) in Gemini (RA 06 50 52.0, Dec +33 27 44)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin

NGC 2289 (= PGC 19716)
Discovered (Feb 4, 1793) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Gemini (RA 06 50 53.6, Dec +33 28 45)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6 arcmin

NGC 2290 (= PGC 19718)
Discovered (Feb 4, 1793) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Gemini (RA 06 50 56.9, Dec +33 26 17)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.7 arcmin

NGC 2291 (= PGC 19719)
Discovered (Jan 22, 1827) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Gemini (RA 06 50 58.6, Dec +33 31 32)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8 arcmin

NGC 2292 (= PGC 19617)
Discovered (Jan 20, 1835) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0) in Canis Major (RA 06 47 39.4, Dec -26 44 47)
The second IC lists a corrected position (per Howe) of RA 06 42 03, NPD 116 35.6. Apparent size 4.0 by 3.5 arcmin. Less than an arcmin from NGC 2293.

NGC 2293 (= PGC 19619)
Discovered (Jan 20, 1835) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a) in Canis Major (RA 06 47 42.8, Dec -26 45 17)
The second IC lists a corrected position (per Howe) of RA 06 42 06, NPD 116 36.1. Apparent size 4.0 by 3.2 arcmin. Less than an arcmin from NGC 2292.

NGC 2294 (= PC 19729)
Discovered (Feb 22, 1849) by
George Stoney
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E6) in Gemini (RA 06 51 11.2, Dec +33 31 37)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin

NGC 2295 (= PGC 19607)
Discovered (Feb 2, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab) in Canis Major (RA 06 47 23.2, Dec -26 44 10)
The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of RA 06 41 47, and adds "the double nebula is east, not west" (the double nebula being NGC 2292 and 2293). Apparent size 2.1 by 0.6 arcin.

NGC 2296 (=
IC 452 = PGC 19643)
Discovered (Mar 11, 1887) by Lewis Swift (6-28) (and later listed as NGC 2296)
Discovered (Mar 9, 1890) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 452)
A 12th-magnitude reflection nebula in Canis Major (RA 06 48 39.0, Dec -16 54 04)
(The second IC lists a corrected 1860 RA (per Howe) of RA 06 42 25.) A historical discussion will be posted in the next iteration of this page (as the duplicate listing suggests, there are some unfortunate complications). Although the object has a PGC listing, its recessional velocity is close to zero, and at least two studies (by Clemens and Takata) verify that it is an object within our own galaxy, and almost certainly a reflection nebula. The nearly star-free region to the north of the nebula is an absorption nebula, and NGC 2296 is probably part of the same extended cloud, lit up by the bright star hidden within it. Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin.
SDSS image of reflection nebula IC 2296
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2996
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the nebula (the background glare is due to Sirius)
DSS image of region near reflection nebula IC 2296

NGC 2297 (= PGC 19524)
Discovered (Jan 31, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Pictor (RA 06 44 24.5, Dec -63 43 03)
Apparent size 1.9 by 1.5 arcmin

NGC 2298 (= GCL 11)
Discovered (May 8, 1826) by
James Dunlop (578)
A 9th-magnitude globular cluster (type VI) in Puppis (RA 06 48 59.2, Dec -36 00 17)
Apparent size 5.0 arcmin
DSS image of globular cluster NGC 2298
Above, a 6 arcmin wide "closeup" of NGC 2298
Below, a 3 arcmin wide HST image of the core of the cluster (Image Credits: HST, Wikisky cutout)
HST image of core of globular cluster NGC 2298
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the cluster
DSS image of region near globular cluster NGC 2298

NGC 2299 (=
NGC 2302 = OCL 554)
Discovered (Mar 4, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2302)
Discovered (Jan 19, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2299)
A 9th-magnitude open cluster (type II2p) in Monoceros (RA 06 51 56.6, Dec -07 05 04)
(this entry will only contain historical information; for physical data and images see NGC 2302)
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2200 - 2249) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 2250 - 2299     → (NGC 2300 - 2349)