Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2250 - 2299) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 2300 - 2349 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 2350 - 2399)
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2300, 2301, 2302, 2303, 2304, 2305, 2306, 2307, 2308, 2309, 2310, 2311, 2312, 2313, 2314, 2315, 2316,
2317, 2318, 2319, 2320, 2321, 2322, 2323, 2324, 2325, 2326, 2327, 2328, 2329, 2330, 2331, 2332, 2333,
2334, 2335, 2336, 2337, 2338, 2339, 2340, 2341, 2342, 2343, 2344, 2345, 2346, 2347, 2348, 2349

Page last updated Mar 30, 2017
WORKING 2301: Add basic pix, tags
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:
NGC 2300 (= PGC 21231)
Discovered (1871) by
Alphonse Borrelly (2)
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Cepheus (RA 07 32 20.3, Dec +85 42 33)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8 by 1.0 arcmin?
NOAO image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2300
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2300
(Image Credits for all three images: Carlos & Crystal Acosta/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown is most of NGC 2276
NOAO image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2300, also showing part of spiral galaxy NGC 2276, also known as Arp 25, superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing regions
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered between NGC 2276 and 2300
NOAO image of area between spiral galaxy NGC 2276, also known as Arp 25, and lenticular galaxy NGC 2300, superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing regions

NGC 2301 (= OCL 540)
Discovered (Dec 27, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 6th-magnitude open cluster (type I3m) in Monoceros (RA 06 51 45.2, Dec +00 27 33)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 15 arcmin?

NGC 2302 (=
NGC 2299 = OCL 554)
Discovered (Mar 4, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2302)
Discovered (Jan 19, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2299)
A 9th-magnitude open cluster (type II2p) in Monoceros (RA 06 51 56.6, Dec -07 05 04)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 arcmin?

NGC 2303 (= PGC 19891)
Discovered (Nov 24, 1886) by
Lewis Swift (6-29)
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Auriga (RA 06 56 17.4, Dec +45 29 36)
Historical Identification: The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 06 46 01.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.5 arcmin?

NGC 2304 (= OCL 484)
Discovered (Dec 30, 1783) by
William Herschel
A 10th-magnitude open cluster (type II1p) in Gemini (RA 06 55 11.8, Dec +17 59 19)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 arcmin?

NGC 2305 (= PGC 19641)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2? pec) in Volans (RA 06 48 37.3, Dec -64 16 22)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.5 arcmin? (For now, see the wide-field image of NGC 2307)

NGC 2306
Discovered (Feb 23, 1786) by
William Herschel
A star cloud or open cluster in Monoceros (RA 06 54 29.5, Dec -07 11 55)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 2307 (= PGC 19648)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)ab?) in Volans (RA 06 48 51.0, Dec -64 20 06)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.6 arcmin? Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SB(rs)ab.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2307
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2307
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 2305
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2307, also showing elliptical galaxy NGC 2305

NGC 2308 (= PGC 19949)
Discovered (Jan 13, 1872) by
Édouard Stephan (6-5)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Lynx (RA 06 58 37.5, Dec +45 12 40)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.2 arcmin?
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2308
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2308
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2308

NGC 2309 (= OCL 557)
Discovered (Mar 4, 1785) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude open cluster (type II2m) in Monoceros (RA 06 56 03.6, Dec -07 10 28)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.0 arcmin?

NGC 2310 (= PGC 19811)
Discovered (Jan 2, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Puppis (RA 06 53 53.8, Dec -40 51 49)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.3 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 2311 (= OCL 553)
Discovered (Mar 4, 1783) by
William Herschel
A 10th-magnitude open cluster (type III2p) in Monoceros (RA 06 57 47.5, Dec -04 36 41)
Historical Identification:
Discovery Notes: Herschel's published papers list the date of his first observation of WH VIII 60 as Nov 26, 1786, but according to Steinicke, he had already observed it before (presumably during studies of double stars) on Mar 4, 1783, as shown above.
Physical Information: Apparent size 7.0 arcmin?

NGC 2312
Discovered (Jan 18, 1828) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Monoceros (RA 06 58 47.0, Dec +10 17 44)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.0 by 2.5 arcmin?

NGC 2313
Discovered (Jan 4, 1862) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
An emission nebula in Monoceros (RA 06 58 02.8, Dec -07 56 42)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 2314 (= PGC 20305)
Discovered (Aug 1, 1883) by
Wilhelm Tempel (IX-5)
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Camelopardalis (RA 07 10 31.8, Dec +75 19 40)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 2315 (= PGC 20045)
Discovered (Feb 16, 1831) by
John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Lynx (RA 07 02 33.0, Dec +50 35 27)
Historical Identification: The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 06 51 40.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.3 arcmin?

NGC 2316 (=
NGC 2317)
Discovered (Mar 4, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2316)
Discovered (Feb 20, 1851) by Bindon Stoney (and later listed as NGC 2317)
An emission and reflection nebula in Monoceros (RA 06 59 40.8, Dec -07 46 38)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.0 by 3.0 arcmin? Part of a larger nebula.

NGC 2317 (=
NGC 2316)
Discovered (Mar 4, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2316)
Discovered (Feb 20, 1851) by Bindon Stoney (and later listed as NGC 2317)
An emission and reflection nebula in Monoceros (RA 06 59 40.8, Dec -07 46 38)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 2316 for anything else.

NGC 2318
Discovered (Feb 8, 1785) by
William Herschel
An open cluster or group of stars in Canis Major (RA 06 59 27.0, Dec -13 41 52)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 2319
Discovered (Dec 18, 1783) by
William Herschel
A group of stars in Monoceros (RA 07 00 32.2, Dec +03 02 34)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 16 arcmin?

NGC 2320 (= PGC 20136)
Discovered (Dec 28, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Lynx (RA 07 05 41.9, Dec +50 34 51)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 2321 (= PGC 20141)
Discovered (Dec 18, 1849) by
George Stoney
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Lynx (RA 07 05 58.9, Dec +50 45 24)
Historical Identification: The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 06 55 08.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1 arcmin?

NGC 2322 (= PGC 20142)
Discovered (Dec 28, 1790) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Lynx (RA 07 06 00.3, Dec +50 30 38)
Historical Identification: The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 06 55 10.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.4 arcmin.

NGC 2323 (=
M50 = OCL 559)
Discovered (1711) by Giovanni Cassini
Recorded (April 5, 1772) by Charles Messier
A 6th-magnitude open cluster (type II3m) in Monoceros (RA 07 02 47.8, Dec -08 22 33)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 15 arcmin?
NOAO image of open cluster NGC 2323, also known as M50
Above, an image of NGC 2323 (Image Credit: AURA/NSF/NOAO)

NGC 2324 (= OCL 542)
Discovered (Dec 27, 1786) by
William Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster (type II2r) in Monoceros (RA 07 04 07.9, Dec +01 02 41)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 8 arcmin?

NGC 2325 (= PGC 20047)
Discovered (Feb 1, 1837) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Canis Major (RA 07 02 40.2, Dec -28 41 52)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 1.5 arcmin?

NGC 2326 (= PGC 20218)
Discovered (Feb 9, 1788) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Lynx (RA 07 08 10.9, Dec +50 40 56)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.8 arcmin?

PGC 20237 (= "NGC 2326A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 2326A
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sm?) in
Lynx (RA 07 08 34.3, Dec +50 37 54)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.6 arcmin?

NGC 2327
Discovered (Jan 31, 1785) by
William Herschel
An emission nebula in Canis Major (RA 07 04 07.2, Dec -11 18 51)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 1.0 arcmin?

NGC 2328 (= PGC 20046)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Puppis (RA 07 02 36.1, Dec -42 04 05)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 2329 (= PGC 20254)
Discovered (Feb 9, 1788) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Lynx (RA 07 09 07.9, Dec +48 36 57)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.1 arcmin?

NGC 2330 (identification as
IC 457 = PGC 20272 very uncertain)
Discovered (Jan 2, 1851) by Bindon Stoney (and later listed as NGC 2330)
Perhaps discovered (Jan 2, 1851) by Bindon Stoney (and later listed as IC 457)
(To be identified at a later date)
Historical Identification: IC 457, but that identification is doubtful; so although the object usually identified as NGC 2330 would normally be discussed here, I have chosen to discuss its physical properties in the entry for IC 457, and reserve this entry for a historical discussion.) The first IC states "Not seen by Kobold (with the 18-inch refractor at Strassburg), who observed eleven nebulae about this place" (suggesting that he ought to have seen it if it exists and its recorded position was more or less accurate; however, given the 72 inch size of the Leviathan used by Stoney, the small size of the object may have made it unobservable in Kobold's telescope. This comment and the uncertainty about identification applies to both NGC 2330 and 2334).
Physical Information:

NGC 2331 (= OCL 475)
Discovered (Mar 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 9th-magnitude open cluster (type IV1p) in Gemini (RA 07 06 59.8, Dec +27 15 42)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 19 arcmin?

NGC 2332 (= PGC 20276)
Discovered (Dec 28, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Lynx (RA 07 09 33.8, Dec +50 10 55)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.0 arcmin?

NGC 2333 (= PGC 20223)
Discovered (Feb 4, 1793) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Gemini (RA 07 08 21.2, Dec +35 10 12)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin?

NGC 2334 (identification as
IC 465 = PGC 20357 very uncertain,
and identification as IC 458 = PGC 20306 almost certainly wrong)

Discovered (Jan 2, 1851) by Bindon Stoney (and later listed as NGC 2334)
Possibly discovered (Jan 31, 1851) by Bindon Stoney (and later listed as IC 458)
Possibly discovered (Jan 31, 1851) by Bindon Stoney (and later listed as IC 465)
(To be identified at a later date)
Historical Identification: The identification of NGC 2334 is very uncertain, and a proper discussion of what it might or might not be could comprise a monograph, so I will leave that for the next iteration of this page. Recent tradition equates it with IC 458 or IC 465, but both identifications are doubtful, and at least one must be wrong; so although the object identified as NGC 2334 would normally be discussed here, I have chosen to discuss the actual galaxies at the entries for IC 458 and 465, and reserve this entry for a historical discussion.) The first IC states "Not seen by Kobold (with the 18-inch refractor at Strassburg), who observed eleven nebulae about this place" (suggesting that he ought to have seen it if it exists, and its recorded position was more or less accurate; however, given the 72 inch size of the Leviathan used by Stoney, the small size of the object may have made it unobservable in Kobold's telescope. This comment applies to both NGC 2330 and 2334).

NGC 2335 (= OCL 562)
Discovered (Jan 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 7th-magnitude open cluster (type III3m) in Monoceros (RA 07 06 49.4, Dec -10 01 43)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 7.0 arcmin?

NGC 2336 (= PGC 21033)
Discovered (1876) by
Wilhelm Tempel (I-22)
A 10th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Camelopardalis (RA 07 27 03.6, Dec +80 10 40)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 7.1 by 3.9 arcmin? Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SAB(rs)bc.
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 2336 superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, an 8 arcmin wide "closeup" of NGC 2336 (Image Credits: Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide centered on the galaxy (Image Credits as above)
NOAO image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2336 superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing areas

PGC 22238 (= "NGC 2336A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 2336A
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in
Camelopardalis (RA 07 56 15.1, Dec +78 00 47)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.7 arcmin?

NGC 2337 (= PGC 20298)
Discovered (Jan 17, 1877) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 12.4 irregular galaxy (type IBm?) in Lynx (RA 07 10 13.6, Dec +44 27 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2337 (= GC 5373, Stephan list VIII (#19), 1860 RA 07 00 06, NPD 45 19.4) is "extremely faint, small, extended". The position precesses to RA 07 10 13.1, Dec +44 27 29, right on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 435 km/sec, NGC 2337 is about 20 million light years away (based on H = 73 km/sec/Mpc), in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 25 to 40 million light years, taking into account the importance of peculiar (non-Hubble redshift) velocities for such a close object. Assuming a commonly accepted distance of about 25 million light years and its apparent size of about 2.7 by 1.8 arcmin (based on the images below), the galaxy is about 20 thousand light years across. It has apparently undergone a very recent phase of stellar formation, as indicated by its numerous bright bluish star-forming regions. Its relative proximity to our galaxy (in comparison to more distant galaxies) should allow a relatively detailed study of its stellar components and among other things, the time period over which various episodes of stellar formation occurred.
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 2337
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2337
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of irregular galaxy NGC 2337
Below, a 2.6 arcmin wide HST/DSS composite image of the galaxy (Image Credit ESA/Hubble/NASA)
HST/DSS composite image of irregular galaxy NGC 2337

NGC 2338
Discovered (Jan 19, 1828) by
John Herschel
An open cluster or group of stars in Monoceros (RA 07 07 43.0, Dec -05 43 00)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 2339 (= PGC 20222)
Discovered (Feb 22, 1789) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Gemini (RA 07 08 20.3, Dec +18 46 46)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.7 by 2.0 arcmin?

NGC 2340 (= PGC 20338)
Discovered (Feb 9, 1788) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Lynx (RA 07 11 10.7, Dec +50 10 29)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.2 arcmin?

NGC 2341 (= PGC 20259)
Discovered (Nov 10, 1864) by
Albert Marth (100)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc? pec) in Gemini (RA 07 09 12.0, Dec +20 36 12)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin? (Probably a companion of NGC 2342) Recessional velocity 5160 km/sec.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2341
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2341
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing its companion, NGC 2342
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2341, also showing its companion, spiral galaxy NGC 2342

NGC 2342 (= PGC 20265)
Discovered (Nov 10, 1864) by
Albert Marth (101)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Gemini (RA 07 09 18.1, Dec +20 38 13)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.3 arcmin? (Probably a companion of NGC 2341) Recessional velocity 5275 km/sec.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2342
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2342; for a wider view see NGC 2341

NGC 2343 (= OCL 565)
Discovered (Jan 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 7th-magnitude open cluster (type III3p) in Monoceros (RA 07 08 06.7, Dec -10 37 00)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.0 arcmin?

NGC 2344 (= PGC 20395)
Discovered (Nov 24, 1886) by
Lewis Swift (6-30)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Lynx (RA 07 12 28.6, Dec +47 10 02)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.2 arcmin?

NGC 2345 (= OCL 575)
Discovered (Feb 14, 1836) by
John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster (type I3m) in Canis Major (RA 07 08 18.7, Dec -13 11 37)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 12 arcmin?

NGC 2346
Discovered (Mar 5, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude planetary nebula in Monoceros (RA 07 09 22.5, Dec -00 48 22)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.87 arcmin?

NGC 2347 (= PGC 20539)
Discovered (Nov 1, 1788) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Camelopardalis (RA 07 16 04.0, Dec +64 42 41)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.3 arcmin?

NGC 2348
Discovered (Jan 31, 1835) by
John Herschel
An open cluster in Volans (RA 07 03 02.7, Dec -67 23 39)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 11 arcmin?

NGC 2349
Discovered (Mar 4, 1783) by
Caroline Herschel
An open cluster in Monoceros (RA 07 10 48.1, Dec -08 35 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2349 (= GC 1503 = WH VII 27, 1860 RA 07 03 16, NPD 98 24.0) is a "cluster, considerably large, poor, considerably compressed". The position precesses to RA 07 09 59.4, Dec -08 37 25, about 50 arcsec west of the position listed above. However, Corwin notes that the position listed by Dreyer is based on John Herschel's later observation of what was almost certainly a different "object", located about 50 arcsec west of Caroline's observation (a more detailed discussion will follow in the next iteration of this page). So although the position does not agree with Dreyer's listing, it almost exactly agrees with what Caroline (and later her brother William, who listed it as VII 27) observed, so the identity of Caroline and William's cluster seems certain. (This means that the object identified here as NGC 2349 is not the one cataloged by Dreyer; but is more historically correct in terms of what Dreyer and John Herschel thought they were listing, namely Caroline Herschel's discovery.)
Physical Information:
DSS image of open cluster NGC 2349
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on Caroline Herschel's NGC 2349
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2250 - 2299) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 2300 - 2349     → (NGC 2350 - 2399)