Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2550 - 2599) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 2600 - 2649 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 2650 - 2699)
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2600, 2601, 2602, 2603, 2604, 2605, 2606, 2607, 2608, 2609, 2610, 2611, 2612, 2613, 2614, 2615, 2616,
2617, 2618, 2619, 2620, 2621, 2622, 2623, 2624, 2625, 2626, 2627, 2628, 2629, 2630, 2631, 2632, 2633,
2634, 2635, 2636, 2637, 2638, 2639, 2640, 2641, 2642, 2643, 2644, 2645, 2646, 2647, 2648, 2649

Last updated Sep 4, 2017
Checked Corwin's positions, Steinicke's May 2017 databases
Added Dreyer's NGC entries, checked other historical databases
Updated captions and currently posted images to current standards
WORKING 2600, 02, 03, 05, 06, 06+, 22ff: Adding detailed Historical Identifications
WORKING 2626: Adding basic pix, tags

WORKING HERE: See Discovery Notes

NGC 2600 (= PGC 24082)
Discovered (Mar 7, 1886) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Ursa Major (RA 08 34 45.0, Dec +52 42 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2600 (Bigourdan (list I #37), 1860 RA 08 24 12, NPD 36 48.7) has "no description". The position precesses to RA 08 34 39.3, Dec +52 42 55, about 0.8 arcmin west of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.

Discovery Notes: Corwin has a long discussion of the six galaxies in the area (NGC 2600, 2602, 2603, 2605, 2606 and 2606 (eastern companion), which I need to read in detail for any relevant historical notes).
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2600, also showing NGC 2605
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2600, also showing NGC 2605
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2600

NGC 2601 (= PGC 23637)
Discovered (Mar 5, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Volans (RA 08 25 30.6, Dec -68 07 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2601 (= GC 1663 = JH 3126, 1860 RA 08 24 28, NPD 157 39.4) is "faint, pretty small, round, gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 08 25 26.8, Dec -68 07 03, within the western outline of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.1 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2601
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2601
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2601

WORKING HERE: See Discovery Notes

NGC 2602 (= PGC 24099)
Discovered (Feb 16, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Ursa Major (RA 08 35 04.3, Dec +52 49 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2602 (= GC 1664 = JH 508, 1860 RA 08 24 33, NPD 36 41.5) is "extremely faint, small, round, star at 95░". The position precesses to RA 08 35 00.9, Dec +52 50 04, about 0.5 arcmin west northwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits (though the 11th magnitude star is at 75░) and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.

Discovery Notes: Corwin has a long discussion of the six galaxies in the area (NGC 2600, 2602, 2603, 2605, 2606 and 2606 (eastern companion), which I need to read in detail for any relevant historical notes).
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin. (The size is incorrectly listed in almost every catalog; the values here are from a direct measurement of the images below.)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2602, also showing NGC 2603, NGC 2605 and NGC 2606
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2602, also showing NGC 2603, 2605 and 2606
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2602

WORKING HERE: See Discovery Notes

NGC 2603 (= PGC 3133653)
Discovered (Feb 9, 1850) by
George Stoney
A magnitude 16.2 compact galaxy (type C?) in Ursa Major (RA 08 34 31.2, Dec +52 50 25)
Historical Identification(?): Per Dreyer, NGC 2603 (= GC 1667, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 08 24 48, NPD 36 44) is "extremely faint, very small". The position precesses to RA 08 35 15.4, Dec +52 47 31, well to the east of the galaxy listed above, so its identification seems suspect; but as noted immediately below there is considerable confusion about the galaxies in this region, so I will return to this entry when I deal with them as a group.

Discovery Notes: Corwin has a long discussion of the six galaxies in the area (NGC 2600, 2602, 2603, 2605, 2606 and 2606 (eastern companion), which I need to read in detail for any relevant historical notes).
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Steinicke lists V as 15.5, but Corwin states SDSS data correspond to 16.2, as shown above. Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin. Note: A Wikisky search for NGC 2603 incorrectly shows NGC 2606 (which is incorrectly labeled as NGC 2603), so use its coordinates to view it. (This is apparently due to PGC 24117 being incorrectly listed as both NGC 2603 and 2606 in some catalogs.)
SDSS image of region near compact galaxy NGC 2603, also showing NGC 2605 and NGC 2602
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2603, also showing NGC 2602 and 2605
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of compact galaxy NGC 2603

NGC 2604 (= PGC 23998)
Discovered (Mar 12, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 27, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Cancer (RA 08 33 23.2, Dec +29 32 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2604 (= GC 1665 = JH 509 = WH III 292, 1860 RA 08 24 49, NPD 59 59.2) is "very faint, pretty large, round, a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved, double star near". The position precesses to RA 08 33 24.4, Dec +29 32 28, on the northeastern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and the double star to the south makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.7 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2604, also showing PGC 24004, which is sometimes called NGC 2604B
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2604, also showing PGC 24004
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2604

PGC 24004 (= "NGC 2604B")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 2604B
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type Sc? pec) in
Cancer (RA 08 33 35.6, Dec +29 29 57)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 24004, sometimes called NGC 2604B; also shown is spiral galaxy NGC 2604
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 24004, also showing NGC 2604
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 24004, sometimes called NGC 2604B

WORKING HERE: See Discovery Notes

NGC 2605 (= PGC 2424112)
Discovered (Mar 11, 1858) by
R. J. Mitchell
A magnitude 15.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Ursa Major (RA 08 34 53.3, Dec +52 48 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2605 (= GC 1668, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 08 24 52, NPD 36 41) is "faint, small, a little brighter middle".

Discovery Notes: Corwin has a long discussion of the six galaxies in the area (NGC 2600, 2602, 2603, 2605, 2606 and 2606 (eastern companion), which I need to read in detail for any relevant historical notes).
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin. Note: A Wikisky search for NGC 2605 shows the correct object, but does not indicate its NGC identity.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2605, also showing NGC 2600, NGC 2602 and NGC 2603
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2605, also showing NGC 2600, 2602 and 2603
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2605

WORKING HERE: See Discovery Notes

NGC 2606 (= PGC 24117)
Discovered (Feb 16, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Ursa Major (RA 08 35 34.5, Dec +52 47 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2606 (= GC 1666 = JH 510, 1860 RA 08 25 08, NPD 36 44.9) is "considerably faint, small, round, star at 310░".

Discovery Notes: Corwin has a long discussion of the six galaxies in the area (NGC 2600, 2602, 2603, 2605, 2606 and 2606 (eastern companion), which I need to read in detail for any relevant historical notes).
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.8 by 0.65 arcmin (from the images below). Note: A Wikisky search for NGC 2606 shows the correct galaxy, but labels it as NGC 2603. This is apparently due to PGC 24117 being incorrectly listed as both NGC 2603 and 2606 in some catalogs.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2606, also showing NGC 2602
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2606, also showing NGC 2602
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy, also showing PGC 3731915
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2606, also showing PGC 3731915
Corwin lists the position of a western "companion" (NED 2MASX J08352151+5247337, LEDA PGC 2423840) as RA 08 35 21.5, Dec +52 47 34

WORKING HERE: See Corwin's Discovery Notes for NGC 2600 - 2606

2MASXJ08353731+5247086 (= "PGC 3731915")
Not an NGC object but listed here since involved in Corwin's discussion of NGC 2600 - 2606
A magnitude 16(?) galaxy (type E/S0?) in
Ursa Major (RA 08 35 37.3, Dec +52 47 09)
Proper Designations: This galaxy is listed in LEDA as PGC 3731915, but a search for that designation returns no result; hence my placing that designation in quotes above. A search using the 2MASX designation works in LEDA and NED.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.25 by 0.15 arcmin (from the images of NGC 2606).
For now, see NGC 2606 for images

NGC 2607 (= PGC 24038)
Discovered (Dec 24, 1827) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Cancer (RA 08 33 56.6, Dec +26 58 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2607 (= GC 1669 = JH 511, 1860 RA 08 25 27, NPD 62 32.9) is "extremely faint". The position precesses to RA 08 33 53.7, Dec +26 58 41, only 0.7 arcmin west northwest of the bright center of the galaxy listed above (and on the northwestern rim of the galaxy in modern photographs), the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3530 km/sec, NGC 2607 is about 165 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.95 by 0.85 arcmin, it is about 45 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2607
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2607
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2607

NGC 2608 (= PGC 24111 =
Arp 12)
Discovered (Mar 12, 1785) by William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 17, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)b) in Cancer (RA 08 35 17.3, Dec +28 28 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2608 (= GC 1670 = JH 512 = WH II 318, 1860 RA 08 26 44, NPD 61 03.6) is "faint, very little extended, much brighter middle, mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 08 35 15.3, Dec +28 27 46, only 0.8 arcmin southwest of the bright center of the galaxy listed above (and on its southwestern rim in modern photographs), the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2135 km/sec, NGC 2608 is about 100 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 70 to 100 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.3 by 1.4 arcmin, it is about 65 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2608, also known as Arp 12
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2608
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy, also known as Arp 12
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2608, also known as Arp 12

NGC 2609
Discovered (Mar 8, 1836) by
John Herschel
An open cluster in Carina (RA 08 29 34.0, Dec -61 06 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2609 (= GC 1671 = JH 3130, 1860 RA 08 26 49, NPD 150 38.5) is "a cluster, pretty small, a little rich, a little compressed". Of two observations by Herschel, the more detailed says "a double star, chief of a cluster 8th class of scattered stars, 6 arcmin diameter, not very rich or compressed". The position precesses to RA 08 29 31.2, Dec -61 06 41, within 0.4 arcmin of the double star near the center of the cluster listed above, so the identification is certain. Despite this, some catalogs incorrectly list the object as "Not Found" or "Nonexistent"; perhaps for that reason, a Wikisky search for NGC 2609 shows the correct region, but does not show that it contains an NGC object.
Physical Information:
DSS image of open cluster NGC 2609
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2609

NGC 2610
Discovered (Dec 31, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Dec 16, 1827) by John Herschel
Also observed (Feb 11, 1863) by Eduard Sch÷nfeld
Also observed (Feb 17, 1863) by Heinrich d'Arrest
Not observed (Jan 1 to Jun 30, 1898) by Herbert Howe (observed wrong object)
A magnitude 12.7 planetary nebula in Hydra (RA 08 33 23.4, Dec -16 08 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2610 (= GC 1672 = JH 513 = JH 3127 = WH IV 35, 1860 RA 08 26 57, NPD 105 40.1) is "faint, small, attached to a 13th magnitude star, 7th magnitude star to northeast". The second IC says "Howe is wrong in placing this 1 degree north (wrong star). d'Arrest and Schonfeld agree with h" (that is, with John Herschel's GC entry). The position in the NGC precesses to RA 08 33 25.0, Dec -16 08 36, barely outside the northeastern rim of the planetary nebula listed above, the description is a perfect fit and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.7 by 0.65 arcmin for the brighter inner region, and about 0.95 by 0.75 arcmin for the fainter outer region (from the images below).
DSS image of region near planetary nebula NGC 2610
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2610
(Multicolor DSS images of NGC 2610 grossly overexpose the nebula, so a monochrome DSS image of the planetary nebula has been overlaid on multicolor composite images of the region near the nebula to produce the DSS images above and below.)
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the planetary nebula
DSS image of planetary nebula NGC 2610
Below, a 1 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the nebula
PanSTARRS image of planetary nebula NGC 2610

NGC 2611 (= PGC 24121)
Discovered (Mar 29, 1865) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Cancer (RA 08 35 29.2, Dec +25 01 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2611 (= GC 5424, Marth #124, 1860 RA 08 27 09, NPD 64 30) is "very faint, small, pretty much extended, gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 08 35 29.0, Dec +25 01 19, only 0.3 arcmin south of the center of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Historical Note: The NGC entry is copied from Lassell's 1866 paper about observations at Malta, which included Marth's discoveries.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2611
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2611
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2611

NGC 2612 (= PGC 24028)
Discovered (Feb 14, 1836) by
John Herschel
Also observed (Jul 1, 1898 to Jun 30, 1899) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 12.7 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Hydra (RA 08 33 50.0, Dec -13 10 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2612 (= GC 1673 = JH 3128, 1860 RA 08 27 15, NPD 102 41.9) is "bright, small, extended, pretty suddenly brighter middle, between 2 stars". The second IC says (per Howe) "not bright but faint". The position precesses to RA 08 33 51.2, Dec -13 10 28, right on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.8 by 0.65 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2612
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2612
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2612
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the central portion of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of central portion of lenticular galaxy NGC 2612

NGC 2613 (= PGC 23997)
Discovered (Nov 20, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 23, 1835) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.3 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Pyxis (RA 08 33 22.8, Dec -22 58 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2613 (= GC 1674 = JH 3129 = WH II 266, 1860 RA 08 27 15, NPD 112 29.8) is "considerably bright, large, very much extended 110░". The position precesses to RA 08 33 23.1, Dec -22 58 20, almost dead center on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 6.6 by 1.4 arcmin (from the images below).
Composite of ESO and DSS images of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2613
Above, a 12 arcmin wide ESO/DSS composite image centered on NGC 2613 (Image Credit ESO)
Below, a 7 arcmin wide ESO image of the galaxy (Image Credit as above)
ESO image of spiral galaxy NGC 2613

NGC 2614 (= PGC 24473)
Discovered (Dec 1, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Ursa Major (RA 08 42 48.1, Dec +72 58 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2614 (= GC 5425, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 08 27 28, NPD 16 32.2) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round". The position precesses to RA 08 42 42.0, Dec +72 58 31, well within the western rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2614
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2614
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2614

NGC 2615 (= PGC 24071)
Discovered (Feb 6, 1885) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Hydra (RA 08 34 33.4, Dec -02 32 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2615 (Stephan list XIII (#39), 1860 RA 08 27 30, NPD 92 04.2) is "faint, pretty small, a little extended, a little brighter middle, faint star involved, mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 08 34 34.3, Dec -02 32 50, on the eastern side of the nucleus of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.1 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2615
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2615
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2615

NGC 2616 (= PGC 24129)
Discovered (Mar 9, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Hydra (RA 08 35 34.1, Dec -01 51 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2616 (Swift list III (#39), 1860 RA 08 28 34, NPD 91 22.5) is "very faint, small, round, star near to northeast". The position precesses to RA 08 35 40.1, Dec -01 51 19, about 1.5 arcmin east of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2616, also showing IC 515 and IC 516
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2616, also showing IC 515 and 516
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2616

NGC 2617 (= PGC 24141)
Discovered (Feb 12, 1885) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Hydra (RA 08 35 38.8, Dec -04 05 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2617 (Stephan list XIII (#40), 1860 RA 08 28 39, NPD 93 36.6) is "extremely faint, very small, 2 very faint stars involved". The position precesses to RA 08 35 39.4, Dec -04 05 25, well within the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain. Despite that, several references misidentify PGC 24136, a galaxy to the east of NGC 2617, as the NGC object (even Steinicke's older databases, although giving the correct position, used the incorrect identification and physical data). For that reason, PGC 24136 is discussed in the entry following this one.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4260 km/sec, NGC 2617 is about 200 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.1 by 1.1 arcmin, it is about 65 thousand light years across. (Note: Almost all databases, even those that have the correct identification as PGC 24141, list the apparent size of PGC 24136 in its place; the size given here is based on the images below.) NGC 2617 is a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 1.8). Given their apparent proximity and similar recessional velocities, it is possible that NGC 2617 and PGC 24136 are companions.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2617, also showing PGC 24136, which is often misidentified as NGC 2617
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2617, also showing PGC 24136
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2617

PGC 24136 (not = NGC 2617)
Not an NGC object but listed here since often misidentified as
NGC 2617
A magnitude 14(?) spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)bc?) in Hydra (RA 08 35 48.5, Dec -04 05 34)
Historical Misidentification: As noted in the entry for NGC 2617, PGC 24136 is misidentified as NGC 2617 in a number of references, so it is appropriate to discuss the galaxy here, if only as a warning.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4405 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), PGC 24136 is about 205 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.95 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 55 to 60 thousand light years across. (Note: The galaxy is listed in most places as a lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a), but as the images below show it is actually a spiral; hence its listing as such above.)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 24136, which is often misidentified as NGC 2617, also showing the actual NGC 2617
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 24136, also showing NGC 2617
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 24136, which is often misidentified as NGC 2617

NGC 2618 (= PGC 24156)
Discovered (Dec 20, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 27, 1832) by John Herschel
Also observed (Mar 15, 1890) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 12.1 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Hydra (RA 08 35 53.5, Dec +00 42 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2618 (= GC 1675 = JH 515 = WH III 257, 1860 RA 08 28 49, NPD 88 48.8) is "extremely faint, pretty large, irregular figure". The position precesses to RA 08 36 01.7, Dec +00 42 20, about 2 arcmin east of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
An Atypical Error By Bigourdan: As for many other NGC objects, Dreyer published a corrected position in the first IC of RA 08 29 01, based on a statement by Bigourdan (Comp. Rend. 112, p. 850) that the object was 12 seconds of time to the east of the NGC position. Usually, such a correction provides a much better fit to the object's position; but in this case, the "corrected" position precesses to RA 08 36 13.7, Dec +00 42 18, which is 3 arcmin further east of the galaxy. This would be an extremely unlikely mistake for as careful an observer as Bigourdan, so I decided to check the measurements recorded in Bigourdan's "big book" of 1904, as shown below.
Bigourdan's Comparison Stars: Bigourdan made six measurements of the position of the nebula, two on Mar 15, 1890 and four on Feb 16, 1896. In each case he measured offsets from BD+1 2137, at (1900) RA 08 31 07.7, Dec +01 06 24, to a 10th magnitude "Anonyme" star, with a resulting position for that star of (1900) RA 08 30 42, Dec +00 55 00. The offsets between the two stars do not exactly agree with the positions Bigourdan listed for them, but are close enough that there should be no difficulty in identifying the stars by precessing their positions to modern coordinates. And there isn't, as precessing the coordinates to the equinox of 2000 gives a position for BD+1 2137 of RA 08 36 16.8, Dec +00 45 38, and for the "Anonyme" star of RA 08 35 50.7, Dec +00 34 17. The former position lies 1 arcmin southwest of 10th magnitude star TYC 210-1534-1 (= BD+1 2137), and the latter position lies 1.3 arcmin southwest of 10th magnitude star TYC 210-1852-1. Given the nearly identical relative positions, those must be the stars that Bigoudan used, and their actual positions, precessed to the equinox of 1900, should provide a proper reference for the position of NGC 2618.
Bigourdan's Actual Position For NGC 2618: The position of Bigourdan's "Anonyme" star is J2000 RA 08 35 54.4, Dec +00 35 11, which precesses to (1900) RA 08 30 45.6, Dec +00 55 54. The average offsets of the six measurements made by Bigourdan are -2.2 seconds of time in right ascension, and +7' 16" in declination. This puts his position for NGC 2618 at (1900) RA 08 30 43.4, Dec +01 03 10, which precesses to J2000 RA 08 35 52.4, Dec +00 42 27, which falls right on the galaxy listed above (to the west of its nucleus, but well within its outline). In other words, although Bigourdan stated that his position for NGC 2618 fell well to the east of the NGC position (which was already to the east of the galaxy), it actually fell right on the galaxy. So although his "corrected" position was well off the mark, it was not due to an error in his measurements, but some kind of blunder in his reductions. This does not affect the identification of NGC 2618, but it does partially resolve an otherwise puzzling error on Bigourdan's part.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 2.0 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2618
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2618
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2618

NGC 2619 (= PGC 24235)
Discovered (Mar 12, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 17, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Cancer (RA 08 37 32.7, Dec +28 42 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2619 (= GC 1676 = JH 514 = WH II 319, 1860 RA 08 29 01, NPD 60 49.3) is "faint, pretty small, round, brighter middle, mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 08 37 32.4, Dec +28 41 42, on the southern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description is a reasonable fit and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.1 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2619
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2619
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2619

NGC 2620 (= PGC 24233)
Discovered (May 5, 1863) by
William Lassell
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Cancer (RA 08 37 28.2, Dec +24 56 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2620 (= GC 5426, Marth #125, Lassell, 1860 RA 08 29 09, NPD 64 35) is "faint, small, extended". The position precesses to RA 08 37 28.2, Dec +24 56 00, about 0.8 arcmin south of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Historical Note: The NGC entry is copied from Lassell's 1866 paper about observations at Malta, which included Marth's discoveries. But although Marth discovered most of the objects in the list, the paper states that Lassell was the discoverer of #125 in Marth's list.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2620, also showing NGC 2621
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2620, also showing NGC 2621
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2620

NGC 2621 (= PGC 24241)
Discovered (Mar 29, 1865) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Cancer (RA 08 37 37.0, Dec +24 59 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2621 (= GC 5427, Marth #126, 1860 RA 08 29 18, NPD 64 32) is "very faint, small, round". The position precesses to RA 08 37 37.4, Dec +24 58 58, about 1 arcmin south of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing nearby save for NGC 2620, which is accounted for by Marth #125 (and has a similar error in its NGC position), so the identification is certain.
Historical Note: The NGC entry is copied from Lassell's 1866 paper about observations at Malta, which included Marth's discoveries.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2621, also showing NGC 2620
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2621, also showing NGC 2620
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2621

WORKING HERE: Edit following entry for clarity and any errors

NGC 2622 (= PGC 24269)
Discovered (Mar 29, 1865) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b? pec) in Cancer (RA 08 38 11.0, Dec +24 53 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2622 (= GC 5428, Marth #127, 1860 RA 08 29 52, NPD 64 37) is "faint, small, round". The position precesses to RA 08 38 11.0, Dec +24 53 53, right on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Historical Note: The NGC entry is copied from Lassell's 1866 paper about observations at Malta, which included Marth's discoveries.
Physical Information: The recessional velocity of NGC 2622 is 8580 km/sec, but it is obviously interacting with PGC 24266 (each has extended regions of gas, stars and clusters of stars strewn into intergalactic space by their interaction), so the pair must be at the same distance from us and their average recessional velocity should be used to estimate their Hubble distance. The recessional velocity of PGC 24266 is 8470 km/sec, so the average of their recessional velocities is 8525 km/sec. Based on that (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that the pair is about 395 to 400 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the pair was about 385 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 390 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.65 by 0.4 arcmin for the central galaxy and about 1.4 by 1.2 arcmin for its far-flung fragments (from the images below), the central portion of NGC 2622 is about 70 to 75 thousand light years across and the overall structure spans about 155 to 160 thousand light years. One result of their interaction is a starburst in the core of NGC 2622, causing it to be classified as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 1.8). The other galaxies in the field of view do not appear to be taking part in the gravitational interaction, and may be foreground or background objects.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2622 and its companion, PGC 24266
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2622, also showing PGC 24266
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy and its neighbors
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2622 and its companion, PGC 24266
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 2622 and the nucleus of PGC 24266
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2622 and the nucleus of PGC 24266

PGC 24266
Listed here because of its gravitational interaction with
NGC 2622
A magnitude 15(?) lenticular galaxy (type E/S0? pec) in Cancer (RA 08 38 07.1, Dec +24 53 05)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8470 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 24266 is about 395 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about ? million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about ? million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about ? arcmin, the galaxy is about ? thousand light years across. Based on a recessional velocity of 8470 km/sec, PGC 24266 is about 395 million light years away, but whatever its actual distance, it must be the same as for NGC 2622 (which see for images), based on its obvious gravitational interaction with the larger galaxy. The two galaxies are probably within a few hundred thousand light years of each other, and may be less than 200 thousand light years apart. Given its probable distance and its apparent size of 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin, PGC 24266 is about 45 thousand light years across, but that does not take into account the long tail of gas and stars streaming away to its southwest.
NEED TO ADD IMAGES

PGC 1719307
Not an NGC object but listed here since an apparent companion of
NGC 2622 and PGC 24266
A magnitude ? galaxy (type ?) in Cancer (RA 08 38 05.0, Dec +24 53 27)
Note About Designation: NED does not recognize the LEDA designation for this object; instead, it lists it as 2MASXJ08380492+2453267.
Physical Information:
NEED TO ADD IMAGES

NGC 2623 (= PGC 24288 =
Arp 243)
Discovered (Jan 19, 1885) by ╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type Sb pec) in Cancer (RA 08 38 24.1, Dec +25 45 17)
(Corwin lists the position of the northeastern component as RA 08 38 24.2, Dec +25 45 17
of a northwestern component as RA 08 38 23.9, Dec +25 45 16
of a southeastern component as RA 08 38 24.1, Dec +25 45 04
and of a southwestern component as RA 08 38 24.0, Dec +25 45 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2623 (Stephan list XIII (#41), 1860 RA 08 30 03, NPD 63 45.6) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Two galaxies must have recently collided and merged to form this galaxy, which is in the late stages of its merger, having developed a nearly common (though very distorted and spectacularly bright) core, but still showing the aftereffects of its merger in two spectacularly long arms of stars, star clusters and gases thrown out into intergalactic space and now filled with hot, bright young clusters of stars that heat and light up the gases surrounding them. Based on its recessional velocity of 5550 km/sec, NGC 2623 is about 260 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 250 to 350 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.4 by 0.7 arcmin, it is about 180 thousand light years across. The core of the galaxy, filled with exceptionally large numbers of bright young stars, causes it to be classified as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2).
SDSS image of region near peculiar spiral galaxy NGC 2623, also known as Arp 243
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2623, also known as Arp 243
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy (North down & to left, to show more detail)
(Image Credit ESA and A. Evans (Stony Brook) et al., NASA)
HST image of peculiar spiral galaxy NGC 2623, also known as Arp 243
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the core of the galaxy (North up & to right)
(Image Credit as above)
HST image of the core of peculiar spiral galaxy NGC 2623, also known as Arp 243
Below, a ? arcmin wide false-color HST image highlights dusty (red) and star-forming (blue) regions
(Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, ESA, NASA; Processing - Martin Pugh) (North down & to left)
False-color HST image of peculiar spiral galaxy NGC 2623, also known as Arp 243

NGC 2624 (= PGC 24264)
Discovered (Oct 30, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Cancer (RA 08 38 09.6, Dec +19 43 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2624 (= GC 5429, Marth #128, 1860 RA 08 30 06, NPD 69 48) is "extremely faint".
Historical Note: The NGC entry is copied from Lassell's 1866 paper about observations at Malta, which included Marth's discoveries.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin. (Note: Within the western boundary of open cluster M44, but a completely insignificant and unnoticeable speck in images showing the cluster as a whole, and of course as a distant galaxy, completely unrelated to the cluster, save for being in approximately the same direction.)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2624, also showing NGC 2625
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2624, also showing NGC 2625
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2624

NGC 2625 (= PGC 24285)
Discovered (Oct 30, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Cancer (RA 08 38 23.2, Dec +19 43 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2625 (= GC 5430, Marth #129, 1860 RA 08 30 19, NPD 69 48) is "extremely faint, very small".
Historical Note: The NGC entry is copied from Lassell's 1866 paper about observations at Malta, which included Marth's discoveries.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin. Listed as an elliptical galaxy by Steinicke, but as shown by the images below, actually a spiral galaxy. (Note: Within the western boundary of open cluster M44, but a completely insignificant and unnoticeable speck in images showing the cluster as a whole, and of course as a distant galaxy, completely unrelated to the cluster, save for being in approximately the same direction.)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2625, also showing NGC 2624
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2625, also showing NGC 2624
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2625

NGC 2626
Discovered (Jan 2, 1835) by
John Herschel
An emission and reflection nebula in Vela (RA 08 35 31.4, Dec -40 40 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2626 (= GC 1677 = JH 3131, 1860 RA 08 30 28, NPD 130 11.1) is "a 9th magnitude star involved in a pretty bright, pretty large, round nebula".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.0 by 5.0 arcmin

NGC 2627 (= OCL 714)
Discovered (Mar 3, 1793) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 6, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 8.4 open cluster (type III2m) in Pyxis (RA 08 37 15.0, Dec -29 57 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2627 (= GC 1678 = JH 516 = JH 3132 = WH VII 63, 1860 RA 08 31 28, NPD 119 28.0) is "a cluster, considerably large, pretty rich, pretty compressed, stars from 11th to 13th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 9.0 arcmin

NGC 2628 (= PGC 24381)
Discovered (Nov 16, 1784) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Cancer (RA 08 40 22.7, Dec +23 32 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2628 (= GC 1680 = WH III 235, 1860 RA 08 31 51, NPD 65 57.3) is "extremely faint, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 1.1 arcmin

NGC 2629 (= PGC 24682)
Discovered (Sep 30, 1802) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Dec 1, 1863) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 12.2 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Ursa Major (RA 08 47 15.8, Dec +72 59 08)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Per Dreyer, NGC 2629 (= GC 1679 = WH III 982, H O N, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 08 32 00, NPD 16 31.5) is "very faint, small, stellar".
Note About "H O N": In John Herschel's treatise on observations made at the Cape of Good Hope in the 1830's he lists eight nebulae discovered by his father, but not previously published. WH III 982 and WH III 983 (= NGC 2641) are among those eight nebulae; and "H O N" alerts the reader of the GC and NGC to the fact that they will not find those objects in William Herschel's catalogs, but in the Cape catalog.
Apparent size 1.5 by 1.3 arcmin

2630/2631 are presumably (per Corwin) the two overlooked nebulae in this note at the end of T IX
"The 4 new nebulae of the 27th of July are 1 degree north of GC 1679 (NGC 2629) & 1682 (NGC 2641), as well as a new mists of d'Arrest, which I saw earlier when I sketched 1679, where I found two new fine nebulae near 1679. It is, however, very striking that d'Arrest, the new mist found south and north of this group, also measured above 1679 and 82, has overlooked my two new nebulae, which are much brighter than his own and Herschelian ones. Since I described years ago as two pretty little nebulae, and I found them so bright in 1883, I might raise the question whether they are perhaps mutable. I would put less emphasis on my own observations, if not this stellar part of Will and John Herschel and d'Arrest were so well studied."

NGC 2630 (=
NGC 2634 ??)
Recorded (July 1883) by Wilhelm Tempel
A lost or misidentified object in Ursa Major (RA 08 47 07.2, Dec +73 00 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2630 and 2631 (Tempel list IX (note), 1860 RA 08 32, NPD 16 30▒) are "2 very faint, very small, very near III 982", the latter object being NGC 2629. Dreyer's 1860 positions are 1.5 arcmin due north of NGC 2629, but there is nothing located there or at the corresponding precessed position of RA 08 47 07.2, Dec +73 00 00 (whence the position listed above), so the two entries are listed as nonexistent or lost.
However, per Corwin, Temple stated that the two galaxies were brighter than the comparison galaxy, so they presumably do exist, and their positions are simply wrong. He suggests that Temple may have mistaken NGC 2633 for NGC 2629, in which case NGC 2630 and 2631 might be NGC 2634 and PGC 24760 (or "NGC 2634A"); but even if that should prove correct, this entry will contain only historical information.

NGC 2631 (=
PGC 24760 ??)
Recorded (July 1883) by Wilhelm Tempel
A lost or misidentified object in Ursa Major (RA 08 47 07.2, Dec +73 00 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2630 and 2631 (Tempel list IX (note), 1860 RA 08 32, NPD 16 30▒) are "2 very faint, very small, very near III 982", the latter object being NGC 2629. Dreyer's 1860 positions are 1.5 arcmin due north of NGC 2629, but there is nothing located there or at the corresponding precessed position of RA 08 47 07.2, Dec +73 00 00 (whence the position listed above), so the two entries are listed as nonexistent or lost.
Listed by Dreyer as a pair with NGC 2630, which see for historical information, and has been suggested (per Corwin) as possibly being PGC 24760, or "NGC 2634A"; but even if that should prove correct, this entry will remain essentially as-is.

NGC 2632 (=
M44 = OCL 507), Praesepe, the Beehive Cluster
Recorded (360 to 380 B.C.E.) by Eudoxus of Cnidus
Earliest extant mention (260 B.C.E.) by Aratos
Recorded (130 B.C.E.) by Hipparchus
Resolved into starsf (1609) by Galileo Galilei
Also observed (1611) by Nicolas Peiresc
Also observed (1612) by Simon Marius
Recorded (1654) by Giovanni Hodierna
Recorded (March 4, 1769) by Charles Messier
A magnitude 3.1 open cluster (type II2m) in Cancer (RA 08 40 24.0, Dec +19 40 00)
"Ancient" History: Praesepe, or the Beehive Cluster, is easily visible as a "little cloud" of stars in dark skies, and was already known in ancient times, when truly dark night skies were common. The first known mention of its existence is by Aratos, as part of a poem meant to reproduce the now lost prose of Eudoxus of Cnidus. Eudoxus was the first to propose a system of turning spheres as an explanation of the motions of heavenly bodies, and apparently as part of that work he discussed the rising and setting of various constellations. A review of Aratos' work by Hipparchus shows that Eudoxus' work was still extant at the time of Hipparchus, who pointed out errors in both the original prose and (more critically) its poetic transformation. Although practically all of Hipparchus' astronomical works have been lost, we know through Ptolemy that Hipparchus made thousands of relatively accurate observations of celestial objects, and on that basis can be confidently assigned the place of honor as the first person to estimate a reasonably accurate position for the cluster; but the existence of the "little cloud" must have been known no later than the time of Eudoxus and more likely, as early as the time of Eudoxus' father, Aeschines of Cnidus, who was an avid observer of the skies. The cluster was first resolved into "more than 40 small stars" by Galileo, and not long after by some of his contemporaries (probably resoved by Peiresc, definitely resolved by Marius, and Hodierna had it as #1 in his list of objects which were nebulous to the naked eye, but resolved into stars by a telescope); so it had a long history before Messier added it to his catalog.
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2632 (= Hipparchus, M 44, 1860 RA 08 32, NPD 69 32) is "Praesepe Cancri". The position precesses to RA 08 40 03.8, Dec +19 58 33, well within the 95 arcmin diameter of the cluster, so even without the millennia of historical precedence the identification would be certain.
Physical Information: Praesepe is one of the nearest clusters to the Sun, being only about 575 light years away. Given its distance and apparent size, it is about 15 light years across. Studies of the proper motion of objects in the region of the cluster show that about 200 stars share the same motion, and must be cluster members. The nature of the brightest stars in the cluster suggests an age of 730 million years, which is not much less than the 790 million years estimated for the Hyades, and both clusters have similar proper motions, so it is possible that they originated in the same (unknown) star-forming region, at about the same time.
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 2632, also known as Praesepe, or the Beehive Cluster, and as M44
Above, a 1.75 degree wide DSS image centered on NGC 2632, or Praesepe
Below, a ? arcmin wide NOAO image of the cluster
(Image Credit Tom Bash and John Fox/Adam Block/AURA/NSF/NOAO)
NOAO image of open cluster NGC 2632, also known as Praesepe, or the Beehive Cluster, and as M44

NGC 2633 (= PGC 24723 =
Arp 80)
Discovered (Aug 11, 1882) by Wilhelm Tempel
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b? pec) in Camelopardalis (RA 08 48 04.6, Dec +74 05 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2633 (Tempel list VI (#4), list IX (#6), 1860 RA 08 32 22, NPD 15 23.2) is "faint, small, a little extended". The position precesses to RA 08 48 03.9, Dec +74 06 42, on the northern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain. (It is further confirmed by the accurate position of NGC 2634, observed by Tempel on the same nights.)
Discovery Notes: The date of discovery is for Tempel's list VI #4, but Dreyer's position is essentially the same as Tempel's list IX #6. (Dreyer maintained a regular correspondence with Tempel, and presumably confirmed the best position through that correspondence prior to publishing the NGC.)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2160 km/sec, NGC 2633 is about 100 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance measurements of 90 to 110 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.3 by 1.5 arcmin, it is about 65 thousand light years across. As in the case of Arp 79, NGC 2633's listing as Arp 80 is supposed to mean it is a spiral galaxy with a large high surface brightness companion, but there is no sign of such a companion on the corresponding Arp Atlas plate, and the assignment was presumably made merely on the basis of the increased brightness in the star-forming regions on the southern side of the galaxy.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2633, also known as Arp 80
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2633, also known as Arp 80
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2633, also known as Arp 80
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of part of the galaxy
(Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, Wikimedia Commons, "Fabian")
HST image of the eastern portion of spiral galaxy NGC 2633, also known as Arp 80
Below, a ? arcmin wide infrared view of the galaxy
(Image Credit Spitzer Space Telescope, Wikimedia Commons, "Fabian")
Spitzer infrared image of spiral galaxy NGC 2633, also known as Arp 80

NGC 2634 (= PGC 24749, and perhaps =
NGC 2630)
Discovered (Aug 11, 1882) by Wilhelm Tempel
A magnitude 12.0 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Camelopardalis (RA 08 48 25.4, Dec +73 58 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2634 (Tempel list VI (#5), list IX (#7), 1860 RA 08 32 34, NPD 15 31.2) is "faint, small, a little extended". The position precesses to RA 08 48 11.0, Dec +73 58 40, about 1.1 arcmin northwest of the center of the galaxy, and just off its northwestern rim and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain. (It is further confirmed by the accurate position of NGC 2633, observed by Tempel on the same nights.)
Discovery Notes: Both Dreyer's position and the date of discovery are for Tempel's list VI #5. (Dreyer maintained a regular correspondence with Tempel, and presumably confirmed the best position through that correspondence prior to publishing the NGC.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.6 arcmin. Possibly the "lost" NGC 2630.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2634
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2634
Below, a ? arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2634
Below, a ? arcmin PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2634

PGC 24760 (= "NGC 2634A")
Not an NGC object unless the "lost"
NGC 2631, but listed here since often called NGC 2634A
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Camelopardalis (RA 08 48 37.1, Dec +73 56 19)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.4 arcmin

NGC 2635 (= OCL 728)
Discovered (Feb 2, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.2 open cluster (type I3p) in Pyxis (RA 08 38 24.0, Dec -34 46 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2635 (= GC 1683 = JH 3133, 1860 RA 08 32 58, NPD 124 16.2) is "a cluster, pretty much compressed, irregular triangle, stars from 13th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 arcmin

NGC 2636 (= PGC 24747)
Discovered (Jul 27, 1883) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A magnitude 13.8 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Camelopardalis (RA 08 48 24.5, Dec +73 40 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2636 (Tempel list IX (#8), 1860 RA 08 33 00, NPD 15 51) is "very faint, small, 2 stars of 11th or 12th magnitude to east". The position precesses to RA 08 48 25.4, Dec +73 38 49, about 1.4 arcmin south of the galaxy listed above, there is nothing else in the region and the two stars about 6 arcmin to the east make the identification certain.
Discovery Note: Tempel's position for his list IX #8 is a rough value based on Bonner Durchmusterung charts for equinox 1855; Dreyer's 1860 right ascension for NGC 2636 is exactly the same as Tempel's right ascension (precessed for the 5 year difference in equinoxes), but his declination is a degree to the south; however, he maintained a regular correspondence with Tempel, and presumably obtained a more accurate position from him prior to publishing the NGC.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.55 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2636
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2636
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2636
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of elliptical galaxy NGC 2636

NGC 2637 (= PGC 24409 ??)
Recorded (Oct 30, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A nonexistent or "lost" object in Cancer (RA 08 41 19.4, Dec +19 33 21)
or PGC 24409, a magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type SB?) at RA 08 41 13.5, Dec +19 41 28
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2637 (= GC 5431, Marth #130, 1860 RA 08 33 17, NPD 69 57) is "most extremely faint, very small". The position precesses to RA 08 41 19.4, Dec +19 33 21, but there is nothing near the position, so NGC 2637 is often listed as lost or nonexistent. However, a number of databases list a galaxy (PGC 24409) approximately 8 arcmin to the north as NGC 2637 (for instance, LEDA and Wikisky), and although Steinicke lists the NGC object as lost or nonexistent, he gives it a position identical to that of PGC 24409. The rationale (per Corwin) is that of a number of objects observed by Marth on the night in question most are found near his positions, but two are not, and could be listed as lost or nonexistent. However, if it is assumed that both "lost" objects were misrecorded as being about 10 arcmin south of their true positions, then there are appropriate candidates for what he saw, and on that basis NGC 2637 is generally taken to be PGC 24409, and NGC 2643 as PGC 24434. Based on that, this entry treats NGC 2637 as if it is PGC 24409; and even if that were wrong, since the galaxy is listed as NGC 2637 in many places, it seems appropriate to discuss it here, anyway.
Historical Note: The NGC entry is copied from Lassell's 1866 paper about observations at Malta, which included Marth's discoveries.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 9705 km/sec, PGC 24409 is about 450 million light years away (a distance at which relativistic calcultions might be used, but would produce only a minor change in the result). Given that and its apparent size of 0.65 by 0.45 arcmin, the galaxy is about 85 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 24409, which may be the otherwise lost NGC 2637
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 24409, which may be NGC 2637
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 24409, which may be the otherwise lost NGC 2637

NGC 2638 (= PGC 24453)
Recorded (Jan 21, 1885) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 12.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Lynx (RA 08 42 25.8, Dec +37 13 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2638 (Stephan list XIII (#42), 1860 RA 08 33 25, NPD 52 17.0) is "very faint, very small, irregular figure".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.6 arcmin

NGC 2639 (= PGC 24506 = PGC 24507)
Discovered (Mar 9, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 16, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.7 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Ursa Major (RA 08 43 38.1, Dec +50 12 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1639 (= GC 1684 = JH 518 = WH I 204, 1860 RA 08 33 33, NPD 39 17.8) is "considerably bright, small, extended 130░, pretty suddenly much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.1 arcmin

NGC 2640 (= PGC 24229)
Discovered (Feb 26, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.1 lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Carina (RA 08 37 24.5, Dec -55 07 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2640 (= GC 1685 = JH 3134, 1860 RA 08 33 42, NPD 144 37.8) is "pretty bright, small, round, 3 or 4 very small (faint) stars near to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.9 arcmin

NGC 2641 (= PGC 24722)
Discovered (Sep 30, 1802) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Aug 8, 1866) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Ursa Major (RA 08 47 57.5, Dec +72 53 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2641 (= GC 1682 = WH III 983, H O N, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 08 33 46, NPD 16 35.4) is "very faint, stellar".
Note About "H O N": In John Herschel's treatise on observations made at the Cape of Good Hope in the 1830's he lists eight nebulae discovered by his father, but not previously published. WH III 982 (= NGC 2629) and WH III 983 are among those eight nebulae; and "H O N" alerts the reader of the GC and NGC to the fact that they will not find those objects in William Herschel's catalogs, but in the Cape catalog.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.1 arcmin

NGC 2642 (= PGC 24395 = PGC 1062553)
Discovered (Feb 19, 1830) by
John Herschel
Also observed (Jan 4, 1862) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Hydra (RA 08 40 44.4, Dec -04 07 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2642 (= GC 1686 = JH 519, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 08 33 49, NPD 93 38.8) is "very faint, pretty large, gradually brighter middle, 2 bright stars to south, one to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.8 arcmin

NGC 2643 (=
IC 2390 ?? = PGC 24434 ??)
Recorded (Oct 30, 1864) by Albert Marth
A nonexistent or "lost" object in Cancer (RA 08 42 10.1, Dec +19 31 13)
or IC 2390 (RA 08 41 51.7, Dec +19 42 09), which see
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2643 (= GC 5432, Marth #131, 1860 RA 08 34 08, NPD 69 59) is "an extremely faint nebulous star". The position precesses to RA 08 42 10.1, Dec +19 31 13, but there is nothing near the position, so NGC 2643 is often listed as lost or nonexistent. However, a number of databases list a galaxy (PGC 24434) approximately 10 arcmin to the north as NGC 2643 (for instance, LEDA and Wikisky). The rationale (per Corwin) is that of a number of objects observed by Marth on the night in question most are found near his positions, but two are not, and could be listed as lost or nonexistent. However, if it is assumed that both "lost" objects were misrecorded as being about 10 arcmin south of their true positions, then there are appropriate candidates for what he saw, and on that basis NGC 2637 is generally taken to be PGC 24409, and NGC 2643 as PGC 24434, which Dreyer listed as IC 2390. However, even if that is correct, it seems most appropriate to use this entry only for historical information, and reference physical data and images at the IC entry.
Historical Note: The NGC entry is copied from Lassell's 1866 paper about observations at Malta, which included Marth's discoveries.

NGC 2644 (= PGC 24425)
Discovered (Feb 6, 1877) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Hydra (RA 08 41 31.8, Dec +04 58 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2644 (Stephan list IX (#16), 1860 RA 08 34 09, NPD 84 31.4) is "very faint, pretty large, irregularly oval, several small points".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 0.8 arcmin

NGC 2645 (= OCL 754)
Discovered (Dec 29, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 7.0 open cluster (type II2p) in Vela (RA 08 39 02.0, Dec -46 14 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2645 (= GC 1687 = JH 3136, 1860 RA 08 34 21, NPD 135 43.9) is "a cluster, small, stars large (bright) and small (faint)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 arcmin

NGC 2646 (= PGC 24838 =
IC 511)
Discovered (Jul 27, 1883) by Wilhelm Tempel (and later listed as NGC 2646)
Also observed (Sep 1, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 511)
A magnitude 12.1 lenticular galaxy (type SB0(r)a?) in Camelopardalis (RA 08 50 22.0, Dec +73 27 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2646 (Tempel list IX (#9), 1860 RA 08 34 35, NPD 16 01) is "very faint, small, 2 faint stars 2.5 arcmin to southeast". The position precesses to RA 08 49 52.3, Dec +73 28 35, about 2.2 arcmin west northwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby; and the two stars to the southeast make the identification certain.
Discovery Note: Tempel's position for his list IX #9 is a rough value based on Bonner Durchmusterung charts for equinox 1855. Dreyer's 1860 right ascension for NGC 2646 is exactly the same as Tempel's right ascension (precessed for the 5 year difference in equinoxes), but his declination is a degree to the south; however, he maintained a regular correspondence with Tempel, and presumably obtained a more accurate position from him prior to publishing the NGC.
Note About The Duplicate Entry: Until Aug 21, 2017 it was thought that IC 511 (which see) was PGC 24397; but on that date it was discovered that it is actually a misrecorded observation of NGC 2646. (Since this discovery is so recent it will probably not be generally known for a while.)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3680 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), NGC 2646 is about 170 to 175 million light years away, in good agreement with widely varying redshift-independent distance estimates of about 100 to 265 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.3 by 1.3 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 65 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2646, which is also IC 511
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2646
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2646, which is also IC 511
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of lenticular galaxy NGC 2646, which is also IC 511

NGC 2647 (= PGC 24463)
Discovered (Oct 30, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.3 compact galaxy (type C?) in Cancer (RA 08 42 43.1, Dec +19 39 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2647 (= GC 5433, Marth #132, 1860 RA 08 34 42, NPD 69 52) is "a nebulous star".
Historical Note: The NGC entry is copied from Lassell's 1866 paper about observations at Malta, which included Marth's discoveries.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin

NGC 2648 (= PGC 24464, and with
PGC 24469 = Arp 89)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1784) by William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 24, 1830) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.8 spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Cancer (RA 08 42 39.8, Dec +14 17 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2648 (= GC 1688 = GC 521 = JH 3135 = WH III 49, 1860 RA 08 34 51, NPD 75 13.0) is "faint, small, very little extended 135░, pretty suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.2 by 1.1 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2648 and its companion PGC 24469, which comprise Arp 89
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2648 and its companion PGC 24469
Below, a 5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2648 and its companion PGC 24469, which comprise Arp 89

PGC 24469 (with
NGC 2648 = Arp 89)
Not an NGC object but listed here since a physical companion of NGC 2648
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S? pec) in Cancer (RA 08 42 48.2, Dec +14 15 55)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.55 by 0.3 arcmin. A physical companion of NGC 2648, which see.

NGC 2649 (= PGC 24531)
Discovered (Feb 5, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 22, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Lynx (RA 08 44 08.3, Dec +34 43 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2649 (= GC 1689 = JH 522 = WH II 727, 1860 RA 08 35 18, NPD 54 47.3) is "faint, large, round, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.4 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2649
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2649
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2649
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2550 - 2599) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 2600 - 2649     → (NGC 2650 - 2699)