Celestial Atlas
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Page last updated Oct 3, 2012
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NGC 2700
Recorded (1877) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A 15th-magnitude star in Hydra (RA 08 55 50.6, Dec -03 06 58)
Per Dreyer, NGC 2700 (= Tempel, 1860 RA 08 48 45, NPD 94 34) is "extremely faint, very small, 1 arcmin north of 1727", GC 1727 being NGC 2699, which see for images. Dreyer gave the NPD for NGC 2699 as 92 35.0, so if NGC 2700 was an arcmin to the north, its NPD should have been 92 34, and the published value was off by 2 degrees, presumably due to a transcription or printing error. Unfortunately, there is nothing to the north of NGC 2699 save for a few stars. As a result, the star just to the northeast of that galaxy is presumed to be NGC 2700, and its position is the one listed above.

NGC 2701 (= PGC 25237)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Ursa Major (RA 08 59 05.5, Dec +53 46 14)
Apparent size 2.2 by 1.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2701
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2701
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2701

NGC 2702
Recorded (1876) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A star in Hydra (RA 08 55 54.6, Dec -03 03 53)
Per Dreyer, NGC 2702 (= Tempel, 1860 RA 08 48 49, NPD 92 31.2) is "very faint, very small, 4 arcmin northeast of 1727", GC 1727 being NGC 2699, which see for an image. The published coordinates are 5sE and 3.8'N of those for NGC 2699, but as in the case of NGC 2700 there is nothing in the area save for a star located 2s due east of the relative position; so it is presumed to be Tempel's object, and its coordinates are the ones listed above. (Note: In the preceding 'calculation' I have used the relative positions stated in the NGC instead of precessing the 1860 coordinates, as when available, relative positions are a more reliable method of determining the positions of close objects.)

NGC 2703
Recorded (1876) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A pair of stars in Hydra (RA 08 55 47.1, Dec -03 18 23)

NGC 2704 (=
IC 2424 = PGC 25134)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2704)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1892) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 2424)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab) in Lynx (RA 08 56 47.7, Dec +39 22 57)
Apparent size 1.0 by 1.0 arcmin.

NGC 2705
Recorded (1876) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A star in Hydra (RA 08 56 00.0, Dec -03 00 51)

NGC 2706 (= PGC 25102)
Recorded (Feb 27, 1886) by
Lewis Swift (3-42)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Hydra (RA 08 56 12.3, Dec -02 33 48)
Apparent size 1.8 by 0.6 arcmin.

NGC 2707
Recorded (1876) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A star in Hydra (RA 08 56 05.6, Dec -03 03 57)
(See the wide-field image of NGC 2699)

NGC 2708 (=
NGC 2727 = PGC 25097)
Discovered (Jan 6, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2708)
Discovered (Mar 12, 1826) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2727)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Hydra (RA 08 56 07.9, Dec -03 21 38)
Apparent size 2.7 by 1.4 arcmin.

NGC 2709 (= PGC 25103)
Recorded (Jan 27, 1852) by
Bindon Stoney
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Hydra (RA 08 56 12.8, Dec -03 14 33)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.6 arcmin.

NGC 2710 (= PGC 25258)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Ursa Major (RA 08 59 48.4, Dec +55 42 21)
Apparent size 2.0 by 1.0 arcmin.

NGC 2711 (= PGC 25164)
Discovered (Mar 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth (134)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Cancer (RA 08 57 23.5, Dec +17 17 17)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin.

NGC 2712 (= PGC 25248)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Lynx (RA 08 59 30.6, Dec +44 54 50)
Apparent size 2.8 by 1.5 arcmin.

NGC 2713 (= PGC 25161)
Discovered (Mar 3, 1864) by
Albert Marth (135)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab) in Hydra (RA 08 57 20.6, Dec +02 55 17)
Apparent size 3.6 by 1.5 arcmin

NGC 2714 (= PGC 24959)
Discovered (Feb 4, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Carina (RA 08 53 29.8, Dec -59 13 03)
Apparent size 1.1 by 1.1 arcmin.

NGC 2715 (= PGC 25676)
Discovered (1871) by
Alphonse Borrelly (3)
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Camelopardalis (RA 09 08 05.9, Dec +78 05 09)
Apparent size 4.8 by 1.6 arcmin.

NGC 2716 (= PGC 25172)
Discovered (Mar 3, 1864) by
Albert Marth (136)
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a) in Hydra (RA 08 57 35.8, Dec +03 05 25)
Apparent size 1.3 by 1.0 arcmin.

NGC 2717 (= PGC 25146)
Discovered (Mar 20, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0) in Pyxis (RA 08 57 01.1, Dec -24 40 26)
Apparent size 2.1 by 1.5 arcmin.

NGC 2718 (= PGC 25225)
Discovered (Mar 24, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab) in Hydra (RA 08 58 50.3, Dec +06 17 38)
Apparent size 2.1 by 2.1 arcmin.

NGC 2719 (= PGC 25281, and with
PGC 25284 = Arp 202)
Discovered (Mar 28, 1786) by William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type Im) in Lynx (RA 09 00 15.6, Dec +35 43 40)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.3 arcmin. Recessional velocity 3075 km/sec. Interacting with PGC 25284.
SDSS image of irregular galaxies NGC 2719 and PGC 25284, collectively also called Arp 202
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2719 and PGC 25284
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxies NGC 2719 and PGC 25284, collectively also called Arp 202

PGC 25284 (= "NGC 2719A", and with
NGC 2719 = Arp 202)
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 2719A due to its proximity to NGC 2719
A 14th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type Im) in Lynx (RA 09 00 15.9, Dec +35 43 14)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin. Recessional velocity 3115 km/sec. Interacting with NGC 2719, which see for images.

NGC 2720 (= PGC 25238)
Discovered (Mar 10, 1864) by
Albert Marth (137)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Cancer (RA 08 59 08.0, Dec +11 08 59)
Apparent size 1.1 by 1.1 arcmin.

NGC 2721 (= PGC 25231)
Discovered (Feb 1, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Hydra (RA 08 58 56.5, Dec -04 54 05)
Apparent size 2.4 by 1.6 arcmin.

NGC 2722 (=
NGC 2733 = PGC 25221)
Discovered (Jan 6, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2722)
Discovered (Mar 12, 1826) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2733)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Hydra (RA 08 58 46.1, Dec -03 42 35)
Apparent size 2.0 by 1.3 arcmin.

NGC 2723 (= PGC 25280)
Discovered (Mar 3, 1864) by
Albert Marth (138)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Hydra (RA 09 00 14.3, Dec +03 10 42)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin.

NGC 2724 (= PGC 25331)
Discovered (Feb 7, 1832) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Lynx (RA 09 01 01.8, Dec +35 45 45)
Apparent size 1.8 by 1.6 arcmin.

NGC 2725 (= PGC 25332)
Discovered (Mar 10, 1864) by
Albert Marth (139)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S? pec) in Cancer (RA 09 01 03.2, Dec +11 05 51)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2725
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2725
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2725

NGC 2726 (= PGC 25498)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Ursa Major (RA 09 04 56.8, Dec +59 56 00)
Apparent size 1.6 by 0.5 arcmin.

NGC 2727 (=
NGC 2708 = PGC 25097)
Discovered (Jan 6, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2708)
Discovered (Mar 12, 1826) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2727)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Hydra (RA 08 56 07.9, Dec -03 21 38)

NGC 2728 (= PGC 25360)
Discovered (Mar 10, 1864) by
Albert Marth (140)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Cancer (RA 09 01 40.9, Dec +11 05 01)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin.

NGC 2729 (= PGC 25352)
Discovered (Mar 3, 1864) by
Albert Marth (141)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Hydra (RA 09 01 28.6, Dec +03 43 16)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin.

NGC 2730 (= PGC 25384)
Discovered (Mar 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth (142)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBdm) in Cancer (RA 09 02 15.8, Dec +16 50 18)
Apparent size 1.7 by 1.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2730
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2730
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2730

NGC 2731 (= PGC 25376)
Discovered (Mar 3, 1864) by
Albert Marth (143)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Cancer (RA 09 02 08.2, Dec +08 18 02)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin.

NGC 2732 (= PC 25999)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Camelopardalis (RA 09 13 25.0, Dec +79 11 16)
Apparent size 2.1 by 0.9 arcmin.

NGC 2733 (=
NGC 2722 = PGC 25221)
Discovered (Jan 6, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2722)
Discovered (Mar 12, 1826) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2733)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Hydra (RA 08 58 46.1, Dec -03 42 35)
(this entry will probably contain only historical information; for anything else see NGC 2722)

NGC 2734 (= PGC 25413)
Discovered (Mar 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth (144)
A 16th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2) in Cancer (RA 09 03 01.5, Dec +16 51 51)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin.

NGC 2735 (= PGC 25399, and with
PGC 25402 = Arp 287)
Discovered (Feb 26, 1878) by Édouard Stephan (9-18)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)b? pec) in Cancer (RA 09 02 38.5, Dec +25 56 05)
Gravitationally interacting with PGC 25402. Based on a recessional velocity of 2450 km/sec, NGC 2735 is about 115 million light years away, in good agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 120 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.2 by 0.4 arcmin, it is about 40 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2735 and its companion, irregular galaxy PGC 25402 (sometimes called NGC 2735A)
Above, an image of NGC 2735 and PGC 25402
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
Superposition of an SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2735 and its companion, irregular galaxy PGC 25402 (sometimes called NGC 2735A) on a DSS background, to reduce glare from the bright stars at the bottom

PGC 25402 (= "NGC 2735A", and with
NGC 2735 = Arp 287)
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 2735A due to its involvement with NGC 2735
A 16th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type Im pec) in Cancer (RA 09 02 41.8, Dec +25 56 20)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin. Involved with NGC 2735, which see for images.

NGC 2736, Herschel's Ray = the Pencil Nebula
Discovered (Mar 1, 1835) by
John Herschel
An emission nebula in Vela (RA 09 00 17.0, Dec -45 56 53)
NGC 2736 is a bright, linear emission nebula nearly half a degree in extent, but mostly only a couple of arcmin wide. A fainter "shadow" of the ray lies to its west. As with many linear nebulae, NGC 2736 is probably part of an expanding supernova remnant (in this case the Vela Supernova Remnant), but it could a shock wave passing through the interstellar medium as a result of the supernova. NGC 2736 is moving through the interstellar medium at 400 thousand miles an hour, and even at its approximately 815 light year distance, should have a noticeable change in its position relative to the background stars within a human lifetime.
DSS image of emission nebula NGC 2736, also known as Herschel's Ray, or the Pencil Nebula
Above, a half degree wide "closeup" of NGC 2736
Below, a more detailed false-color image of the supernova remnant (Image Credits: ESO)
ESO image of emission nebula NGC 2736, also known as Herschel's Ray, or the Pencil Nebula

NGC 2737 (= PGC 25453)
Discovered (Feb 23, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab) in Cancer (RA 09 03 59.6, Dec +21 54 23)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4 arcmin. Recessional velocity 3165 km/sec. Since NGC 2737 and 2738 have similar recessional velocities, they are probably at about the same distance from us; and if so, they may be a physical pair.

NGC 2738 (= PGC 25454)
Discovered (Feb 23, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Cancer (RA 09 04 00.5, Dec +21 58 06)
Apparent size 1.4 by 0.6 arcmin. Recessional velocity 3110 km/sec. Since NGC 2738 and 2737 have similar recessional velocities, they are probably at about the same distance from us; and if so, they may be a physical pair.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2738
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2738
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 2737
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2738, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 2737

NGC 2739 (= PGC 25530)
Discovered (Feb 18, 1855) by
R. J. Mitchell
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab) in Ursa Major (RA 09 06 02.7, Dec +51 44 40)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.2 arcmin. Recessional velocity 8855 km/sec. Since NGC 2739 and 2740 have nearly the same recessional velocity and are in nearly the same direction, they are probably a physical pair. However, given their relative lack of distortion, they are probably not quite as close as they appear, and most likely one is a little behind or in front of the other.
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 2739 and 2740
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2739 and 2740
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 2739 and 2740

NGC 2740 (= PGC 25531)
Discovered (Feb 17, 1831) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab) in Ursa Major (RA 09 06 05.0, Dec +51 44 08)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9 arcmin. Recessional velocity 8850 km/sec. Since NGC 2739 (which see for images) and 2740 have nearly the same recessional velocity and are in nearly the same direction, they are probably a physical pair. However, given their relative lack of distortion, they are probably not quite as close as they appear, and most likely one is a little behind or in front of the other.

NGC 2741 (= PGC 25425)
Discovered (Mar 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth (145)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Cancer (RA 09 03 16.5, Dec +18 15 38)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin.

NGC 2742 (=
NGC 2816 = PGC 25640)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1790) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2742)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1832) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2816)
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Ursa Major (RA 09 07 33.2, Dec +60 28 46)
Apparent size 3.0 by 1.5 arcmin.

PGC 25836 (= "NGC 2742A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 2742A since in general area of
NGC 2742
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb pec) in Ursa Major (RA 09 09 57.6, Dec +62 14 49)
Apparent size 1.6 by 0.6.

NGC 2743 (= PGC 25496)
Discovered (Feb 22, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sd) in Cancer (RA 09 04 54.0, Dec +25 00 15)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin.

NGC 2744 (= PGC 25480)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb pec) in Cancer (RA 09 04 39.1, Dec +18 27 51)
Apparent size 1.6 by 1.2 arcmin. As noted in the following entry, the bright southern extension of this distorted galaxy is sometimes referred to as PGC 200248 or "NGC 2744A". However, although it may be a remnant of a galactic collision, it appears more likely to be a distended extension of the resulting chaos than a truly separate object. There is also a very long, very faint extension to the north.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2744, also showing the position of the putative PGC 200248
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2744
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide view enhanced to show the faint northern extension
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2744, enhanced to show its faint northern extension
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2744

PGC 200248 (= "NGC 2744A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 2744A due to its proximity to
NGC 2744
A 16th-magnitude peculiar galaxy (type pec) in Cancer (RA 09 04 38.7, Dec +18 27 22)
Apparent size 0.2 by 0.2 arcmin. As likely to be a distended extension of NGC 2744 (which see for images) as an actual companion.

NGC 2745 (= PGC 25478)
Discovered (Mar 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth (146)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Cancer (RA 09 04 39.3, Dec +18 15 28)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin.

NGC 2746 (= PGC 25533)
Discovered (Mar 10, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa) in Lynx (RA 09 05 59.5, Dec +35 22 38)
Apparent size 1.6 by 1.5 arcmin.

NGC 2747 (= PGC 25507)
Discovered (Mar 29, 1865) by
Albert Marth (147)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Cancer (RA 09 05 18.3, Dec +18 26 34)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin.

NGC 2748 (= PGC 26018)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Camelopardalis (RA 09 13 43.0, Dec +76 28 33)
Apparent size 3.1 by 1.1 arcmin.

NGC 2749 (= PGC 25508)
Discovered (Mar 5, 1862) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2) in Cancer (RA 09 05 21.3, Dec +18 18 49)
Apparent size 1.8 by 1.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2749
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2749
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 2751 and 2752
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2749, also showing spiral galaxies NGC 2751 and 2752
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2650 - 2699) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 2700 - 2749     → (NGC 2750 - 2799)