Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2700 - 2749) ←NGC Objects: NGC 2750 - 2799 Link for sharing this page on Facebook→ (NGC 2800 - 2849)
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2750, 2751, 2752, 2753, 2754, 2755, 2756, 2757, 2758, 2759, 2760, 2761, 2762, 2763, 2764, 2765, 2766,
2767, 2768, 2769, 2770, 2771, 2772, 2773, 2774, 2775, 2776, 2777, 2778, 2779, 2780, 2781, 2782, 2783,
2784, 2785, 2786, 2787, 2788, 2789, 2790, 2791, 2792, 2793, 2794, 2795, 2796, 2797, 2798, 2799

Page last updated Dec 29, 2018
Updated formatting to current standard
Added Dreyer entries, Checked Steinicke updated databases
Checked Corwin positions, tentative IDs, added basic pix, tags, captions
NEXT: Finish historical IDs, physical information, look for hi-res pix

NGC 2750 (= PGC 25525)
Discovered (Mar 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 21, 1863) by Heinrich d'Arrest nox 94, 1867 paper
A magnitude 11.9 spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Cancer (RA 09 05 47.9, Dec +25 26 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2750 (= GC 1756 = WH III 291, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 08 57 35, NPD 64 00.5) is "very faint, considerably large, brighter middle and nucleus, 2 considerable stars to west". The position precesses to RA 09 05 48.5, Dec +25 26 11, nearly dead center on the galaxy listed above, there is nothing comparable nearby, the description fits and d'Arrest's paper also notes the position of the bright star to the southwest, so the identification is certain. (The use of "2 c *" by John Herschel and Dreyer to describe the stars to the west is unusual, but (per Corwin) is confirmed by reference to WH's original notes.)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2675 km/sec, NGC 2750 is about 125 million light years away, in perfect agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 125 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.2 by 1.9 arcmin, it is about 80 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2750
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2750
Before, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2750

NGC 2751 (= PGC 25517)
Discovered (Mar 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(s)ab?) in Cancer (RA 09 05 32.4, Dec +18 15 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2751 (= GC 5456, Marth #148, 1860 RA 08 57 40, NPD 71 11) is "extremely faint, extremely small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2751, also showing NGC 2749 and NGC 2752
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2751, also showing NGC 2749 and 2752
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2751

NGC 2752 (= PGC 25523)
Discovered (Mar 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Cancer (RA 09 05 43.1, Dec +18 20 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2752 (= GC 5457, Marth #149, 1860 RA 08 57 48, NPD 71 07) is "pretty faint, pretty large, very much extended, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.4 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2752, also showing NGC 2749 and NGC 2751
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2752, also showing NGC 2749 and 2751
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2752

NGC 2753 (= PGC 25603)
Discovered (Feb 21, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)ab? pec) in Cancer (RA 09 07 08.2, Dec +25 20 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2753 (= GC 1757, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 08 57 55, NPD 64 06.2) is "very faint, very small, 14th magnitude star 40 arcsec to northwest".
Physical Information: NGC 2753 is listed as a pair of elliptical galaxies in most references, and in lower-resolution images does look like a brighter slightly southwestern object and a fainter slightly northeastern object, so poorly resolved that they could well be ellipticals; but as the images below show it is actually a barred spiral with barely noticeable somewhat ringlike arms. Based on a recessional velocity of 2785 km/sec, NGC 2753 is about 130 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.6 by 0.45 arcmin, it is about 25 thousand light years across, making it a dwarf galaxy.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2753
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2753
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy clearly shows that it is a single galaxy, not a pair
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2753

NGC 2754 (= PGC 25504)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Hydra (RA 09 05 11.3, Dec -19 05 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2754 (Muller list II (#408), 1860 RA 08 58 44, NPD 108 31.9) is "extremely faint, small, round, 1st of 3", the others being NGC 2757 and 2758.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2754, also showing NGC 2757 and NGC 2758
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2754, also showing NGC 2757 and 2758
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2754
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy separates it from foreground stars
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2754

NGC 2755 (= PGC 25670)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)b?) in Lynx (RA 09 07 58.3, Dec +41 42 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2755 (= GC 1758 = WH III 626, 1860 RA 08 58 52, NPD 47 44.5) is "very faint, small, irregular figure, a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2755
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2755
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2755

NGC 2756 (= PGC 25757)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1790) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 10, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b?) in Ursa Major (RA 09 09 00.9, Dec +53 50 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2756 (= GC 1759 = JH 553 = WH II 828, 1860 RA 08 58 52, NPD 35 35.4) is "pretty bright, pretty small, extended, very gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.2 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2756
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2756
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2756

Need to find magnitudes for all three stars in the triplet, and replace "pair" by triplet

NGC 2757
Recorded (1886) by
Frank Muller
Also supposedly observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude "13.8" and 15.3 triplet of stars in Hydra (RA 09 05 25.6, Dec -19 02 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2757 (Muller list II (#409), 1860 RA 08 59 08, NPD 108 28.9) is "extremely faint, 2nd of 3, perhaps a star", others "of 3" being NGC 2754 and 2758. The second IC notes (per Howe) "is only an extremely faint double star, distance 12 arcsec" (distance meaning separation). The position precesses to RA 09 05 33.8, Dec -19 02 19, about 0.6 arcmin northeast of NGC 2758, but that galaxy obviously can't be NGC 2757, because the description is completely different. The key to the identification of NGC 2757 must be its description, which suggests that it is a star or very small group of stars, and the fact that Muller places it 6 seconds of time west of NGC 2758. Based on the idea that NGC 2757 must be something to the west of the galaxy, Howe chose the magnitude 14.9 and 15.2 pair of stars about 8 seconds to the west of NGC 2758, but (per Corwin), since Howe was able to see that pair as a double star with only a 16 inch telescope, Muller's 26 inch telescope would certainly have seen that wide a pair as two separate stars, and believes that since Muller couldn't tell that what he saw was a pair of stars, Howe's pair cannot be NGC 2757. Instead, the closer "pair" listed above, which lies 5 seconds of time to the west of NGC 2758, seems a far more likely (and in terms of position, more accurate) choice for what he recorded. In fact, Corwin notes that this triplet was picked up as a single non-stellar object by the Guide Star Catalogue software, so it actually fits Muller's description quite well. Based on this, the triple star listed above is almost certainly NGC 2757.
Physical Information: As noted above, the southern member of the triplet is magnitude 15.3, while the northern pair is magnitude 13.8; but at the moment I haven't been able to find separate magnitudes for either member of the northern pair. However, since the purpose of the NGC was to catalog nebulae and clusters of stars, it really makes no difference.
PanSTARRS image centered on the group of stars listed as NGC 2757, also showing NGC 2758
Above, a 3 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image centered on NGC 2757, also showing part of NGC 2758
(Howe's pair is also shown, but is almost certainly not NGC 2757)

NGC 2758 (= PGC 25515)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Hydra (RA 09 05 31.2, Dec -19 02 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2758 (Muller list II (#410), 1860 RA 08 59 14, NPD 108 28.9) is "extremely faint, small, extended 0°, 3rd of 3", the others being NGC 2754 and 2758. The position precesses to RA 09 05 39.8, Dec -19 02 19, just over 2 arcmin east northeast of the galaxy listed above, the description is a reasonably good fit, and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 0.5 arcmin
DSS image of region near NGC 2758, also showing NGC 2754 and the triplet of stars listed as NGC 2757
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2758, also showing NGC 2754 and 2757
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of NGC 2758
Below, a 2 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of NGC 2758

NGC 2759 (= PGC 25718)
Discovered (Mar 20, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 7, 1832) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Lynx (RA 09 08 37.3, Dec +37 37 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2759 (= GC 1760 = JH 554 = WH III 647, 1860 RA 08 59 33, NPD 51 48.7) is "very faint, considerably small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2759
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2759
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2759

NGC 2760 (probably not either
PGC 26654 or PGC 26035)
Recorded (Mar 26, 1887) by Lewis Swift
A lost or nonexistent object in Camelopardalis (RA 09 15 42.5, Dec +76 22 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2760 (Swift list VI (#34), 1860 RA 08 59 33, NPD 13 03.0) is "very faint, small, round, nearly between stars of 8th and 9th magnitude". The position precesses to RA 09 15 42.5, Dec +76 22 50 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there nor near there, and although the position does lie between two stars, they are 13th magnitude, far too faint to be what Swift claimed to observe. As a result of this and the discussion below, NGC 2760 is probably lost or nonexistent, as noted above.
Possible But Questionable Identifications: At one time Corwin suggested that Swift might have observed PGC 26654, but has since rejected the idea because the stars flanking it are also too faint to be what Swift observed, and the galaxy almost certainly has too low a surface brightness to have been observed by Swift's wide-field, low-power equipment. However, this is the object listed as NGC 2760 in NED (albeit with a caveat), so it is discussed in the second entry below. At the current time, Corwin favors (though again with some trepidation) that Swift might have observed PGC 26035, because though well away from his listed position, it is among the closest objects to that incorrect value, has just enough surface brightness to have been observable by Swift, and though the two stars flanking it are still a bit on the faint side and fairly far apart, they would have been visible in Swift's 33-arcmin wide field of view; so it is discussed in the first entry below. However, since neither galaxy can be certainly identified with NGC 2760, this entry will continue to maintain that it is lost or nonexistent.
DSS image of region near Swift's position for the apparently lost or nonexistent NGC 2760
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Swift's position for NGC 2760

PGC 26035 (possibly but probably not =
NGC 2760)
Probably not an NGC object but listed here as a possible identification of NGC 2760
A magnitude 15(?) lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Camelopardalis (RA 09 14 11.7, Dec +75 56 48)
Historical "Identification": As noted in the entry for NGC 2760, this is considered a possible (though very uncertain) candidate for what Swift misrecorded and Dreyer used as NGC 2760. Whether it really is Swift's object will probably never be known, but it is considered here, simply because it may be noted as that NGC object in one place or another.
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 26035, which is thought to be a possible candidate for the lost or nonexistent NGC 2760
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 26035
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 26035, which is thought to be a possible candidate for the lost or nonexistent NGC 2760
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 26035, which is thought to be a possible candidate for the lost or nonexistent NGC 2760

PGC 26654 (almost certainly not
NGC 2760)
Almost certainly not an NGC object but listed here since often listed as NGC 2760
A magnitude 14(?) irregular galaxy (type Irr?) in Draco (RA 09 24 13.0, Dec +76 31 55)
Historical "Identification": As noted in the entry for NGC 2760 this was once suggested as NGC 2760, and although that now seems very unlikely, it is still listed as such in some places, so it is discussed here more as a warning than anything else.
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy PGC 26654, which is sometimes (mis?)identified as the lost or nonexistent NGC 2760
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 26654
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of irregular galaxy PGC 26654, which is sometimes (mis?)identified as the lost or nonexistent NGC 2760
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of irregular galaxy PGC 26654, which is sometimes (mis?)identified as the lost or nonexistent NGC 2760

NGC 2761 (= PGC 25638)
Discovered (Mar 29, 1865) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Cancer (RA 09 07 30.8, Dec +18 26 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2761 (= GC 5458, Marth #150, 1860 RA 08 59 37, NPD 71 01) is "very faint, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2761
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2761
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2761

NGC 2762 (= PGC 25828)
Discovered (Feb 26, 1851) by
Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Ursa Major (RA 09 09 54.5, Dec +50 25 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2762 (= GC 1767, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 09 00 12, NPD 39 01.4) is "very very faint, small, round, 1st of 4", the others being NGC 2767, 2769 and 2771.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2762, also showing NGC 2762 and part of NGC 2769
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2762, also showing NGC 2762 and 2769
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2762

NGC 2763 (= PGC 25570)
Discovered (Feb 8, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Dec 16, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)c) in Hydra (RA 09 06 49.1, Dec -15 30 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2763 (= GC 1761 = JH 560 = WH III 275, 1860 RA 09 00 14, NPD 104 56.4) is "very faint, pretty small, brighter middle, small (faint) star 30 arcsec to north".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 2.0 arcmin
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2763
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2763
Below, a 3 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 2763

NGC 2764 (= PGC 25690)
Discovered (Nov 16, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 24, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type Sa? pec) in Cancer (RA 09 08 17.5, Dec +21 26 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2764 (= GC 1762 = JH 557 = WH III 236, 1860 RA 09 00 15, NPD 67 59.8) is "considerably faint, very small, round, extremely mottled but not resolved, between 2 pretty bright stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.0 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2764
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2764
Below, a 1.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2764

NGC 2765 (= PGC 25646)
Discovered (Jan 27, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 15, 1830) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Hydra (RA 09 07 36.6, Dec +03 23 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2765 (= GC 1763 = JH 558 = WH II 520, 1860 RA 09 00 17, NPD 86 02.6) is "very faint, pretty large, extended, gradually brighter middle, extremely mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.1 arcmin
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2765
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2765
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2765

NGC 2766 (= PGC 25735)
Discovered (Mar 22, 1884) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(r)a? pec) in Cancer (RA 09 08 47.6, Dec +29 51 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2766 (Stephan list XIII (#44), 1860 RA 09 00 23, NPD 59 34.5) is "very faint, very small, irregular figure, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.5 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2766
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2766
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2766

NGC 2767 (= PGC 25852)
Discovered (Mar 8, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Ursa Major (RA 09 10 11.9, Dec +50 24 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2767 (= GC 1764 = JH 556, 1860 RA 09 00 29, NPD 39 02.1) is "very faint, suddenly brighter middle equal to 15th magnitude star, 2nd of 4", the others being NGC 2762, 2769 and 2771.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2767, also showing NGC 2762, NGC 2769 and NGC 2771
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2767, also showing NGC 2762, 2769 and 2771
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2767

NGC 2768 (= PGC 25915)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1790) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 8, 1832) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.9 lenticular galaxy (type SA0) in Ursa Major (RA 09 11 37.4, Dec +60 02 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2768 (= GC 1765 = JH 555 = WH I 250, 1860 RA 09 00 42, NPD 29 23.4) is "considerably bright, considerably large, a little extended, pretty suddenly brighter middle and large bright nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.4 by 3.0 arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SA0-.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2768
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2768
Below, an 8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2768

NGC 2769 (= PGC 25870)
Discovered (Mar 7, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Ursa Major (RA 09 10 32.2, Dec +50 26 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2769 (= GC 1766 = JH 559, 1860 RA 09 00 48, NPD 39 00.4) is "pretty faint, small, extended, pretty suddenly a little brighter middle, 3rd of 4", the others being NGC 2762, 2767 and 2771.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.4 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2769, also showing NGC 2762, NGC 2767 and NGC 2771
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2769, also showing NGC 2762, 2767 and 2771
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2769

NGC 2770 (= PGC 25806)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 22, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Lynx (RA 09 09 33.7, Dec +33 07 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2770 (= GC 1768 = JH 562 = WH II 490, 1860 RA 09 00 57, NPD 56 18.4) is "faint, large, much extended 150°, mottled but not resolved, 2 stars to north".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.7 by 1.1 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2770
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2770
Below, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2770

PGC 25769 (= PGC 82318 = "NGC 2770A" = "NGC 2770B")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 2770A or NGC 2770B
A magnitude 15.2 irregular galaxy (type Irr?) in
Lynx (RA 09 09 19.6, Dec +33 07 19)
Warning About Non-Standard Designations: As is not unusual in the case of the non-standard usage that adds a letter to an NGC designation, this object has two different "NGC" designations; and is a good example of why, although such non-standard designations are common, they should never be used.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1850 km/sec, PGC 25769 is about 85 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin, it is about 18 thousand light years across; so it could be classified as a dwarf irregular.
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy PGC 25769, sometimes called NGC 2770A or NGC 2770B, also showing NGC 2770
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 25769, also showing NGC 2770
Below a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of irregular galaxy PGC 25769, sometimes called NGC 2770A or NGC 2770B

NGC 2771 (= PGC 25875)
Discovered (Mar 7, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)ab?) in Ursa Major (RA 09 10 39.7, Dec +50 22 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2771 (= GC 1769 = JH 561, 1860 RA 09 01 00, NPD 39 04.4) is "very faint, small, a little extended, 4th of 4", the others being NGC 2762, 2767 and 2769.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 1.9 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2771
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2771, also showing NGC 2767 and 2769
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2771

NGC 2772 (= PGC 25654)
Discovered (Jan 23, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type Sab? pec) in Pyxis (RA 09 07 41.8, Dec -23 37 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2772 (= GC 1770 = JH 3146, 1860 RA 09 01 28, NPD 113 05.3) is "extremely faint, a little extended, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Possibly (probably?) interacting with the small galaxy to its west, which might explain its peculiar structure. Apparent size 1.5 by 0.5 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2772
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2772
Below, a 2.25 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2772
Below, a ? arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2772

NGC 2773 (= PGC 25825)
Discovered (Mar 6, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Cancer (RA 09 09 44.2, Dec +07 10 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2773 (= GC 5459, Marth #151, 1860 RA 09 02 18, NPD 82 15) is "very faint, small, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2773
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2773
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2773

NGC 2774 (= PGC 25879)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 25, 1827) by John Herschel
Also observed (Feb 19, 1863) by Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (Feb 7, 1877) by Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Cancer (RA 09 10 39.9, Dec +18 41 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2774 (= GC 1773 = JH 565 = WH III 61, d'Arrest, Stephan list IX (#19), 1860 RA 09 02 46, NPD 70 44.2) is "very faint, small, round, among 5 small (faint) stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9 arcmin
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2774
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2774
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2774

NGC 2775 (= PGC 25861)
Discovered (Dec 19, 1783) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 4, 1826) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.1 spiral galaxy (type SA(r)ab) in Cancer (RA 09 10 20.1, Dec +07 02 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2775 (= GC 1771 = JH 564 = WH I 2, 1860 RA 09 02 53, NPD 82 23.6) is "considerably bright, considerably large, round, very gradually then very suddenly much brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: NGC 2775 is a perfect example of an unusual type of spiral characterized by a large, perfectly smooth central bulge, a extended relatively smooth disc characteristic of a lenticular galaxy, and an extremely complex multi-armed spiral structure lying between the two regions. The spiral structure must be home to a very large number of massive stars, as the galaxy has averaged nearly two supernova events per decade over the last 30 years. Based on a recessional velocity of 1350 km/sec, the galaxy is about 65 million light years away, in reasonably good agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 55 million light years; as a result its distance is usually stated as 60 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 4.3 by 3.3 arcmin, it is about 75 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2775
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2775
Below, a 4.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2775
Below, another image of the same region (Image Credit Jeff Newton/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 2775
Below, a 1.87 arcmin wide HST image of the central region (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, Fabian RRRR)
HST image of a portion of spiral galaxy NGC 2775

NGC 2776 (= PGC 25946)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1828) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.6 spiral galaxy (type S(rs)bc?) in Lynx (RA 09 12 14.5, Dec +44 57 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2776 (= GC 1772 = JH 563, 1860 RA 09 02 56, NPD 44 28.3) is "pretty bright, large, round, very gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8 by 2.5 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2776
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2776
Below, a 4.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2776

NGC 2777 (= PGC 25876)
Discovered (Mar 6, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type SBd?) in Cancer (RA 09 10 41.9, Dec +07 12 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2777 (= GC 5460, Marth #152, 1860 RA 09 03 16, NPD 82 13) is "faint, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2777
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2777
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2777

NGC 2778 (= PGC 25955)
Discovered (Mar 28, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 22, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Lynx (RA 09 12 24.4, Dec +35 01 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2778 (= GC 1774 = JH 566 = WH II 564, 1860 RA 09 03 44, NPD 54 24.2) is "pretty bright, small, round, pretty suddenly much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.0 arcmin? Not far from and possibly a physical companion of NGC 2779.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2778 and its possible companion, spiral galaxy NGC 2779
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2778 and 2779
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 2778
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2778

NGC 2779 (= PGC 25958)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1850) by
George Stoney
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)cd? pec) in Lynx (RA 09 12 28.3, Dec +35 03 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2779 (= GC 1775, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 09 03 48, NPD 54 22.7) is "extremely faint, very small, 92 arcsec northeast of h 566", (JH) 566 being NGC 2778.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin. Not far from and possibly a physical companion of NGC 2778. The galaxy has a foreground star lying directly in front of its center, and it has a very diffuse structure, making it difficult to classify.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2778 and its possible companion, spiral galaxy NGC 2779
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2778 and 2779
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 2779
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2779

NGC 2780 (= PGC 25967)
Discovered (Mar 10, 1790) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 3, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)ab? pec) in Lynx (RA 09 12 44.5, Dec +34 55 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2780 (= GC 1776 = JH 567 = WH III 826, 1860 RA 09 04 04, NPD 54 30.4) is "very faint, small, round, small (faint) double star to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2780, also showing part of NGC 2778
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2780, also showing part of NGC 2778
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2780

NGC 2781 (= PGC 25907)
Discovered (Feb 8, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Dec 16, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.6 lenticular galaxy (type (R)S0(r)a?) in Hydra (RA 09 11 27.5, Dec -14 49 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2781 (= GC 1777 = JH 569 = JH 3147 = WH I 66, 1860 RA 09 04 50, NPD 104 14.7) is "bright, small, very little extended, pretty suddenly much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 1.5 arcmin
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2781
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2781
Below, a 4.4 by 3.6 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
(Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2781

NGC 2782 (= PGC 26034 =
Arp 215)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 18, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.6 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)a? pec) in Lynx (RA 09 14 05.1, Dec +40 06 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2782 (= GC 1778 = JH 568 = WH I 167, 1860 RA 09 05 11, NPD 49 18.8) is "considerably bright, round, much brighter middle and bright nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.7 by 2.4 arcmin. The result of the collision of a much smaller galaxy with a large spiral. Long arcs of material thrown out into intergalactic space are filled with young stars created by the compression of clouds of interstellar gas in the wake of the collision.
SDSS image of region near peculiar spiral galaxy NGC 2782
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2782
Below, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of peculiar spiral galaxy NGC 2782
(a composite of Hubble Legacy Archive images will be posted in the next iteration of this page)

NGC 2783 (= PGC 26013)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 12.6 elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Cancer (RA 09 13 39.5, Dec +29 59 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2783 (= GC 1779 = WH III 295, 1860 RA 09 05 21, NPD 59 23.4) is "very faint, very small, round, 2 pretty bright stars to southwest". The second IC adds "is = Bigourdan 274, RA 09 05 14, NPD 59 25".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.5 arcmin. Possibly a physical pair with IC 2449.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2783 and IC 2449, which is sometimes erroneously called NGC 2783B
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2783, also showing IC 2449
Below, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2783 and IC 2449, which is sometimes erroneously called NGC 2783B
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 2783
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2783
IC 2449 (= PGC 26012 = "NGC 2783B")
Listed here because sometimes incorrectly called NGC 2783B; refer to its IC listing
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Cancer (RA 09 13 32.8, Dec +30 00 00)
Warning About Non-Standard Designations: IC 2449 has a perfectly good NGC/IC designation of its own, and calling it anything else is foolish and only likely to lead to confusion.
Physical Information: Given its IC designation, see that for anything else.

NGC 2784 (= PGC 25950)
Discovered (Nov 20, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 7, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.2 lenticular galaxy (type SA0) in Hydra (RA 09 12 19.4, Dec -24 10 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2784 (= GC 1780 = JH 571 = JH 3148 = WH I 59, 1860 RA 09 06 05, NPD 113 35.9) is "bright, large, much extended 64°, gradually much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.5 by 2.2 arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SA(l)0°.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2784
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2784
Below, a 7.0 by 5.8 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
(Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2784

NGC 2785 (= PGC 26100)
Discovered (Mar 16, 1884) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type SBm? pec) in Lynx (RA 09 15 15.3, Dec +40 55 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2785 (Stephan list XIII (#45), 1860 RA 09 06 15, NPD 48 30.4) is "extremely faint, pretty small, irregularly extended, several extremely faint stars involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.5 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2785
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2785
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2785

NGC 2786 (= PGC 26008)
Discovered (Apr 5, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type S(rs)a?) in Cancer (RA 09 13 35.6, Dec +12 26 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2786 (= GC 5461, Marth #153, 1860 RA 09 06 17, NPD 77 17) is "very faint, very small, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2786
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2786
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2786

NGC 2787 (= PGC 26341)
Discovered (Dec 3, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 28, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.7 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0/a) in Ursa Major (RA 09 19 18.6, Dec +69 12 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2787 (= GC 1781 = JH 570 = WH I 216, 1860 RA 09 06 33, NPD 20 13.0) is "bright, pretty large, a little extended 90°, much brighter middle, mottled but not resolved, very small (faint) star involved to the southeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.1 by 1.8 arcmin
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2787
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2787
Below, a 3.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2787
Below, a 3.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2787
Below, a 0.5 arcmin wide HST image of the nucleus (Image Credit NASA/Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA))
HST image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2787

NGC 2788 (= PGC 25761)
Discovered (Jan 29, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type Sab) in Carina (RA 09 09 03.2, Dec -67 55 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2788 (= GC 1782 = JH 3150, 1860 RA 09 06 36, NPD 157 21.8) is "very faint, very small, much extended 105°".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.4 arcmin
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2788
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2788
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2788

PGC 25400 (= "NGC 2788A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 2788A
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type Sb) in
Volans (RA 09 02 39.5, Dec -68 13 37)
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.9 by 0.4 arcmin
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 25400, which is often called NGC 2788A
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 25400
Below, a 3.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 25400, which is often called NGC 2788A

PGC 25443 (= "NGC 2788B")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 2788B
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type Sb? pec) in
Volans (RA 09 03 34.9, Dec -67 57 59)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.4 arcmin
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 25443, which is often called NGC 2788B
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 25443
Below, a 1.75 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 25443, which is often called NGC 2788B

NGC 2789 (= PGC 26089 =
NGC 3167)
Discovered (May 1, 1862) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 3167)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1883) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 2789)
A magnitude 12.2 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SA0(rs)a?) in Cancer (RA 09 14 59.7, Dec +29 43 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2789 (Stephan list XIII (#46), 1860 RA 09 06 37, NPD 59 41.6) is "pretty faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 09 15 00.0, Dec +29 43 48, right on the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain. (See NGC 3167 for a discussion of the double listing.)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 6335 km/sec, NGC 2789 is about 295 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.6 by 1.35 arcmin, it is about 135 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2789
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2789
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2789

NGC 2790 (= PGC 26092)
Discovered (Feb 17, 1865) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Cancer (RA 09 15 02.8, Dec +19 41 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2790 (= GC 5462, Marth #154, 1860 RA 09 07 05, NPD 69 44) is "very faint, small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2790
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2790
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2790

NGC 2791 (= PGC 26088)
Discovered (Dec 21, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type S(r)a?) in Cancer (RA 09 15 02.0, Dec +17 35 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2791 (= GC 5463, Marth #155, 1860 RA 09 07 08, NPD 71 50) is "faint, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.3 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2791
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2791
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2791

NGC 2792 (= P-K 265+04.1 = "PGC 3517759")
Discovered (Mar 2, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.6 planetary nebula in Vela (RA 09 12 26.6, Dec -42 25 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2792 (= GC 1783 = JH 3149, 1860 RA 09 07 11, NPD 131 51.6) is "a remarkable object, a planetary nebula, pretty bright equal to a 9th magnitude star, very small, round, among stars".
PGC Designation Note: For purposes of completeness, LEDA assigns a PGC designation to this object, even though it isn't a galaxy; but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, so it is shown in quotes.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.35 arcmin
DSS image of region near planetary nebula NGC 2792
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2792
Below, a 0.4 arcmin wide HST image of the planetary nebula (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, Fabian RRRR)
HST image of planetary nebula NGC 2792

NGC 2793 (= PGC 26189)
Discovered (Mar 6, 1828) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SBm) in Lynx (RA 09 16 47.3, Dec +34 25 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2793 (= GC 1784 = JH 572, 1860 RA 09 08 11, NPD 54 59.1) is "very faint, small, round, double star 5 seconds of time to west, 5 arcmin to north".
Physical Information: Vr 1685 km/sec. Corwin lists an apparent companion (PGC 82356) at RA 09 16 40.9, Dec +34 26 51 (to the northwest of NGC 2793), but that object has a recessional velocity in excess of 7000 km/sec, and is just an optical double. (Still, in the next iteration of this page I'll provide a link to an entry for that galaxy.) Apparent size 1.2 by 1.0 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2793
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2793
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2793

NGC 2794 (= PGC 26140)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1866) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type S(rs)ab?) in Cancer (RA 09 16 01.8, Dec +17 35 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2794 (= GC 5464, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 09 08 12, NPD 71 49.2) is "extremely faint, very small, southwestern of 2", the other being NGC 2795.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.2 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2794, also showing NGC 2795
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2794, also showing NGC 2795
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2794

NGC 2795 (= PGC 26143)
Discovered (Dec 21, 1863) by
Albert Marth
Also observed (Mar 15, 1866) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 12.8 elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Cancer (RA 09 16 03.9, Dec +17 37 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2795 (= GC 5465, Marth #156, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 09 08 14, NPD 71 47.0) is "extremely faint, very small, northeastern of 2", the other being NGC 2794.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.0 arcmin
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2795, also showing NGC 2794 and NGC 2797
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2795, also showing NGC 2794 and 2797
Below, a 2.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2795

NGC 2796 (= PGC 26178)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 27, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Cancer (RA 09 16 41.8, Dec +30 54 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2796 (= GC 1785 = JH 573 = WH III 296, 1860 RA 09 08 17, NPD 58 31.8) is "extremely faint, small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2796, also showing NGC 2795
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2796, also showing NGC 2795
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2796

NGC 2797 (= PGC 26160)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1866) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)b?) in Cancer (RA 09 16 21.7, Dec +17 43 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2797 (= GC 5466, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 09 08 26, NPD 71 41.6) is "extremely faint, several stars near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2797, also showing NGC 2795 and IC 2454
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2797, also showing NGC 2795 and IC 2454
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2797

NGC 2798 (= PGC 26232, and with
NGC 2799 = Arp 283)
Discovered (Jan 14, 1788) by William Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type SBa? pec) in Lynx (RA 09 17 22.9, Dec +42 00 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2798 (= GC 1788 = WH II 708, 1860 RA 09 08 32, NPD 47 27.6) is "pretty bright, small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8 by 0.9 arcmin? Interacting with NGC 2799. Used (with its companion) by the Arp Atlas as an example of galaxies with infall and attraction.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 2798 and 2799, also collectively known as Arp 283
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2798, also showing NGC 2799
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the interacting galaxies
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 2798 and NGC 2799, also collectively known as Arp 283

NGC 2799 (= PGC 26238, and with
NGC 2798 = Arp 283)
Discovered (Mar 9, 1874) by Ralph Copeland
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SBm? pec) in Lynx (RA 09 17 30.9, Dec +41 59 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2799 (= GC 5467, Copeland (using Lord Rosse's Leviathan), 1860 RA 09 08 40, NPD 47 28.0) is "faint, considerably large, very much extended, east of II 708", (WH) II 708 being NGC 2798.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 0.5 arcmin? Interacting with NGC 2798, which see for images. Used (with its companion) by the Arp Atlas as an example of galaxies with infall and attraction.
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2700 - 2749) ←NGC Objects: NGC 2750 - 2799→ (NGC 2800 - 2849)