Celestial Atlas
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Page last updated Feb 2, 2015
WORKING 2751: Add basic pix, tags

NGC 2750 (= PGC 25525)
Discovered (Mar 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Cancer (RA 09 05 48.0, Dec +25 26 15)
Based on a recessional velocity of 2675 km/sec, NGC 2750 is about 125 million light years away, in perfect agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 125 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.2 by 1.9 arcmin, it is about 80 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2750
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2750
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2750

NGC 2751 (= PGC 25517)
Discovered (Mar 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth (148)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Cancer (RA 09 05 32.4, Dec +18 15 43)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin

NGC 2752 (= PGC 25523)
Discovered (Mar 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth (149)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Cancer (RA 09 05 42.9, Dec +18 20 23)
Apparent size 1.8 by 0.4 arcmin

NGC 2753 (= PGC 25603)
Discovered (Feb 21, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBcd(r)?) in Cancer (RA 09 07 08.3, Dec +25 20 30)
NGC 2753 is listed as a pair of elliptical galaxies in every reference I can find, and in lower-resolution images does look like a brighter slightly southwestern object and a fainter slightly northeastern object, so poorly resolved that they could well be ellipticals; but as the images below show, it is actually a single barred galaxy with barely noticeable somewhat ringlike arms, hence my tentative listing above as a spiral galaxy. Based on a recessional velocity of 2785 km/sec, NGC 2753 is about 130 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.6 by 0.45 arcmin, it is about 25 thousand light years across, making it a dwarf galaxy.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2753
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2753 clearly shows that it is a single galaxy, not a pair
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2753

NGC 2754 (= PGC 25504)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller (II-408)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Hydra (RA 09 05 11.2, Dec -19 05 05)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin

NGC 2755 (= PGC 25670)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Lynx (RA 09 07 58.3, Dec +41 42 31)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin

NGC 2756 (= PGC 25757)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Ursa Major (RA 09 09 00.9, Dec +53 50 55)
Apparent size 1.7 by 1.2 arcmin

NGC 2757
Recorded (1886) by
Frank Muller (II-409)
A pair of stars in Hydra (RA 09 05 23.4, Dec -19 02 05)
The second IC notes (per Howe) "is only an extremely faint double star, distance 12 arcsec" (distance meaning separation).

NGC 2758 (= PGC 25515)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller (II-410)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Hydra (RA 09 05 31.1, Dec -19 02 34)
Apparent size 1.9 by 0.5 arcmin

NGC 2759 (= PGC 25718)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Lynx (RA 09 08 37.2, Dec +37 37 17)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin

NGC 2760
Recorded (Mar 26, 1887) by
Lewis Swift (6-34)
A lost or nonexistent object in Camelopardalis (RA 09 15 41.9, Dec +76 22 57)

NGC 2761 (= PGC 25638)
Discovered (Mar 29, 1865) by
Albert Marth (150)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Cancer (RA 09 07 30.7, Dec +18 26 06)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin

NGC 2762 (= PGC 25828)
Discovered (Feb 26, 1851) by
Bindon Stoney
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Ursa Major (RA 09 09 54.4, Dec +50 25 06)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin

NGC 2763 (= PGC 25570)
Discovered (Feb 8, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Hydra (RA 09 06 49.0, Dec -15 29 57)
Apparent size 2.3 by 2.0 arcmin

NGC 2764 (= PGC 25690)
Discovered (Nov 16, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Cancer (RA 09 08 17.4, Dec +21 26 35)
Apparent size 1.5 by 1.0 arcmin

NGC 2765 (= PGC 25646)
Discovered (Jan 27, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Hydra (RA 09 07 36.5, Dec +03 23 34)
Apparent size 2.1 by 1.1 arcmin

NGC 2766 (= PGC 25735)
Discovered (Mar 22, 1884) by
Édouard Stephan (13-44)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab) in Cancer (RA 09 08 47.4, Dec +29 51 55)
Apparent size 1.4 by 0.5 arcmin

NGC 2767 (= PGC 25852)
Discovered (Mar 8, 1831) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Ursa Major (RA 09 10 11.8, Dec +50 24 07)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin

NGC 2768 (= PGC 25915)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 10th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E6) in Ursa Major (RA 09 11 37.4, Dec +60 02 11)
Apparent size 6.4 by 3.0 arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SA0-.
SDSS image of galaxy NGC 2768
Above, an 8 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2768
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near galaxy NGC 2768

NGC 2769 (= PGC 25870)
Discovered (Mar 8, 1831) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Ursa Major (RA 09 10 32.3, Dec +50 26 01)
Apparent size 1.8 by 0.4 arcmin

NGC 2770 (= PGC 25806)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Lynx (RA 09 09 33.5, Dec +33 07 27)
Apparent size 3.7 by 1.1 arcmin

PGC 25769 (= PGC 82318 = "NGC 2770A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 2770A due to its proximity to
NGC 2770
A 15th-magnitude pair of galaxies (type S? + S?) in Lynx (RA 09 09 19.5, Dec +33 07 20)
SDSS image of possible galaxy pair PGC 25769, sometimes called NGC 2770A
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 25769
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 2770
SDSS image of region near possible galaxy pair PGC 25769, sometimes called NGC 2770A, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 2770

NGC 2771 (= PGC 25875)
Discovered (Mar 8, 1831) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab) in Ursa Major (RA 09 10 39.7, Dec +50 22 45)
Apparent size 2.3 by 1.9 arcmin

NGC 2772 (= PGC 25654)
Discovered (Jan 23, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Pyxis (RA 09 07 41.8, Dec -23 37 10)
Apparent size 1.5 by 0.5 arcmin

NGC 2773 (= PGC 25825)
Discovered (Mar 6, 1864) by
Albert Marth (151)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Cancer (RA 09 09 44.1, Dec +07 10 27)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3 arcmin

NGC 2774 (= PGC 25879)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Cancer (RA 09 10 39.9, Dec +18 41 48)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9 arcmin

NGC 2775 (= PGC 25861)
Discovered (Dec 19, 1783) by
William Herschel
A 10th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(r)ab) in Cancer (RA 09 10 20.1, Dec +07 02 14)
NGC 2775 is a perfect example of an unusual type of spiral characterized by a large, perfectly smooth central bulge, a extended relatively smooth disc characteristic of a lenticular galaxy, and an extremely complex multi-armed spiral structure lying between the two regions. The spiral structure must be home to a very large number of massive stars, as the galaxy has averaged nearly two supernova events per decade over the last 30 years. Based on a recessional velocity of 1350 km/sec, the galaxy is about 65 million light years away, in reasonably good agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 55 million light years; as a result its distance is usually stated as 60 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 4.3 by 3.3 arcmin, it is about 75 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2775
Above, a 4.8 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2775
Below, another view of the central region (Image Credits: Jeff Newton/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 2775
Below, a closeup of most of the central region (Image Credits: Hubble Legacy Archive, Wikimedia Commons)
HST image of a portion of spiral galaxy NGC 2775
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2775

NGC 2776 (= PGC 25946)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Lynx (RA 09 12 14.5, Dec +44 57 17)
Apparent size 2.8 by 2.5 arcmin

NGC 2777 (= PGC 25876)
Discovered (Mar 6, 1864) by
Albert Marth (152)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab) in Cancer (RA 09 10 41.8, Dec +07 12 26)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin

NGC 2778 (= PGC 25955)
Discovered (Mar 28, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Lynx (RA 09 12 24.5, Dec +35 01 40)
Apparent size 1.4 by 1.0 arcmin. Not far from and possibly a physical companion of NGC 2779.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2778 and its possible companion, lenticular galaxy NGC 2779
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2778 and 2779
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxies
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2778 and its possible companion, lenticular galaxy NGC 2779

NGC 2779 (= PGC 25958)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1850) by
George Stoney
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a) in Lynx (RA 09 12 28.3, Dec +35 03 14)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin. Not far from and possibly a physical companion of NGC 2778, which see for images.

NGC 2780 (= PGC 25967)
Discovered (Mar 10, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB pec) in Lynx (RA 09 12 44.3, Dec +34 55 32)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin

NGC 2781 (= PGC 25907)
Discovered (Feb 8, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a) in Hydra (RA 09 11 27.5, Dec -14 49 02)
Apparent size 3.0 by 1.5 arcmin

NGC 2782 (= PGC 26034 =
Arp 215)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa) in Lynx (RA 09 14 05.0, Dec +40 06 49)
Apparent size 3.7 by 2.4 arcmin. The result of the collision of a much smaller galaxy with a large spiral. Long arcs of material thrown out into intergalactic space are filled with young stars created by the compression of clouds of interstellar gas in the wake of the collision.
SDSS image of peculiar spiral galaxy NGC 2782
Above, a 4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2782
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near peculiar spiral galaxy NGC 2782
(a composite of Hubble Legacy Archive images will be posted in the next iteration of this page)

NGC 2783 (= PGC 26013)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Cancer (RA 09 13 39.4, Dec +29 59 35)
The second IC states "is = Bigourdan 274, RA 09 05 14, NPD 59 25". Apparent size 2.2 by 1.5 arcmin. Possibly a physical pair with IC 2449.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2783 and spiral galaxy IC 2449, sometimes erroneously called NGC 2783B
Above, a 4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2783 and IC 2449
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the two galaxies
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2783 and spiral galaxy IC 2449, sometimes erroneously called NGC 2783B

IC 2449 (= PGC 26012 = "NGC 2783B")
Listed here because sometimes incorrectly called NGC 2783B; refer to its IC listing
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Cancer (RA 09 13 32.9, Dec +30 00 01)

NGC 2784 (= PGC 25950)
Discovered (Nov 20, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 10th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Hydra (RA 09 12 19.4, Dec -24 10 21)
Apparent size 5.5 by 2.2 arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SA(l)0°.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2784
Above, a 7 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2784
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2784

NGC 2785 (= PGC 26100)
Discovered (Mar 16, 1884) by
Édouard Stephan (13-45)
A 14th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type Im) in Lynx (RA 09 15 15.2, Dec +40 55 05)
Apparent size 1.5 by 0.5 arcmin

NGC 2786 (= PGC 26008)
Discovered (Apr 5, 1864) by
Albert Marth (153)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Cancer (RA 09 13 35.5, Dec +12 26 26)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin

NGC 2787 (= PGC 26341)
Discovered (Dec 3, 1788) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a) in Ursa Major (RA 09 19 18.4, Dec +69 12 13)
Apparent size 3.1 by 1.8 arcmin
HST image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2787
Above, an HST image of NGC 2787 (Image Credits: NASA & the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA))

NGC 2788 (= PGC 25761)
Discovered (Jan 29, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab) in Carina (RA 09 09 03.3, Dec -67 55 57)
Apparent size 1.8 by 0.4 arcmin

PGC 25400 (= "NGC 2788A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 2788A since in general area of
NGC 2788
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Volans (RA 09 02 40.0, Dec -68 13 36)
Apparent size 2.9 by 0.4 arcmin

PGC 25443 (= "NGC 2788B")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 2788B since in general area of
NGC 2788
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Volans (RA 09 03 35.0, Dec -67 57 59)
Apparent size 1.5 by 0.4 arcmin

NGC 2789 (= PGC 26089 =
NGC 3167)
Discovered (May 1, 1862) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 3167)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1883) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 2789)
A magnitude 12.2 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SA0(rs)a?) in Cancer (RA 09 14 59.7, Dec +29 43 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2789 (Stephan list XIII (#46), 1860 RA 09 06 37, NPD 59 41.6) is "pretty faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 099 15 00.0, Dec +29 43 48, right on the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain. (See NGC 3167 for a discussion of the double listing.)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 6335 km/sec, NGC 2789 is about 295 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.6 by 1.35 arcmin, it is about 135 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2789
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2789
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2789

NGC 2790 (= PGC 26092)
Discovered (Feb 17, 1865) by
Albert Marth (154)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Cancer (RA 09 15 02.7, Dec +19 41 51)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin

NGC 2791 (= PGC 26088)
Discovered (Dec 21, 1863) by
Albert Marth (155)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Cancer (RA 09 15 01.9, Dec +17 35 34)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.3 arcmin

NGC 2792
Discovered (Mar 2, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude planetary nebula in Vela (RA 09 12 26.5, Dec -42 25 39)
Apparent size 0.35 arcmin

NGC 2793 (= PGC 26189)
Discovered (Mar 6, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBm) in Lynx (RA 09 16 46.6, Dec +34 25 56)
Apparent size 1.2 by 1.0 arcmin

NGC 2794 (= PGC 26140)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1866) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB?) in Cancer (RA 09 16 01.7, Dec +17 35 22)
Apparent size 1.2 by 1.2 arcmin

NGC 2795 (= PGC 26143)
Discovered (Dec 21, 1863) by
Albert Marth (156)
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Cancer (RA 09 16 03.7, Dec +17 37 42)
Apparent size 1.4 by 1.0 arcmin

NGC 2796 (= PGC 26178)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Cancer (RA 09 16 41.8, Dec +30 54 58)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin

NGC 2797 (= PGC 26160)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1866) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABb?) in Cancer (RA 09 16 21.7, Dec +17 43 38)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2797
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2797

NGC 2798 (= PGC 26232, and with
NGC 2799 = Arp 283)
Discovered (Jan 14, 1788) by William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa pec) in Lynx (RA 09 17 22.9, Dec +42 00 00)
Apparent size 2.8 by 0.9 arcmin. Interacting with NGC 2799.
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 2798 and 2799, also collectively known as Arp 283
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2798 and 2799
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 2798, also showing NGC 2799
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 2798 and 2799, also collectively known as Arp 283

NGC 2799 (= PGC 26238, and with
NGC 2798 = Arp 283)
Discovered (Mar 9, 1874) by Ralph Copeland
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBm pec) in Lynx (RA 09 17 31.0, Dec +41 59 38)
Apparent size 1.9 by 0.5 arcmin. Interacting with NGC 2798, which see for images.
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2700 - 2749) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 2750 - 2799     → (NGC 2800 - 2849)