Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2750 - 2799) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 2800 - 2849 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 2850 - 2899)
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2800, 2801, 2802, 2803, 2804, 2805, 2806, 2807, 2808, 2809, 2810, 2811, 2812, 2813, 2814, 2815, 2816,
2817, 2818, 2819, 2820, 2821, 2822, 2823, 2824, 2825, 2826, 2827, 2828, 2829, 2830, 2831, 2832, 2833,
2834, 2835, 2836, 2837, 2838, 2839, 2840, 2841, 2842, 2843, 2844, 2845, 2846, 2847, 2848, 2849

Page last updated Aug 14, 2013
WORKING: Check positions (Corwin+)/add physical data/pix, tags

NGC 2800 (= PGC 26302)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Ursa Major (RA 09 18 35.1, Dec +52 30 53)
Apparent size 1.4 by 0.9 arcmin?
SDSS image of NGC 2800
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2800
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near NGC 2800

NGC 2801 (= PGC 26183)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1865) by
Albert Marth (157)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Cancer (RA 09 16 44.2, Dec +19 56 07)
Apparent size 1.1 by 1.0 arcmin?
SDSS image of NGC 2801
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2801
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near NGC 2801

NGC 2802 (= PGC 26177)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Cancer (RA 09 16 41.1, Dec +18 57 50)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6 arcmin? In same field of view as NGC 2803

NGC 2803 (= PGC 26181)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Cancer (RA 09 16 43.8, Dec +18 57 16)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin? In same field of view as NGC 2802

NGC 2804 (= PGC 26196 =
IC 2455)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2804)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 2455)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Cancer (RA 09 16 49.9, Dec +20 11 54)
Apparent size 1.4 by 1.2 arcmin?

NGC 2805 (= PGC 26410)
Discovered (Apr 2, 1791) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBd?) in Ursa Major (RA 09 20 20.4, Dec +64 06 10)
Apparent size 6.3 by 4.8 arcmin?

NGC 2806
Recorded (Feb 17, 1862) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 15th-magnitude star in Cancer (RA 09 16 56.7, Dec +20 04 16)
In same field of view as NGC 2807, which see for a wide-field view. Its identity as NGC 2806 is absolutely certain, but that appellation is often incorrectly assigned to PGC 26212, which also see.

NGC 2807 (= PGC 26213)
Discovered (Feb 17, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec) in Cancer (RA 09 17 00.7, Dec +20 02 10)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.55 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2807 and lenticular galaxy PGC 26212, which is sometimes called NGC 2807A and sometimes misidentified as NGC 2806
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2807 and PGC 26212
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair, also showing NGC 2801, 2806 and 2809
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2807 and lenticular galaxy PGC 26212, which is sometimes called NGC 2807A and sometimes misidentified as NGC 2806; also shown are lenticular galaxy NGC 2809, part of spiral galaxy NGC 2801, and the star that is actually NGC 2806

PGC 26212 (= "NGC 2807A", and not =
NGC 2806)
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 2807A due to its proximity to NGC 2807
Also, often misidentified as NGC 2806

A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Cancer (RA 09 16 57.6, Dec +20 01 45)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.35 arcmin. In same field of view as NGC 2806 and NGC 2807 (which see for images).

NGC 2808 (= GCL 13)
Discovered (May 7, 1826) by
James Dunlop (265)
A 6th-magnitude globular cluster (type I) in Carina (RA 09 12 02.6, Dec -64 51 45)
Apparent size 14 arcmin?

NGC 2809 (= PGC 26220)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1827) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Cancer (RA 09 17 06.9, Dec +20 04 09)
Apparent size 1.3 by 1.2 arcmin? In same field of view as NGC 2806 and NGC 2807 (which see for a wide-field image).

NGC 2810 (= PGC 26514)
Discovered (Dec 3, 1788) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Ursa Major (RA 09 22 04.5, Dec +71 50 38)
Apparent size 1.7 by 1.7 arcmin? Sometimes referred to as NGC 2810A.

2MASX J09215851+7152013 (= "NGC 2810B")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 2810B due to its proximity to
NGC 2810
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Ursa Major (RA 09 21 58.2, Dec +71 52 00)
Apparent size 0.2 by 0.1 arcmin?

NGC 2811 (= PGC 26151)
Discovered (Dec 31, 1785) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Hydra (RA 09 16 11.2, Dec -16 18 45)
Apparent size 2.5 by 0.9 arcmin?

NGC 2812 (= PGC 26242)
Discovered (Feb 17, 1865) by
Albert Marth (158)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Cancer (RA 09 17 40.8, Dec +19 55 09)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.1 arcmin? In same field of view as NGC 2813.

NGC 2813 (= PGC 26252)
Discovered (Feb 17, 1865) by
Albert Marth (159)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Cancer (RA 09 17 45.4, Dec +19 54 25)
Apparent size 1.3 by 1.1 arcmin? In same field of view as NGC 2812.

NGC 2814 (= PGC 26469)
Discovered (Apr 3, 1791) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Ursa Major (RA 09 21 11.5, Dec +64 15 07)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.3 arcmin?

NGC 2815 (= PGC 26157)
Discovered (Nov 20, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Hydra (RA 09 16 19.5, Dec -23 38 02)
Apparent size 3.5 by 1.1 arcmin?

NGC 2816 (= PGC 25640 =
NGC 2742)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1790) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2742)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1832) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2816)
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Ursa Major (RA 09 07 33.2, Dec +60 28 46)
This entry will primarily contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 2742.

NGC 2817 (= PGC 26223)
Discovered (Mar 26, 1887) by
Lewis Swift (6-35)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Hydra (RA 09 17 10.6, Dec -04 45 10)
Apparent size 2.0 by 1.7 arcmin?

NGC 2818 (= OCL 743 + a planetary nebula)
Discovered (May 28, 1826) by
James Dunlop (564)
An 11th-magnitude planetary nebula and open cluster in Pyxis (RA 09 16 10.0, Dec -36 37 34)
Apparent size 1.4 arcmin?

NGC 2819 (= PGC 26274)
Discovered (Dec 21, 1863) by
Albert Marth (160)
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Cancer (RA 09 18 09.4, Dec +16 11 53)
Apparent size 1.4 by 1.3 arcmin?

NGC 2820 (= PGC 26498)
Discovered (Apr 3, 1791) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magitude spiral galaxy (type SBc? pec) in Ursa Major (RA 09 21 46.0, Dec +64 15 31)
Apparent size 4.1 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 2458 (= PGC 26485 = "NGC 2820A")
Discovered (Mar 14, 1899) by Guillaume Bigourdan (397) (and later listed as IC 2458)
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 2820A due to its proximity to NGC 2820
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Ursa Major (RA 09 21 30.2, Dec +64 14 18)
Listed here because sometimes incorrectly called NGC 2820A. See IC 2458 for anything else.

NGC 2821 (= PGC 26192)
Discovered (Mar 26, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pyxis (RA 09 16 47.8, Dec -26 49 00)
Apparent size 2.0 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 2822 (= PGC 26026)
Discovered (Jan 29, 1835) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Carina (RA 09 13 49.8, Dec -69 38 39)
Apparent size 3.3 by 2.2 arcmin?

NGC 2823 (= PGC 26340)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1850) by
George Stoney
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Lynx (RA 09 19 17.4, Dec +34 00 30)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 2824 (= PGC 26330)
Discovered (Apr 30, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Cancer (RA 09 19 02.3, Dec +26 16 13)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin?

NGC 2825 (= PGC 26345)
Discovered (Apr 3, 1831) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Lynx (RA 09 19 22.4, Dec +33 44 35)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4 arcmin? For now, see NGC 2831 for a wide-field view of the region.

NGC 2826 (= PGC 26346)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1850) by
George Stoney
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Lynx (RA 09 19 24.1, Dec +33 37 25)
Apparent size 1.6 by 0.3 arcmin?

NGC 2827 (= PGC 26342 =
IC 2460)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1850) by George Stoney (and later listed as NGC 2827)
Discovered (Feb 28, 1900) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 2460)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Lynx (RA 09 19 18.9, Dec +33 52 51)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.3 arcmin? Near NGC 2828, which see for a wide-field image.

NGC 2828 (= PGC 26365)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1850) by
George Stoney
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Lynx (RA 09 19 34.8, Dec +33 53 19)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2828
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2828
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 2827
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2828, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 2827

NGC 2829 (= PGC 2036350)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1850) by
George Stoney
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Lynx (RA 09 19 52.3, Dec +33 38 58)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin?

NGC 2830 (= PGC 26371, and with
NGC 2831 and 2832 = Arp 315)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1785) by William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Lynx (RA 09 19 41.2, Dec +33 44 17)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.3 arcmin? With its companions, used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a group of galaxies. Whether they are an actual physical group is uncertain, as they have recessional velocities differing by nearly 2000 km/sec.

NGC 2831 (= PGC 26376, and with
NGC 2830 and 2832 = Arp 315)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1850) by George Stoney
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Lynx (RA 09 19 45.6, Dec +33 44 41)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin? With its companions, used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a group of galaxies. Whether they are an actual physical group is uncertain, as they have recessional velocities differing by nearly 2000 km/sec.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2831, lenticular galaxy NGC 2830 and elliptical galaxy NGC 2832, which comprise Arp 315
Above, a 4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2831, also showing NGC 2830 and 2832
Below, a labeled version of the image above
Labeled version of SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2831, lenticular galaxy NGC 2830 and elliptical galaxy NGC 2832, which comprise Arp 315
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxies, also showing NGC 2825
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2831, also showing lenticular galaxy NGC 2830 and elliptical galaxy NGC 2832, with which it comprises Arp 315; also shown is spiral galaxy NGC 2825

NGC 2832 (= PGC 26377, and with
NGC 2830 and 2831 = Arp 315)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1850) by George Stoney
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Lynx (RA 09 19 46.8, Dec +33 44 59)
Apparent size 3.0 by 2.0 arcmin? With its companions, used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a group of galaxies. Whether they are an actual physical group is uncertain, as they have recessional velocities differing by nearly 2000 km/sec.

NGC 2833 (= PGC 26389)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1850) by
George Stoney
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Lynx (RA 09 19 57.8, Dec +33 55 39)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.3 arcmin?

NGC 2834 (= PGC 26400)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1850) by
George Stoney
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E??) in Lynx (RA 09 20 02.5, Dec +33 42 38)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 2835 (= PGC 26259)
Discovered (Apr 13, 1884) by
Wilhelm Tempel (IX)
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Hydra (RA 09 17 52.6, Dec -22 21 19)
Apparent size 6.6 by 4.4 arcmin?

NGC 2836 (= PGC 26017)
Discovered (Jan 29, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Carina (RA 09 13 45.3, Dec -69 19 59)
Apparent size 2.7 by 2.0 arcmin?

NGC 2837
Recorded (Dec 16, 1827) by
John Herschel
A pair of ?th-magnitude stars in Hydra (RA 09 18 23.4, Dec -16 28 53)

NGC 2838 (= PGC 26434)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E?) in Lynx (RA 09 20 43.0, Dec +39 18 59)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9 arcmin?

NGC 2839 (= PGC 26425)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1850) by
George Stoney
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Lynx (RA 09 20 36.3, Dec +33 39 04)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9 arcmin?

NGC 2840 (= PGC 26445)
Discovered (Mar 10, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Lynx (RA 09 20 52.7, Dec +35 22 06)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9 arcmin?

NGC 2841 (= PGC 26512)
Discovered (Mar 9, 1788) by
William Herschel
A 9th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(r)b) in Ursa Major (RA 09 22 02.3, Dec +50 58 35)
Per Dreyer, NGC 2841 (= John Herschel's GC 1823, 1860 RA 09 12 19, NPD 38 26.0) is "very bright, large, very much extended 151, very suddenly much brighter middle equivalent to 10th magnitude star". The position precesses to RA 09 22 01.4, Dec +50 58 32, within 0.2 arcmin of the center of the galaxy, so the identification is certain. With a recessional velocity of only 640 km/sec, peculiar (non-Hubble expansion) velocities make the 30 million light year redshift-based distance estimate very uncertain. So it is hardly surprising that the result is not in very good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 40 to 85 million light years (not that those are in much agreement with each other, either). The most generally agreed-upon distance is about 46 million light years. Using that distance and the galaxy's apparent size of 8.1 by 3.5 arcmin, NGC 2841 would be about 110 thousand light years across; but it is usually stated as being 150 thousand light years across, suggesting that larger distance estimates are still in general use. NGC 2841 has a relatively small number of hot, bright young stars lining its spiral arms, and few regions filled with heated gas lit up by such stars. This has led to the suggestion that perhaps an earlier stage of intense star formation swept gas that might form newer stars out of the central regions of the galaxy. This idea appears to be borne out by Chandra X-ray images of the galaxy, which show that its halo is filled with clouds of multi-million degree gases blown out of the galaxy at some time in the past. NED lists NGC 2841 as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 1), and as an "isolated" galaxy, meaning there are no other galaxies or galaxy groups in its general neighborhood.
SDSS image of NGC 2841
Above, an 8 arcmin wide "closeup" of NGC 2841
Below, a more nearly true-color image (Image Credits: Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)

Below, the same view digitally adjusted to match the SDSS image at the top

Below, a HST view of the central 20% of the galaxy; note the relative lack of bright stellar clouds
(Image Credits: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration)

Below, a composite of X-ray and visible images of the galaxy
(Image Credits: X-ray: NASA/CXC/U. Mass/Q.D.Wang; Optical: NOAO/KPNO )
Composite of X-ray and visible-light images of NGC 2841
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near NGC 2841

NGC 2842 (= PGC 26114)
Discovered (Mar 8, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Carina (RA 09 15 36.4, Dec -63 04 10)
Apparent size 1.6 by 1.3 arcmin?

NGC 2843 (= PGC 26414)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 16th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Cancer (RA 09 20 28.7, Dec +18 55 34)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin?

NGC 2844 (= PGC 26501)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Lynx (RA 09 21 48.0, Dec +40 09 07)
Apparent size 1.7 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 2845 (= PGC 26306)
Discovered (Feb 1, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Vela (RA 09 18 36.9, Dec -38 00 35)
Apparent size 2.3 by 1.2 arcmin?

NGC 2846
Recorded (Apr 4, 1874) by
Lawrence Parsons, 4th Earl of Rosse
A pair of ?th-magnitude stars in Hydra (RA 09 19 40.4, Dec -14 40 32)
The first IC adds "Bigourdan's #153: RA 09 13 15, NPD 104 06, very faint, stellar, is doubtless = 2846".

NGC 2847
Discovered (Mar 5, 1855) by
R. J. Mitchell
A star-forming region in spiral galaxy NGC 2848 (RA 09 20 08.6, Dec -16 31 02)

NGC 2848 (= PGC 26404)
Discovered (Dec 31, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Hydra (RA 09 20 09.8, Dec -16 31 32)
Apparent size 2.5 by 1.5 arcmin? Includes the star-forming region listed as NGC 2847

NGC 2849 (= OCL 756)
Discovered (Jan 22, 1838) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude open cluster (type II2m) in Vela (RA 09 19 22.8, Dec -40 31 13)
Apparent size 3.0 arcmin?
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2750 - 2799) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 2800 - 2849     → (NGC 2850 - 2899)